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I Love Indy Because...

Morgan

MORGAN SNYDER, ‘07

One might peg me as someone with a bit of bias towards Indy. After all, as Director of Public Relations for Visit Indy, I’m paid to pitch to journalists what it is that makes Indy so special and worthy of ink in Forbes or AFAR Magazine.

I love my job. But, I love my job because I love the product I get to promote. One doesn’t come without the other.

I was closing in on graduation from Butler in 2007 and wanted one more internship to round-out my skillset. I landed a gig with the city’s tourism office and it was in the span of those four internship months where I was forced to learn a new product: Indianapolis. I learned that there’s more than an iconic motor speedway and 500-mile race. There’s a glimmering canal walk, 250 acres of urban greenspace with seven museums and a top ten zoo. I learned that less than a mile from Butler’s campus there’s the original, iconic LOVE sculpture and one of the most progressive art museums in the country. The world’s largest children’s museum. A restaurant that’s pegged for having the world’s spiciest dish and another restaurant that is named on Condé Nast Traveler’s World’s Best Restaurants list. A city that checks the boxes on just about any sporting event one can imagine. Hip and funky neighborhoods. And so much more.

After that internship, I was sold on the city that was going to be my home. The city where I would make my core group of friends, find my husband, and raise our family together.

What I didn’t know or even really care that much about as a college student was that Indy was super accessible and affordable. Friends can flee to bigger cities after college – some of mine did – but ask them how much they paid for that tiny studio apartment or what their meal cost even at the most casual of restaurants. Indy is continuously ranked as one of the country’s most affordable cities. Even better, Indy is a city that is led by listeners, believers, and visionaries. Did you know this city built a football stadium when we didn’t even have a football team? And look where we are now. If you have an idea, you can actually make it happen here. The guy that built an 8-mile, $63 million bike trail in the heart of downtown wrote his idea on a napkin and without any taxpayers’ dollars, he made it happen. Project for Public Spaces called his trail, “the biggest and boldest step by any American city.”

Fortunately for us, Indy loves their Butler Bulldogs. We’re a community that has a unique bond in the principles we learned through The Butler Way. And I am continuously grateful that our city operates under a similar mantra.

 

NATALIE VAN DONGEN, ’18

I love Indianapolis because it rejects expectation. Upon seeing our humble skyline, one may believe that Indianapolis is nothing more than a run-of-the-mill, midwestern, industrial city – this assumption would be incorrect. Indianapolis is defined by its residents, and therefore cannot be adequately defined by any given industry, belief system, socioeconomic status, or even basketball team. We are artists, agriculturalists, environmentalists, athletes, activists, techies, entrepreneurs, doctors, spiritual leaders, and civil servants. We are mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, friends, and community members. We are hard workers, determined to do better and grow faster than any expectation would allow. We are our own city, made for each other, by each other.

Indianapolis is by no means a perfect city. In recent years, we have faced the same unrest many of our country’s cities have had to overcome. The issues we are facing currently will not subside in a day’s time. These challenges, be it an aging infrastructure or increased political tension, will require time, patience, and diligence. However, we do not claim to be perfect, nor do we claim to be complete. Indianapolis is a constant work in progress, wherein we must not only identify the adversity laid at our feet, but learn how to overcome as a community. We do not make excuses, we do not point fingers, we do not fall victim to hatred, and above all else, we watch out for all members of our community.

I love Indianapolis because it is limitless. In years past, Indianapolis has welcomed the victims of natural disasters, opened our hearts to refugees, and become a new home to disenfranchised populations. All who have come to Indianapolis, no matter if it was out of newfound opportunity or dire circumstance, have become an integral part of our city’s fabric. An engravement in the stone of the Old City Hall building in downtown Indianapolis reads, “I am a citizen of no mean city” – that is Indianapolis. A city proud of its people, the backgrounds of those people, and the accomplishments of those people.

 

JEFFREY STANICH III, ‘16

Indianapolis will sneak up on you - like how, during a random visit with a friend, it turned out to be a place I might actually like to call home.

Years ago, my high school buddy Elliot and I were down from Wisconsin for the day looking for some warmer golfing weather that we never found, so we had time to kill in a place we knew nothing about. Until he said: “Want to go check out that one small school that just made it to the Final Four?” So we did.

As reader has probably already picked up on, the institution in question was Butler University, and it turned out to be so much more than one small school. After leaving with more reasons to return than any other university visit had offered, Butler was choice number one when it came time to choose. And the following four years surpassed every expectation that I had built up in my head since first walking up the steps of Robertson Hall.

Beyond the ways that Butler integrated me into the surrounding city - such as statehouse visits with journalism courses, or learning that weekends begin on Thursday nights in Broad Ripple - it was on my peers and I to get to know Indianapolis beyond the bubble.

And for as much as we tried to get to know places, it wasn’t until the June following my ’16 commencement that I finally stumbled upon the downtown canal walk, and months more until I got to witness the leaves turn every September in Holliday and Garfield parks. Sure, nice places to spend some time are found in every city - but that autumn was when I learned how Butler University and Indianapolis are part of an entire community that has your back. 

I got my first real job out of college - writing speeches for Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett - because his chief of staff somehow found my name on Butler’s website. This job (beyond a consistent paycheck) offered a chance to see the true dynamic identity of Indianapolis, that major-metropolis-with-small-town-charm people often speak to.

On any given weekend, hundreds of thousands of visitors will flood the town late into the night for world-class events like the Indy 500 and GenCon, and then by Monday you’re bumping into old and new friendly faces to catch up with during your morning routine.

You can meet residents whose families have lived in a neighborhood for generations, and then spend time with whole communities of Burmese immigrants who are just starting their lives in America through Exodus Refugee Immigration.

There are all the jobs you could want in the 80,000-strong hospitality industry that is to credit for Indianapolis’ ranking as the number one convention city in the United States, or you can pursue just as many careers in one of the many tech companies like Salesforce and Infosys that contribute to our reputation as the Tech Capital of the Midwest. (We’re not letting Silicon Prairie catch on, sorry.)

So Indianapolis will sneak up on you - for me, it transformed from a day-trip destination, to a place where I spent four years learning and living, to the place where I still intend on growing. My little cousin is starting at Butler in August, and she’s echoing that same sentiment I did six years ago: “this is a whole lot better than I expected.”

Yeah, it is, I tell her. And you’re only at the beginning.

 

I Love Indianapolis Because...
Summer in IndyPeopleCommunity

I Love Indy Because...

We know Indy is a great city; we asked 3 young alumni to tell us why. 

Indy Named Most Underrated City in America

by Elizabeth Duis ’20

This past May, Forbes named Indianapolis the Most Underrated City in America.

“It’s a city with an exploding culinary scene that is easy to get to, about as cheap as any urban destination in America, with lots of worthwhile attractions and a litany of special and Bucket List events, full of new hotels and outdoor activities, and every time I come back wondering, why don’t you hear more about Indy?” Larry Olmsted explained in his recent article. “Well, now that is all starting to change.”

Events like the Indy 500 have been on the public’s radar for years, but new developments such as the bid for Amazon’s second headquarters and Travel + Leisure’s 50 Best Places to Travel both included Indianapolis and have caused the media to take a closer look at Circle City. What they’ve found is a vibrant, growing metropolis that is ideal for young professionals.

“From a business perspective…Indy punches so far above its weight class,” Olmsted continued. “That and the low cost of living and high quality of life are all reasons why Indy recently made the cut to the short list for Amazon’s new second headquarters.”

As a future or current college student, you may be wondering what does this mean for me? Location is a huge factor to weigh when making a college decision. For those who are considering Butler University, the city of Indianapolis is closely tied to who we are and what we do. As the 15th largest city in America, it’s not too big and it’s not too small. It’s just right.

Indy is both an experience and a resource for Butler Bulldogs. It’s a metropolis that sustains, entertains, and connects us with the rest of the world. To show our love for Circle City, we’ve broken down some of our favorite ways that Indianapolis benefits Butler students during their time here and even after graduation.

While You’re a Student

No matter where you come from, Indianapolis is the perfect place for you. Indy has often been described as a “Goldilocks” type of city. For those coming from a bigger city, it’s a chance to receive personalized attention, take advantage of a lower cost of living without losing any benefits, and escape inconveniences like traffic, pollution, and crowded neighborhoods.

The opposite can be true as well. If you come from a small town, Indianapolis can be like a starter city to immerse yourself in a new and exciting environment. It’s a chance to try on big city life without any risk. Butler’s campus is its own community in the heart of a vibrant neighborhood just ten minutes from downtown Indianapolis. Within a short walk, bike ride, or drive, there is always something fun to do and wonderful places to eat. You can truly feel connected to the rest of the world.  

Not only does the environment fit just right, but the attitude of the environment fits as well. This is a place where you truly matter and you can make big things happen. Butler faculty and Indianapolis employers alike are concerned with and committed to your success. You’ll be a big fish in a big pond.

Another benefit to having Indy at your doorstep can be summarized in one word: internships. One of the aspects that sets Butler apart is that many degree tracks require an internship. The internships you complete during your time at Butler will connect you to this vibrant, growing city. This access to some of the nation’s top companies and organizations gives you a leg up on the competition.

After four years of making valuable networking connections and lifelong friends, graduates have a strong desire to put down roots here. It’s almost like if you love Butler, then you’re guaranteed to love Indy!

After Graduation

Even after you’ve walked across the stage at graduation, the Butler-Indy network is one that you will never lose. More than likely, the internship (or several!) that you completed during your time at Butler will help connect you to employment after graduation. That’s one of the many reasons that Butler University’s overall placement rate is 97%. That sense of security is critically important in today’s ever-shifting job market.

If you don’t have an “in” right away, don’t worry! Both Butler and Indy have several resources to help connect you to your next job. Butler’s Internship and Career Services will work closely with you even after graduation to ensure that your transition into the real world is a smooth one.

Another great Indianapolis resource goes by the name of Indy Hub. Established as a resource for 20 and 30-year olds to learn more about and become more connected with the city, Indy Hub coordinates signature programs and initiatives to provide young professionals with opportunities that cannot be found elsewhere. With your success in mind, Indy Hub helps bridge the gap between where you are and where you want to be.

The city of Indianapolis is an extremely collaborative place. It’s hard to find another place in the country that offers you access to thriving companies like Eli Lilly and Roche. Statistics like high quality of life and low cost of living speak for themselves, but when you read between those lines you uncover that Indianapolis is a place where you can easily find professional and personal success.

Not only can you pursue your career here, but you can also watch professional sports, dine at award-winning restaurants, explore miles of biking trails, or even go see a Broadway show! These are just a few reasons why young professionals are turning their heads towards Indy.

Here at Butler University, we are proud to call Indianapolis our home, and we hope that maybe one day you will too.

Summer in IndyCommunity

Indy Named Most Underrated City in America

Indy is both an experience and a resource for Butler Bulldogs.

AcademicsCommunity

Popularity, Success Spark Second IPS/Butler Lab School

BY Rachel Stern

PUBLISHED ON Aug 10 2018

It was never supposed to happen this way.

The goal was one, if that, and that alone seemed daunting, even impossible at times. Starting a school, and not just any school, was the dream for Ena Shelley, Dean of Butler University’s College of Education. But in reality, she couldn’t imagine the pieces coming together.

It was after a sabbatical in Italy in 1998. Between all the pizza, Shelley managed to fall in love with something else. A new style of teaching, the Reggio model, and she vowed to figure out a way to bring it back with her.

The idea of a Lab School was born, but it was very much just an idea, she says.

“I knew I had to change my curriculum, but I didn’t have any schools where my students could actually see what I wanted to do,” Shelley says. “My dream was to have a Lab School in Indianapolis that we could share with the community, but also use to teach Butler students. The dream was never to have two.”

About 20 years after her initial trip to Italy, Shelley’s seeing double. A second Lab School, born out of demand, success, and lots of work, is up and running at 54th Street.

And even though it was never part of the plan, well, it sure seems like it was.

Lab School 55’s campus happens to occupy the school building that is named after Eliza A. Blaker. Named after the founder of Butler’s College of Education. This was a complete coincidence and just happened to be a building that the Indianapolis Public Schools Superintendent said was available and was in close proximity to Butler.

“The community has responded in ways I never anticipated,” Shelley says. “Being asked to open a second one is really an honor. The dream has gone way further than I ever thought it could.”

What is the Lab School?

It’s a couple weeks before school starts and Nicole Kent is talking on the phone, cradling it between her ear and shoulder, while she furiously types an email on her cell phone.

She’s at School 60, the original Lab School. But really, she is itching to get to School 55, the new Lab School. Furniture is about to be delivered and from the sounds of the conversation, there are a few hiccups with the delivery.

Kent, who graduated from Butler’s College of Education, will be the principal at the new Lab School. She used to teach at the original Lab School and was the assistant principal for two years.

That’s not uncommon. Butler graduates tend to flock to the Lab Schools. In fact, at Lab School 60, or the original, 69 percent of teachers graduated from Butler with either a Bachelor’s or a Master’s Degree. At Lab School 55, or the second Lab School, 61 percent of the teachers are Butler grads.

Teachers receive continued professional development from Butler, and the Lab Schools also serve as a classroom to current Butler education students. Some also student teach at the Lab Schools.

But, says Ron Smith, the Lab Schools don’t hire just Butler grads. Smith is the principal at the original Lab School. He says they hire from wherever, but, because the Lab School program is different than a traditional learning environment, they need teachers who are able to teach that style, and, Butler grads are familiar with the Reggio model.

Learning at the Lab Schools is project based. There aren’t a lot of worksheets where students are mindlessly copying things down. The curriculum is teacher created. Art is infused into most classrooms. Inquiry, research, and exploration are the cornerstones of the Lab School curriculum, where there is a bigger picture behind each lesson. It is not about memorizing facts, but rather about communicating and collaborating and acquiring life skills.

“Of course, we want our students to do well on the standards you would find in the state curriculum, but beyond that we want our kids to become life-long learners,” Smith says. “We want them to find joy in learning, we want them to ask questions of their own and to find answers to those questions and projects help us get at that. That helps us get beyond the state curriculum.”

The Lab Schools are magnet schools. Students are chosen by random lottery from all who apply, with preference given to applicants who live nearby, have siblings in the school, and then children of either Butler or IPS employees. 

Lab School 60 has consistently been one of the two most requested elementary schools in Indianapolis since 2012. Students come from Broad Ripple, Butler-Tarkington, Meridian Kessler, to name a few, and the hope is that with a second school, even more of the city will be served.

“As a University, we value being a really good community member,” Shelley says. “We not only want to serve the community, but also learn from the community. We are not separate, but we are better together, and I think we are always striving to fulfill that mission.”

Is it working?

Amy Goldsmith vividly remembers the first time she met Ena Shelley.

Goldsmith was serving on the Indianapolis Public Schools’ Strategic Planning Committee and Shelley was presenting on the concept of the first Lab School. Goldsmith, whose daughter was about to enter kindergarten, was planning on sending her to School 57, but after hearing Shelley speak, everything changed.

“I remember thinking to myself, ‘wow, there really are people who think the same things as me about education,’” says Goldsmith, who lives in Irvington. “I was so excited that Indianapolis was going to have something like that for our community.”

Quickly, Goldsmith changed course and enrolled her daughter in the inaugural year of the first Lab School. And her family hasn’t looked back. She has a seven-year-old, 10-year-old, and 12-year-old who are all in the Lab School.

Prior to Shelley’s presentation, Goldsmith had never heard of Reggio Emilia. After doing some research, and listening to Shelley, she was sold. And now, three kids later, she is the one constantly pitching the Lab School to friends, and really, anyone who will listen.

“It’s hard when you find something you love, you can’t stop talking about it,” Goldsmith says. “I find myself making the sales pitch all the time, maybe too often. People are probably sick of hearing it from me. But I really do mean everything I say.”

And it is not just Goldsmith’s words. The statistics support her pitch.

By the end of second grade each year, about 75 percent of Lab School students are above grade level on the text reading and comprehension assessment. In language arts, the achievement gap between white and black students has been reduced by more than 25 percent.  

There are delegation days at the Lab School where groups from around Indiana, and outside of the state, come to visit and see what’s going on.

“It has been great to get a lot of interest and have the program be so popular,” Kent says. “But at our core we always want to be a place that is representative of our whole city. The second school gives us a chance to enroll more students and serve more students. The goal is to always serve our community as best we can.”

What’s next?

The original Lab School has grown to pre-K through 8th grade. It opened as pre-K through 1st grade and added a grade every year. This is the first year the original is at capacity, which is about 570 students.

The second Lab School opened with pre-K through 6th grade and each year they will add a grade until they have 8th grade. In its inaugural year, School 55 has around 300 students. Last year, about 180 attended the school.

Most families who had children attending School 55 prior to it becoming the Lab School this year decided to keep their kids at the school, Kent says. Of the 180 students that attended the school last year, about 150 are staying.

“I was asked early on, in year two or three, if I thought this was scalable and if we could replicate it and at the time I really didn’t think we could,” Shelley says. “But when I see the community response and the potential we have, I find myself wondering if a third is possible. But that is just me wondering. Right now there is much work to be done and we are just happy to be part of our community.”

 

Media contact:
Rachel Stern
rstern@butler.edu
914-815-5656

AcademicsCommunity

Popularity, Success Spark Second IPS/Butler Lab School

Starting a school, and not just any school, was the dream for Ena Shelley.

Aug 10 2018 Read more
Arts & CulturePeopleCommunity

Community Arts School Head Honored As United Way 'Hero'

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 26 2018

Butler Community Arts School Director Karen Thickstun has been honored as one of United Way of Central Indiana's 100 Heroes for her efforts to grow the arts education program from 180 students in 2002 to more than 2,000 in 2016–2017.

The 100 Heroes awards are being given to 100 people from the Central Indiana community who have made a positive impact over the last 100 years.

"I appreciate the opportunity to share with the community what the Butler Community Arts School is all about," Thickstun said. "This is nice recognition for Butler, for the Community Arts School, for the Butler students who are doing something in the community. This isn't about one person. It is about one person plus staff and faculty and Butler students and community partners that have been with us from the very beginning."

The Butler Community Arts School (BCAS) provides affordable arts instruction to the Indianapolis community—people like Kennon Ward, who is now Assistant Music Director of The Salvation Army's Phil Ramone Orchestra for Children in New York—and enables Butler students to hone their teaching skills. BCAS offers private lessons, group classes, camps, and off-campus community programming.

Last year, 59 percent of the BCAS students taking lessons received a scholarship, and minority enrollment accounted for 53 percent.

The BCAS program was the vision of Peter Alexander, then Dean of the Jordan College of Fine Arts, who had started a similar community arts school at the University of Southern Mississippi. Alexander "saw the potential for using college students as the primary instructors and making inroads into the community with that dynamic," Thickstun said.

Alexander approached Thickstun with the idea in January 2002. At the time, Butler's only music instruction for the community was a piano camp. With the help of Arts Administration Professor Susan Zurbuchen, Thickstun secured a grant from the Indiana Arts Commission to provide need-based scholarships to students who wanted music lessons but could not afford them.

By September 2002, BCAS was up and running.

"It was a leap of faith by the Indiana Arts Commission because they were funding something that didn't exist yet," she said. "But Butler had credibility, and the Jordan College of Fine Arts had credibility, and I'm assuming they saw the potential."

The Indiana Arts Commission has renewed that grant every year since. Last year, BCAS received grants totaling more than $113,000 from the Indiana Arts Commission, the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation, The Indianapolis Foundation, Summer Youth Program Fund, and the Lilly Endowment. Some 90 percent of the grant money goes to provide student need-based scholarships.

The program also now has:

-Thirteen community partners serving more than 800 students with music, visual arts, dance, and theatre programs. The Martin Luther King Center, Metropolitan Youth Orchestra, Auntie Mame Child Development Center, and Christel House Academy have all been community partners since the beginning.

-Sixteen summer camps serving over 600 students ages 7 and older. The camps include a summer ballet intensive that will be expanded to four weeks beginning in 2018, as well as theatre and music programs. A new guitar camp will debut in 2018.

-Nine group class programs—including Guitar for Young Bulldogs, Youth Theatre, and Children's Orchestra—serving more than 200 students ages 5 and older.

-Nine areas of private lessons serving over 400 students ages 5 and up. Lessons are available in piano, strings, voice, woodwinds, brass, percussion, guitar, music theory, and composition.

"I'm proud that Butler has stood behind the program for 16 years and continued to support it," Thickstun said. "Butler has recognized that it provides community engagement for the University students, in addition to all the good that it does for the children in the community."

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

Arts & CulturePeopleCommunity

Community Arts School Head Honored As United Way 'Hero'

Karen Thickstun has made a positive impact on the central Indiana community.

Feb 26 2018 Read more
AcademicsCommunity

Kenzie Academy, Butler University Executive Education Partner to Accelerate Tech Careers

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jun 20 2018

Kenzie Academy, an Indianapolis-based education and apprenticeship program that develops modern tech workers, and Butler University, a private liberal arts and professional education institution with a 160-year history of leading innovation in higher education, today announced a strategic partnership to offer a new model of education to the next generation of technology professionals. Through this innovative partnership, all Kenzie Academy graduates will receive a joint Kenzie Academy and Butler Executive Education certificate at the completion of the Kenzie Academy Front-End Web Development, Full-Stack Web Development, and Software Engineering programs.

The Kenzie-Butler certificate offers a new educational model with a path to employment to a wide range of Hoosiers looking for alternatives to a traditional, four-year college education. Kenzie’s programs are designed to be less expensive and less time-intensive than a four-year degree. By blending elements of traditional college with immersive learning and paid work, individuals from all different backgrounds, including recent high school graduates, those re-entering the workforce, and those looking to shift careers, will have the opportunity to gain education and work experience in high-demand, technical fields. Butler is adding Kenzie’s program to its offerings through its Executive Education program.

“We took notice of Kenzie Academy as soon as it appeared in Indiana,” said Jim Danko, President of Butler University. “The dynamics in higher education today require universities to think beyond the traditional models of the past century. Participating in a new model of education with Kenzie Academy, which is reimagining the way learning is delivered, will extend the market Butler currently serves beyond the traditional four-year residential undergraduate student. Butler University is excited to expand the way we serve the high-growth, high-energy technology community in Indianapolis and the greater Midwest alongside Kenzie Academy.”

Kenzie Academy, a college alternative, offers courses in Front-End Web Development (six months), Full-Stack Web Development (one year), and Software Engineering (two years). Kenzie’s career track programs combine paid apprenticeship work and immersive learning, closing the gap between learning and working. The software development courses cover modern programming languages and the most relevant computer science concepts. Students meet and network with local and national tech leaders, and are provided with one-on-one mentorship. Through Kenzie Studios, Kenzie Academy’s consulting arm, students complete real-world consulting projects for industry clients and are paid for their work. Students can use an Income Share Agreement (ISA) in place of tuition to finance their training at Kenzie, making the program accessible to people without the financial means to pay tuition up front.

“We feel Butler University is the perfect partner for Kenzie, and we’re proud to jointly offer a new type of learning model to the market. Kenzie’s unique approach to developing students who are knowledgeable in the latest technical competencies combined with Butler Executive Education’s proven success in developing workforce leaders creates a powerful solution for producing the talent critically needed by employers,” said William Gulley, Executive Director of Butler Executive Education.

Through the partnership with Butler Executive Education, Kenzie students will have the opportunity to develop skills in areas frequently noted by employers as critical to an individual’s overall success, including communication, problem-solving, change management and basic business acumen. These educational opportunities will be developed and delivered in the form of micro-credentials, allowing students to create a personalized curriculum, and additional certification, in the areas that complement Kenzie’s curriculum and are aligned with a student’s personal interest, capability and future career path.

“We can’t think of a better institution than Butler University to launch this first university partnership,” said Chok Leang Ooi, co-founder and CEO of Kenzie Academy. “Butler has a strong history of doing things differently. We’re excited to bring our innovative institutions together to level the playing field for anyone who wants a first-class education and a chance to be part of the tech ecosystem in Indiana.”

 

Media contact:
Rachel Stern
rstern@butler.edu
317-940-9257

AcademicsCommunity

Kenzie Academy, Butler University Executive Education Partner to Accelerate Tech Careers

Students completing the Kenzie program will receive a joint certificate from Kenzie Academy and Butler Executive Education.

Jun 20 2018 Read more
Student LifeCommunity

Message from Butler University Office of Admission

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 26 2018

Butler University is deeply saddened by the shootings that took place at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida. The students, teachers, staff, and the entire community of Parkland have been in our thoughts and prayers during this exceptionally difficult time.

