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And They Said It Wouldn't Last: Richard Clark's Orchestra Turns 30

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PUBLISHED ON Nov 08 2017

Butler Professor of Music Richard Auldon Clark started his group, the Manhattan Chamber Orchestra, in 1987. By 1989, the orchestra was performing at Carnegie Hall, and by 1990, it was being reviewed—favorably—in The New York Times.

“Many big names in the profession told me the group won’t last,” Clark recalled. “‘You’re doing great work, it’s a nice way for you to get started. But the group won’t survive.’ Well, they’re wrong. Tons and tons of recordings later and live radio broadcasts and Carnegie Hall shows and performances and international attention, we’re still here.”

Not only is the group still here, but it’s getting ready for a 30th anniversary concert at Symphony Space in New York City on November 21. The concert will feature music by Clark, Howard Cass, Seymour Barab, Eric Ewazen, and Alan Hovhaness.

“I play with the group, sometimes I’m conducting, sometimes they’re playing my music,” he said. “Most composers whose work we perform are living and friends of the group. It’s become a real clique in New York, a modern music clique.”

Over the years, the size of the group has changed—it started as 70 musicians, and now it’s 16—and a number its members have graduated to great organizations such as the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, and the Chicago Symphony.

But the Manhattan Chamber remains Clark’s baby. So at least once a month, he drives from Indianapolis to New York for rehearsals and performances.

“It’s a really good group of players who are really dedicated,” said Clark, who started teaching at Butler in 2003 and serves as conductor of the Butler Symphony Orchestra. “And I’m the chief cook and bottle washer. There’s a thrill to having your own group of musicians that you work with, people who you really know and really trust.”

But as much as he loves being in New York and playing with his orchestra, Clark said he also appreciates returning to Indianapolis, where the garage on his house is bigger than the Manhattan apartment he used to rent.

Richard Auldon ClarkFor one thing, he can devote more time to composing while he’s at Butler.

“It’s a focused, wonderful environment to create,” he said. “In New York, I was always running around like a madman playing every gig, every show, every concert, teaching in between. Freelance life in New York is a wonderful thing to do when you’re young, but it grows weary.”

Last year, thanks to a sabbatical and financial support from Butler, Clark was able to finish the opera he wrote with Kurt Vonnegut, based on the author’s play Happy Birthday, Wanda June, and see its world premiere performed by Indianapolis Opera.

“That was one of the landmarks of my composing career,” he said. “And that was all because of Butler.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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And They Said It Wouldn't Last: Richard Clark's Orchestra Turns 30

Butler Professor of Music Richard Auldon Clark started his group, the Manhattan Chamber Orchestra, in 1987.

Nov 08 2017 Read more
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Former Congressmen Open 2017–2018 Diversity Lecture Series

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PUBLISHED ON Oct 12 2017

Two of Indiana’s most prominent and respected political leaders, former U.S. Senator Richard Lugar and former U.S. Representative Lee Hamilton, will sit down for a discussion with former Lieutenant Governor and current Ivy Tech Community College President Sue Ellspermann at 6:00 PM Monday, November 13, in Clowes Memorial Hall as part of Butler University’s Celebration of Diversity Distinguished Lecture Series.

A Conversation with Senator Richard Lugar and Representative Lee Hamilton, co-presented by Ivy Tech Community College, is free and open to the public, but tickets are required. They will be available beginning Friday, October 19, at 10:00 AM at the Clowes Hall box office and through ButlerArtsCenter.org.

At a time when the country seems politically polarized and incapable of engaging in civil discourse, Lugar and Hamilton will talk about ways to bring us together.

Richard LugarLugar is the longest-serving member of Congress in Indiana history (1976–2012). He currently is  President of The Lugar Center, a non-profit organization focusing on global food security, WMD nonproliferation, aid effectiveness, and bipartisan governance. He serves as a Professor of Practice and Distinguished Scholar at the School of Global and International Studies at Indiana University and is distinguished faculty member in the Department of History and Political Science at the University of Indianapolis, where he leads the Richard G. Lugar Symposium for Tomorrow’s Leaders.