Future Butler students should know that community involvement is one of our University’s core values. And we applaud individuals who choose to serve, and advocate, as responsible members of society. As articulated in The Butler Way, we appreciate and identify with individuals who understand humility, passion, unity, servanthood, and thankfulness.

Applicants to Butler University who respectfully engage in meaningful and authentic discourse regarding important issues within our society will not be penalized in the admission process.

AcademicsCommunity

Planet Parade: Venus, Jupiter, Moon, Saturn, Mars to All Line Up this Weekend

BY Marc Allan

PUBLISHED ON Aug 16 2018

For the first time in more than a decade, Venus, Jupiter, the Moon, Saturn, and Mars will be lined up across the sky.

The best time for viewing will be on the evenings of August 17 and 18, according to Butler University Professor of Physics and Astronomy Brian Murphy—weather permitting, of course. Mars will be near its closest approach to Earth since 2003, and through a telescope, one should be able to see cloud-covered Venus in a quarter phase, the rings of Saturn, the belts and satellites of Jupiter, and Mars’ polar caps (if the dust storm has cleared).

Murphy, who is also the Director of Butler’s Holcomb Observatory, says the planets all orbit the sun in different periods, which means they are typically scattered along the zodiac. Some may be seen only before sunrise, only after sunrise, or not at all if they appear in the direction of the Sun.

"Being able to observe the Sun, Moon, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn in a two- to three-hour time span is quite nice," he said.

Murphy encourages people to get out and see this "planet parade"—either by looking through the telescope at the Holcomb Observatory, which is the ninth largest telescope East of the Mississippi River, or simply by going outside and viewing the night sky.

"It's an ideal time to get out and see the planets," he said. "Usually, we don't have four planets visible at once in good viewing location, along with a quarter moon, which is the ideal time to view the moon. And they're all evenly spaced. If you ignore the sun, these are the four brightest objects in the sky we're talking about."

It’s hard to calculate when this lineup will occur again, Murphy says, but something similar will likely occur in two years. But after that, it will not happen for a long time.

In addition to telescope viewing at the Observatory, Planetarium shows will take place each evening.

 

Media contact:

Marc Allan
News Manager
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

AcademicsCommunity

Planet Parade: Venus, Jupiter, Moon, Saturn, Mars to All Line Up this Weekend

  

Butler astronomer says phenomenon likely won’t occur again for a long time

Aug 16 2018 Read more
PeopleCommunity

In National Survey, Butler Alumni Outshine Most Others

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 29 2019

For Jarod Wilson, work is much more than just a job. The 2008 Butler University graduate was a first-generation college student. He was able to attend Butler only after being named a 21st Century Scholar.

Now he works at the place that awards those scholarships.

Gallup Poll Results“It’s exciting to me to be able to work for an agency that helped me want to go to college and go to Butler, which was my dream school,” he says. “And the work that we do is so important and close to my heart, coming from a first-generation background. I have a close, personal connection to the work.”

Wilson is the Director of Post-Secondary Outreach and Career Transitions with the Indiana Commission for Higher Education. He works with colleges to make sure they are providing support to students who receive financial aid. To him, his job and his mission is personal.

Through Wilson, it is easy to see why 78 percent of Butler grads say they are deeply interested in the work they do. That compares with 73 percent of college graduates nationwide, according to the Gallop-Purdue Index. The GPI is an annual survey of a representative sample of more than 70,000 U.S. college graduates who have obtained a bachelor’s degree. It measures overall well-being, workplace engagement, college experiences, and affinity and attachment to one’s alma mater.

Butler outperformed its peers by most GPI measures. For example, nearly nine in 10 Butler alumni are satisfied with the education they received, and 80 percent say Butler was the perfect place for them.

Mollie Thomas, a 2015 graduate, completely agrees.

Thomas majored in Arts Administration and minored in Art + Design. She now works as the Manager of Member and Donor Experience for Newfields, the Indianapolis Museum of Art’s campus. For her, Butler provided the perfect combination of being challenged, yet also providing a place to figure out exactly what path to take after school.

“I was able to pursue my passion in an environment where people helped me grow,” she says. “It was ideal. I feel way more equipped to navigate our world and our culture because of the education I got.

It is not surprising, then, that 42 percent of grads said they had a job waiting for them when they graduated, according to the GPI. That compares with 31 percent of college graduates nationally. And 53 percent say that Butler’s Internship and Career Services office was helpful in their preparation to land that job. Nationally, 43 percent say that about their alma mater’s career services office.

Aaron Smith doesn’t know where he would be without Butler’s Career Services Office. The 2017 grad knew he was passionate about clothing design, but Butler didn’t teach that. He sought out Courtney Rousseau, a Career Services Advisor who teaches a course called Career Planning Strategies. Her course covers topics like resume writing, networking, and interviews. After talking to Smith, Rousseau connected him with a professional in the clothing design field who was able to share her experiences.

Now, Smith works as a personal stylist for Dia & Co., a plus-size women’s clothing subscription company. He selects outfits for customers and helps them style the clothing he picks.

“Courtney making that happen—that was just the best for me,” he says. “I’m now doing something that I love, which is working in the realm of fashion.”

Butler President James Danko says he is pleased that grads appreciate what they learned and the attention they received while on campus.

“I’m so happy to see that Butler graduates have found their education worthwhile, and that they’ve been able to have meaningful, fulfilling careers,” Danko says. “This is what we strive for every day.”

PeopleCommunity

In National Survey, Butler Alumni Outshine Most Others

Butler Grads excel in well-being, work place engagement, and college experience.

Jan 29 2019 Read more

What She Did On Her Summer Vacation: Shakespeare

By Marc Allan

For the past 10 years, Butler Theatre Chair Diane Timmerman has spent her summers bringing Shakespeare to the masses in White River State Park—first as an actor and, since 2013, as Producing Artistic Director of the Indianapolis Shakespeare Company, better known as Indy Shakes.

It's a huge commitment of time and energy, but Timmerman has a list of reasons that it's worth her time.

"There's a freewheeling joy to getting together and producing a Shakespeare play outdoors, where it was originally produced," she said as she prepared for this summer's production of the rarely produced tragedy Coriolanus, August 2-4.

Her list continues:

-Indy Shakes gives work to Butler alumni and interns. This summer's cast includes alumni Ryan Ruckman '06 and Joanna Bennett '08, and four current students are working as interns. "This project provides gainful, paying, artistically satisfying work for local artists. So that's a driver. I seem to have the ability to give a lot of other theater artists jobs, and I really like that."

-These free shows are an opportunity to expose more people to theater. Through surveys, Indy Shakes has found that as many as 12 percent of its audiences are seeing live theater for the first time.

-She gets the chance to work with so many talented people. "To have the professional quality of the actors, directors, designers, and everyone doing this work is incredible."

Coriolanus tells the story of a man who ends up seizing power and wielding that over the people. The story, Timmerman said, is easy to understand and dynamic.

"I think it's going to be our strongest production to date," she said.

Indy Shakes was founded as the Heartland Actors Repertory Theatre in 2006-07 by a group of equity actors. They began by doing mostly contemporary work, but Shakespeare in the Park took hold and became the company's primary activity. Timmerman was in the first Shakespeare production, The Merchant of Venice.

This year, the company launched a new traveling troupe that played a one-hour version of Macbeth in city parks, libraries, and community centers.

"What I love about this company is that none of us really have to do it," said Timmerman, who has been teaching at Butler for 25 years. "All of the artists are gainfully employed in other ways. But this project feeds everybody's artistic soul."

Coriolanus will be staged August 2-4 at 8:00 PM each night in White River State Park. Admission is free. Food trucks and beer and wine vendors will be on hand and pre-show entertainment begins at 5:00 PM.

 

In the photo: Grant Goodman and Constance Macy star in 'Coriolanus.' (Julie Curry Photography)

Shakespeare
Summer in IndyPeopleCommunity

What She Did On Her Summer Vacation: Shakespeare

Theatre Chair Diane Timmerman is Producing Artistic Director for Indy Shakes

CommunityPeople

Butler Presents Eight Alumni Awards

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 27 2017

Honorees to receive their recognition during Homecoming Weekend.

Butler University will hold the annual Alumni Awards Recognition Program for extraordinary professional achievement and service to the University and their communities on Friday, October 20, at 6:00 PM in the Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts.

This year’s recipients are:

  • Butler Medal: Norman W. Wilkens ’57
  • Butler Service Medal: Dr. Robert Grechesky
  • Joseph Irwin Sweeney Award: Becky L. Ruby-Wojtowicz ’05
  • Hilton Ultimus Brown Award: Michael Hole ’08
  • Robert Todd Duncan Award: Wayne C. Burris ’77
  • Katharine Merrill Graydon Award: Kevin J. McDevitt ’77
  • Ovid Butler Society Mortar Award: Karen (Dietz) Colglazier ’70 MA’74 and John W. Colglazier
  • Foundation Award: Branden ’02 and Jenn Renner

Registration for the awards ceremony and all Homecoming activities can be made online at butler.edu/homecoming. More about the recipients and their awards follows.

Norman W. Wilkens ’57 (The Butler Medal)

Norman W. Wilkens, President, Wilkens Consulting LLC, has been active in marketing, advertising, education, and public relations in Indianapolis for over sixty years. A 1957 graduate of Butler University with a Bachelor of Science in Radio and Television, Wilkens began his career as an announcer and floor director/writer at WTTV (Channel 4). He joined WXLW radio as Continuity Director in 1958. Four years later, he joined Ruben Advertising in its Public Relations Division.

The next steps of his career included advertising and marketing in leading Indianapolis firms including Handley & Miller and Caldwell, Larkin, Sidener, and Van Riper. At that juncture, he and others formed McQuade, Wilkens, Bloomhorst Advertising.

Wilkens became a principal in Carlson & Co. Advertising as President/CEO. Seven years later, he merged the agency into Montgomery, Zuckerman & Davis (MZD) as Vice President and Account Supervisor. He left MZD to form an in­house agency for Standard Management Corporation, an international insurance holding company, in 1993.

In 1996, he spun the agency out of its in-house status and it became an independent firm under the banner Advertising Visions Inc. Five years later, the name was changed to Ambient Communications. In 2004, he dissolved the agency to serve as an independent marketing consultant emphasizing health care. Today, that entity is known as Wilkens Consulting LLC.

Wilkens has held teaching posts at Butler University (for 21 years), Indiana University, and Indiana Wesleyan University, as an instructor in broadcast writing, advertising, and public relations. His father, Dr. Irvin Wilkens, received his pre-medical degree from the old Butler Campus in lrvington.

The Butler Medal, the highest honor conferred by the Butler University Alumni Association, recognizes individuals for a lifetime of distinguished service to either Butler or their local community while at the same time achieving a distinguished career in their chosen profession.

Robert Grechesky (The Butler Service Medal)

Dr. Robert Grechesky is Emeritus Professor of Music and Director of Bands at Butler University. He taught conducting, music education courses, wind band history and literature, and euphonium, and he conducted the Butler Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble on four European tours. In 2014, he retired from active teaching after 41 years of service at Butler.

Grechesky received his Bachelor of Arts in Music Education from Rutgers University, and his Master of Music and doctorate in Music Education and Conducting from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

He was named a Sagamore of the Wabash, the highest civilian award that the State of Indiana gives, by Governor Mike Pence, and in 2016 he was honored by his election to the Butler University Athletic Hall of Fame. He is the recipient of the A. Frank Martin Award, a national award given by Kappa Kappa Psi for outstanding service to college bands. Grechesky was named 2010 “Outstanding University Music Educator” by the Indiana Music Educators Association. He was selected as the 2010–2011 recipient of the James B. Calvert Lifetime Achievement Award by the Indiana Wind Symphony, and was named Outstanding Professor by the Butler Mortar Board.

He will be awarded the Butler Service Medal, which recognizes emeriti faculty or retired faculty and staff (alumnus or non-alumnus) for a lifetime of distinguished service to Butler University and to the community.

Becky L. Ruby-Wojtowicz ’05 (Joseph Irwin Sweeney Alumni Service Award)

Becky Ruby-Wojtowicz graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Arts Administration and a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism (Public Relations).

After two years as Individual Giving Manager at the Indianapolis Zoo, and two years in a similar position at Wishard Health Foundation, she left to run lilly lane, a company she started in January 2008 to provide flowers, event-planning, and other services. (Her first client was a Butler alumnus.) lilly lane has now provided wedding flowers to over 600 couples, as well as corporate and non-profit clients.

Ruby-Wojtowicz was a four-year member of the Young Alumni Board, including one year as vice president and one as president, and has taught at Butler in the Arts Administration program.

She and her husband, Justin, have a daughter, Claire.

The award she is receiving is named for Joseph Irwin Sweeney, whose student career was cut short when he suffered an untimely death in summer 1900, prior to his senior year. It goes to a graduate who completed their degree within the past 15 years who has contributed significant service to the University.

Michael Hole ’08 (Hilton Ultimus Brown Alumni Achievement Award)

Dr. Michael Hole is a pediatrician and social entrepreneur who started his career as a case manager focused on child trafficking before founding two international development campaigns: Power of Children, which started a primary school for 350 students in post-conflict Uganda, and BeHaiti, which helped Partners in Health develop and distribute a vitamin-enriched food treating 50,000 malnourished youth yearly and support an orphanage for 64 disabled, abused, or homeless children abandoned during Haiti’s 2010 earthquake.

He completed residency at Harvard Medical School, where he trained at Boston Children’s Hospital, the world’s No. 1 children’s hospital as ranked by U.S. News & World Report, and Boston Medical Center, New England’s largest safety-net hospital. He earned an MD and MBA from Stanford University with concentrations in public management, community health, and social innovation, and he holds a Bachelor of Science cum laude with honors in Biology and Spanish from Butler University, where he was a Lilly Scholar and the 2008 Top Male Student.

In 2016, he co-launched StreetCred, an organization at the intersection of government and health systems helping low-income families build assets while they wait in pediatric clinics and hospitals. Featured by The Boston Globe and CBS News, StreetCred has returned more than $1.5 million in tax refunds to vulnerable families, which placed Hole on Forbes Magazine‘s 30 Under 30 list of social entrepreneurs.

The Hilton Ultimus Brown Alumni Achievement Award honors alumni who have exited the University within the past 15 years and have made major contributions to a career field or to society.

Kevin McDevitt ’77 (Katharine Merrill Graydon Alumni Service Award)

Kevin McDevitt, Senior Vice President-Wealth Management for UBS Financial Services Inc., graduated from Butler University with a degree in mathematics and went on to earn his MBA in finance from the University of Detroit. He is a Certified Financial Planner and is a member of the Investment Management Consulting Association. He is a member of UBS’s distinguished Director’s Club, which recognizes the top Financial Advisors in the firm. McDevitt has worked for UBS for 30 years.

McDevitt is the current President and a founding member of the Butler University Detroit Alumni Chapter and has been a member of the Ovid Butler Society for the past five years. He also was a supporter of the Campaign for Hinkle Fieldhouse.

In the Detroit community, he has served as a former Introduction Leader of Landmark Education, past President of Marian Athletic Club, and member of the Finance Committee at St. Ireneaus Church.

McDevitt was a four-year letter-winner as a running back on Butler’s football teams, 1973–1976. He led the NCAA (all divisions) in kickoff returns in 1975, and he still holds Butler’s career record for kickoff returns. He won the conference scoring title in 1974, and he became the first Butler football player to score 100 points in a season in 1976. In 2003, he was inducted into the Butler Athletic Hall of Fame.

He and his beloved late wife, Kathy ’78, met at Butler. They have four children, including daughter Shannon, who is a senior at Butler this fall. Shannon is a Health Science and Business major and is a member of the Butler’s Women’s Soccer Team. In 2016, she was named to the All-BIG EAST Conference Second Team.

He is receiving the Katharine Merrill Graydon Alumni Service Award, which is presented to a graduate who received their degree more than 15 years prior to the presentation of the award in recognition of outstanding service to Butler University.

Wayne C. Burris ’77 (Robert Todd Duncan Alumni Achievement Award)

As Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer for Roche Diagnostics Corp.—a position he has held since 1996—Wayne Burris uses his strong background in U.S. and international accounting and finance experience dealing with business and reporting issues to provide strategic and tactical advice for the many Roche businesses.

He was a founding member of the Roche Diagnostics-North American STAR initiative that generated over $100 million in purchasing savings and has since become a global initiative, and he served on the Diagnostics Investment Committee tasked with deciding how to allocate and approve over $500 million in annual capital investments.

Prior to his current position, Burris was Head of Global Finance for Patient Care and, before that, was Vice President of Finance. Before joining Roche Diagnostics in 1986, he was Senior Manager for Price Waterhouse LLP, focusing on clients in the financial service industry and on global healthcare manufacturers in diagnostics, orthopedics, and pharmaceuticals.

Burris, a Certified Public Accountant, is a native of Indianapolis. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting and Finance from Butler University, where he was voted one of the Top Ten Male Students and was named the Outstanding Male Student of his graduating class. He was a recipient of an Ernst & Young scholarship in accounting, and in 2002, he was inducted into the Butler University Athletic Hall of Fame.

He is being honored with the Robert Todd Duncan Alumni Achievement Award, which is presented to a Butler graduate who received their degree more than 15 years prior to the presentation of the award in recognition of outstanding contributions in a career field or to society.

Karen (Dietz) Colglazier ’70 MA ’74 and John W. Colglazier (Ovid Butler Society Mortar Award)

Karen and John, “Bud,” Colglazier have been Ovid Butler Society members since 2002. Karen joined the OBS Executive Committee in 2008 and served as the chairperson for three years. She also served on the Butler Parent-Faculty Council (2002–2003) and in the fall of 2005 joined the Board of Visitors for the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, which she is still a member of today.

Karen, an Indianapolis native, spent her childhood playing in the sand under the bleachers and running the ramps of Hinkle Fieldhouse, rolling down the grassy hill onto the football field, and sledding behind the Butler Bowl. Her father, Bob Dietz ’41, was an All-American basketball player at Butler and long-time assistant Men’s Basketball coach to Tony Hinkle from 1947–1970. Karen attended Butler for her undergraduate and graduate degrees, receiving her Bachelor of Arts in History/Political Science and her Master of Arts in American History.

In the summer of 1974 she was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship for study and travel in India, an achievement she credits to the rigorous curriculum of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Karen taught social studies in Indianapolis Public Schools and Hamilton Southeastern High School, and was a Title IX girl’s tennis coach, being a part of the first high school girls’ tennis program in IPS in 1971.

Bud is owner and President of Don Hinds Ford in Fishers, Indiana. He is a 1967 graduate of Indiana University Kelley School of Business and a member of Sigma Chi Fraternity.

The Colglaziers are the parents of three children—sons John and Mark and daughter Carrie. John and Mark are part of the management team at Don Hinds Ford. Carrie, a member of the Butler Women’s Soccer team studying in the pre-PA program, was killed by a drunk driver June 6, 2003. In 2006, Bud and Karen established an endowed scholarship in Carrie’s memory to benefit a Butler Women’s Soccer player who best exemplifies the Butler Way.

The Mortar Award, created in 1995, honors one person or couple each year who personifies the Butler spirit by demonstrating great vision, leadership, and generosity to Butler University.

Branden ’02 and Jenn Renner (The Foundation Award)

Branden and Jenn Renner were one of the first pledges to the new Butler Andre B. Lacy School of Business building, and their contribution will result in a conference room being named for them.

Brandon, who played football for Butler, graduated in 2002 with a Bachelor of Science in Finance. He is now Associate Vice President, Investments & Financial Advisor for Renner Masariu Wealth Management of Raymond James—one of the youngest vice presidents in Raymond James’ 50-year history. He has also been a consecutive five-year winner of the Achiever’s Club Award and has been nominated as one of Five Star Professional’s Top Wealth Advisors in Indianapolis.

He is a member of the Indiana Motor Truck Association’s Executive Committee and the chairman of their Allied Committee, past President of the Butler Young Alumni Board and Central Indiana Alumni Chapter, and past member of the Ovid Butler Society Executive Committee, Career Services Advisory Board, and Alumni Engagement Subcommittee for the Board of Trustees.

In addition, he has won the Joseph Irwin Sweeney Alumni Service Award and the Barbara Busche OBS Award, and was the Rotary Foundation’s Paul Harris Fellow.

Jenn graduated from Purdue University in 2005 with a Bachelor of Arts in Education. She was an Avon Community School Corporation elementary-school teacher and is now a stay-at-home mom with sons Luke and Logan. She works as a Beachbody coach and is active with the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

The Foundation Award, created in 2011, honors one person or couple (age 40 and younger) each year who personifies the Butler spirit by demonstrating leadership and generosity to Butler University.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

CommunityPeople

Butler Presents Eight Alumni Awards

Honorees to receive their recognition during Homecoming Weekend.

Butler University will hold the annual Alumni Awards Recognition Program for extraordinary professional achievement and service to the University and their communities on Friday, October 20, at 6:00 PM in the Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts.

Sep 27 2017 Read more
AcademicsCommunity

You Are Not Alone

BY Marc D. Allan MFA '18

PUBLISHED ON Dec 17 2018

Kat Strube was “incredibly nervous” as she stood in front of 47 middle-schoolers at Christ the King Catholic School in Indianapolis. And that seemed fitting, really, for what was about to happen next.

For the next 30 minutes she and Butler University classmates Sid Garner, Alex Reinke, Maggie Nobbe, and Hannah Justice would deliver a presentation called "Understanding Anxiety," their final project in the course “Mental Illness: Biological, Psychological, and Sociological Perspectives.”

“I’m not somebody who feels super comfortable in this setting,” Strube, a biology major, says, “but it’s an interesting project.”

As the 11- and 12-year-olds listened attentively, the Butler students went through topics such as what anxiety is, what causes it, and what are the best ways to deal with it. They made paper fortune-tellers with the kids—"a fun, useful distraction for those facing anxiety or other mental illness," they explained—and answered the students’ questions. While one student wanted to know if any of the Butler group knew men’s basketball player Kamar Baldwin, all the other questions they asked dealt directly and seriously with the topic.

“I was super-surprised,” Strube said. “Everyone seemed receptive and to be listening. No one had their head down. Everyone participated and everyone had great questions. It’s not what you expect from middle school students. So that was pretty cool.”

Strube and her classmates were one of 12 teams from the Butler class who went out to Indianapolis-area middle schools in early December to discuss—and attempt to destigmatize—mental illnesses such as anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia. The groups also delved deeper into areas including technology disorders and addictions, sleep disorders, and substance abuse.

The class, which was offered this fall for the third time, is team-taught by Professors Kate Novak (Sociology), Tara Lineweaver (Psychology), and Jennifer Kowalski (Biology). But this was the first time Butler students went into the community to share what they'd learned, including general information (6.8 million children suffer from General Anxiety Disorder), and specifics, such as breathing techniques to ease symptoms.

 “We wanted our students to help middle school kids recognize the stigmas associated with mental illnesses, how the stereotypes are not true, to combat fears and worries about mental illness and to encourage them to know how to get help if they have a problem or they know someone who has a problem,” said Lineweaver.

It was not just about what the Butler students said, but who was delivering the information, Novak said. And getting into the community gave Butler students the chance to understand the implications of what they are learning in the classroom in a new, more real way.

“It's good to have college students come and talk to middle-schoolers because they really look up to college students,” Novak said. “They're going to take it a little more seriously. And a lot of our students have incorporated examples from their own lives. They're saying, ‘I'm willing to talk about this.’ It's been really good for our students, too. It gets them out and thinking about this: What does this mean in terms of people lives? They're not just thinking about the academic component. What is a mental illness? What does the research say? How does this impact people's lives, and how can they have an impact?”

To get the Butler students into the community, the professors teamed with the Joseph Maley Foundation, whose HOPE Program (Health through Outreach, Personal Perspectives, and Engagement) was created to bring emotional, physical, social and mental health awareness and advocacy to students in preschool through 12th grade. HOPE is one of five programs that fulfills the Maley Foundation's mission to serve children of all abilities.

Allison Boyll, a manager with the foundation, helped arrange the Butler students’ visits to local schools, including Westfield Middle School, Indianapolis Public Schools 91, St. Richards, St. Lawrence, St. Monica, and Christ the King.

"I think anytime we can work with students in the area of mental health and help them realize that it’s a natural area of conversation and we can talk about all areas of mental health, it helps to reduce the stigma on mental health and getting the support that you need,” Boyll said. “It just makes it everyday language, so that when you do need some extra support, if you need extra support, you don’t have to be afraid to reach out to get that help.”