Hamilton, who served in Congress for 34 years (1965–1999), is Director of the Indiana University Center on Congress, a non-partisan educational Lee Hamiltoninstitution seeking to improve the public’s understanding of Congress and to inspire young people and adults to take an active part in revitalizing representative government in America. Located on the IU Bloomington campus, the Center offers an extensive array of civic education resources and activities aimed at fostering an informed electorate that understands our system of government and participates in civic life.

Sue EllspermannEllspermann has more than 30 years of experience in higher education, economic and workforce development, and public service. She was selected to serve as President of Ivy Tech Community College and began her tenure in May 2016. She is the ninth individual to hold the position and first female president for the college. Ellspermann served as Indiana’s 50th Lieutenant Governor from 2013 until March 2016.

 

 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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Former Congressmen Open 2017–2018 Diversity Lecture Series

At a time when the country seems polarized, Lugar and Hamilton will talk about ways to bring us together.

Oct 12 2017 Read more
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Artist KP Singh to Speak at Winter Commencement

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PUBLISHED ON Nov 16 2017

Artist, community leader, and 2016 Butler University Legacy Award winner Kanwal Prakash Singh will receive an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters and serve as the keynote speaker for Winter Commencement on Saturday, December 16, at 9:00 AM in Clowes Memorial Hall.

Robert Postlethwait MBA ’74 and Kathleen Postlethwait MS ’74 will receive Honorary Doctors of Science and Humane Letters, respectively.

KP Singh

A native of India, KP Singh is one of the Hoosier State’s most prolific and well-known artists. His pen-and-ink images of great buildings, colleges, places of worship, and other historic sites are displayed in public and private collections throughout the United States and the world. In 2007, three of his drawings were installed in The Sikh Heritage Gallery at The Museum of Natural History, part of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC.

Singh earned his Bachelor of Arts from Punjab University and Bachelor of Architecture and Master of Technology in Regional Planning from The Indian Institute of Technology. He also earned a Master of City Planning from The University of Michigan. He founded KP Singh Designs, a firm specializing in fine art, in 1972.

Singh considers community service to be a major focus and commitment of his Sikh faith as well as a civic responsibility. He is a founding member of The International Center of Indianapolis, a past member of the Butler University Center for Faith and Vocation Advisory Board, and has tirelessly served many other local and national organizations.

Bob and Kathi Postlethwait are fellow exemplars in their dedication to serving others. Bob Postlethwait, Retired President of the Neuroscience Project Group at Eli Lilly and Company, is a former Butler University Trustee and current member of the Butler Business Consulting Group Advisory Board. Among many other activities, he has served on the Advisory Council for the National Alliance on Mental Illness and the Board of Directors of the National Foundation of Suicide Prevention.

Kathi Postlethwait, a former Analytic Chemist at Eli Lilly and Company, is a member of the boards of WFYI and The Villages, as well as a past member of the Indianapolis Museum of Art Board of Governors.

Together, the Postlethwaits served as co-facilitators of the 2016–2017 One Butler: Brain Project Committee. In 2013, they established the Kathi and Bob Postlethwait Mental Health Recovery Center at Eskenazi Health, an inpatient facility for individuals with serious mental illness who require a safe environment for their recovery.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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Artist KP Singh to Speak at Winter Commencement

The ceremony begins at 9:00 AM on Saturday, December 16.

Nov 16 2017 Read more
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Father Thomas Baima '76 Awarded Gold Palm of Jerusalem

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PUBLISHED ON Oct 20 2017

In acknowledgement of his lifetime of service to the Church and the Holy Land, Father Thomas A. Baima ’76 was presented with the Gold Palm of Jerusalem, the highest distinguished service award of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre, an international order of the Vatican that serves the Holy Land, on October 21 at Saint John the Evangelist Church in Indianapolis.

Photo courtesy of USML.Baima’s activities on behalf of the Holy Land stretch back to the 1980s. As an ecumenical officer, he worked extensively with Eastern Christian, Muslim and Jewish Communities. His connection to the Middle East began with work with the Melkite Catholic Church and the Arab Christian community in Chicago.

He worked ecumenically with the Armenian Church, one of the major Christian communions of the Holy Land. He planned and managed Joseph Cardinal Bernardin’s historic Dialogue Visit to Israel, the West Bank and Gaza with leadership of the Catholic/Jewish Dialogue in Chicago. He accompanied Cardinal Bernardin in meetings with numerous dignitaries, including presidents, prime ministers, the foreign minister of the State of Israel, the president of the Palestinian Authority, the chief rabbi of Israel, and others.

He worked with Francis Cardinal George and the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago to create the Fassouta Project, which raised $100,000 to create a computer literacy center in the all-Christian village of Fassouta in northern Israel as a demonstration project to call attention to the problem of Christian emigration.

Baima is a priest of the Archdiocese of Chicago. He currently serves as Vice Rector for Academic Affairs of the University of Saint Mary of the Lake, where he is a full professor of dogmatic theology and Vicar for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs of the Archdiocese of Chicago.

He studied Philosophy and Religion at Butler and has served on the Board of Visitors of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and on the Advisory Board of the Center for Faith and Vocation.

The author of six books, and an internationally recognized expert in the promotion of Christian unity and interreligious dialogue, Father Baima serves on two Vatican dialogue commissions, the dialogue of fraternity and service with the Buddhists and the theological dialogue with the Assyrian Church of the East. Nationally, he is a member of the Catholic-Muslim Consultation for the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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Father Thomas Baima '76 Awarded Gold Palm of Jerusalem

Baima’s activities on behalf of the Holy Land stretch back to the 1980s.

Oct 20 2017 Read more
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President Danko Responds to DACA

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PUBLISHED ON Sep 06 2017

On September 7, 2017, Butler University President James M. Danko sent the following letter to Indiana’s U.S. Senators and Indiana’s U.S. Representative for District 7 concerning the proposed changes in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

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President Danko Responds to DACA

On September 7, Butler President James Danko sent this letter to Indiana’s U.S. Senators and Representative.

Sep 06 2017 Read more
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The Year That Was: Top Stories From Butler In 2017

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PUBLISHED ON Dec 21 2017

We started plans for a second Lab School and painted a 20-by-40-foot mural in Clowes Hall. We challenged the status quo, again, being named the Most Innovative School in the Midwest. We expanded, knocked down an old dorm, started building a new one, and hired a new basketball coach.

In 2017, Butler University students and faculty brought excitement and ingenuity to campus and the community around them. Here’s a look back at some of the top stories of the year.

Goodbye to Schwitzer Hall

After more than 60 years, the Butler community said goodbye to Schwitzer Hall. The old dorm will be replaced by the new 647-bed student residence hall, set to open in fall 2018.

http://news.butler.edu/blog/2017/04/beam/

Helping businesses

Thanks to a $5 million commitment from Old National Bank, Butler unveiled the Old National Bank Center for Closely Held Business. The Center provides privately owned businesses throughout Indiana training, education, mentoring, and networking opportunities to help them succeed.

http://news.butler.edu/blog/2017/05/onb-center/

Student-run insurance company

Items such as Butler’s live mascot bulldog, rare books, fine art, and observatory telescope, can now be insured by Butler’s student-run insurance company. The student-run operation received licensing approval from the Bermuda Monetary Authority, giving students hands-on experience that will prepare them for an industry that anticipates needing 400,000 new employees by 2020.

http://news.butler.edu/blog/2017/05/captive/

Support for the sciences

Enrollment in the sciences at Butler has increased nearly 50 percent over the last decade. And to support that increase, Butler alumnus Frank Levinson ’75 gave the University a $5 million gift that will go toward the transformation of Butler’s science teaching and laboratory spaces. These new facilities will enable Butler to collaborate with local and global science and health/life science companies.

http://news.butler.edu/blog/2017/06/levinson/

Back home

LaVall Jordan ’01 became the University’s 24th Men’s Basketball Coach in June, returning to the school where he both played and served on the coaching staff. He said he couldn’t, “…wait for the first game. When I hear the chant ‘B-U, T-L-E, R you a Bulldog,’ I may stop coaching for a second and turn around and say ‘Hell, yeah.’”

http://news.butler.edu/blog/2017/06/lavall-24/

A second Lab School

If all goes as planned, there will be two Lab Schools come fall 2018. The first Butler Lab School has been so successful that the Indianapolis Public Schools has asked Butler’s College of Education to create a second one. The plan is for the second school to be located at 1349 East 54th Street.