That was the reason Christ the King Principal Ed Seib wanted his students to see the presentation. He said mental illnesses get in the way of students being able to reach their potential. Since a social stigma exists, “we want to let them know early on that it’s something they can talk about, it’s something that can be dealt with, and we’re here for them. The presentation was a great way of opening those doors and seeing kids who aren’t that much older than they are talking to them on their terms.”

Frank Meyer, 12, a Christ the King seventh-grader who saw the presentation, said he thought it was extremely worthwhile. He learned that while talking to a friend might not always be the most helpful, it’s always good to have someone to talk to when you’re going through a tough time. He also was interested in hearing about the most common disorders among children—test anxiety and social anxiety—because he deals with those from time to time.

He said hearing from the college students let him know that he’s not alone.

And getting that message out, Professor Kowalski said, is just one of the many benefits of this course.

“It's been a good challenge for the students to have to take the more academic information that they learned and then figure out what's critical, what's going to resonate with the middle-school students,” she said. “And I think it fits with the goals of the course, which are integrating these ideas, communicating about mental illness, dispelling stereotypes, things like that.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan MFA '18
News Manager
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822  

AcademicsCommunity

You Are Not Alone

Butler students explain mental illnesses to Indianapolis-area middle schoolers.

Dec 17 2018 Read more
United States Marine Band
Arts & CultureCommunity

One Night Only: Colburn to Rejoin "The President's Own" United States Marine Band

BY Marc Allan

PUBLISHED ON Sep 14 2018

You can take the colonel out of the band, but you can't take the band out of the colonel.

So when “The President’s Own” United States Marine Band comes through the Indianapolis area on October 27, retired Col. Michael Colburn—now in his fifth year as Director of Bands at Butler University—will return to the podium. He'll conduct the band he led for 10 years in a performance of John Williams' "The Adventures of Han" from the movie Solo: A Star Wars Story.

"I was really thrilled to get the invitation," Colburn said. "And this will be a chance for a local audience to realize that they have a connection to the Marine Band that perhaps they weren't aware of right here at Butler."

Colburn, who directed the Marine Band from 2004-2014, said he received the invitation from his successor, Col. Jason Fettig, after Fettig found out that the band's tour would stop in Carmel, right outside Indianapolis.

They decided that it would be most appropriate for Colburn to conduct a piece by Williams because during Colburn's tenure with the band, he established a close relationship with the famed composer.

Their friendship started with a letter about 20 years ago—Colburn wrote to Williams asking him to guest-conduct the Marine Band, and Williams did. They collaborated several other times, including in 2004 when Williams requested that Marine Band perform his music during the Kennedy Center Honors tribute to him.

"Col. Colburn's distinguished service as the 27th Director of the U.S. Marine Band had an immeasurable impact on the ongoing success and reputation of this historic ensemble," Fettig said. "He spearheaded many notable artistic achievements for the organization during his time at the helm, not the least of which is developing our close relationship with famed composer and conductor John Williams. I'm absolutely thrilled to welcome Col. Colburn back to the podium of "The President's Own."

The rest of the concert at the Center for the Performing Arts in Carmel will feature a selection of patriotic music—Sousa marches such as "Semper Fidelis" and "Stars and Stripes Forever" (that's Colburn conducting in these video clips)—as well as some recent original music for wind band.

"This concert is a rare opportunity to hear the Marine band," Colburn said. "They only come through this area once every 4-5 years at most. I encourage people to get out there and get a little taste of what people in Washington, DC, and especially people in the White House get to hear all the time. This is really one of our national musical treasures."

"The President's Own" U.S. Marine Band will perform at the Center for the Performing Arts in Carmel on October 27. Ticket and tour information is available here.

Media Contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

 

United States Marine Band
Arts & CultureCommunity

One Night Only: Colburn to Rejoin "The President's Own" United States Marine Band

Butler's Director of Bands will conduct his former band when they come to area on October 27. 

Sep 14 2018 Read more

Taking Pharmacy Skills to a North Carolina Indian Reservation

Meghan Blais '17

When I first learned about the opportunity to work on an Indian Reservation during my sixth-year pharmacy rotations, I immediately knew I wanted to apply. As students, we are lucky enough to have a few options to choose from when applying, but I knew I wanted to go to North Carolina—partly because I had peers who had told me great things about the site and partly because I was familiar with the Smoky Mountains and the beauty in that area. So, when I received my schedule and saw that I would be going to North Carolina, during the fall no less, I was ecstatic. My rotation is in Cherokee, North Carolina, and as its name implies, it is at the Cherokee Indian Hospital, which serves the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. But it is not a reservation. The Eastern Band owns the land; they built the hospital too, and anyone who steps foot into the facility can see that. The culture of the tribe is reflected in almost every facet.  But the culture is also reflected in the care, and that is why I wanted so badly to have a rotation at this site.

Mountains

 

Throughout my entire month, I will have the opportunity to learn and apply my time in the classroom to real situations, but I will also be able to learn about a patient population, a culture that I have limited experience with, and about how there is more to healthcare than just medicine.

Within these next few posts, I will try to convey my time and experiences in North Carolina.  And as the saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words.  I’ll start off with this one of the sunrise from the top of the mountain just outside of town.

Rotations for Butler students start on Mondays, unless there is a holiday, but those are always exceptions to the rule.  And, since our rotation sites change every four weeks, it is pretty much like starting a new job every month.  This rotation was no different.  I reported to work bright and early on Monday morning where I went through orientation for the better part of the morning.  I had my picture taken, received my ID badge, and got a brief tour of the facility before being dropped off at the pharmacy to meet my preceptor and the other students on rotation (I had already met one of them since the hospital has housing for its students—my roommate was from a pharmacy school in upstate New York!). Meghan Blais with Waterfall

Then I got a quick tour and information session about the pharmacy, which fills on average, 1000 prescriptions a day.  The amazing thing about the Cherokee Indian Hospital is that is serves as both an in-patient and out-patient facility.  Primary care doctors and pediatricians have offices in what was known as the clinic—a large building which houses 12 different medical teams and serves over 18,000 enrolled members.  There is an emergency department, a lab, an eye care clinic, and a dental clinic.  In addition to this, there is also a 20-bed facility which houses patients who are admitted to the hospital, a wound care clinic in conjunction with physical therapy, and a complementary and alternative medicine center.  This is where I would be working for a month!Cherokee Syllabry

In the afternoon, I was trained on their electronic health record system, then was taken on a more in-depth tour of the hospital.  It was during this tour that I started to learn more about the people I would be serving during the month—the Cherokee Indians.  I was told about the importance of nature and the environment around someone during the healing process, which is why the hospital is built in a way such that every room has a window with a beautiful view of the mountains.  I also learned about how the hospital was built to be the center of care for this community and how important it was that the community was reflected within the walls of the hospital.  On the floor, you can see the river and its banks, an important aspect of life to the Cherokee.  At one end is the spider which is said to have brought fire to the community.  At the other end, a water beetle, which brought water to the community.  The entrance that was built to look like a basket weaved by a local woman, known as the Rotunda.  The artwork, most of which was done by local artists, which incorporates the Cherokee syllabary—the language of the tribe.  It is truly beautiful!

As much as I loved taking in all the different aspects in the hospital, though, I love working with the patients too!  I jumped right in on Tuesday, where I worked in one of the counseling rooms, talking with patients about their medications.  This is such an important part of pharmacy, and it is one of my favorite parts really.  These interactions allow me to get to know someone, to find common ground and create a relationship that promotes trust and improved care.  As the week progressed, I moved into the anticoagulation clinic—where patients taking warfarin (or Coumadin) would follow-up and work with pharmacists to ensure proper management—and into the actual clinic, where pharmacists were called on to follow-up with patients on a wide range of conditions, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and tobacco cessation.  Being able to work in an environment that provides me with so many different opportunities is phenomenal, and I know it is making me a much more well-rounded student pharmacist!  With one week under my belt, I am excited to get back and do more next week.  Until then, we have a weekend to explore all that Cherokee, NC has to offer!

Returning to a rotation site after the first week takes on a whole new look because at this point, you have had a week to learn your way around, ask questions, and find your groove in the work place.  The great thing about this rotation was the daily changing of tasks.  No two days were the same for me.  Some days I would counsel in the morning, then work with the teams in the clinic in the afternoon.  Other days I would work in the anticoagulation clinic, better known as a Coumadin clinic.  Most importantly, though, every day I had a chance to talk with patients, ask questions, and help make decisions about their care.

A huge part of the reason I love pharmacy and what I do is due to the interactions and communication with both patients and other healthcare providers.  Pharmacists have an amazing opportunity to not only help the patient but to advocate for them within the healthcare team.  At the Cherokee Indian Hospital, there were about 10 medical teams of caring for about 20,000 patients! So, it is understandable that communication is key to be successful.  Doctors relied on pharmacists to help care for the patients beyond simply supplying medications.  Clinic pharmacists worked directly with patients to help them better control their diseases, such as diabetes and high blood pressure.  As a student, I had a unique opportunity to lead some of these sessions, to interview patients, determine potential gaps in care, and problem-solve to close those gaps.Cherokee Seal

In addition to my patient care responsibilities, weeks 2 and 3 of my rotation also brought me opportunities to present at the monthly P&T (pharmacy and therapeutics) meeting.  P&T meetings are not exclusive to 1 hospital; if a location has a formulary—a list of approved drugs available for use in the pharmacy and hospital—it has P&T meetings.  Having the opportunity to present at these meetings, as a student, is a little less common, so I was very excited to have the chance to do this while on rotation!  My presentation was also a bit different since it was not a drug proposal but rather an educational review on the recommended treatments for irritable bowel syndrome.  I will spare you from my nerd talk, and simply say it was an excellent way for me to learn about a disease state I was not very familiar with and to provide an informative session to the doctors on staff about the available options for their patients. 

Suffice to say that the middle weeks of my rotation were busy ones.  But, with each week completed, we earn a weekend to explore.  Cherokee is in an amazing location—both Gatlinburg and Asheville are an hour’s drive away.  The Great Smoky Mountain National Park and Blue Ridge Parkway both have entrances a few miles from the student housing.  The new presence of forest fires, however, have casted a smoky haze over the town making hiking and exploring the mountains a bit more difficult. The tourism season is winding down, so town is much less crowded.  However, the other students and I still found time to explore some of the shops, many filled with handmade crafts by local artists, and to watch the Chicago Cubs win the World Series (I was much more excited about this than any of the other students, but they offered support for me while I cheered at the TV).  It is amazing that I am nearly done with my rotation already, but I have one week left and a few more new experiences to come.  Stay tuned, and in the meantime, check out these pictures and the stories they tell within the hospital!

The last week of a rotation is always a confusing time—on one hand, you have finally become acclimated to the location and feel comfortable with all your tasks, on the other hand, you are about to leave just as you started to get settled in.  My last week at the Cherokee Indian Hospital was still filled with new experiences though, and new students (you can see them all below)!  But most importantly, my last week was filled with reflection and appreciation for all the experiences I had this month.

I had the chance to sit in with the pharmacy resident and the physician who operates the pain management clinic.  I also had a chance to go into the in-patient side of the hospital for table rounds—a quick way for everyone on the medical team to receive updates about the patients currently being treated.  It is easy to think that the primary topic of these conversations would be the medicine, but it wasn’t.  Many of the topics and updates focused on the patient and his or her life, struggles taking place outside the hospital.  Some touched on the forest fires, which were threatening the homes of some of the patients.  Others focused on reunions of family deaths and how this time of the year, the holiday season, can be difficult. 

In all these conversations, though, one thing remained the same—compassion.  It can be easy to get caught up in the medicine; after all, there are so many novel treatments and interesting research trials to capture the eye.  There is more to that though, and that is what my time in Cherokee taught me.  Care comes in all forms—sometimes it is a hospital room with a spectacular view of the mountains, other times it is a simple question of ‘how are you doing?’    


Group of Students

I have always wanted to do something with my life that serves others.  For a while, I thought about being a teacher (I still do, but in pharmacy now!), and then I found pharmacy.  It combined my love for math and chemistry with the ever-changing world of medicine.  But most importantly, it provided me with an outlet to show compassion and make a difference in others’ lives, to have an impact.  But truthfully, my month in Cherokee made a difference in my life and had an impact on me. 

If someone would have asked me when I started my journey at Butler if I could have imagined it would take me here, my answer would have been no.  I was not keen on being away from family, traveling to a place where I know no one.  But, here I am now, a month later and I can’t imagine my rotation schedule without Cherokee.

If there is one thing I want to share (apart from the pictures of course), it is this—don’t be afraid to do something different, to go somewhere new.  Learning happens all around us when we step outside the classroom, all you must do is talk to others and listen in return.

AcademicsCommunity

Taking Pharmacy Skills to a North Carolina Indian Reservation

When I first learned about the opportunity to work on an Indian Reservation during my sixth-year pharmacy rotations, I immediately knew I wanted to apply.

Arts & CultureCommunity

Butler Community Arts School Offers Piano For Autistic Students

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 08 2017

Inside a Lilly Hall practice room, a father is sitting on the piano bench next to his 6-year-old son, encouraging the boy to look at the sheet music and play.

“Play this one, play this one,” Dad says, pointing. “Play a ‘D.’”

The boy plays the note.

“And there’s that sharp,” says the piano teacher, who’s sitting to the side. “See that sharp there?”

The boy plays the next note. “Yes!” the teacher says.

Then the boy, who is autistic, stops and lets out a howl of sadness, as if he doesn’t want to play anymore. He hugs his father and turns away from the piano. Then, just as quickly, he’s back around, his hands on the keys.

“Play,” his father says. “‘D.’”

The entire 45-minute lesson takes place in fits and starts like this, with the teacher and the boy’s father coaxing him through pieces of a song. As soon as he’s finished, the boy climbs from the piano bench and heads to a chair to watch videos on a phone. His father directs him back to the bench.

The boy started taking piano lessons in the summer after his parents found a flyer in a doctor’s office advertising piano lessons for children on the autism spectrum. The teacher, Marge Lucas ’97 MM ’00, has been offering these lessons through the Butler Community Arts School since January.

 

 

Lucas believes music is highly successful in the development of neural circuits for cognitive processing, and she has developed a method of music instruction—honed at Butler and in graduate studies at Indiana University-Bloomington—that is applied to the individual learning style and personality of the student.

Her method involves a combination of letters, colors, and sounds that help students process the information needed to play music while developing motor and language skills.

She explains it like this: “For children with autism, they have overconnectivity and underconnectivity. The ones I get are usually already gifted in music, and they have absolute pitch. So their right hemisphere is overconnected. The left hemisphere is language. So they’re overconnected in spatial skills. But they are underconnected in language. Therefore, they can’t express themselves. But if you develop their musical ability and teach them according to the natural progressions of scale degrees and chords, their brain is wired to hear that.”

Lucas, who has Asperger syndrome, says she can understand her students, whereas other people don’t. And she says she has seen her methods work. One student, who started out “almost non-verbal and definitely in his own world,” developed the ability, after eight years of lessons, to do music theory on a graduate level. Another, a 12-year-old she’s been teaching for three years, went from banging on the low notes of the piano to being able to play the title theme from The Legend of Zelda video game.

With the 6-year-old, she had an extraordinary breakthrough two weeks later when the boy began to get distraught. His father said something to him, and the boy responded, “I’m tired.”

“His parents looked at each other, stunned.” Lucas said. “They said they had never heard him say anything like that ever before. Instead of a wail came a short sentence. It made my day.”

The father of the 6-year-old student says Lucas’ methods do work. His son practices piano every day.

“My son is very intelligent,” he says, “but it’s a different kind of intelligence.”

Butler Community Arts School Director Karen Thickstun says she regularly gets calls from parents whose children have autism, asking if she had a teacher who works with students who have learning differences.

“Most of the time, I had to say no,” Thickstun says, “because our teachers are primarily college students and they’re not yet trained to teach more than the traditional approaches to teaching.”

When Thickstun did offer a referral, it was to Lucas, who has been teaching privately for years. Last year, she talked to Lucas about devoting a day to teaching at Butler. Lucas’ presence proved so popular that she is now at Butler for more than a day each week, teaching six to 10 students.

“She’s one of the very few piano teachers in the state—maybe in the Midwest—who’s specializing in developing piano materials to reach autistic children,” Thickstun says.

Lucas’ presence also benefits Butler students, who can watch what she’s doing. Thickstun says the skills Lucas has are ones that teachers are going to need to know more and more.

Thickstun says that what Lucas does requires patience, but also the ability to think differently.

“She has to get into their mind and find different materials that fit,” Thickstun says. “In the students I see her work with, the materials are different for each child. She’s very much trying to figure out that particular child. Marge has been a great addition to the Butler Community Arts School. Part of our mission is access to the arts for everybody, and this is a demographic we have typically not been able to serve.”

The Butler Community Arts School is grateful for the generous support of the National Endowment for the Arts, the Indiana Arts Commission, the Indianapolis Foundation of Central Indiana Community Foundation, the Summer Youth Program Fund, and the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

AcademicsCommunity

Butler Launches Online Master’s in Risk and Insurance

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jul 12 2018

Butler University's Lacy School of Business will introduce an online Master of Science in Risk and Insurance (MSRI) program—among the first of its kind in the nation—beginning in January 2019 to help address the gap between the risk and insurance industry’s personnel needs and the limited talent pool that exists in today’s job market. 

The degree is intended to serve students who aspire to advanced roles in corporate risk management. It will also serve students with a few years of finance or legal experience seeking employment in the insurance field, as well as early-phase professionals already working for insurance firms in both property and casualty, and life and health, and students who have an undergraduate degree in risk and insurance and want to pursue advanced study in the industry. 

More information about the program is available www.butler.edu/msri. Applications will be open beginning August 1.

“The need for risk management professionals in the professional services industry is well-documented," said Donald J. Ortegel, Resident Managing Director of Aon. "The good news is that the trend line is positive for professionals with a specific, applicable risk management four-year degree. Someone holding an advanced degree or additional education in this area would have an edge over other professionals competing for open and career-advancement opportunities.”

The part-time MSRI program will be conducted exclusively online, except for two required in-residence experiences—one on the Butler campus at the start of the program and one at the end of the program in the “world's risk capital,” Bermuda. Coursework will take approximately 24 months to complete.

Zach Finn, Clinical Professor and Director of Butler’s Davey Risk Management and Insurance program, said Butler's goal with the new MSRI program is to prepare students for an industry that anticipates needing 400,000 new employees by 2020.

"As one insurance executive said in our focus group: 'This degree is an automatic $10,000 raise for any employee who acquires it,'” said Victor Puleo, Butler Associate Professor of Risk Management and Insurance, who will run the MSRI program.

The MSRI curriculum will include content dealing with property and casualty, and health and life. It also will have unique and hard-to-find courses on insurance-linked securities and a hands-on opportunity to run a captive insurance entity.

Puleo said graduates of the program will have access to some of the best jobs available for corporate risk managers. Other candidates will be able to enter or accelerate their careers with insurance carriers and brokers. High-caliber graduates from this program will possess the capability to attain senior level positions in these firms.

Butler already boasts a robust undergraduate program for Risk Management and Insurance, including the MJ Student-Run Insurance Company, known in industry parlance as a “captive.”

The company, the first of its kind for a university, insures Butler programs and items including the live mascot Butler Blue III, rare books, artwork, and the telescope at the Holcomb Observatory. Students learn how to write the insurance policy and what the coverage terms will be, and they're figuring out how to finance the company. In doing so, they are able to apply their risk-management expertise in accounting, investments, and numerous other areas.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan MFA '18
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

 

AcademicsCommunity

Butler Launches Online Master’s in Risk and Insurance

"This degree is an automatic $10,000 raise for any employee who acquires it."

Jul 12 2018 Read more
Lacey School
Community

Small Business Center Moves to Butler

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 04 2018

Butler University is the new host of the Central Indiana Small Business Development Center, which provides guidance and resources to entrepreneurs and small business owners at all phases—concept, startup, growth, and maturity. The Central Indiana Small Business Development Center’s mission is to have a positive and measurable impact on the formation, growth, and sustainability of small business in Indiana and to develop a strong entrepreneurial community.

The Small Business Center (SBDC) will become a division of the Lacy School of Business’ Old National Bank Center for Closely Held Business. The four-employee Central Indiana Small Business Development Center will be primarily located at the Speak Easy Downtown Indianapolis, but will be part of the Indianacoworkingpassport.com network providing access to multiple co-working spaces across Central Indiana.

The Indiana Economic Development Corporation (IEDC) administers a grant from the federal Small Business Administration that enables these small-business development centers to exist and partners with local organizations to host them. The Indy Chamber has hosted the Central Indiana Small Business Development Center since 2014 and integrated it into its other key initiatives, including the Business Ownership Initiative (BOI) and the Women’s Business Center.

“The Indy Chamber has been proud to host the Central Indiana SBDC team for the last three years,” Indy Chamber President and CEO Michael Huber said. “While we will miss having these amazing individuals in our office, we are excited for the growth of their small business support services through this new relationship with Butler University. We will continue to partner with the Central Indiana SBDC team, the US Small Business Administration, and additional partners to further develop the entrepreneurial ecosystem of the Indy region.”

Dennis Wimer, Director of the Old National Bank Center for Closely Held Business said he wants Butler to build on the good work done by the Indy Chamber to help small businesses grow and will maintain the partnerships already in place. This partnership will help the Butler community connect more deeply with the small business community in Central Indiana.

Steve Standifird, Dean of Butler’s Lacy School of Business, said having the Center become part of the University is “a great addition to Butler.”

“It will give us additional opportunities for experiential education, enable us to partner with the business community, and continue our efforts to help Indiana businesses grow,” he said.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Lacey School
Community

Small Business Center Moves to Butler

On January 1, Butler University became the new host of the Central Indiana Small Business Development Center, which provides guidance and resources to entrepreneurs and small business owners at all phases—concept, startup, growth, and maturity.

Jan 04 2018 Read more
AcademicsCommunity

Butler Business Consulting Group Posts Impressive Numbers

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 15 2017

To tell the story of the Butler Business Consulting Group (BBCG), it helps to look at the numbers.

The BBCG, which helps businesses solve their challenges, has worked with 94 clients, including Roche Diagnostics, Defenders, Hitachi, Eskenazi Health Foundation, and MJ Insurance.

Trent Ritzenthaler, left, discussed the 10-year anniversary of the BBCG with Inside Indiana Business host Gerry Dick.

It’s generated over $10 million in revenue— $7 million of which has been returned to help continue to fund academic programs in the Lacy School of Business.

About 192 Lacy School of Business student analysts have had an internship with the BBCG, and they have participated in over 300 projects with client companies representing 40 different industries.

And now, the BBCG has a number of its own to celebrate. The group is marking 10 years of serving the Indiana business community, Butler University students, and the University this year.

Executive Director Trent Ritzenthaler is proud of those numbers. He’s even more proud of the stories behind the numbers.

‘A great business model’

One of Ritzenthaler’s favorites to tell is about the BBCG’s longtime relationship with Estes Design and Manufacturing, a family-run sheet metal fabricator on Indianapolis’ Eastside and one of the consulting group’s longest-standing clients.

In 2008, Ritzenthaler said, Estes approached the BBCG about increasing sales of its products, which include metal fabricated mailboxes and metal cabinets. Estes bends the metal needed to manufacture those products.

The BBCG did a sales-effectiveness project for Estes, which led to the consulting group serving as Estes’ outsourced marketing team. BBCG professionals and student-interns worked with the company on a new website, blog, and marketing campaign. As a result, Estes hired BBCG as its marketing department—a role the consulting group continues to play.

That was just the beginning.

Over the years, the BBCG has guided Estes through potential acquisitions of other companies, provided outsourced financial services support, and even provided a short-term loan from the BBCG Investment Fund to purchase a piece of equipment integral to the growth of their operations.

“We’ve helped bring a lot of positive change to that company in a lot of ways, and they’ve been a great partner in doing so, allowing our professional staff and student analysts to play tangible roles in bringing about those positive changes,” Ritzenthaler said.

Estes Design President Tim Estes agreed.

“The professionalism they have exhibited and the whole model of using interns, whether they be undergrad or grad students, has been great,” he said. “They’ve got a great business model. I tell Trent all the time that I would have killed to have done something like that in college and been able to get that experience.”