http://news.butler.edu/blog/2017/08/lab-school-2/

A new home for football and soccer

The Butler Bowl was officially renamed the Sellick Bowl. Butler’s longtime home for football and soccer was renamed in honor of Winstan R. “Bud” Sellick ’47 and his wife, Jacqueline (Blomberg) ’44.

http://news.butler.edu/blog/2017/09/new-name/

A painting the size of a two-bedroom apartment

[caption id="attachment_26734" align="alignright" width="163"] Justin Vining's painting hangs in Clowes Hall.[/caption]

The Butler Arts Center unveiled its first commissioned piece, The Journey from Outside In. It was a 20-by-40-foot painting by Indianapolis artist Justin Vining that required 263 hours of work spread over three months and 25.5 gallons of paint. Vining’s painting, which will hang in the Clowes Memorial Hall lobby for a year, depicts sunrise over the Indianapolis skyline, the Butler campus, and farmland on the outskirts of town.

http://news.butler.edu/blog/2017/09/vining/

Most Innovative School, again

Butler was named the Most Innovative School in the Midwest Regional Universities category of the U.S. News and World Report rankings for the third straight year. This category was created by U.S. News three years ago “so high-ranking college officials could pick schools that the public should be watching because of the cutting-edge changes being made on their campuses.”

http://news.butler.edu/blog/2017/09/rankings-2018/

Butler expands

Butler got 40 acres larger with the official purchase of property and buildings from Christian Theological Seminary. Butler’s College of Education will move into the main building on the CTS campus beginning with the 2018–2019 academic year. CTS will continue to reside on campus in a part of the main building, counseling center, and apartments.

http://news.butler.edu/blog/2017/06/butler-cts/

 

Media contact:
Rachel Stern
rstern@butler.edu
317-940-9257

 

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The Year That Was: Top Stories From Butler In 2017

In 2017, Butler students and faculty brought excitement and ingenuity to campus and the community around them.

Dec 21 2017 Read more
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Butler Team Takes Second in Library Competition

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PUBLISHED ON Dec 01 2017

IU team won; Purdue team finished third.

A four-member team from Butler took second place in the finals of the Midwest Business Libraries Case Competition, a contest that challenges students to apply their business information literacy skills to solve a marketing and strategy problem.

Sarah BraunsteinJess Kolanowski

The Butler team included Sarah Braunstein, a student in the College of Communication, and three Lacy School of Business students, Nicole Henrich, Jess Kolanowski, and Bret Smith. Henrich and Kolanowski are employees of the Information Commons, a collaborative program of the Butler Libraries and the Center for Academic Technology.

Fourteen teams entered the competition, and six made it to the finals, including those from Butler, IUPUI, Indiana University (Bloomington) and Purdue. First place in the competition was awarded to the team from Indiana University, and third place went to Purdue.

This year's client company was Crew Carwash, an Indiana family-owned business with 30 statewide locations. Teams in the competition were tasked with conducting research to present their recommendations for Crew's social media marketing strategy.

Nicole Henrich
Bret SmithThe judging panel for the competition included Mindi McKeeman, Marketing Director for Crew Carwash; Hessam Sarooghi, Assistant Professor in the Lacy School of Business; Vanessa French, Electronic Resources Librarian at Butler; Heather Howard, Business Librarian at Purdue; and Katharine Macy, Business Librarian at IUPUI.

 

 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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Butler Team Takes Second in Library Competition

A team from Butler took second place in the finals of the Midwest Business Libraries Case Competition.

Dec 01 2017 Read more
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The 2017 Indiana Outstanding College Student of Spanish Award Goes To ...

BY Hannah Hartzell '17

PUBLISHED ON Dec 08 2017

This time last year, Alex Bartlow ‘17 was studying abroad on the southeastern coast of Spain. Bartlow, a finance and Spanish double major, said the experience improved his Spanish skills immensely.

So, when his Spanish professor told him she wanted to nominate him for the 2017 Indiana Outstanding College Student of Spanish Award, Bartlow agreed.

Alex Bartlow

“I thought it would be a fantastic honor,” he said. “But I didn’t know if I would actually get chosen.”

He was.

Bartlow, along with four other Butler students, received the 2017 Indiana Outstanding College Student of Spanish Award, given by the Indiana Chapter of the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese (AATSP).

The award is given to students of outstanding academic record, exceptional interest for the Iberoamerican culture, exemplary community service, remarkable overseas experience and astonishing passion for Spanish.

The recognition is something Bartlow said, he doesn’t take lightly.

“Today, foreign language is sort of overlooked,” he said. “So, it’s really neat to see an organization continue to honor people for their contribution to foreign language and foreign language education.”

Fellow award recipient, Chiara Evelti ’17, echoed that sentiment.

“It places importance on the need to uphold and promote languages in the Midwest,” she said.

According to Evelti, that’s something Butler has done very well.
Chiara Evelti

“The Spanish department at Butler is phenomenal,” she said. “The courses truly engage students, not only with grammar and linguistics, but also the culture of Spanish speaking countries.”

She said her Spanish professors have also become some of her closest mentors.

With graduation rapidly approaching, Bartlow and Evelti have no plans stop speaking Spanish. Both want to incorporate it into their careers and continue developing their skills.

“Spanish is such a part of my life now,” Evelti said. “I’ve spent eight years studying the language, and I don’t plan on forgetting it any time soon.”

The AATSP recognized Alex Bartlow, Bridget Cato, Chiara Evelti, Emma Harris and Rachel Lewis in an award ceremony on November 4.

Butler Spanish professor Elisa Lucci-Riester also received recognition as the 2017 Excellence in Teaching Impact and Motivation Award winner.

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Adam Grant to Speak at Butler

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 12 2017

Adam Grant, one of the world’s 25 most influential management thinkers, will speak about “Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World” October 4 at 7:00 PM in the Schrott Center for the Arts.

Adam GrantAdmission is free, but tickets are required. Public tickets will be available beginning at 10:00 AM Tuesday, September 19, at the Clowes Hall box office and ButlerArtsCenter.org.

In his speech, Grant, a leading expert on how we can find motivation and meaning, and live more generous and creative lives, will explore how we can all get better at recognizing and championing new ideas, and how to build cultures that welcome diverse perspectives and honest feedback.

Grant is The New York Times bestselling author of three books that have sold over a million copies and been translated into 35 languages: Give and Take, Originals, and Option B with Sheryl Sandberg. His TED talks have been viewed more than 9 million times, and his keynote speaking and consulting clients include Facebook and Google, the NBA, the Gates Foundation, Goldman Sachs, and the U.S. Army and Navy.

He is the Saul P. Steinberg Professor of Management and a Professor of Psychology at the Wharton School of Business, where he has been the top-rated Professor for six straight years.

Grant has been recognized by Fortune’s 40 under 40, Oprah’s Super Soul 100, and a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader, and received distinguished scientific achievement awards from the American Psychological Association and the National Science Foundation. He writes for The New York Times on work and psychology, and serves on the Lean In board and the Department of Defense Innovation Board.

Grant, whose insights on unleashing originality have been praised by J.J. Abrams, Richard Branson, and Malcolm Gladwell, received his bachelor’s degree from Harvard University and his doctorate from the University of Michigan.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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Adam Grant to Speak at Butler

Author/professor/thought leader explains how people with groundbreaking ideas made them happen.

Sep 12 2017 Read more
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How Butler Prepared Him for the Mayo Clinic

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PUBLISHED ON Sep 19 2017

As an undergraduate at Butler, Robert Jacobson ’80 participated in a dizzying array of activities—debate team, student government, dorm governance, writer, and cartoonist for The Butler Collegian—while majoring in pre-med.

All of that, he told students in the Pre-Med Society over lunch on September 21, shaped and prepared him for the rigors of medical school and a career in pediatrics at the Mayo Clinic.

Robert Jacobson“I would say Butler is a great place for professional preparation,” said Jacobson, who grew up in Indianapolis' Warren Township. “Butler offers you a lot of opportunities to challenge yourself, and medical schools are looking for how well you do on the standardized tests and how well you’ve challenged yourself. They want to see students who did hard work and did well with that. Butler offers you that. At the same time, Butler offers you a chance to explore who you are and what you’re capable of doing.”