The beginning

The BBCG got its start in 2005 thanks to a $22 million grant from the Lilly Endowment Inc. to help accelerate experiential learning.

A portion of the funds were used to create what was initially called the Butler Business Accelerator. With the money came a mission: Help Indiana companies that have been in business for five years and were generating between $5 million and $50 million in sales grow, prosper, hire more people, achieve their goals, and stop Indiana’s brain drain.

The Accelerator started serving clients in 2007 and then became the BBCG in 2012.

Ritzenthaler said the BBCG provides benefits not only to its corporate clients, but to Butler (both by earning money and by familiarizing companies with Butler and its programs) and to Butler students (for internships and experiences that help them start and advance their careers). He called it “the cyclical positive effect of those things on each other.”

As an example, he cited the BBCG’s work with MJ Insurance.

Initially, the insurance company signed on for help with marketing strategy and sales processes design. Later, the partnership expanded to include digital strategy development. As that was occurring, MJ’s Chief Operating Officer joined the BBCG Consulting Advisory Board, MJ donated money to name Butler’s new student run captive insurance program, MJ hired several graduates from the Lacy School of Business, and an MJ representative joined Butler’s Davey Risk Management Program Board of Advisors.

And in October, a member of Butler’s Information Technology staff moved over to MJ full time to serve as their new Chief Information Officer.

“You’re helping students, who are helping clients, who are hiring students and donating back to the university and helping academic programs,” Ritzenthaler said. “That is a dynamic set of positive changes for all of the stakeholders involved.”

How students benefit

Kate Allen ’15 interned with the BBCG as a student and worked on at least five projects. Allen said she was given great responsibility and autonomy. She had three other internships while at Butler, and the BBCG, “was a totally unique environment.”

Allen now works in finance for Eli Lilly and Co. She credits her experience at the BBCG with helping her get ahead.

“Being able to use my interpersonal skills and problem-solving skills in the BBCG and then apply that to my first full-time job has been really helpful,” she said.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

AcademicsCommunity

Butler Business Consulting Group Posts Impressive Numbers

To tell the story of the Butler Business Consulting Group (BBCG), it helps to look at the numbers.

The BBCG, which helps businesses solve their challenges, has worked with 94 clients, including Roche Diagnostics, Defenders, Hitachi, Eskenazi Health Foundation, and MJ Insurance.

Nov 15 2017 Read more
CampusCommunity

Andre Lacy Dies in Motorcycle Accident In Africa

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 30 2017

Gift from the philanthropist and his wife resulted in the renaming of the College of Business.

Andre B. Lacy, the man for whom Butler’s Lacy School of Business is named, was killed Thursday, November 30, in a single-rider accident while on a private motorcycle tour in southern Africa.

“We are saddened to share the news that Andre B. Lacy passed away this morning,” said J.A. Lacy, chief executive officer and president of LDI, where Andre Lacy was Chairman of the Board. “Andre was known for his entrepreneurial fire and sense of adventure in business and life. We take comfort knowing that he passed away while pursuing one of his passions in life, and are inspired by the legacy of leadership that he leaves.”

Steve Standifird, Dean of the Lacy School of Business, issued this statement:

“It is with great sorrow that I share with you that Andre Lacy was killed in a motorcycle accident earlier today. There will be a university wide note coming out from Jim Danko later today. I wanted you all to be made aware of this incredibly tragic news prior to the university announcement.

“Andre and Julia Lacy will be remembered in perpetuity for their transformational gift to name the Lacy School of Business. For those of us that have had the good fortune of working with Andre as Senior Advisor for the school, he will be remembered as someone who cared deeply for the success of the school and of our students.

“Andre had become a central figure in the Lacy School of Business. I have personally benefited immensely from his insights. That said, the most meaningful moments for me have been his one-on-one conversations with our students. He had the unique capability of connecting with our students in the most meaningful of ways. He was more than a Senior Advisor; he was a friend, colleague, and inspirational leader for many of us. He will be deeply missed by many.”

Butler President James M. Danko said in an email to campus that Lacy was “a dear friend to Butler University.”

“The transformational gift from Andre and his late wife, Julia, built upon a nearly decade-long relationship with the University,” Danko said. “Their gift went far beyond a monetary commitment; in sharing their family name with Butler, Andre and Julia Lacy created a legacy for young businesspeople in the city they love. They endorsed The Butler Way, and everything it stands for—especially caring for others and leading with integrity.”

Following graduation from Denison University, Lacy started his career at LDI’s founding enterprise, U.S. Corrugated Fibre-Box, where he worked his way through the corporate ranks. Following the sale of U.S. Corrugated, he was named executive vice president and chief operations officer of the newly created Lacy Diversified Industries, the holding company that would become LDI. He was elected CEO of LDI in 1983 and Chairman of the Board in 1991. He remained chairman following his retirement from LDI in 2006.

A strong advocate of civic progress, especially economic development, agriculture, and education, Lacy was co-chair of the Cultural Trail fundraising committee and a co-creator of Conexus. In 2009, Governor Mitch Daniels appointed Lacy chairman of the Indiana State Fair Commission, a role in which he remained in until his death. As commission chair, he was a driving force behind the State Fair Coliseum restoration.

Lacy provided leadership for many boards, including the United Way of Central Indiana, Indianapolis 500 Festival, Indianapolis Public School Board, and Economic Club of Indianapolis. He served as an advisor for the Lacy School of Business at Butler University. He was also an alumnus of the Stanley K. Lacy Executive Leadership Series (SKL) and served as moderator of Class XV.

In addition to his civic contributions, Lacy was active on numerous corporate boards, including Hulman & Company, Herff Jones, Patterson Companies, Inc., Ethyl Corporation, National Bank of Indianapolis, and Indianapolis Power & Light Company. He is past chairman of the Indiana State Chamber of Commerce and the chairman of the National Association of Wholesaler-Distributors.

Governors Roger Branigan, Robert Orr, and Mitch Daniels each recognized Lacy as a Sagamore of the Wabash.

Information regarding funeral arrangements will be announced in the coming days.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

CampusCommunity

Andre Lacy Dies in Motorcycle Accident In Africa

Andre B. Lacy, the man for whom Butler’s Lacy School of Business is named, was killed Thursday, November 30, in a single-rider accident while on a private motorcycle tour in southern Africa.

Nov 30 2017 Read more
Hurricane Irma Destruction
CampusCommunity

Hurricane Irma, Up Close and Personal

BY Hannah Hartzell ’17

PUBLISHED ON Sep 18 2017

September 6 was supposed to be the first day of school in the U.S Virgin Islands. Teachers like Vanessa Mackenzie were supposed to start lessons.

Then Hurricane Irma struck. You can’t hold class when a Category 5 hurricane is barreling through the Caribbean.

Mackenzie, who graduated from Butler in 2015, had recently moved to the Caribbean and was slated to begin her first year of teaching on the island of St. Thomas. When we spoke the week after the hurricane, she was just hoping her students were safe and had a place to sleep.

“Half of my students live on St. John and the other half live in the part of the island that was completely devastated,” Mackenzie said. “I don’t know what kind of devastation they are going home to, or not going home to.”

It’s not only homes that are destroyed. Mackenzie said power lines are strewn across the streets. Cars have no windows. Trees are stripped bare.

With the island in disarray, citizens are on a curfew. They are only allowed outside between noon and 6:00 PM. During those hours, Mackenzie said everyone wants three things: gas, ice, and water.

“It’s unbelievable how important those things have become,” said Mackenzie, who stayed in a hotel on the south portion of the island during the hurricane—and returned to find her house still standing. “You need gas for your car and your generator, and water is essential on a Caribbean island.”

Citizens are unsure when the next shipment of supplies will come, so they are relying on the generators for power. “We need electricians, contractors, and construction workers,” Mackenzie said. “We need national help.”

For now, Mackenzie is running her generator for a few hours a day, just enough to keep food cold.

She’s also utilizing a Facebook group where people are sharing information about where they’ve found provisions. “That’s how I’m finding out where ice is available,” she said. “That’s how we’re spreading information.”

Those that don’t have internet are relying on word of mouth and the help of neighbors.

“Every time you approach someone in the street, they ask how you are and how your family is,” Mackenzie said. “There have been a lot of people helping and that’s the coolest part.”

The islanders have been told it will take six to 12 months to restore power. There’s no word on when the students will start school again.

“Private schools are getting back in class sporadically,” Mackenzie said. “But I work for a public-school system and I lost all the windows in my classroom. The wall is concave.”

One of the school buildings that is intact is being used by the Red Cross for disaster relief.

Mackenzie though, hopes classes can resume quickly.

“Coming back to school will be the only sense of normal stability for these kids. There’s no routine right now.”

The children are learning one lesson you can’t learn in a classroom though: resiliency.

“We’re going to rebuild,” said Mackenzie. “We’re going to be OK.”

Hurricane Irma Destruction
CampusCommunity

Hurricane Irma, Up Close and Personal

Vanessa Mackenzie ’15, who is teaching on the U.S. Virgin Islands, hopes to get back to her classroom soon.

Sep 18 2017 Read more
Arts & CultureCommunity

Collins to Replace Glück in Visiting Writers Series

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 11 2018

Former United States Poet Laureate Billy Collins will replace another former United States Poet Laureate, Louise Glück, in Butler University's spring 2018 Vivian S. Delbrook Visiting Writers Series lineup.

Collins will give a public reading in the Atherton Union, Reilly Room, on Wednesday, April 18, at 7:30 PM.

Admission is free and open to the public without tickets.

Collins, who sees his poetry as “a form of travel writing” and considers humor “a door into the serious,” served as U.S. Poet Laureate from 2001 to 2003 and was the New York State Poet Laureate from 2004­­ to 2006.

He has published 12 collections of poetry, including Questions About Angels, The Art of Drowning, Sailing Alone Around the Room: New & Selected Poems, Nine Horses, The Trouble with Poetry and Other Poems, Ballistics, Horoscopes for the Dead, and Picnic, Lightning. His book Aimless Love: New and Selected Poems 2003 – 2013 was a New York Times bestseller as is his most recent book of poetry, The Rain in Portugal.

His work has appeared in a variety of periodicals including The NewYorker, The Paris Review, and The American Scholar. His last three collections of poems have broken sales records for poetry.

He has been honored by fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Guggenheim Foundation. He has also been awarded the Oscar Blumenthal Prize, the Bess Hopkins Prize, the Frederick Bock Prize, and the Levinson Prize — all awarded by Poetry magazine. In October 2004, Collins was selected as the inaugural recipient of the Poetry Foundation’s Mark Twain Award for Humor in Poetry.

Glück had to cancel her scheduled appearance due to illness.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan MFA '18
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

(Photo by Bill Hayes)

Arts & CultureCommunity

Collins to Replace Glück in Visiting Writers Series

Billy Collins will speak at Butler on April 18.

Apr 11 2018 Read more
Community

Visiting Writing Series Announces Spring Speakers

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 04 2017

Series begins February 1 with Kazim Ali.

Novelist/biographer Edmund White and Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Louise Glück will be among the speakers this spring in Butler University’s Vivian S. Delbrook Visiting Writers Series.

The series begins February 1 with poet/novelist Kazim Ali and continues with novelist Ali Eteraz (February 15), poet Danez Smith (March 22), White (April 3), and Glück (April 18). Times and locations are below.

All events in the spring 2018 series are free and open to the public without tickets. For more information, call 317-940-9861.

More information about each speaker follows.

Kazim Ali
Thursday, February 1, 7:30 PM
Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall

Kazim Ali’s books include several volumes of poetry, including Sky Ward, winner of the Ohioana Book Award in Poetry; The Far Mosque, winner of Alice James Books’ New England/New York Award; The Fortieth DayAll One’s Blue; and the cross-genre text Bright Felon. He has received an Individual Excellence Award from the Ohio Arts Council, and his poetry has been featured in Best American Poetry.  His novels include The Secret Room: A String Quartet, and among his books of essays is Fasting for Ramadan: Notes from a Spiritual Practice.

Ali is an Associate Professor of Creative Writing and Comparative Literature at Oberlin College. His new book of poems, Inquisition, and a new hybrid memoir, Silver Road: Essays, Maps & Calligraphies, are scheduled for release in 2018.

Ali Eteraz
Thursday, February 15, 7:30 PM
Atherton Union, Reilly Room

Ali Eteraz is the author of the debut novel Native Believer, a New York TimesBook Review Editors’ Choice selection. He is also the author of the critically acclaimed memoir Children of Dust, which was selected as a New Statesman Book of the Year, won the Nautilus Book Award Gold, and was featured on PBS with Tavis Smiley, NPR with Terry Gross, C-SPAN2, and numerous international outlets. O, The Oprah Magazine, called it “a picaresque journey” and the book was long-listed for the Asian American Writers Workshop Award.

Previously, he wrote the short story collection Falsipedies and Fibsiennes. Other short stories have appeared in The Adirondack ReviewstorySouthChicago Quarterly Review, and Forge Journal.

Eteraz is an accomplished essayist and has been spotlighted by Time Magazine and Pageturner, the literary blog of The New Yorker.

Danez Smith
Thursday, March 22, 7:30 PM
Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall

 

Danez Smith is the author of Don’t Call Us Dead (2017), finalist for the National Book Award in poetry; [insert] Boy (2014), winner of the Lambda Literary Award and the Kate Tufts Discovery Award; and the chapbook hands on ya knees. Their writing has appeared in many magazines and journals, such as PoetryPloughshares, Beloit Poetry Journal, and Kinfolks. Smith is a 2011 Individual World Poetry Slam finalist and the reigning two-time Rustbelt Individual Champion and was on the 2014 championship team Sad Boy Supper Club.

 

In 2014, they were the festival director for the Brave New Voices International Youth Poetry Slam and were awarded a Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry fellowship from the Poetry Foundation.

Edmund White
Tuesday, April 3, 7:30 PM
Atherton Union, Reilly Room

Edmund White is America’s preeminent gay writer. In biography, social history, travel writing, journalism, the short story, and the novel, this prolific and versatile author has chronicled the gay experience in the United States from the closeted 1950s through the AIDS crisis and beyond.

His first novel, Forgetting Elena, published in 1973, is the story of an amnesia victim, set at a stylish resort reminiscent of Fire Island. With the classic coming-of-age tale A Boy’s Own Story, White cemented a place for himself—and for gay fiction—in the cultural consciousness. His celebrated fiction also includes Nocturnes for the King of NaplesCaracoleThe Beautiful Room Is Empty (winner of the 1988 Lambda Literary Award), The Farewell SymphonyThe Married ManFanny: A FictionHotel de Dream, and Jack Holmes and His Friend. His latest is Our Young Man.

White has been involved in the gay rights movement since the Stonewall riots in New York City in 1969 and has acted as one of its canniest observers. His pioneering The Joy of Gay Sex: An Intimate Guide for Gay Men to the Pleasures of a Gay Lifestyle was published in 1977 and served as a national coming-out announcement for the entire gay community.

White has also made his mark as a highly accomplished biographer. Genet: A Biography is recognized as a definitive work on writer and playwright Jean Genet, and in 1993 it won both the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Lambda Literary Award. White also authored the well-received Marcel Proust and Rimbaud: The Double Life of a Rebel. His memoir Inside a Pearl: My Years in Paris recounts the fifteen years he spent living there—one of the most productive and creative phases in his career.

White is a regular contributor to The Times Literary Supplement, The New York Times Book Review, and Vanity Fair, and is a member of both the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Louise Glück
Wednesday, April 18, 7:30 PM
Atherton Union, Reilly Room

Louise Glück is the author of twelve books of poetry and served as the U.S. Poet Laureate from 2003-2004. In 1993 Glück won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry for her collection The Wild Iris. She is the recipient of fellowships from the Rockefeller and Guggenheim Foundations and from the National Endowment for the Arts. Other honors include the Academy of American Poets Prize, the William Carlos Williams Award, the Bobbitt National Poetry Prize, the Ambassador Book Award, and the National Book Critics Circle Award, and her most recent book of poems Faithful and Virtuous Nightxs received the 2014 National Book Award. Her book of essays Proofs and Theories: Essays on Poetry (1994) was awarded the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for Nonfiction, and her book Vita Nova (2001) won the first New YorkerReaders Award. In 2001 Yale University recognized her lifetime achievement by awarding her its Bollingen Prize for Poetry.

Glück is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and currently serves as the Rosenkranz Writer-in-Residence in the Department of English at Yale University.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

Visiting Writing Series Announces Spring Speakers

The series begins February 1 with poet/novelist Kazim Ali and continues with novelist Ali Eteraz (February 15), Barry (March 1), poet Danez Smith (March 22), White (April 3), and Glück (April 18). Times and locations are below.

Dec 04 2017 Read more
AcademicsCommunity

Yoga Gives Lab School Students Time to Breathe

BY

PUBLISHED ON Mar 13 2017

 

 

It’s after lunch in 1990 Butler graduate Lisa Gundaker’s kindergarten/first-grade class at the IPS/Butler University Laboratory School, and that means it’s time for downward-facing dog, star pose, and tree position.

She turns off the lights and puts on a recording of forest sounds—crickets chirping, birds calling.

“Take a deep breath in,” she instructs. “Lower your arms and let your breath out.”

Most of her 20 or so students, who have scattered around the room, stretch and balance themselves silently as their teacher leads them through various yoga moves. Some curl up with little stuffed animals they call “breathing buddies” and rest quietly.

“Think about your day,” she says as she walks around the room spraying a lavender/peppermint mist. “Think about one positive thing that’s happened today.”

For these 10 minutes, a quiet calm takes over the room.

 

The yoga exercises Gundaker leads in her classroom are replicated daily throughout the Lab School—and have been since the elementary school reopened five years ago as a partnership between the Indianapolis Public Schools and Butler. The idea is to relieve stress, to give the students a chance to move purposefully, and teach them how to calm down and focus.

“It gives them a time to be by themselves,” Gundaker says later. “We’re together, we’re together, we’re together. We’d just come back from recess and lunch. My thinking about adding yoga to quiet times is that children learn to slow down and reflect. They get to know themselves better and they can take it home too.”

Yoga at the Lab School started when Heather Williams, then the administrative assistant, saw that some classrooms were struggling to stay focused. She started in one classroom and soon was in all of them. As the Lab School grew—it started with kindergarten and first grade and has added a grade every year—so did Williams’ responsibilities.

Today, her title is Yoga Instructor/Researcher, and she’s paid, in part, from a three-year, $150,000 grant from PNC Bank, a major supporter of the Lab School.

"PNC's signature philanthropic cause is early childhood education, which is supported through its Grow Up Great program," PNC Senior Vice President Jeff Kucer said. "The Lab School was a perfect fit for us."

Williams said the yoga program’s positive effects can be seen in students across the school. For some, like Ella, a student in Gundaker’s class, yoga is fun.

“I like yoga,” she says, “because it kind of makes you relax sometimes and it makes you focus. And it feels good.”

For others, yoga is vital. Williams tells the story of a Lab School student who has lost both parents to murder. He’s a quiet, soft-spoken kid, but when he gets worked up, no one can seem to quite get him back down, she said. They’ve done yoga together, and the boy’s grandmother has told Williams that he will go home and do the exercises on his own.

“There is a ton of scientific research backing up yoga, breathing, and mindfulness—how it not only helps academically but also with life skills,” she said. “Now there are a lot more people taking it seriously and doing the research on it to back that up. If you’re going to teach someone academics but you don’t teach them how to deal with emotions or teach them life skills, then you’re not teaching the whole child. If they don’t know how to deal with their inner struggles, it’s going to affect them one way or another.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

AcademicsCommunity

Yoga Gives Lab School Students Time to Breathe

It’s after lunch in 1990 Butler graduate Lisa Gundaker’s kindergarten/first-grade class at the IPS/Butler University Laboratory School, and that means it’s time for downward-facing dog, star pose, and tree position.

Mar 13 2017 Read more
Arts & CultureCommunity

Director In The Making: Julia Hren

BY Hannah Hartzell ’17

PUBLISHED ON Oct 12 2017

The Butler senior participated in the production of ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time.’

Things move swiftly in the theater world. That’s something Julia Hren ’18 can attest to. Last spring, the Theatre Production and Strategic Communications major was recommended for an internship at the Indianapolis Reparatory Theater (IRT).

Risa Brainin, the director of the production The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time,needed an assistant. Hren said she was interested.

Julia Hren in the lobby of the Indiana Repertory Theatre. She interned with the IRT during ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time.’

Three days later, Hren was sitting in on auditions. It only got busier from there.

“There were various Skype meetings with designers [over the summer],” Hren said. “Then, everyone got together to talk about preplans for the set and costumes…. It was very fast paced.”

Rehearsals began in late August and continued until opening night on September 22. (The show ran through October 14.) Somehow, Hren balanced the nine-hour-long rehearsal days with a full load of classes at Butler.

The experience came with struggles though—like a relapse of mononucleosis. Still, Hren said it was all worth it.

“It is one of the most touching shows I’ve ever read or seen,” she said. “When I first read the script, I actually cried. It’s so wonderful.”

The Incident, which won the 2015 Tony for Best Play, tells the story of an autistic teenager, Christopher, who witnesses a mysterious event and goes on a quest for the answers.

“The show is really moving,” she said. Perhaps even more so to Hren, who has been a part of the production from the beginning.

“[The cast and crew] really wanted me to get something out of this,” she said. “In the end, it was a wonderful process and one of the best experiences of my life.”

She also feels more prepared for life after Butler.

“Before, I would look at the IRT from the outside and think it looked cool. Now, I know how it functions … and the way [it] functions is incredible. The whole show came together in about a month.”

So, what’s the talented senior up to in the coming months? Probably recovering from mono and planning for graduation.

“My dream job is to do PR and advertising for a theater,” she said, before adding: “I also would also love to direct.”

Arts & CultureCommunity

Director In The Making: Julia Hren

Things move swiftly in the theater world. That’s something Julia Hren ’18 can attest to. Last spring, the Theatre Production and Strategic Communications major was recommended for an internship at the Indianapolis Reparatory Theater (IRT).

Oct 12 2017 Read more
Community

The Speak Easy, A Butler Partner, To Add Second Location

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 11 2017

The Speak Easy, a member based non-profit organization that brings established businesses and entrepreneurs together in the spirit of growth and acceleration, will open a second, downtown location this summer with founding partners Butler University, Bruce A. Bodner Company, Inc., and Nextech.

The Speak Easy Downtown will be located within the Mile Square in the historical Morrison Opera House building at 47 S. Meridian St. Its doors are scheduled to open July 2016.

Founded in 2011, The Speak Easy has graduated over 170 new companies from its Broad Ripple location. The approximately 300 active members of The Speak Easy range in size from small to medium sized locally owned businesses, to high-growth startups and established enterprise companies.

“When you look at research surrounding innovation hubs throughout the country, you find the most successful ones involve partnerships across multiple organizations with differing backgrounds,” said The Speak Easy Executive Director Danielle McDowell. “We want to accelerate the growth of these companies by convening the right players in our community – like Butler, Bodner, and Nextech – to set The Speak Easy apart as an institution for collaboration, not just business incubation.”

Like its Broad Ripple location, the Speak Easy Downtown will provide an inspirational and collaborative environment for entrepreneurs; however, it’s strategic focus will extend beyond early-stage companies and offer resources and programs to fuel the success of companies in the growing and scaling stages. In addition, with founding partners Nextech and Butler, the focus will expand beyond the current community of entrepreneurs to also include Indy’s next generation of innovators and business leaders.

“Thanks to our partners, the Speak Easy Downtown will be a hub of mentorship and critical business resources such as education, funding, and talent,” added Andy Clark, Board Chairman and co-founder of The Speak Easy. “This project is about serving our community of entrepreneurs by giving them the space and the resources to grow.”

The new location will offer co-working concepts, reservable desks, and small-office micro leasing. In collaboration with founding partners, the space will include programming, education opportunities, and exposure to collaboration resources needed to accelerate business.

“Butler University is passionate about innovation and community,” said Butler President James M. Danko. “This new partnership with the Speak Easy Downtown will allow us to further our support of Central Indiana businesses and entrepreneurs, while also providing exceptional opportunities for our students, faculty, and alumni to connect and collaborate.”

The Speak Easy was founded in 2011 with a mission to cultivate the healthiest entrepreneurial ecosystem, anywhere. Since openings its doors to the Indianapolis community five years ago, it has brought together active and engaged entrepreneurs at every stage of business.

For more information on the Speak Easy, visit https://www.speakeasyindy.com/.