The Center for High Achievement and Scholarly Engagement (CHASE) invited Dr. Jacobson to be the first speaker in its alumni speaker series, which is designed to connect graduates with current students in the Honors Program. Jacobson, who graduated with Highest Honors in Chemistry, shared his story with several science classes, groups of students interested in pursuing medicine, and, on Thursday night, nearly 100 people in the Reilly Room.

He shared fond memories of how he met Renee (Oehler) ’81, a Pharmacy major, on his first day at Butler. How, as a sophomore, he created a dorm-based fraternity event called the Ross Hall Rat Race that featured competitions such as the blindfolded maze and a mattress race and ended with a dance. How he helped Renee, who ran the campus movie series, promote a screening of The Exorcist by drawing a poster showing a girl vomiting and the caption “Guess What’s Coming Up This Friday.”

And he told how lessons he learned gathering evidence as part of debate preparation inspired him as he advanced from medical school at the University of Chicago to residency at Yale University. At Yale, one of his mentors told him that no one should take a job in clinical medicine without touring the Mayo Clinic.

Jacobson was already a fan of the world-renowned clinic—he had signed up for the free monthly magazine Mayo Clinic Proceedings while at Butler. On the tour, Jacobson noted the clinic’s practice of evidence-based medicine that depended on research.

“I fell in love with Mayo Clinic,” he said. “It was everything a former debater from Butler would love about medicine because there was real evidence for what we did and I could be part of gathering the evidence just the way I started in September of 1976 for the debate team at Butler—collecting evidence.”

Jacobson said he originally intended to be an internist, and found pediatrics mortifying. “The first child I ever drew blood from was dying of measles in a hospital bed.” But the first rotation he had as a four-year resident was ambulatory pediatrics, and he found it intriguing that every child, depending on their age and their development, offered a different aspect of “the differential diagnosis”—the list of diseases you would consider in making a diagnosis.

He had found his calling.

Jacobson advised students to “realize what you can deliver and are good at.” He said he had been active in student government at a university-wide level, but he found dorm activities to be a better fit. “While I got a kick at times from butting heads with our President, Alexander Jones, and Herb Schwomeyer, the Dean of Men, it wasn’t the thing I really enjoyed. So ask yourself: What am I good at and what do I enjoy doing? And how can I do that better?”

He also offered advice about:

-The importance of the Honors Program. Good students often hear that they’re doing well, he said. “The Honors Program gave me the opportunity to hear, ‘That’s not good enough. You’ve got to do that over.’ The program pushes you and prepares you for medical school, where everyone is an exceptional student.

-Writing a thesis. “Even if you don’t think of yourself as a great writer, you are writing it down and trying to make the sentences match and click with the evidence. In making your arguments, you will learn so much more.”

-Starting on projects immediately. “I think there’s a real danger in procrastinating because something’s difficult. I think that if you have work assigned, spending a little time on it every day is better than saving it up. Get working now rather than putting off the big things.”

“Butler will do a great job preparing you for how to study, how to think, how to present yourself, and how to be efficient with time,” he said. “There will be doubts in your mind whether the degree of work is worth it. But boy, I swear I meet people in all walks of life who will tell you that about their career—there were certain points where they were questioning it. But the great thing about health is the problem you’re trying to solve won’t go away. There will always be ill people who need your help. To have a career where you’re helping a person, you can keep coming back to: That’s worth it.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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How Butler Prepared Him for the Mayo Clinic

Jacobson advised students to “realize what you can deliver and are good at.”

Sep 19 2017 Read more
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Sixteen Superintendents to Participate in Butler's EPIC Program

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PUBLISHED ON Dec 18 2017

Sixteen school superintendents from across Indiana will participate in Butler University's second annual Educators Preparing Inspired Change (EPIC) program, a yearlong leadership excellence program designed to transform the business and constituent-services aspects of their work.

The superintendents, who are listed below, will come to Butler six times in 2018, beginning January 18, for sessions in strategy development, budgeting/finance, change management, community/stakeholder outreach, building a high-performance team, and board relations.

"The challenges facing our public school districts are well documented," said Dr. J. T. Coopman, Executive Director of the Indiana Association of Public School Superintendents (IAPSS).  "Budget cuts, increased class sizes, and socioeconomic conditions require our public school superintendents operate in an environment of rapid change and uncertainty.  EPIC will support Superintendents transformative growth in leadership to thrive in this new reality."

The EPIC program is a joint venture of Butler University’s College of Education and the Lacy School of Business in partnership with Indiana Association of Public School Superintendents (IAPSS).

Participants in the 2018 EPIC program are:

-Brent Lehman, North Adams Community Schools.

-Timothy LaGrange, Southwest Dubois County School Corporation.

-Amanda Whitlock, Clinton Prairie School Corporation.

-Jeremy Riffle, Triton Community School Corporation.

-Lynn Reed, Salem Community Schools.

-Paul Ketcham, Batesville Community School Corporation.

-Andrew Jackson, Sunman-Dearborn Community Schools.

-Charles Cammack, Fort Wayne Community Schools.

-Timothy Edsell, Nineveh-Hensley-Jackson United School Corporation.

-Jana Vance, Rochester School Corporation.

-David Clendening, Franklin Community Schools.

-Shawn Price, Flat Rock-Hawcreek School Corporation.

-Andrea Mobley, Monroe County Community School Corporation.

-Timothy Taylor, Jac-Cen-Del Community School Corporation.

-Karl Galey, Lawrenceburg Community School Corporation.

-Robert Moorhead, South Ripley Community School Corporation.

Twelve school superintendents completed the first EPIC program. They are: Robert Evans, Shelby Eastern Schools; Deborah Howell, Franklin County Community School Corporation; Jim White, Bremen Public Schools; Thomas Hunter, Greensburg Community Schools; Scott Deetz, Madison-Grant United School Corporation; Ginger Bolinger, Duneland School Corporation; Gregory Walker, Brownstown Central Community School Corporation; Steven Baule, Muncie Community Schools; Matthew Prusiecki, Metropolitan School District of Decatur Township; Lisa Lantrip, Southern Hancock Schools; Scott Olinger, Plainfield Community School Corporation; Sam Watkins, Peru Community Schools.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

 

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Sixteen Superintendents to Participate in Butler's EPIC Program

Sixteen school superintendents from across Indiana will participate in Butler's second annual EPIC program.

Dec 18 2017 Read more
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The Butler Arts Center Sees the Big Picture (20x40 Feet)

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 07 2017

The Butler Arts Center has unveiled The Journey from Outside In, a 20-by-40-foot painting by Indianapolis artist Justin Vining that required 263 hours of work spread over three months and 25.5 gallons of paint.

The painting, which will hang in the Clowes Memorial Hall lobby for a year, depicts sunrise over the Indianapolis skyline, the Butler University campus, and farmland on the outskirts of town. The Clowes Hall lobby is open to visitors Monday through Friday from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

The Journey from Outside In“My inspiration for the painting really stems from my time as an elementary art school teacher, and a lot of my early work as a professional artist,” Vining said. “Super whimsical, very brightly colored, tons of movement. Because of its massive scale, there’s a lot of room for playful fun. When thinking about this, I had a lot of different ideas churning, but I thought that style of my artwork would lend itself best to this project.”

A time-lapse video of The Journey from Outside In, from start to unveiling, can be seen here. An interview with Vining is here.

Vining’s painting is the first piece commissioned by the Arts Center. Ty Sutton, Executive Director of the Butler Arts Center (Clowes Hall, the Schrott Center for the Arts, the Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall, and Lilly Hall Studio Theatre), said a painting of this size is “a true challenge for any artist.”

“This is the size of a two-bedroom apartment at 800 square feet,” he said. “When I met with Justin for the first time, I was confident that he was the perfect choice for our first commission. The amount of work and dedication, and the extraordinary number of man-hours and support this took from Justin’s entire community of supporters is really something special.”

Vining is an Indianapolis-based artist, specializing and landscapes and cityscapes. He studied Art Education at Purdue University and taught elementary art for three years. Following his tenure as a teacher, Vining attended Valparaiso Law School, where he rekindled his love for creating between classes and clerking. Shortly after graduating and passing the bar in 2010, he decided to pursue art full time and hasn’t looked back since.