Community

The Speak Easy, A Butler Partner, To Add Second Location

The Speak Easy, a member based non-profit organization that brings established businesses and entrepreneurs together in the spirit of growth and acceleration, will open a second, downtown location this summer with founding partners Butler University, Bruce A. Bodner Company, Inc., and Nextech.

Sep 11 2017 Read more
CTS
CampusCommunity

Butler University Expands with Purchase of CTS Campus

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 19 2017

Butler University just got a bit larger—40 acres larger.

Butler has completed the purchase of 40 acres of property and buildings from Christian Theological Seminary (CTS), both schools announced on Wednesday, December 20, 2017.

Butler’s College of Education (COE) will move into the main building on the CTS campus beginning with the 2018–2019 academic year. CTS will continue to reside on campus—in a part of the main building, counseling center, and apartments—through a special long-term lease. CTS will also retain ownership of a parcel of land on the far west side of the property on Michigan Road.

A benefit for both

Though Butler and CTS will continue to be independent, both schools say this collaboration is a major benefit.

“This purchase supports the momentum of our current strategy and future vision, providing Butler with new physical space for growth as we seek to further enhance the University’s academic experience,” Butler President James Danko says. “This partnership offers many benefits and creates opportunity to explore how we can best serve the needs of CTS, Butler, and our broader communities.”

Under the agreement, Butler plans to provide both campuses with services, such as grounds maintenance, the cost of which both schools will share.

“Put simply, this is a bold move that enables CTS to be good stewards of our physical and financial resources for the benefit of preparing transformative leaders for the church and community,” CTS Interim President Bill Kincaid says. “This agreement represents an opportunity to ensure the mission of CTS will continue for many generations to come.”

An innovative space

While COE will be the first to occupy the newly acquired space, Butler continues to explore ways to expand and enhance its innovative educational vision both on campus and in the community through the investment in the CTS space. Renovations to the main building on the CTS campus are set to begin after January 1 and will revolve around classrooms and faculty offices, as well as improvements to technology and accessibility.

“We may be the first college physically moving to CTS, but this purchase has the potential to enhance Butler’s position as an innovative leader in all aspects of education,” COE Dean Ena Shelley says. “This space will afford our entire University the chance to further our commitment to transformative student-centered learning.”

Shared history and mission

Butler and CTS have a history.

In 1855, the two institutions were founded as a single entity, North Western Christian University. They separated formally in 1958 when Butler’s religion department split from the University and formed what would become today’s CTS.

Since then, CTS and Butler have remained independent, but they have shared a rich and dynamic history of educating students to prepare them for rewarding and meaningful lives. Along the way, the two schools have collaborated academically, programmatically, and through shared services.

 

Media contact:
Rachel Stern
rstern@butler.edu
317-940-9257

CTS
CampusCommunity

Butler University Expands with Purchase of CTS Campus

Butler has completed the purchase of 40 acres of property and buildings from Christian Theological Seminary (CTS), both schools announced on Wednesday, December 20, 2017.

Dec 19 2017 Read more
Community

Butler Alums Make a Successful Hand-Off

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 01 2017

Bruce Scifres replaces Ed Tinder at the CYO.

When Ed Tinder ’71 decided to retire as Executive Director of the Catholic Youth Organization (CYO) in the Archdiocese of Indianapolis—a position he held for 33 years—he hoped someone with excellent credentials would want to take over.

He got his wish when Bruce Scifres ’79 was hired. That’s Bruce Scifres who coached local high school football for 37 years, winning seven state championships in 27 years at Roncalli High School. The Bruce Scifres who was inducted into the Butler Athletic Hall of Fame in 2007.

“That a coach like this, as prominent as he is, was interested in this position pumped my chest up because it shows that what you tried to build over 33 years is attractive,” Tinder said, sitting across from Scifres. “There were 80 applicants for the job. When somebody like Bruce, a Hall of Famer, applies, you feel like the job is pretty important.”

Tinder was doubly happy because Scifres is a Butler guy.

“I think there’s something to the Butler Way,” Tinder said. “Being part of a community like Butler for the years you’re in school, I think you adopt an outlook on life, about how you’re going to lead your life, in every aspect. You adopt an attitude of helping people and service. That maybe got our feet in the door as Head Football Coach at a high school or Executive Director of CYO. It’s just the mindset on life, the attitude on life we got while we were at Butler.”

*

By his sophomore year at Butler, Ed Tinder knew he wanted to teach and coach. He credits his Butler coaches—Tony Hinkle, Bill Sylvester, Don Benbow, and others—with that. “These were individuals I just wanted to be like. I wanted to help people.”

After graduating with a major in Education, Tinder was hired at Roncalli High School, where he taught Social Studies, World History, Economics, and Drivers’ Education for nine years and was Head Football Coach from 1977–1979. (He took over from Bill Kuntz ’50, who played football at Butler, and his successor at Roncalli as Head Football Coach was Bill Kuntz’s son Bill Jr. ’75, another Butler grad.)

In spring 1980, Tinder moved to the CYO. He worked for four years under Bill Kuntz Sr., then became Executive Director.

Tinder said 15,000-20,000 young people in third grade through high school participate in CYO activities, which include 13 sports, music competitions, science fairs, hobby fairs, a chess program, and more. The Executive Director oversees a $5 million budget and answers to a 21-member board.

“You are, to a large extent, creating the climate in which all the activities are going to take place,” he said. “This is how we’re going to do things. So you take a little bit of that outlook on life gained through your education and your time spent at Butler University in the classroom and on the athletic fields and that becomes part of you when you administer a program like CYO.”

Tinder said he loved the job because people “are invested, and they’re emotional. That’s where I got my fuel for continuing for 33 years, to be able to work with people and interact through those kinds of emotions. I enjoyed it immensely. I miss a great deal of it, but you know when it’s time to move on.”

*

Bruce Scifres, who took over in June at the CYO, said he sees his role as a continuation of what Tinder established.

“I love it here,” he said, “and Ed has been amazing in helping. He’s answered tons of questions. Beyond that, if a Director is judged by the people he has hired to work for the organization, Ed Tinder was a master of his trade. The culture he developed here I feel blessed to be a part of.”

Scifres started at Butler as a Business Administration major—”It took a second-semester Accounting class to help me decide I didn’t like certain aspects of that”—and finished by majoring in Social Studies and Education.

A year after graduation, he was hired at Roncalli. He spent three years there, then moved over to public schools for seven years. In 1990, he returned to Roncalli as the Football Coach and Social Studies teacher. (He later taught weight training and was Assistant Dean of Students.) Part of his duties were Field Manager of the school’s football stadium, where he spent most Sundays. “I saw a lot of CYO games,” he said.

He also watched plenty of the games in which his two sons and two daughters played.

Scifres said he was attracted to the CYO job because “we’re doing something worthwhile. We’re doing something to help other people. That’s why people get into education. What other job could I do at this point in my life that would have as much of an influence on young people?”

Scifres turned 60 in February, and he knows he doesn’t have 33 years to devote to the CYO. But he said he plans to give his all to the role.

“As a coach, part of your job is to teach kids how to play a game—strategy, get them in shape, organize, practice hard every day, and teach them how to win,” he said. “But I’ve always thought the more important part was to teach kids how to live their lives. They should strive each day to give their best to be the person God created them to be and make their parents proud and do all the things they have an opportunity to do through athletics.”

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

Butler Alums Make a Successful Hand-Off

When Ed Tinder ’71 decided to retire as Executive Director of the Catholic Youth Organization (CYO) in the Archdiocese of Indianapolis—a position he held for 33 years—he hoped someone with excellent credentials would want to take over. He got his wish when Bruce Scifres ’79 was hired.

Dec 01 2017 Read more
AcademicsCommunity

Wherefore Art Thou, Juliet Blue? In a Butler Chemistry Lab

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 02 2017

A “happy accident” leads to a scientific discovery.

In a couple of weeks, some chemists in Verona, Italy, are going to find out what’s been happening in a Butler University Chemistry lab, and they’re going to be grateful.

They’re going to be notified that junior Ben Dawson, working with Chemistry Professor Anne Wilson this past summer, has replicated a pigment that matched a color called Juliet blue that the Italian chemists had discovered on historical artifacts.

“I think they’ll be excited that somebody’s actually making these,” Wilson said. “People have been talking about these pigments but not making them.”

The Italian scientists’ discovery of Juliet blue goes back to 2010. They laid out the problem in a paper they published: Their museum had placed several ancient flints, used for making arrowheads, in storage. They had put the flints in a drawer, on rubber mats to keep them from breaking. When they opened the drawer, they found that a chemical reaction had occurred. The flints, which were gray, had turned blue—a color the chemists would later call Juliet blue.

The chemists thought the color on the flints was derived from a volatile organic component that was coming from the rubber mats, and that the culprit was a stabilizer that’s added to keep the rubber from falling apart over time.

Dr. Greg Smith, the Otto N. Frenzel III Senior Conservation Scientist at the Indianapolis Museum of Art, read the Italians’ paper and gave a copy to Wilson, asking if she thought someone at Butler might want to try to figure out a synthesis for Juliet blue. She thought that would be a great summer project for a student, so she had Dawson try to make the pigment. She paid him with an annual grant the Chemistry Department receives from Eli Lilly and Co. to do synthetic chemistry work.

“Initially, we were not having a lot of success” trying to re-create the chemical reaction that caused the discoloration, Wilson said. “Then Ben left out some things over the weekend, and some of his indicator plates had turned blue.”

Juliet blue.

“It was a very happy accident,” Wilson said.

Dawson confirmed that the way this blue pigment occurred on the surface of the flints was probably due to a combination of air oxidation, coupled with some contamination from the compound in the rubber mats. And he able to make additional quantities of the pigment.

“It’s a beautiful blue,” Wilson said. “It looks very Disney. It’s beautiful. It’s a great blue. It’s a lot of fun to be doing this and to see these great colors.”

Although reproducing Juliet blue is essentially an academic exercise, Wilson said, it could have practical applications. Butler Chemistry professors and students have done several projects with the Indianapolis Museum of Art on artworks that have faded over the centuries. Perhaps, Wilson said, this summer’s finding could be a step in figuring out how to treat, and possibly restore, artifacts that have been damaged.

“It’s exciting when you get scientists from different areas together and they start talking and trading ideas,” she said. “I think we’re very fortunate to be this close to the lab at the IMA. I think we’re very fortunate to be able to try things.”

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

AcademicsCommunity

Wherefore Art Thou, Juliet Blue? In a Butler Chemistry Lab

Chemists in Verona, Italy, will find out what’s been happening in a Butler University Chemistry lab.

Oct 02 2017 Read more
Dinner

Dinner with 10 Bulldogs

Megan Ward MS ’13

from Spring 2018

It’s not about the location or the menu for that matter. I mean, let’s not kid ourselves—college students are all about a home-cooked meal. But, what a Dinner with 10 Bulldogs is really about is the energy and connections made between students and alumni. 

Just ask Bryan Brenner ’95, CEO of FirstPerson and current Butler Trustee, who was hooked after hosting a dinner. “I’ve hosted a few of these because they inspire me—the eagerness of students to connect ... It reminds me to go for big goals in my own life and to encourage others.” 

Curious how Butler students feel about Dinner with 10 Bulldogs? Look no further than Logan Schwering ’18, who has engaged with alumni in various contexts, but says the Dinner with 10 Bulldogs is the most memorable. “It’s motivating and inspiring to see how much success Butler alumni have achieved. The dinners lead to connections that last a lifetime.” 

In Schwering’s case, it also led to an internship with FirstPerson. As Brenner puts it, 

“[The dinner] gives us access to great future talent! It’s also a great opportunity to reconnect to the purpose and values of Butler. I’ve instilled those values in my company. ” 

These values—trust, collaboration, and innovation, to name a few— are important to Butler students and many seek those values in an employer. It should come as no surprise, then, that FirstPerson has seven Butler alumni on staff and several Butler interns. 

So what kind of company is FirstPerson? It’s an Indianapolis-based strategic business advisory that helps organizations of all sizes become better businesses by developing smarter people strategies. Their core solutions—benefits and compensation, leadership and infrastructure, and community and culture—help organizations design meaningful employment experiences, resulting in healthier employees and a more productive business. 

“I do market research, benchmarking, sales support, and build community partnerships,” Schwering explained of his internship role, where he assists the small group team (clients with less than 200 employees). And with so many Butler alumni on staff, I wasn’t shocked to learn that Schwering reports to one—Alli Isaacs ’10, who is a Strategist in the organization. 

His connection to Butler alumni at FirstPerson doesn’t end there. Schwering was introduced to FirstPerson by Mark Minner ’12, a Managing Director with the company. Minner and Schwering met through their mutual involvement in Phi Delta Theta. Schwering’s role in Student Government Association (SGA) also gave him opportunities to speak with and present to Butler Trustees, including Brenner. 

About a year later, FirstPerson hosted a Dinner with 10 Bulldogs event and Schwering attended. He interacted with Brenner and Minner at the dinner and, as they say, the rest is history. 

For those of you thinking about hosting a Dinner with 10 Bulldogs, Brenner has some advice: “Do it! You’ll be energized by the rich personalities of Butler students, and their capacity for understanding the world around them. You’ll remember why you love Butler, and discover new ways to engage with your alma mater.” 

Still on the fence? Schwering reassures me that Butler students want to hear about your Butler experience. He also added, “If it’s the food selection that has you worried, fear not. Anything homemade or from a restaurant is likely better than what we would have eaten in the dining hall or made on our own.” 

See, I told you it wasn’t about the menu. 

We Need You!

Collaborate with and inspire Butler students while making connections that will last a lifetime. To host a Dinner With 10 Bulldogs, please visit butler.edu/busf/dinner-10-bulldogs. You will be energized to reconnect with Butler while encouraging students to “go for big dreams.” 

Dinner
GivingPeopleCommunity

Dinner with 10 Bulldogs

On the menu: trust, collaboration, innovation, and connections

by Megan Ward MS ’13

from Spring 2018

Read more

Growing Community Connections

By Morgan Skeries '20

An Indianapolis Community Requirement, also known as an ICR, is a learning experience that integrates classroom knowledge with activities in the Indianapolis community. Students are required to take one course in any part of the university that involves active engagement with the Indianapolis community, and there are many classes that offer this.

Grace Bowling, junior strategic communications major, explains that an ICR helps students to learn more about Indianapolis and the way it is unique to other cities. “An Indianapolis community requirement is a way that Butler students can broaden their horizons and make themselves well rounded students,” Grace said. “It is a way that we can reach out to the community we live in and impact them on a deeper level.”

ICR’s are a great way to push Butler University students out of their comfort zones. Moreover, Grace said it was important to be apart of something that is bigger than herself. By fulfilling her ICR requirement in a science course, called “The World of Plants,” and by partnering with students at the Indianapolis School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, she found that she loved connecting with the students. She found that she really enjoyed the experience and being able to get involved into the community.

“A lot of what we did was very hands on,” Grace said. “For example, our ICR required a project that helped us connect with students from ISBVI. We made butterflies with them, planted plants in their personal butterfly garden, and explored the Indianapolis Zoo's Butterfly Garden.”

The experience really impacted her positively and showed her that doing something bigger than herself is always important to pursue. “I loved getting to know the community better and learning more about the place that I live in,” she said.

Want to learn more? Information all about ICRs can be found on Butler University’s Indianapolis community requirement page.

Green House
Student LifeCommunity

Growing Community Connections

Indianapolis Community Requirement’s are a great way to push Butler University students out of their comfort zones.

Green House

Growing Community Connections

By Morgan Skeries '20
Community

President James M. Danko on SB 12

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 28 2019

Just as we did as a University back in August, we continue to stand for, and support, strong hate crimes law. The specific language that made SB 12 a strong, comprehensive, and therefore, effective, hate crimes bill, was removed, rendering it unenforceable, unjust, and therefore, unacceptable. That’s why I called Indiana House Speaker Brian Bosma to express the time is long overdue to remove Indiana from the list of five states without sufficient hate crimes law that the majority of Hoosiers support. I have signed on with other area leaders in a letter to Legislative Leadership making it abundantly clear how important a real bill that protects everyone is. Butler was founded on the ideals of inclusivity, respect, and making sure we provide an open and tolerant environment for all. That is our responsibility and duty. Those are our values and principles.

 

Student Choice and Student Voice: One Grad's Path to Success

By Brittany Bluthardt '20

“Did you see this?” Butler University staff members said as they celebrated one of many student success stories this spring.

Michele Eaton, a Butler alumna and Indianapolis educator, didn’t expect to become an Education Week “Leader to Learn From” after she left campus in 2008. She began her professional career prepared, but she didn’t know what her future success would entail.

Despite her current passion for the field, Eaton didn’t always want to pursue education. She originally had dreams of becoming an engineer but was discouraged by a teacher at a young age. Eaton didn’t let this affect her future. She eventually found her calling at Butler University.

“I knew the impact one person could have, positive or negative,” Eaton said. “I wanted to be the teacher that encouraged a student to follow their dreams, and I would help them to get there.”

After receiving her degree in Secondary Education, Eaton kick-started her career and taught in Indianapolis as a second-grade teacher. Ena Shelley, dean of the college of education, remembers her as academically talented, eager to learn, and a quiet leader. She was very happy to hear of Eaton’s honor, but she wasn’t surprised.

“I wish she could've heard our excitement because people were so proud of her,” Shelley said. “In a time when there are so many challenges in education, she was a message of hope and inspiration for the whole college to keep going.”

Eaton accomplished her goal of becoming an educator and became a second grade teacher after earning her degree at Butler. She took an online class for her master’s degree while teaching. From the completely online program, she earned a master’s degree in education with a focus in technology.

“I was so enamoured with the program and the professional connections that I was able to make without ever meeting anyone face to face,” she described. “I quickly became an advocate. Online learning was something I could get behind.”

A few years later in 2012, Eaton became the virtual education specialist for MSD Wayne Township. Shortly she was promoted to director of virtual and blended learning, a position created specifically for Eaton’s interests and skill set. Eaton helps direct the Achieve Virtual Education Academy, an online school for students to receive a high school diploma outside of the classroom. She trains teachers from across the state on blended learning, a combination of online schooling and face-to-face interaction.

Despite Eaton’s experience in education, the program had a rocky start with low engagement and interest. The teachers tried various techniques, but nothing worked. Eaton knew they needed to think about the academy from a different perspective.

“My first instinct was to throw out a ton of ideas, but this was something I’d never actually done myself in the classroom. I took a step back and said, ‘Let’s be students.’” And with that idea in mind, she began to study who they were serving.

She collected data and feedback from the teachers and redesigned their techniques to fit each individual. What they learned was that the academy students come from various backgrounds, ethnicities, and ages; over half of the students are adults. To accommodate this nontraditional student, Eaton worked with the teachers to recreate the program and revolutionize student’s thoughts of online learning.  The academy now allows students to recover lost credits, accelerate their learning, and earn an official high school degree -- not a lesser equivalent.

The proof of Eaton’s success in the numbers. Total graduating students rose from six in 2011 to 30 last year.

“There’s not a one-size fit all solution for any student or any classroom, but when you’re talking about a specialized population that you find in a virtual school, you can’t just create something and hope for the average,” Eaton said. “The more that we can personalize the experience for our students, the more success that we’re going to find.”

“Student voice and student choice” is one of Eaton’s main teaching philosophies. Although technology is inevitable for online learning, she doesn’t think of the internet as an educational barrier.

“It’s not about entertainment, it’s about doing work that I care about -- doing work that matters,” she said. “I think that if we help students find their voice, we can help students learn how to be advocates for their own learning. Technology is a catalyst for that type of work.”

Eaton’s passion for helping students flourished at Butler. College of education majors experience hours of student-teaching in classrooms across the city. Eaton said this lead to professional connections with other teachers and leaders in the field. Her advice for current and future students pursuing education is to get connected.

“It is too hard of a job to do on an island,” Eaton said. “Learn how to network. Butler makes that possible, so when you leave that is something you can continue to pursue.”

Eaton kept her strong connections. One of her mentors from Butler University is professor Arthur Hochman, who even today she still turns to for advice. Hochman knew she was impressive from the start, and he remembers her unwavering energy and focus. From a few notes he kept while Eaton was in school, he reminisces on his visit to her classroom during her first year of teaching.

“I spoke to her principal on the way into the school, who warned me that she had a really challenging group of children,” he wrote. “I came in expecting the usual first-year teacher chaos but instead I saw order and innovation. The class had a clear sense of community, and you could not have found a more joyful teacher standing in front of a group of young children. I will never forget what Michele whispered to me: ‘I must have gotten an easy class as a first year teacher, because these kids come to school every day ready to learn.’”

Hochman said this is only the beginning for Eaton. Dr. Shelley hopes she will return to Butler to speak about her success or become a mentor for future educators. A part of the COE’s vision statement is to challenge the status quo, and Eaton does just that.

“She embodies this can-do, must-do spirit of giving back and moving people forward,” Dr. Shelley said. “It’s that quiet leadership of bringing people along, not forcing them, but helping them to see how it works. That’s a gift. That’s a true leader.”

As for the future, Eaton hopes to continue improving and growing as an educator. Above all, she thanks Butler for helping her to reach this point in her career. When asked, she says doesn’t have just one favorite memory as a student -- she just remembers the people.

“Butler is all about community,” Eaton said. “I think that was one of the best things about coming here and certainly something that won’t leave me.”

PeopleCommunity

Student Choice and Student Voice: One Grad's Path to Success

Michele Eaton, a Butler alumna and Indianapolis educator, didn’t expect to become an Education Week “Leader to Learn From” after she left campus in 2008.

#FTK: Butler University Dance Marathon

By Malachi White '20

BUDM#FTK, For The Kids, is a popular hashtag that is often taken out of context and used in a jokingly ironic way. However, at Butler #FTK is taken very seriously. We do care about the people we are serving in our community. One of the ways we show this is by hosting our annual Butler University Dance Marathon.

Dance Marathon is a multi-hour, multi-faceted event that blends dancing, games, crafts, food, and fun into one philanthropic experience. Students are on their feet the entire duration of the marathon as they stand for the kids at Riley. Funds for Dance Marathons are raised in a variety of ways. The main way funds are raised for Dance Marathons is through personal donations from friends, family, and the community either online or offline.

My friend Phil Faso, a sophomore at Butler, says he thoroughly enjoyed participating for his first time this year. “It personally impacted my life because I’ve done similar things before but not to such a great extent and it was very heartwarming.” Phil said. “It’s for an amazing cause and everyone should be aware of what we can do to help other people in need.”

Butler University Dance Marathon, or BUDM, is sponsored by Butler’s SGA. Their mission statement is “to engage the students of Butler University in striving to improve the quality of life for the children and families of Riley Hospital for Children.” This student-led organization works throughout the school year and summer to raise money to support cancer research performed at the hospital. Our money also helps the hospital continue its tradition of treating all patients, regardless of financial concerns.

Holding this organization close to her heart and platform, Annie Foster is a junior chemistry and Spanish double major, and has worked with BUDM since her first year on campus. “As soon as I joined, I knew this organization was about something bigger than I could ever imagine,” Annie said. “Supporting this organization means joining a movement to give hope back to the kids.” She started as a morale committee member during her first year. Her sophomore and junior years she worked on the executive board as Director of Fundraising. She will close her time at Butler as the Vice President of Finance. All students have the opportunity to be on the executive board by attending call out meetings, being actively annually, and showing commitment to the cause.

“From the start I knew I wanted to join the executive board and make a difference in this organization. BUDM has given my college experience meaning,” Annie said. “Being on a college campus comes with feeling of being in a bubble, secluded from the world around you. Getting involved in BUDM brings you out of that bubble and into the real world. It provides a new perspective, it teaches you about the power of hope, and it allows you to become apart of something larger than yourself.”BUDM

Inspired by the ability to make a change, Taylor Murray is a senior pharmacy major and served on the executive board of BUDM this past year. He realized that his impact on a family in need superseded monetary support for the cause. “I saw the joy and hope, especially, that support and simply dancing can bring to a child, or families face regardless of the amount of money raised that year,” Taylor said. “That was something that truly made me want to continue my involvement with the organization and the cause as a whole.”

As co-director of the morale committee Taylor says that “this committee meshed my love for dancing, with that of wanting to bring happiness and energy to those who may need it most.”

“Prospective students may not have had a Dance Marathon at their high school, and/or did not even know it was happening/what it is when they step foot onto Butler’s Campus,” Taylor said.  “From the outside, it may look like another organization at block party, but once you step out and begin to talk to those who have experienced it or been involved, one can realize it is more than an organization, it is a family.”