Originally from a small farm town in Indiana, Vining finds inspiration from American regionalist painters and WPA-era public works. In his progress as a full-time artist, his artwork has evolved from bright, whimsical watercolors and acrylics to more classical oil scenes. In his exploration of oils, he’s begun working en plein air and exploring more muted, natural tones. In 2017, he plans to continue his exploration in oils, balancing this new found love of plain air painting with his studio work.

Starting in 2009, Vining’s work has been displayed in cities and towns throughout Indiana. His exhibits and shows in 2017 have included the 93rd Annual Hoosier Salon Exhibit, Juried Exhibit at the Indiana State Museum; “Painting in the Parks,” a group exhibit in the Garfield Park Art Center; and “Chasing Daylight,” new work by Indiana Plein Air Painters, Hoosier Salon, Carmel.

 

Media contact:
Joanna Hodges
jhodges@butler.edu
317-940-6411

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The Butler Arts Center Sees the Big Picture (20x40 Feet)

Because of its massive scale, there’s a lot of room for playful fun.

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History As Seen Through the Eyes of the Disney Company

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 08 2017

Jason Lantzer’s family trips to Disney World started as vacations. They ended up becoming research for his new book, Dis-History: Uses of the Past at Walt Disney’s Worlds.

In the book, Lantzer, Assistant Director of the Butler University Honors Program, looks at the way Walt Disney’s theme parks have presented history over the years. Each area of the parks, starting with Main Street, gets dissected—what’s there, what’s missing, what’s changed, and what Walt Disney wanted to do as he attempted to reflect his vision of America.

Dis-History“In some ways, Walt Disney is a public historian as he’s fashioning Disneyland, which opened in 1955,” Lantzer said. “And that carries over into Disney World 16 years later—that notion that we’re going to have an educational component to what we do, that it’s not just about going and seeing characters from movies and riding rides. They were helping shape public discourse at the time.”

Early on, the Disney Company was interested and active in “edutainment” about subjects as broad as Davy Crockett and space exploration. Lantzer said that when Disneyland opened, Frontierland was supposed to give visitors the sensation that they were stepping into the past. The original exhibit had horses and a stagecoach, and real Native Americans talking about their customs and traditions.

Lantzer writes that in a speech when the park opened, Disney said he wanted to connect today’s youth with what their parents and grandparents had to go through to settle in this country.

“Davy Crockett was a huge part of that,” said Lantzer, who also teaches an Honors Seminar at Butler called “Disney in American Culture.” “He has almost no presence in the Disney parks today.”

But Disney was a different company then, Lantzer said. It didn’t have the mythology—or the raft of characters—it has today. So while longtime history-related exhibits like the Hall of Presidents still spark interest and discussion among visitors, Disney now has its own history and doesn’t need to rely on the grand American historic narrative anymore.

“In the Epcot theme park, the Norwegian pavilion has been taken over by Frozen,” he said.Jason Lanzter

Lantzer said the Disney Company cooperated in the writing of the book, giving him access to corporate archives. Among the nuggets he was able to glean: Disney had planned history-intensive exhibits that let visitors “experience” the signing of the U.S. Constitution and see what Boston was like before the Battle of Lexington and Concord, but those were never built.

The archives do not indicate why.

In the book, Lantzer also looks at the quality of the history Disney presents—both positive and negative. He particularly likes the Hall of Presidents and American Adventure at Epcot.

“It’s hitting on everything possible,” he said. “Does it get everything? No, of course not. But what it does do, it does surprisingly well for a 20-minute show exposing American history from the Colonial period to the present.”

Overall, Lantzer said, Disney does a reasonably good job presenting history.

“Could they do things better? Sure,” he said. “But that’s not their business. They are a company, for profit, and they are trying to find ways that are going to hit with the public. If history is a tool in that regard, then they’re going to use it.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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History As Seen Through the Eyes of the Disney Company

Jason Lantzer’s family trips to Disney World started as vacations. They ended up becoming research for his new book.

Sep 08 2017 Read more