This year BUDM raised $301,576 for Riley Children’s Hospital and Butler celebrates being the second largest fundraising school in undergraduate schools with less than 12,000 students. Taylor tells his story and experience with BUDM by sharing how he has grown since his first year at Butler. He hopes that after he graduates he will be able to come back to people who have found their passions and act upon them to make their own Butler experiences special.

“From my experiences with BUDM, I have come to realize that I can be a leader, but a leader that doesn’t necessarily have to be the loudest or most successful in the room, but a leader who can lead by example and as one with the others,” Taylor said. “My advice to prospective students is if you do not know what you what in life, finding and driving toward your passion(s) will open up new avenues and opportunities you never would have thought existed.”

BUDM
Student LifeCampusCommunity

#FTK: Butler University Dance Marathon

#FTK, For The Kids, is a popular hashtag that is often taken out of context and used in a jokingly ironic way. However, at Butler #FTK is taken very seriously. 

Antiretrovirals and Intentionality

Emily Yarman ’17

“I’m too early. Typical,” I thought as I sat silently in my car, eagerly waiting for the day to begin. On the first day of my elective rotation, I arrived at the Damien Center in downtown Indianapolis fifteen minutes before the doors to the building were unlocked. I would spend the next month at Indiana’s largest AIDS service organization in their sister clinic, Damien Cares, seeing patients with HIV and AIDS. Although I love being early on my first day, this has led to a great deal of waiting in my car. As I sat there, the engine gently purring, I wondered what the month would hold. I quizzed myself on what I knew about HIV: the risk factors, the pathophysiology, the medications used to treat it and how they work. I stopped mentally drilling myself when I realized that I didn’t actually know much about the day-to-day life of a patient with HIV. I had studied the disease enough to pass the test, but I hadn’t had an opportunity to really get to know any patients with HIV.

I thought about the struggles patients with HIV in the US have had since the 1980s. I had learned about the social implications of HIV and I wondered what emotional hardships these patients had been through. I already knew that my month at the Damien Cares clinic would teach me a great deal about medical management of patients with HIV. I realized then, while sitting in my idling car, that it would also deepen my knowledge about how to care for a patient as a whole person.

My first patient was a gentleman in his early 50’s. He had been on ART (anti-retroviral therapy) for years and came to the office for a visit as an established patient. I followed my preceptor, Randall McDavid, NP, into the exam room and introduced myself. After a pretty uneventful follow-up visit, Randall and I sat down in his office. He turned to me and asked, “If you saw that man walking down the street, would you think he had HIV?” I quickly responded, “No, I wouldn’t.” This patient did not look like he was HIV-positive. Neither did my second patient. Or my third patient. As someone that recognizes the damage that stereotypes can cause, I’m always trying to purge myself of my presuppositions about people. As I saw more patients on that first day, I realized I had failed to do just that; I had unconsciously built up presuppositions about how an HIV-patient would look or act. I expected patients with HIV to appear much more sick than this gentleman had.

I was reminded on this rotation that by unconsciously pigeonholing a patient, I set myself up for failure as a provider. Even something as simple as having preconceived notions about what an HIV patient looks like can affect the way I practice medicine. There are certain risk factors that make a patient more likely to acquire the illness, but HIV still affects every sex, gender, age, race, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status. Embarking on the slippery slope of making assumptions about patients can lead to big mistakes in forming treatment and prevention plans for them. By making assumptions about patients, I also miss out on the opportunity to get to know and learn from them, which could benefit my future patients. It seems simple, but it is easy to overlook the fact that everyone suffers when providers make assumptions, especially in a patient population as diverse as the HIV community. There is no one face of HIV. This month, I have been learning to stop giving it one.

***

I held the diaphragm of my stethoscope over his left chest and heard the thunderous, rapid lub-dub of his heart. I finished my physical exam and told Randall that everything was within normal limits, except his heart, which was beating quickly. The patient shifted uncomfortably in his chair when we asked him questions about his sexual habits. He laughed nervously when we inquired about drug use. This was the typical behavior of a patient new to the clinic.

New patients with HIV experience a spectrum of emotions during that first visit, including fear and anxiety. Their anxieties include questions about what it means to have HIV, if they can afford the treatment, and ultimately, if it will kill them. They are nervous about if the people they meet at the clinic will judge or chide them. Their fear of being rebuked is legitimate; decades after HIV showed up in the US, it still carries a stigma and is very closeted. The medical and social concerns that a new HIV patient has culminate into a patient presentation like the one I described above: visibly restless and apprehensive about being honest with their provider.

An established patient with HIV, however, is a foil of a new patient with HIV. While new patients tend to be restless and apprehensive, many established patients are calm and relaxed. Long-time HIV-positive patients understand that if they are compliant with their medications, their life can be much like the life of a person that is HIV-negative. They are happy to see Randall and talk about their social and sexual histories with ease. The visit becomes less about HIV and more about friendly conversation and getting to know each other. During physical exam, their hearts beat at a regular rate again.

Some of this release of anxiety in patients is because of patient education about the disease and the effectiveness of HIV medications. HIV pharmacotherapy has progressed a great deal since the 1980s. Many patients with HIV take just one pill per day and have an undetectable blood viral load. Causes of death in the HIV population are increasingly due to chronic illness, like most of the US, and less due to immunological compromise because we diagnose and treat earlier. The average life expectancy of an HIV-positive patient is the same as an HIV-negative patient. When patients learn about these advances in our understanding and treatment of HIV, many of their fears are quelled. This, however, is only a part of the cause for calm in established patients.

The other, bigger, part of the relief of anxiety for established patients with HIV is the relationship that they build with their provider. The care that Randall provides his patients is non-judgmental. He talks comfortably about patient’s sexual habits and drug use without scolding them. I have watched patient’s anxiety melt away during office visits because of the relaxed demeanor. This allows the patient to be honest, which enables Randall to take better care of them. I have observed that this kind of therapeutic relationship is the key to success for patients at the clinic. The patients that are most healthy are patients that have built this kind of relationship with Randall. In the presence of empathetic medical care, the patient’s viral load and anxiety both drop. Randall always says “HIV is a relationships disease,” and he’s right. Because HIV is a physically and socially taxing disease, it is best treated with appropriate medical therapy and a caring heart.

***

Seeing established patients with HIV gives me so much hope during those initial patient visits at the clinic. As a future physician assistant, I have the opportunity to be part of what brings that hope to fruition. I can walk with patients on their journey to have an undetectable viral load and an unbroken spirit. This month, I have learned that even in in the face of a disease that used to be a death sentence, there is hope on the horizon through proper medical treatment and a truly therapeutic relationship. Serving patients in this way, however, is not simple. It requires a concerted effort on the part of the provider to be intentional about the medical and emotional care they offer. I have learned that part of that intentional care is to resist pigeonholing patients and to actively dismantle stereotypes that we create. I have learned that it means listening and responding in a way that creates a comfortable environment for the patient to be honest in, regardless of any social stigma involved. Truly treating a patient as a whole person requires all of these things and nothing less.

A Chance to Be Heard

Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

from Fall 2018

Harper, a 3-year-old in a pink jacket with tan sleeves, is supposed to have her hearing checked, but she’s having none of it. Margaret Fries ’19, a Butler senior from St. Louis majoring in audiology, is trying to coax Harper to raise her hand when she hears a tone through the headphones she’s wearing.

“It’s not scary,” says Fries, one of nine Butler Communication Sciences and Disorders students at Children’s Day In preschool to administer speech and hearing tests as part of Professor Ann Bilodeau’s Community Screenings class. “I promise.”

Harper sits silent and stone-faced, so Fries tries Plan B—a set of rubber-tipped darts known as play audiometry. Fries shows her the set of green darts with blue suction tips. She tells Harper to hold a dart up to her ear and then stand it on the table after she hears a tone.

Before long, Harper is actively participating. When she’s finished, she utters two words to Fries: “Thank you.” “It started out a little tough,” Fries says afterward, “but you just have to change up methods. We always like to start with raising their hands—that’s just the easiest way—but most younger kids don’t do that, or don’t want to do that. So then we move on to play audiometry. If that doesn’t work, high-fives or some way of getting them to recognize they are hearing the sound is next. It sometimes takes a while.”

Fries and her classmates have gotten plenty of practice. During the spring 2018 semester, they administered more than 500 speech and hearing tests at almost a dozen locations. Nearly a quarter of the children they tested needed some kind of follow-up attention.

Bilodeau, Director of the Butler Speech and Language Clinic, says what they’re doing in this preschool and other places they visit fills a gap in the healthcare system. Typically, children are screened for hearing and speech disorders from birth to age 3, and then again when they’re in school. But from ages 3-5, services aren’t readily available.

“There aren’t enough speech-language pathologists to see all the kids who need to be seen,” she says. “All the preschool directors are so grateful, the teachers are so lovely when we come, and the parents are lovely.”

At this preschool, located at a United Methodist Church near 54th and Illinois streets in Indianapolis, the Butler students are separated into two rooms. One is for hearing tests, which are administered using an audiometer, a machine that measures the ability to hear different sounds, pitches, and frequencies, and one is for speech.

Breanna Corbin ’19, a senior from Indianapolis studying to be a Speech-Language Pathologist, is in the speech room, working with a preschooler named Ruben. She opens a colorful book and points to the pictures.

“This is the woman’s …”

“Foot!” Ruben says.

“And you write with …”

“A pencil!”

Dozens of questions follow. While Corbin is administering the test, Shelby Miller ’19, a senior from Fishers, Indiana, who’s studying to be a Speech-Language Pathologist, explains that the Butler students in this room are checking to make sure the preschoolers can produce specific words and sounds and can identify colors, shapes, and body parts. They evaluate the children based on articulation, fluency, and voice intelligibility.

They also see whether the preschoolers can carry on a conversation. Ruben certainly can. When he coughs, Corbin asks if he needs a tissue. She helps him blow his nose. Ruben tells her that when it’s time to use hand sanitizer, he holds his hands together. “Like a book!”

“When I first started doing this,” Corbin says afterward, “it took a lot of adjusting. I’d never worked with kids before, so it required adjusting to what the kids say. They’re going to be silly, but that’s how kids are. Now, it’s knowing what to expect, knowing that you’ve got to be patient. You have to take time to talk to them but also keep them on track.”

By the time the Butler students have finished their work at Children’s Day In, they will have seen nearly 40 children. Christy Whaley, who runs the preschool program, says Butler is providing an important and much needed community service.

“I’m a teacher at heart,” she says, “so my former background wants the Butler students to encourage the students to come in and let us be their guinea pigs. And it really works out—the parents love having the opportunity to have their children have free screenings. This is a perfect age group for the students and a perfect setting.”

Whaley said every time Butler Communication Sciences and Disorders students have visited her preschool, they have diagnosed at least one preschooler who needs further attention.

“Even if you catch just one a year, it’s worth having,” she said.

The Butler students all will go on to graduate school for advanced degrees in Audiology and Speech Pathology. Courtney Rooker ’19 a senior from St. Joseph, Michigan, said getting into the community to administer these tests gives them needed experience.

“In Butler’s program, you get a lot of hands-on opportunities in the clinic, at school, and then here,” she says. “Kids can be anxious and nervous and difficult to work with, so that’s definitely been a huge learning curve for me, especially the patience part of it and teaching them what to do. But this is an amazing experience that Butler offers.”

 

 

Community

A Chance to Be Heard

Taking Butler to the Community

by Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

from Fall 2018

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PeopleCommunity

As Female Veteran Population Grows, So Do Their Healthcare Needs

BY Rachel Stern

PUBLISHED ON Nov 12 2018

 

 

INDIANAPOLIS—Veronica Vernon has, essentially, two jobs.

The Butler University Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice spends about half her time teaching student pharmacists and student physician assistants in the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, and the rest of her time is spent at the Richard L. Roudebush VA Medical Center in Indianapolis. At the VA, where she has worked since 2011, she sees Iraq veterans, Afghanistan veterans, male veterans, and transgender veterans. But there was one segment of the population she noticed she was seeing more and more of: female veterans.

The total veteran population is projected to decline from 20.0 million in 2015 to 11.9 million in 2045, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs. And male veterans are expected to diminish by nearly half over that same time period. But despite all of this, the number of female veterans has been on the rise, and is projected to continue going in that direction.

However, Vernon says, services have not necessarily matched that trend.

“For the foreseeable future, there will be more and more female veterans coming through the VA and we need to adapt and learn how to provide the best possible care for them, just as we have done for men,” Vernon says. “A team-based approach to care of female veterans is required. The VA desires to be a leader in women’s healthcare.”

So Vernon, who specializes in women’s health, took matters into her own hands. She, along with Butler graduates Maggie Meuleman and Christina White, and Butler undergraduate Sarah Lenahan, assessed menopausal symptom management by a clinical pharmacist at the Indianapolis VA.

Their research, which they just presented at the annual North American Menopause Society Conference, showed that female veterans who received care for menopausal symptoms by a clinical pharmacist specializing in women’s health, saw a significant decrease in symptoms.

“We saw major resolution for these patients at the end of this specialized care,” Vernon says. “That highlights two important things. One, pharmacists bring a real value to the healthcare team when it comes to managing disease states. And two, which is probably even more important, is that most VA’s don’t have a pharmacist who focuses on women’s health issues. Women’s healthcare is a rapidly growing area in the vet population and the more we focus on it, evidently, the better off patients will be. This population deserves the best possible care and we need to start giving that.”

From August 2013 to August 2017, Vernon and her team tracked a total of 121 patients at the Richard L. Roudebush VA Medical Center in Indianapolis. The average age of the female veteran patients was 52.

When Vernon and her team started seeing patients, the average number of hot flashes or night sweats reported was 11.9 per day. After a year of being treated by the team of pharmacists dedicated to women’s health, the average number of hot flashes or night sweats reported was 1.4.

The percentage of patients reporting vaginal dryness, irritation, and pain during intercourse prior to pharmacist management was 57 percent. After a year of pharmacist management, the average was 6.6 percent.

In all, 88.4 percent of patients who had vaginal dryness, irritation, and pain during intercourse, saw resolution, Vernon says. The team followed up with patients, on average, every three weeks, and used different therapies depending on the situation. Some therapies were hormonal agents, non-pharmacological, Gabapentin, and Clonidine.

“Physicians have limited time to fully dive into the different obstacles patients are facing and then counsel the patient all the time. We believe this research shows the power of having a pharmacist as part of the care team,” Lenahan says. “After the initial diagnosis is made by the primary care physician, the pharmacist can enter the picture and manage the disease state from there in a much more specialized, specific way.”

And nowhere is the power of this continuity of care clearer that at the VA, Vernon says, where female veterans are on the rise, yet there is a real gap when it comes to adequate services. Many providers at the VA have never had a female patient so there is a discomfort and lack of knowledge when it comes to treating things, such as menopausal symptoms, she says.

But as this segment continues to grow, the reality is that providers at the VA will have to treat a female veteran. Having a system in place that utilizes the pharmacist fully, Vernon says, clearly produces results that will benefit patients.

“Our research shows the power of the right care,” she says. “Most VA’s don’t have a pharmacist that focuses on women’s health but the hope is that this data shows how impactful it is, and as this population grows, awareness too grows, in hopes our female veterans get the best possible care. This is about improving access for female vets.”

Media contact:
Rachel Stern
Director of Strategic Communications
rstern@butler.edu
914-815-5656

PeopleCommunity

As Female Veteran Population Grows, So Do Their Healthcare Needs

The number of female veterans has been on the rise, and is projected to continue going in that direction.

Nov 12 2018 Read more

An Enterprising Pediatrician Expands His Mentors’ Influence

Monica Holb ’09

Scientific theories comprise some of the lessons Butler University students receive in Gallahue Hall. One, for example, is Hubble’s law, which describes the expanding universe. In the law’s equation—velocity = H x distance— the H stands for Hubble’s constant. 

But if that equation were adjusted to explain the expanding influence of Butler’s science departments in the universe, the H might stand for Hole: Dr. Michael Hole ’08. 

 

Hole graduated from Butler less than a decade ago; received his MD and MBA from Stanford University; and spent time in Ecuador, Guatemala, Uganda, and Haiti. Now a pediatrician and clinical fellow at Harvard, Hole is committed to improving life trajectories for the poorest children. Around the world, many children are better off because of Butler scientists’ influence on Hole. 

“The part of science I like is its potential impact on the human experience beyond the classrooms and laboratories. Scientists, often humbly behind the scenes, make life better for each of us,” Hole said. “The mentors I had at Butler pushed me to apply their teaching outside the classroom, which led me to Timmy Global Health.”

Hole, who founded the Butler chapter of Timmy Global Health, an organization fighting for global health equity, credits his professors for shaping his work. Mentors such as Professors Bob Pribush, Thomas Dolan, Shelley Etnier, Phil Villani, Carmen Salsbury, and John Esteb taught him the minutiae of biology and chemistry, while placing the learning in a broader context. 

“You may think that learning how a muscle contracts is silly as a student. But imagine you understand that and can apply it for someone whose muscles aren’t working. You can help them work better,” Hole said. 

When Hole worked with a medical service team in Ecuador, he saw the effects of developing-world poverty on human suffering. “That broke my heart,” he said. The experience moved Hole to focus on becoming a physician for underprivileged children. 

“The Butler Way, if you will, supported me to take on leadership positions and to start organizations aimed at those social injustices,” Hole said. 

This support, particularly from Pribush and the late President Bobby Fong, allowed Hole to begin a fundraising campaign to build a school in Uganda. After raising $50,000 and partnering with Building Tomorrow, an organization providing access to education in hard-to-reach areas, Hole is proud to say the school now serves 350 children. The students, aged 4 to 14, learn science among other subjects, and the Butler influence continues its expansion. 

Hole has since kept in touch with his Butler science mentors. “They have been instrumental in helping me think about how to increase the impact of the missions of the organizations I’ve created,” he said. 

Among those organizations is StreetCred. As a pediatrician, Hole sees the negative impact of poverty on children’s health. He lamented that resources were available, but inaccessible. StreetCred helps parents file their taxes and apply for and access the benefits they can put toward children’s health—and it is all done in the doctor’s waiting room. 

“Butler had patience with me. They taught me and got me fired up about scientific thinking because of the implications it could have on human suffering. What is unique is that they are not only interested in scientific thinking, but are experts in mentorship; they are experts in trying to understand what gets me out of bed in the morning so they can apply their expertise to that,” Hole said. 

Yet, the biology major who became a doctor doesn’t necessarily think of himself as a scientist. 

“What I do is mostly social. If you find a cure for cancer, but you can’t get it to the poorest people, there is a gap. That is my passion—figuring out how to use the brilliant minds and breakthroughs of scientists and getting it to the people who need it most.” 

For children around the world, the universe is indeed expanding, leading to health and opportunity—in large part because of the Butler scientists who continue to influence Dr. Hole.

PeopleCommunity

An Enterprising Pediatrician Expands His Mentors’ Influence

Around the world, many children are better off because of Butler scientists’ influence on Hole. 

The Path Began at Butler

Patricia Snyder Pickett '82, APR

The recent addition of the Healthcare and Business major to Butler University’s College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences reflects the evolving needs within the life sciences industry. Many of these students will go straight into jobs at pharmaceutical or medical device companies, healthcare IT, or public policy positions; others will be prepared to go into clinical graduate programs or pursue post-graduate programs in public health or hospital administration. 

When Lynne Zydowsky ’81 began pursuing her Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy at Butler University, no such combination major existed and her path seemed fairly clear cut. After graduation, she would probably return to the small town of Newton, Illinois and help run the family-owned drug store where she had worked for nearly as long as she remembered. Her father had followed the same path—including graduating from Butler—and it seemed a logical progression. 

Instead, at the urging of what she describes as the interested and insightful Butler Pharmacy School faculty, she received a doctorate in Chemistry from The Ohio State University and was a National Institutes of Health post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School. Because her career path kept merging with the business side of life sciences, she briefly considered entering an MBA program. “However, in the end, I really believed that I was learning a lot along the way, and that I had the innate desire to solve the problems at hand and was able to accomplish it in a positive and creative way,” she said. 

In the last 25 years, she has launched and built several successful life science companies, playing a key role in raising private capital, setting overall corporate strategy, and establishing and managing strategic alliances. Since 2003, she has owned her own business, Zydowsky Consultants, as well as served as Chief Science Advisor to the CEO for Alexandria Real Estate Equities Inc, a NYSE traded company. In addition, she co-founded the Alexandria Summit®, an invitation-only gathering that brings together the world’s foremost visionaries from the biopharma and tech industries; medical, academic, financial, philanthropic, advocacy groups; and government to discuss and take action on the most needed innovation in life sciences. 

She credits much of her success and subsequent leadership to a work ethic established in the family business that carried over to her years at Butler. “There was no doubt that my post-graduate work was going to be self-funded. Even while at Butler, I worked in the science library as a lab tech and at both Haag’s Drug Store and the Winona Hospital pharmacy,” she recounts. “I got my (pharmacy) license to practice in Indiana and Ohio after college because I had to support myself in graduate school. I learned to manage my time and work efficiently.” 

Her advice to those students considering a career in the life sciences? 

“You always have to be realistic about the opportunities at hand—even when I was getting my PhD I was thinking about my future job,” she said. “I’d really like to see students intern every summer in internships that are meaningful where they can experience different segments of business, science, or philanthropy and not wait until their last summer before graduation … why not do it every summer?” 

Zydowsky has lived in San Francisco since 1996, moving there initially for a position with a biotech company. She admits it took several years before she adjusted to living on the West Coast. Now? “I can’t imagine leaving,” she said. “Acceptance, social responsibility, and innovation are woven into the fabric of the city. There’s a feeling that no problem is too big to solve. Living here really changed me; it’s made me more open and creative in my thinking.”

PeopleCommunity

The Path Began at Butler

The recent addition of the Healthcare and Business major to Butler University’s College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences reflects the evolving needs within the life sciences industry.

The Path Began at Butler

Patricia Snyder Pickett '82, APR

Families in Residence

For most of us, the idea of raising a family in a residence hall on a college campus sounds, to put it mildly, challenging. But for many of Butler’s Faculty In Residence (known as FIRs), this challenge is well worth it. Celebrating nearly three decades, the FIR program places faculty members in residence halls with “learning communities” of approximately 80-120 students. Officially, FIRs host a minimum of two activities a month for their learning communities, to introduce students to campus and the city of Indianapolis. Activities might be shared meals, game nights, volunteer work, or attending lectures or sports events with students.

Unofficially and by choice, FIRs do much more. They lead lots of informal conversations in their living quarters, ranging from politics and entertainment to picking careers and Final Four teams. FIRs dispense cookies and encouragement to students cramming for exams, model the fun and challenge of family life, and offer a concerned adult ear to the homesick, the lovelorn, the questioning—even to parents emotionally overwhelmed at leaving their child on campus.

While not all FIRs have children in residence, many do. Sharing a family home with approximately 100 undergrads under your roof may seem daunting, but these communities become extensions of the FIR’s family. The unique living quarters provide extraordinarily unique opportunities for children of FIRs to see college life up close and for college students to see family life.

We asked Four Faculty in Residence to speak about what it’s like to raise children in this unique arrangement.

 


Meet the Families in Residence

Name: Catherine Pangan
Position at University: Associate Professor, College of Education
Names of Family members who live in residence: Roland, Hudson (13), Violet (7)
Residence Hall (current and past): Fairview, Resco, Schwitzer

What are the benefits of raising a family in this unique environment?
They are so fortunate to be around an enormous amount of role models doing extraordinary things every day. On a daily basis, they see students studying, working, enjoying friendships, struggling and succeeding.  They get to see what it is like for college students to grow, as they grow themselves! We also feel like we are in a mini-neighborhood within Butler. Ms. Janine Frainier and the bookstore staff, BUPD, and of course, Miss Denise, and the Starbucks staff have been extraordinarily supportive and kind throughout the entire experience. They feel like family as well.

What's it like to live in a neighborhood of only college-age students?
You age, but your neighbors don't. It is kind of like the fountain of youth!

As your children grow and become adults, what do you hope they will take from this experience?
I hope they feel connected to a community the same way they feel living at Butler.

Is there a story that you think exemplifies your family in residence experience?
I've told this story so many times, but when Hudson was four years old and learning to ride his bike, he was trying to make it down the whole length of Hampton. As he rode, he had students shouting "Go Hudson!" from sorority and fraternity windows - students were clapping for him on the street as he rode by, and then they let out a huge cheer for him when he made it to the end. I will never forget his smile when he made it, or the Butler students that helped him get to the end! If that doesn't exemplify the Butler Way, I'm not sure what does!

What's your commute like in the morning?
Short!

***

Name: John Esteb
Position at University: Chemistry Professor
Names of Family members who live in residence: 4 total (including me)
Residence Hall: Resco C-Wing

What are the benefits of raising a family in this unique environment?
The kids learn how to interact with adults and also are exposed to so many wonderful cultural events, speakers, shows, etc. that almost no other kid gets to experience on a regular basis

What's it like to live in a neighborhood of only college-age students?
There is constantly a lot of energy around and there is ALWAYS something going on!  It is a unique experience that we get to interact with them both inside and outside the classroom and help not only with their academic development but get to know them as the fun and talented people they are in their day to day life as well.

As your children grow and become adults, what do you hope they will take from this experience?
I hope that they see the value of the college experience (with everything that it entails) and also learn that everyone has strengths that they can showcase in their own unique ways when put into an environment that provides the right opportunities and fosters the development of skills and talents.

Is there a story that you think exemplifies your family in residence experience?
We have had many! Ranging from my son jumping around and singing along with students at a Butlerpalooza concert, to cheering on the Colts and my kids going crazy in the stands at the game with students that were die-hard Colts fans, to the kids competing with the students to see who would be willing to eat the wildest sushi order, to just hanging out with the students over cheesecake, bbq, cookies, donuts, etc. at the apartment!

What's your commute like in the morning?
Normally great (since I just walk in)! Haha!

***

Name: Ryan Flessner
Position at University: Associate Professor of Teacher Education (COE)
Names of Family members who live in residence: Courtney (wife), Abel (11), Adelyn (10)
Residence Hall (current and past): Fairview House (2016-present), Ross Hall (2013-2016)

What are the benefits of raising a family in this unique environment?
Our kids are surrounded by young adults who are working toward their goals on a daily basis while also enjoying each other's company and the beautiful campus on which we live. The kids have the opportunity to see college students find their way, develop friendships, and contribute to our community. Abel and Adelyn learned to ride their bikes on the mall, and they can always find a pick-up game of kickball with ever-ready college students. Who wouldn't want to grow up on this campus?!

What's it like to live in a neighborhood of only college-age students?
It's inspiring to see students finding their way in the world, discovering their passions, and contributing to the community. I'm a better professor because I see more than just the academic side of college life. In addition to their commitments to their studies, I see the students' commitments to campus and community organizations, their commitments to their network of friends and mentors, and their commitments to their future careers.

As your children grow and become adults, what do you hope they will take from this experience?
I hope my kids understand the privileges they have in life and the ways in which their experiences are shaping their futures. I hope they use their privilege to benefit others as they make their way in the world.

Is there a story that you think exemplifies your family in residence experience?
There are too many magical moments to count. We've been to the wedding of one of our RAs, we've been references for residents as they seek employment, and we've even helped a student learn to wrap holiday gifts! My favorite memory, however, is probably from a faculty dinner we hosted on our patio last fall. After the event with her professors that evening, one of our residents said, "This is why I came to Butler - so I could interact with the faculty and we could get to know each other as people." Making that moment possible for her was incredibly rewarding, and her gratitude was worth all of the effort we put into this role.

What's your commute like in the morning?
I love the fact that I can walk my kids to the bus and then walk across campus to my office. That 15-minute stroll is a great way to organize my thoughts as I transition into my teaching or my research.

***

Name: Erin Garriott
Position at University: Instructor in Special Education, College of Education
Names of Family members who live in residence: Scott Garriott (husband), Ella (15), Mae (9) and Weston (5)
Residence Hall (current and past): ResCo B-wing currently, Schweitzer for 2 years

What are the benefits of raising a family in this unique environment?
To have my kids surrounded by goal-centered, focused, kind, thoughtful BU students is priceless. We also think the access to sports, the arts, campus projects, and events are real benefits.

What's it like to live in a neighborhood of only college-age students?
It’s so much fun! There’s always something going on or conversations to join in on. We’ve been so lucky to live by wonderfully caring and kind students. We realize how much we rely on their energy to get through our days. When students aren’t here, we totally miss them!

As your children grow and become adults, what do you hope they will take from this experience?
I hope they will remember the time we got to spend together in our cozy living space. I hope they take with them the importance of working hard to reach a goal. We hardly ever go by a study lounge where there isn’t at least one student in there studying. Mostly, I really hope they take the amazing feeling of being part of something bigger than themselves. Butler is a really special place to be. I know my kids “know” that because of the conversations we’ve had about the people here and the experiences we’ve gotten to have with our residents.

Is there a story that you think exemplifies your family in residence experience?
There are sooooo many, from Ms. Denise getting Scott and I an anniversary cake to students leaving encouraging notes to our kids outside our door. The one that always sticks out though came from my husband Scott. As long as I’ve known him, I’ve always been an educator. He had often made comments about how I always had my students on my mind and he didn’t seem to understand how that happened. Fast forward 15 years...our first year as a FIR family was coming to an end. I mentioned one evening during dinner that classes were finishing up and students would be moving out soon. Scott said in a panic, “Do you think we’ll ever see Emma again?” And all evening, he would randomly ask things like, “I wonder if Allison got her summer job?” and “Do you think Helen will stop by to say good-bye?” My favorite one was, “I hope Rex (Hailey’s dad) knows he can stop by and see us anytime.” After just one year, he had experienced the relationships you build with young people and how it changes your life. He has a better sense of what it means to care deeply about a group of students; it was a lesson I could never teach but am so glad I got to see click.

What's your commute like in the morning?
Surprisingly, I drive to my office. I take my kids to their bus stop at 46th and Cornelius and then hustle to South Campus for class.

FamilyPeopleCommunity

Families in Residence

Sharing a family home with 100 undergrads under your roof may seem daunting, but they become family.

Marc Williams

A Philanthropic Vibe

Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

from Spring 2018

As a student, Marc Williams ’07 spent as much time as possible in Fairbanks, Room 050, working on his music and learning audio production. 

“I just threw myself into that,” he said. “Admittedly, I didn’t think of what it would be like for me after college. I was just so in love with having the opportunity to be hands-on with equipment I could never afford in my entire life. I thought that was such a great opportunity. I was all-in when it came to that.” 

What it’s been like since college has been a mix that takes advantage of Williams’ many talents. He is, depending on the time of day: A special-education teacher at Fishers (Indiana) High School; the on-court emcee at Butler Men’s Basketball home games; a recording artist and deejay (known as Mr. Kinetik; his latest record is called Voyager); event producer and promoter (Fam Jaaams, a family-oriented dance party, is his newest event); and Adjunct Professor at Butler, where he teaches “A World of Hip-Hop,” a course on the global impact of rap culture. Not to mention husband and father. 

The through line for all of this? Butler. 

“Butler is where I was able to figure out who I really wanted to be,” he said. “As I was learning new information, I was able to form a more detailed perspective about myself and my place in the world. I met people from all over the world, had support from incredible people, and was able to experience things in ways I really never imagined.” 

Williams came to Butler from Dayton, Ohio, in 2003—two years after his sister Danielle—for the Engineering Dual Degree Program. When that major didn’t fit, he switched to Recording Industry Studies. 

“Best decision I made in college in terms of academics,” he said. 

After graduation, Williams went back to Dayton to work for a car dealership management software company, then returned to Indianapolis in 2008 for a job with a company that sold copy machines. “I hated every part of it,” he said. 

He saw an ad on Career Builder for a transition-to-teaching program. “I thought, I like young people and I like working with people and watching them become better,” he said. “I thought it would be nice to do because there were so many educators who had helped teach me. I thought it would be a cool thing to do and give back. A philanthropic vibe. I thought I was going to save the world from a classroom.” 

Williams is now in his 10th year of teaching at Fishers, where his classes include Algebra 1, English 10, and a basic reading/writing skills class—and he has found his niche. He approaches teaching this way: Students are like plants. Some of them will grow fast, some will take a while, some will take more work than others, some might not grow the way you want them to. 

He approaches his role as on-court emcee—a position he pioneered during the 2009–2010 season—with the same kind of thoughtfulness. “I’m not really the center of attention, as much as it may seem like it. I just want people to be engaged and have a good time and establish an environment that helps the team play better.” 

And just as Williams enjoys helping to excite the Hinkle Fieldhouse crowd, he’s just as happy to have a chance to spend time at his alma mater. 

“Butler is my home away from home,” Williams said. “I hope I’ll always have a way to be somewhere around 4600 Sunset Avenue for the rest of my life.” 

Marc Williams
GivingPeopleCommunity

A Philanthropic Vibe

"I thought I was going to save the world from a classroom.”

by Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

from Spring 2018

Read more
Arts & CulturePeopleCommunity

Angela Brown Sings Again in Celebration Concert

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 08 2018

Indianapolis-based soprano Angela Brown, who had taken some time off due to vocal stress, returns to the stage for a free concert on Sunday, February 25, at 7:30 PM at Butler University's Schrott Center for the Arts as part of the Celebration of African-American Music Concert.

The concert will feature Brown, Butler University choirs, and the Eastern Star Church Choir performing together and separately songs such as "This Little Light of Mine," "Wade in the Water," and "Lift Every Voice and Sing."

The Celebration of African-American Music Concert, pioneered by Jeremiah Marcèle Sanders MM '17 in collaboration with the Efroymson Diversity Center, Mu Phi Epsilon and the School of Music, celebrates the vast wealth of African-American culture through singing.

"Our singing is a tool for increasing the awareness of the oppression under which African slaves were brought to this land," Sanders said. "We wish that all see a day in which we celebrate a reconciliation of racial injustice. Until that day arrives, we rejoice in hope, sing in unity of mind and spirit, and educate toward equality."

Brown, a Butler University Visiting Guest Artist during the 2017–2018 academic year, sang on the Grammy-winning recording of "Ask Your Mama,” composer Laura Karpman’s setting of the poem by Langston Hughes of the same title. She also co-starred in the new American opera Charlie Parker’s Yardbird in the 2015 world-premiere performance with Opera Philadelphia.

She reprised the role of Addie Parker in historic performances at The Apollo in New York City in 2016, for Lyric Opera of Chicago and Madison Opera, and in London at The Hackney Empire in 2017.

This season includes solo appearances with the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra, Venice Symphony Orchestra, Fayetteville Symphony Orchestra, and Duisberger Philharmonic (Germany) as well as performances of Opera…from a Sistah’s Point of View in the United States.

The Butler choirs will be conducted by John Perkins, Associate Director of Choral Activities, who joined the University in 2014. Perkins previously served at the American University of Sharjah (UAE) from 2008-2014. Perkins’ teaching and research centers around broadening reasons for choral musicking, including social justice education. In pursuit of these goals, in the spring of 2016 he created a transnational course entitled "Peacebuilding through Choral Singing."

Sherri Garrison, who conducts the Eastern Star Church, Cooper Road campus, has been the Minister of Music there for the last 30 years. During her tenure at Eastern Star Church, she has overseen six choirs, of which she taught and directed five, two praise teams, two dance ministries, and a full music staff.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

Arts & CulturePeopleCommunity

Angela Brown Sings Again in Celebration Concert

Performance will feature the great soprano along with Butler choirs and the Eastern Star Church choir.

Feb 08 2018 Read more
Arts & CultureCommunity

Butler to Celebrate 100 Years of Bernstein

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 09 2018

Butler University's Jordan College of the Arts will mark the 100th anniversary of the birth of American composer, conductor, author, and lecturer Leonard Bernstein with a series of performances throughout 2018, beginning with the Butler Symphony Orchestra performing the Overture to Candide on February 24 at the Schrott Center for the Arts.

“Leonard Bernstein’s legacy was the passion he brought to his music, whether in the role of creator/composer, performer/conductor, or teacher/author," said Lisa Brooks, Dean of Butler's Jordan College of the Arts. "There are very few musicians alive today who have not been somehow influenced by his genius.”

In addition to the performances, the Butler University School of Music will offer an undergraduate course called Topics in Nineteenth-Century Music: Mahler and Bernstein, taught by Dr. Clare Carrasco in the fall.

Bernstein received an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Butler in 1976.

Here is the list of performances honoring the Maestro, who was born August 25, 1918, and died October 14, 1990.

Spring 2018

Music at Butler Series: Butler Symphony Orchestra performs the Overture to Candide, Saturday, February 24, 7:30 PM, Schrott Center for the Arts.

Music at Butler Series: Wind Ensemble presents Symphonic Dances from West Side Story, Sunday, February 25, 3:00 PM, Schrott Center for the Arts.

Butler Opera Theatre and Butler Symphony Orchestra present Trouble in Tahiti, Friday and Saturday, April 13–14, 7:30 PM, Schrott Center for the Arts.

Neighborhood Concert Series: Wind Ensemble performs Candide Suite, Thursday, April 26, 7:00 PM, Schrott Center for the Arts.

Music at Butler Series: Choral Concert, choruses from The Lark for choir, percussion, countertenor soloist, Sunday, April 29, 3:00 PM, Schrott Center for the Arts.

Fall 2018

Wayne Wentzel Lecture Series: Dr. Carol Oja, Harvard University, Tuesday, October 16. Time and venue to be announced.

Neighborhood Concert Series: Jazz Ensemble and Butler Symphony Orchestra performing a newly commissioned medley of Bernstein works for studio orchestra, Thursday October 18, 7:30 PM, Schrott Center for the Arts.

Music at Butler Series: Butler Symphony Orchestra playing Symphony No. 1 (“Jeremiah”), with School of Music faculty member Kirsten Gunlogson, mezzo-soprano, Sunday, October 21, 3:00 PM, Clowes Memorial Hall.

Neighborhood Concert Series: Wind Ensemble performs A White House Cantata with two vocal soloists (soprano and baritone) from the Marine Band and a small chorus; Prelude, Fugue, and Riffs, with clarinet soloist from the Marine Band; and On the Waterfront Suite transcription, Thursday, November 15, 7:30 PM, Schrott Center for the Arts.

 

(Photo from leonardbernstein.com)

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

Arts & CultureCommunity

Butler to Celebrate 100 Years of Bernstein

Events in the series begin February 24.

Feb 09 2018 Read more

Scholarship: The Joel Cornette Scholarship Fund

Patricia Snyder Pickett '82, APR

When legendary Coach Tony Hinkle first touted The Butler Way, it was the pinnacle for which to strive—not just on the court, but throughout life, long after hanging up the uniform. The Butler Way demands commitment, denies selfishness and accepts reality, yet seeks constant improvement while promoting the good of the team above self. 

Joel Cornette ’03 embodied The Butler Way both during his time at Butler University and his post-graduate years. He was a member of the first Bulldog Sweet 16 team in 2003; his 144 career blocks and .544 career field goal percentage also rank among the Top 10 in Butler history. He later served as a member of the Butler coaching staff from for the 2006–2007 season as the team’s Coordinator of Basketball Operations before going to Iowa as a member of Todd Lickliter’s staff. He was an NBPA-certified player-agent, serving as the Director of Basketball recruiting for Priority Sports since January 2012. 

Tragically, Cornette passed away of natural causes last August at age 35. It was a loss that shook his family and friends to the core, as well as both the Butler community and peers in the world of athletics. 

In the wake of such an inexplicable loss, those who loved him most chose to commemorate him in a means of which they knew he would approve. The Joel Cornette Scholarship Fund was established by his family and Butler University to provide support for future Bulldogs. 

“Through the generous support of our donors, we’ve been able to establish this scholarship program/fund, that will guarantee there will be monies available for deserving student athletes now and into the future,” said Ken LaRose, Associate Athletic Director for Development. “We are able to pay tribute to these special people while offering the gift of education to our student athletes.” 

As a testament to this inspiring young man, at least five Butler head coaches (past and present), immediately donated to the fund along with scores of others, expediting the scholarship to be fully funded at the endowed level of $50,000. 

“We could never out give what he gave to the institution,” said Todd Lickliter, Cornette’s coach while at Butler. “It was such an honor to have been involved with him, and the scholarship will continue his good works.” 

Lickliter points to a well-known mantra often emphasized by former Lacy School of Business Dean Richard Fetter: “If you do well, do good.” 

“Joel did both,” he said. “He epitomized what it meant to be a true student athlete. Not only did he earn a distinguished degree, but he opened the door for others through his play on the court as well as his ability to articulate his vision and what Butler meant to him. He naturally drew people to the institution. He did well, and he did good.” 

 

Contributions in Joel’s honor may be made online or by check to Butler University Advancement, 4600 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis, IN 46208. 

AthleticsGivingCommunity

Scholarship: The Joel Cornette Scholarship Fund

Scholarship: The Joel Cornette Scholarship Fund

Patricia Snyder Pickett '82, APR
Community

Cybersecurity, An $87 Billion Industry and Growing

BY Marc Allan

PUBLISHED ON Feb 20 2019

Keny Ramirez and Linet Rivas visited Butler University on Tuesday, February 12, thinking they might be interested in some kind of computer career. They left feeling even more certain.

The 10th graders from Shortridge High School made the trip to campus to participate in The Alliance Cybersecurity Converge Tour, a three-hour exploration of potential jobs in computer security, along with lessons in how to protect themselves from scammers.

"I'm definitely thinking about it," says Ramirez.

The event was part of a partnership between Security Advisor Alliance (SAA), a nonprofit serving the cybersecurity industry, and Butler's Information Technology office. SAA approached Eric Schmidt, Butler's Chief Information Security Officer, who thought the session would be a good way to bring students to campus and give them information about potential careers.

Shortridge and Purdue Polytechnic High School brought about 40 students total to the Reilly Room, where they heard some startling statistics about the cybersecurity industry, played a game of Capture the Flag (on computers, of course), and heard from professionals about career options.

The students heard that cybersecurity is an $87 billion industry annually, and it's growing by 30 percent a year. Gaming, by comparison, is a $70 billion industry, growing by 5 percent a year. Not only that, but 1.5 million computer security jobs are currently open, as the industry tries to stop the $2 trillion in cybercrime that takes place each year.

The industry is looking for more women, and more people of diverse backgrounds. Diverse backgrounds, they were told, equals diversity of solutions for stopping hackers.

They also heard about scams like "vishing"—people who pretend to be from reputable companies and get their victims to reveal personal information like credit card and social security numbers—and were schooled in the benefits of "password hygiene"—creating a password that cannot be easily guessed.

Sidney Plaza, Executive Director of SAA, says her organization wants students to understand that hacking into computers is just one way thieves steal information. Sometimes, people unknowingly give away their information.

"It's the human element," Plaza says. "It's not just 1's and 0's; it's people making decisions."

Taft Davis, who teaches engineering and computer science at Shortridge, said the International Baccalaureate school is adding cybersecurity courses next year. He wanted his students to attend the session at Butler to give them an idea of what cybersecurity is and gauge their interest in a career.

"Like they said, it's a wide-open market out there, and it's just going to get bigger," Davis says. "Every company needs protection."

Community

Cybersecurity, An $87 Billion Industry and Growing

1.5 million computer security jobs are open, as the industry combats $2 trillion in cybercrime annually.  

Feb 20 2019 Read more

Stream Lines

Marc Allan

from Spring 2016

The Impact of Water

Walk in Holcomb Gardens these days and you’ll see a series of red lines, mirrors, backwards words, and a pedestal in the center where visitors can stand. There are poems written on the mirrors, as well as facts about the Indianapolis water system. And there are even jokes: What is a tree that looks different on both sides? Asymmetry. 

They’re all part of StreamLines, an interactive project that merges art and science to advance the Indianapolis community’s understanding and appreciation of its waterways. 

StreamLines—in place for the next two years—was unveiled in September 2015. It’s the result of a $2.9 million National Science Foundation grant awarded to the Center for Urban Ecology at Butler University. 

The project features a collection of dance performances (choreographed by Butler Dance Professor Cynthia Pratt), musical recordings, poetry, and visual art tailored for sites along the six Indianapolis waterways—White River, Fall Creek, Central Canal, Little Eagle Creek, Pleasant Run, and Pogue’s Run. The art created for each site invites the community to learn, explore, and experience the science of local water systems. 

Also incorporated into the project is an interactive website (streamlines.org), smartphone app, and related programming to increase access, enhance interpretation, and provide expanded opportunities for learning. 

Spokesperson Ryan Puckett said the objective is to inform Indianapolis about its waterways, to understand the impact water has on us, and to recognize the impact we have on water. 

“We’re not trying to get somebody a PhD in the science of water,” he said. “We’re trying to go for things like getting people to understand that we all live in a watershed. In Indianapolis, we live in the White River Watershed. When a drop of water hits the ground here, it eventually flows into the White River, which ends up in the Mississippi River, which ends up in the Gulf of Mexico, which ends up in the ocean. So that connectivity to all those different waterways shows we can have some impact on the ocean.” 

Community

Stream Lines

by Marc Allan

from Spring 2016

Read more

When a Journalist's Questions Transform Care

Monica Holb ’09

When one begins his healthcare career following a tandem bike across the country, there is no telling where he’ll travel and what he’ll learn along the way. 

“Transformation is a never-ending journey,” John Doyle ’74, said. He may have been referencing the continuing changes of the healthcare industry; he may have been talking about his own career. 

Doyle, Executive Vice President of Ascension, the largest nonprofit healthcare system in the United States, also serves as President and CEO of Ascension Holdings and Ascension Holdings International. He has spent his career in healthcare, a science-heavy industry. But the journalist by training admits science was never his strong suit. 

While at Manual High School, Doyle was named Editor in Chief of the Manual Booster and advisor Jane Gable encouraged him to apply for a Pulliam family-sponsored Hilton U. Brown Journalism scholarship. Upon being awarded the scholarship, he made the choice to attend Butler University and study Journalism. 

The closest Doyle got to science at Butler was covering the 1973 opening of Gallahue Hall for The Collegian. The writer’s outside perspective has allowed him to advance in a scientific industry, asking the unconstrained questions to stimulate progress. That is a trait emblematic of both journalists and scientists. 

After writing for and editing The Collegian, and having spent his senior year as Editor in Chief, Doyle found himself with a post-graduate internship at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. St. Jude commissioned a husband and wife to ride a tandem bike across the country to raise awareness and funds for the organization dedicated to healing sick kids. Doyle’s job was to plan the ride, work with media contacts, make introductions, and lay the foundation for a continuing campaign. 

“It was an exciting thing,” Doyle said. “I took off in a new Chevy Impala loaded with a stack of McDonald’s coupons to generate interest and support for what was, at the time, the world’s largest childhood cancer research center.” Along the way, he learned more about the science behind saving children’s lives. Going to entertainer Danny Thomas’ world-renowned hospital had a lasting impact as Doyle saw staff so dedicated to the children. “It became a heartfelt mission.” 

Doyle credits long-time Chairman of the Butler Journalism Department Art Levin with instilling in him a passion for bringing important issues to people’s attention. And with the road trip, Doyle began a career in healthcare communications to bring awareness to important issues and seek new solutions. “I was thunderstruck with the importance of the work they were doing,” Doyle said of St. Vincent Health, part of Ascension, when he began his work there in 1996. 

As the industry endured changes, Doyle brought the science of marketing to the healthcare organizations he served. He was challenged by the perception of “merchandising” care, but knew consumers were increasingly making choices about where they would go for their care. 

Moving from communications to strategy, Doyle helped incubate the new ways healthcare systems provided care. He helped organizations rebuild their capacity to serve the community and to see the way forward to meet the needs of different populations. With his colleagues at Ascension beginning in 2000, he worked on systemwide efforts to improve the patient experience and to eliminate preventable injuries and deaths. During this time, Ascension made great foundational strides with innovative safety and quality initiatives that kept patients from being harmed during the course of care. Doyle was particularly drawn to the mission of faith-based care with a primary concern for the poor and vulnerable. Ascension provides nearly $2 billion of charity care and community benefit annually. 

Now, Doyle is learning from international care providers on how to transform healthcare in the United States. Doyle travels to India and the Cayman Islands with Ascension partners Narayana Health and Health City Cayman Islands to see how they can provide high-quality healthcare, particularly to the poor and vulnerable, at lower costs. While the United States spends more in healthcare than other countries, it does not see significantly higher positive outcomes. As CEO of Ascension Holdings International, Doyle is charged with sharing what has been learned at Ascension and bringing innovative lessons learned back to the United States.

“Over the years in my work, I’ve had the privilege of being a voice at the table, with the ability to ask how we might think differently to make things better,” he said.

Throughout the journey that began with raising awareness for a tandem bike ride across the country and to discovering new models to care for patients through international joint ventures, Doyle has continued asking questions. Whether that’s the journalist or the scientist in him, it’s helping transform healthcare.  He remains excited to ask, “What’s next?”

John lives with his wife, Barb, and daughter, Ginna, in St. Louis, Missouri. 

PeopleCommunity

When a Journalist's Questions Transform Care

When one begins his healthcare career following a tandem bike across the country, there is no telling where he’ll travel and what he’ll learn along the way.

Dave

Beam Me Up, Scottie

Patricia Pickett ’82 APR

from Spring 2018

A product of Butler University’s Radio/Television program (now part of the College of Communication), Dave Arland ’85 began his career working a graveyard shift at an automated radio station that played easy listening music … not exactly the stuff of which dreams are made. 

That rather inauspicious beginning led to big things that included working at the then top-rated news station in the city (WIBC), serving as the Press Secretary for four-term Indianapolis Mayor Bill Hudnut, and ultimately landing at Thomson/RCA in 1991 where he became Vice President of Global Consumer Marketing. One of those jobs you think you’ll be in forever—until you’re not. Dave Arland and company at CES“I was there 16 years, but the last five produced a major shift away from the consumer business to B2B,” he recounts. “Every week, I was getting additional budget cuts and having a difficult conversation with someone.” Eventually, his job was eliminated as well, and for the first time in a long time, his future wasn’t so certain. 

Friends encouraged him to launch his own firm—a rather daunting task if you’ve never run a business before. But another friend gave a stellar piece of advice: “What’s the worst that can happen? It’s an epic fail, and you go to work for some big company.” 

Arland started with one client that soon became three that became six. “We moved out of my spare bedroom and into this office about six years ago,” he says, nodding to the wall covered with his beloved deck of the Starship Enterprise (yes, he’s a Trekkie of galactic proportion). “I hired my first full-time employee and then a second. It just grew.” 

In January, Arland Communications celebrated its 10th anniversary. He has built upon the expertise in the consumer electronics industry gained through his time at Thomson/RCA to become a major player working for large manufacturers like LG and Panasonic (both in the U.S. and Japan), as well as the Consumer Technology Association that stages the annual CES. As one of the largest tradeshows in the world—with 185,000 attendees in Las Vegas for four days in a space equivalent to 47 Lucas Oil Stadiums—it garners hours of air time via reporters interested in the “next big thing.” 

Staying nimble and relevant in the fast-moving pace of electronics and technology can present a challenge in and of itself. Calling himself a “reluctant entrepreneur,” Arland credits Butler with the preparation that enabled him to succeed. 

“I picked Butler because of the Radio/Television program; they had a great intern program and offered substantial on-air experience,” he says. “It may not have prepared me for the exact place I am now, but I’d like to think Butler prepared me for new challenges and being willing to learn.” 

And willing to change. He continues, “You have to learn to not fall into the same old way you’ve done things. I keep up by hiring people younger and smarter than me ... they are amazing and do incredible work.” Among those people is Butler graduate Joshua Phelps ’12 as well as a rotation of interns from his alma mater that he touts as “fabulous.” 

Dave Arland in a StudebakerMore than three decades after he graduated, Arland offers three timeless pieces of advice: 

  • Find a way to work somewhere doing something so you get a taste of what the real world is like. It may not be the be-all-end-all, but you have to show initiative, be thorough, and find a way in. In my case, working late at night at an easy listening station led to other opportunities. 
  • If you are a student, immerse yourself in something but experience everything. I didn’t have the highest GPA; I wasn’t aiming for that. But I was very involved—from choir and marching band to the radio station to being an officer in my fraternity (Lambda Chi Alpha). 
  • Get out of your bubble. I took a class called “Change and Tradition” that was taught by noted professor Emma Lou Thornbrough. We were on opposite ends of the political and life spectrum, and I learned so much. If you’re a college Democrat and I bleed blue, or a college Republican and bleed red, get out of your bubble to listen and respect other opinions. The world is not a bubble just for what you want to hear. 
Dave
PeopleCommunity

Beam Me Up, Scottie

“Immerse yourself in something but experience everything.” 

by Patricia Pickett ’82 APR

from Spring 2018

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An Innovative Partnership

Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

Tim Valentine and Joshua Gaal started Train 918, their video-production company, at Butler. But after graduating in 2016, they needed a home base.

They found it at the Broad Ripple Speak Easy, which bills itself as "a place for entrepreneurs to create, collaborate, and learn."

The Broad Ripple Speak Easy only offers community space, though, and with their business growing, the Train 918 partners needed dedicated office space. So they moved to the downtown Indianapolis Speak Easy—of which Butler University is a founding partner—where they have an office and a secure place for their equipment. Not only that, but they work alongside lawyers, graphic designers, programmers, and others trying to build new businesses. The opportunities to collaborate are abundant.

"What's nice about the Speak Easy is the community," Valentine said. "If you ever have a question, there's tons of people that are here as resources. I can't tell you the amount of times I get up and walk across to the guy next door, who's a venture capitalist, and ask him a question about an email I'm going to send or a marketing strategy or anything like that. Everyone's here trying to help each other out to get to that next step."

Butler got involved with the Speak Easy in 2016 when the business was looking to expand beyond its Broad Ripple location. Andy Clark MBA '99, a founder of the Broad Ripple Speak Easy, approached the University with the idea of a partnership downtown.

Melissa Beckwith, Butler's Vice President for Strategy and Innovation, Chief Information Officer Pete Williams, and Lacy School of Business Dean Steve Standifird saw the potential.

"What an interesting opportunity from the standpoint of experiential education," said Beckwith, who's now a Speak Easy board member. "If you have this very entrepreneurial co-working space with all of these companies, it is another way to connect Lacy School of Business students into the working environment of these companies. There are all kinds of possibilities for internships and job placements. It's another way to connect our students with the business community."

The downtown Speak Easy, located at 47 South Meridian Street, is situated in a 12,000-square-foot space. With its exposed brick and pipes, rustic woodwork, and large common area where members can avail themselves of coffee and beer, it looks like something you'd expect to see in Seattle or Silicon Valley.

Travis Herring, Speak Easy Experience Manager, said the downtown venue has 17 offices with tenants. (Over all, the Speak Easy now has about 1,000 members and five locations in Central Indiana.)

Herring sees the space as a middle ground for fledgling businesses for whom working from a coffee shop might not be conducive to doing business but renting a large office might be too expensive. Membership costs $75 a month, or $750 a year (office space is additional), and gives members access to community space in the five Speak Easy locations.

Valentine said the office that Train 918 rents for about $1,200 a month has been "100 percent worth it. We as a company make that back monthly—easily—just by the connections that we make."

Beckwith said the Speak Easy partnership has been worth it for Butler too. Butler students have been able to get involved with companies housed at the Speak Easy. Representatives from some of the companies have come to campus to work with students in the Real Business Experience classes. The Small Business Development Center, which became part of Butler on January 1, is housed in the Speak Easy. And the Speak Easy and Butler's Executive Education program are working to develop a non-degree certificate program for Speak Easy members.

"There are so many benefits for us partnering with startups and creating synergies we can potentially offer beyond academic," she said. "This is giving us an opportunity to be in the middle of a lot of companies."

Innovative Partnership
Community

An Innovative Partnership

"Everyone's here trying to help each other out to get to that next step."

Innovative Partnership

An Innovative Partnership

Marc D. Allan MFA ’18
Max

That's the Ticket

Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

from Spring 2018

In October 1956, Schumacher was finishing a two-year stint in the Army and thinking about what to do with his Journalism degree from Butler. He picked up a copy of the Indianapolis Star—he had his subscription forwarded to Fort Sheridan, Illinois, where he was stationed—and read a one-paragraph news brief reporting that Marjorie Smyth, the ticket manager for the Indianapolis Indians baseball team, was leaving. 

Schumacher called his mentor, J.R. Townshend Sr., who knew Frank McKinney Sr., the Indians’ Chairman of the Board, to help him arrange an interview. That December, Schumacher went to McKinney’s Fidelity Bank office on East Market Street. After a brief conversation, McKinney wrote a note on a little piece of paper and told Schumacher to take the note to Ray Johnston, the team’s General Manager. 

“He didn’t put it in an envelope,” Schumacher said. “He just handed it to me. He wrote something like: ‘This is the young man I talked to you about for the open position at the ballpark.’” 

Schumacher took the paper to Johnston. He was hired. 

Over the next dozen years, Schumacher advanced from Ticket Manager to Public Relations Director to General Manager to President and Chairman—a position he held for 47 years until he retired at the end of 2016. In that time, the Indians won 19 divisions and eight league championships, turned a profit for 42 consecutive years after periods of financial losses, and moved into a downtown Indianapolis ballpark still considered one of the best in America. 

“After I graduated from Butler, I thought I’d get a regular job—work for the Star, maybe—or be in somebody’s PR department or putting together publications for some corporation,” he said. “This just dropped in my lap.” 

Truly a Butler Family 

Schumacher grew up at 44th Street and Winthrop Avenue in Indianapolis, his academic future seemingly preordained. His father, a musician, and his mother, who worked in a downtown department store and later at a bank, both went to Butler when the campus was in Irvington. His two older sisters preceded him on the Fairview campus. “I never thought about anything else other than Butler,” he said. 

As a sophomore at Shortridge High School, where his classmates included future U.S. Senator Richard Lugar and author Dan Wakefield, Schumacher became interested in Journalism. He also played second base on the Shortridge team, which was coached by Jerry Steiner, a 1940 Butler graduate and future Butler Athletic Hall of Fame inductee. Steiner accompanied Schumacher on a visit to ask Tony Hinkle about an athletic scholarship. They arrived to find Hinkle cutting the grass, his leg in a cast—the result of a lawnmower accident from a previous session mowing the baseball field. 

Schumacher remembers Hinkle’s response. “He said, ‘Well, kiddo’—everybody was ‘kiddo’—‘we have a great school here. It’s a wonderful school. We announce when baseball practice starts, and you can come out for ball.’ He didn’t say baseball. And away we go. Long story short, that’s what I did.” 

Schumacher drove his 1936 Chevrolet Coupe the two miles to Butler (later upgrading to a ’41 Pontiac), where he studied Journalism and walked on to the baseball team. He was surprised at his first game when Hinkle called out, “Hey, Schuey, coach third base.” He did that for two years before earning some playing time in his last two years. (His best game, four hits in four at-bats against DePauw was overshadowed by teammate Norm Ellenberger, who threw a no-hitter that day.) 

When Schumacher wasn’t playing ball, he was in class or writing for The Butler Collegian. He worked his way up to Editor, but when the boss at his summer job—public relations for Junior Baseball, a citywide youth baseball program—asked him to stay on during the school year, Schumacher chose the paying job. 

Time to Go to Work 

That turned out to be the right decision: The man who ran Junior Baseball, J.R. Townsend Sr., would later provide the introduction to Frank McKinney Sr. with the Indianapolis Indians. 

By his senior year, Schumacher also had a second job with the Indianapolis Times. He took calls from sports correspondents at high schools, gathering information for box scores and game stories. He also wrote his own stories occasionally—like on the night of March 20, 1954, when he was sent to the tiny town of Milan to see if there was anyone around. (Almost everyone was in Indianapolis, watching their team win the state high school basketball championship.) 

“I loved that,” Schumacher said. “I really loved that. That got me hooked on Journalism.” 

With what he learned in classes, on The Collegian, and through his outside jobs, he graduated with skills that translated well for what was to come next. 

“I thought at the typewriter better than longhand, so to have correspondence that had to go out to somebody for Indians’ business, I could sit down and compose a coherent letter and fire it into the mail to them,” he said. “I was very happy with my education. It helped me develop the necessary skills to be successful, and I had what it took to get started.” 

Building a Franchise and Family 

From 1957 until he stepped down in 2016, Max Schumacher experienced enormous successes—and the occasional hiccups. He once traded a future Cy Young Award winner (Mike Cuellar), but he also helped assemble teams that won four consecutive championships in the 1980s. The 1986 title, won in the bottom of the ninth inning of the seventh game when the Indians’ Billy Moore drove in the winning run off future star Rob Dibble, remains a personal favorite. 

Perhaps his greatest success in those years was meeting and marrying Judy Whybrew, an Indiana University graduate who worked on the Indians’ ticket staff. Schumacher had been hired to replace her friend Marge Smith as ticket manager, “and I was not real well received because I was replacing her friend,” he said. “But we got to know each other well, and we fell in love later.” Bruce, their first son, who succeeded Max as Indians Chairman of the Board and CEO, was born in 1959, followed by Brian, Karen, and Mark, and they now have five grandchildren. 

Over the years, Schumacher had opportunities to go to the major leagues, but he turned them down. He grew up in Indianapolis and, except for his two years in the Army, has lived here his entire life. With the Indians, he was more or less his own boss, and he was instrumental in building one of America’s great minor-league franchises. He’s particularly proud that for the team’s employees, “to have on their resume that they worked for the Indianapolis Indians is a pretty good line to have.” 

“I never had the feeling that I wanted to be a big guy in my industry,” he said. “A lot of people think if you work in baseball, you need to get to the major leagues if you want to be a success. So many people have said to me, ‘I thought you would have been in the major leagues by now.’ If you’re an attorney, do you have to work in New York or Chicago or Los Angeles to be successful in your profession? No. And I don’t, either.” 

Max
AthleticsPeopleCommunity

That's the Ticket

Can one little newspaper story change a life? It did for Max Schumacher ’54. 

by Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

from Spring 2018

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Butler Alumna Makes Science Fun

Krisy Force

from Spring 2017

Julie Boyk ’10, Senior Education Coordinator for the Museum of Science and Industry (MSI) in Chicago, remembers having a difficult time deciding which college to attend. She was excited to be accepted to Butler University but she had two other colleges who were offering scholarships from which to choose. It wasn’t until her dad was heading to Indianapolis for a business trip that he asked her along to tour the campus.

“I went on the trip just to appease my father. It was freezing cold and snowing, but the moment I stepped out of my dad’s car, I felt at home,” Boyk said. “I thought, ‘this is where I was going to spend the next five years of my life.’ We went on a tour, further drawing me into what some people call ‘Butler magic;’ I was hooked.”

Boyk spent her next few years at Butler working toward her degree in Early/Middle Childhood Education. About a year after graduation, Boyk stumbled across a position at MSI while perusing the museum’s website prior to a planned visit, and since she had been having a difficult time finding a job within the school systems, she decided to apply. Julie Boyk with students

“MSI was the mecca of field trips as a kid from the Chicago suburbs, so the thought of working there brought back many positive memories,” Boyk said.

During her interview, Boyk pulled from the skills toolkit Butler’s College of Education gave her to demonstrate a potential lesson plan that was hands on, thoughtful, and tasty since Oreo cookies were involved.

“All of the hands on work Butler exposed me to was very helpful and I wouldn’t be the teacher I am today without that,” Boyk said.

Before she made it home, Boyk had an offer.

Since getting hired, Julie has had many realizations about herself and the job she had in mind before starting at MSI.

“I never saw myself teaching middle school or high school students, but it’s so fun. I’ve discovered it’s one of my favorite parts,” Boyk said.

Her list of favorites regarding her work at MSI doesn’t stop there. Every day is different and through MSI’s Learning Labs she has the opportunity to teach a wide range of science subjects like forensics, pendulums, simple machines, and Mars, where students and Boyk have the opportunity to teleconference with real NASA scientists to ask questions.

If she had to choose a favorite aspect of her job, it would be when she gets to make science fun for all of the students who enter the museum with the mindset that science is boring, or confusing.

Julie Boyk with students

“Not too long ago we were doing a project about Mars and a student in 6th or 7th grade asked me if I was a scientist. Technically I’m not, but to answer his question, and to get him involved I responded by saying ‘Yes, I am a scientist and you are too,’” Boyk said. “At first he said ‘No, no I’m not.’ He came up to me after class and told me, ‘I understand what you mean now about how I’m a scientist too,’”

Creating even just a small shift in attitude among students about science, and making sure they understand that science can be messy and fun is why Boyk loves the work she does and for a museum that is considered an industry leader.

“I’m able to touch the lives of so many more students with what I’m doing here. Between myself and four other co-workers, we are able to interact with about 24,000 students a year,” Boyk said. “We really are at an important museum, and it makes me want to work above and beyond my abilities to make sure I represent the museum in the best way possible.” 

AcademicsCommunity

Butler Alumna Makes Science Fun

It wasn’t until her dad was heading to Indianapolis for a business trip that he asked her along to tour the campus.

by Krisy Force

from Spring 2017

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It's In Her Nature

Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

from Spring 2017

Marissa Byers ’18, the first Butler student to officially major in Environmental Studies, figures she now has the best of all worlds when it comes to career options. The junior from Springfield, Illinois, could use what she’s learning to work in public health. Or maybe on public policy issues. Or perhaps working for a non-profit or doing something in urban ecology. 

As someone with a broad range of interests who has considered majors in business, communication, and education, Environmental Studies plays to her strengths. 

“My passion has always been the environment, and in Environmental Studies I get to combine a lot of my skills,” she said. “If I go into non-profit work, I’m going to be using those communication skills and those business skills in outreach with communities. So I’ll be using my strengths for a purpose I’m passionate about. Environmental Studies is a nice combination of that.” 

Environmental Studies is a new major under the Science, Technology, and Environmental Studies (STES) umbrella. Biology Professor Carmen Salsbury, who directs the STES program, said student interest in a broad range of disciplines is driving the new major, which allows for a career in the science arena without doing the classic biology-chemistry-physics track. 

“What’s great about STES is that these majors reflect how the world is,” Salsbury said. “These majors are very interdisciplinary and that’s how the world is as well. You have to know an awful lot about a lot of things. If we’re trying to train students who are going to contribute to society, we have to teach them to think broadly and critically and see how things interconnect.” 

Environmental Studies majors focus on the relationship between environment and society and those environmental issues that deserve attention, like: How do we institute environmental change or awareness? Students take some prescribed science courses to establish a basic understanding of chemistry, ecology, and evolutionary biology, as well as other courses that focus on the environment. They also delve into the sociological aspects, such as humanity’s relationship with the environment and what that means for the future. 

All Environmental Studies majors must complete a practicum experience—either taking the Environmental/Sustainability Practicum course or by completing an independent practicum/ internship experience in which they work with a community partner on an issue relevant to that partner. Byers, for example, is fulfilling her requirement by interning with the CUE Farm on campus. Some students might work with Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, or even at the statehouse dealing with lobbying organizations on an issue like concentrated animal feeding operations or another factory farming-related cause. 

“We really want the students to get out into the community and engage the community in those issues that are environment-related,” Salsbury said. “I think students are recognizing that science and society is critically important to implement policy and change behaviors with regard to the environment, medical practices, and immunizing children, to name just a few areas. All of those things have major sociological, ethical, cultural, political, and economic components to them.” 

Byers said she figures she may end up in a job that doesn’t exist yet. That might mean something in the area of working with kids, since there’s a trend in schools to incorporate nature into the curriculum. That has a lot of benefits for child development education, she said, and also prepares the next generation to be more environmentally conscious. 

“I want to work in urban environments to change people’s perceptions of nature as something that’s out there that we’re not connected to,” Byers said. “I want to bring it into urban environments to help people understand what their daily actions do to the overall environment.”

AcademicsCommunity

It's In Her Nature

by Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

from Spring 2017

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Writing for Wellness

Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

from Spring 2017

Leona, a lady beyond a certain age, likes to break out in song. Doesn’t matter where she is or who’s in the room or that it’s well after Christmas and she’s still singing “Silent Night.” She’s going to sing.

At this moment, she’s sitting in a conference room at American Village retirement community, explaining herself between song bursts to Stephanie Anderson, a student in Butler’s Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program. Every Tuesday, Anderson and three other MFA students visit Leona and others at American Village to hear their stories and get them down on paper.

Leona talks, and Anderson captures her words.

“Leona feels happiest when she is among her 10 children,” she writes. “She loves to sing a lot too, and this is a gift she shares with her children, especially since it's a God-given talent. She loves singing in a choir and sharing the community, because God knows when she is happy and sad, and he projects his goodness through her. Leona knows we have to choose happiness. Words cannot describe the joy she feels being with her family, the one at home, and the one at church.

“Sometimes she is so glad to be alive that she bursts into song, being so glad for her life and her gift. She used to teach singing and sometimes she would sing those songs to her children when they felt lonely or sad, particularly ‘Amazing Grace.’ Leona believes firmly in love and laughter and compassion, and believes harder in the power of beautiful love. She doesn't want to be evil and frowning. She wants to kill sadness with joy. She sings when she is sad and when she is happy, because the voice is the soul coming to the light."

Sometime later, Anderson reflects on what happens in these sessions.

“We’re making a difference in these people’s lives,” she says. “We’re getting to know each other. We’re making friends. We’re showing ourselves and each other that it’s a big world we live in, but in this circle there’s joy, there’s happiness, there’s laughter. This is marvelous.”

This is Writing for Wellness, a program that MFA students began two years ago to use writing for therapy, for recollection, for relief, for fun. The first classes took place at Eskenazi Health in Indianapolis, where the MFA students worked with hospital staff who needed an opportunity to relax and unload.

Since then, Writing for Wellness has expanded—to Riley Hospital for Children, Indiana Women’s Prison, Hope Academy (a high school for students recovering from addiction), and Indiana Youth Group (an  organization for LGBT youth). The program is soon to add sessions for breast-cancer survivors.

The idea to bring Writing for Wellness to Butler started with Hilene Flanzbaum, the Director of the MFA program. Flanzbaum has taught creative writing on the undergraduate and graduate levels, and her husband, Geoffrey Sharpless, runs the summer creative writing camp at Butler and teaches creative writing at Park Tudor School. They often talk about the psychological benefits of that work, how the participants seem happier when they’re getting a chance to express themselves.

Flanzbaum thought that idea could be incorporated in the MFA program. And since one of the program’s missions is to provide service, Writing for Wellness seemed like a natural fit.

“It’s a discipline that’s fairly well established in other places but had no footprints at all in Indiana or Indianapolis,” Flanzbaum says. “So I saw a real opportunity for our students.”

Around the same time, Flanzbaum was recruiting a new MFA student, Bailey Merlin, who had taught in a Writing for Wellness program as an undergraduate at Berry College in Rome, Georgia.

“When we talked on the phone,” Merlin says, “I told her what I did: I bring everyone in, I have people write, they come to conclusions on their own, and it’s pretty fascinating. She’s like, ‘That’s exactly what we want.’”

That led Merlin to choose Butler for her MFA, and she led the MFA program’s first Writing for Wellness group that went to Eskenazi. There, she says, they saw staff members “writing about things they’d never expressed before and crying.” At Riley Hospital, she worked in a behavioral unit with kids suffering from eating disorders and depression.

“To see the spark of life go back into them is just amazing,” she says.

The spark works both ways.

“You would be amazed how much doing this changes you as a person,” Merlin says. “Just to see how you directly affect someone else. You don’t get that opportunity a lot.”

The MFA students who facilitate the program all seem to have that reaction. Tristan Durst has spent her Tuesday afternoons writing with a retiree named Robert, who was part of a 1950s Indianapolis-based doo-wop group called The Counts. The first week, she says, he told the same stories several times.

“Now, he’s remembering more, and more of his personality is coming out,” she says. “And this week, he was cracking jokes left, right and center. He was telling me about his brothers playing baseball and he said, ‘I won’t say that I was the best baseball player. I could, but I won’t.’ He started slipping in jokes, and I’m getting a real sense that he enjoys being there.”

Taylor Lewandowski, the MFA student who’s leading the group at the senior center, says he and the other Butler students are needed there. He tells the story of a woman he’s worked with named Martha.

“Her roommate passed away, and she saw her last breath,” Lewandowski says. “That obviously affected her. She came in three days after that and I worked with her. Afterward, she said, ‘That was really good for me. It was good for me to get out and talk to someone.’ Writing for Wellness creates this community that’s really nice. It’s really a service. We’re there to be there for them and once you realize that, it’s really nice. We’re actually doing something good.”

AcademicsCommunity

Writing for Wellness

Leona, a lady beyond a certain age, likes to break out in song.

by Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

from Spring 2017

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One Butler: The Brain Project

Catherine Pangan MS ’99

from Spring 2017

What do you get when you combine leaders in the neuroscience field from around Indianapolis, an engaged community, and a spirit of integrated learning? You guessed it—One Butler: The Brain Project. 

One Butler: The Brain Project is a yearlong, campus-wide initiative focusing on brain health, with the goal of developing appreciation of how neuroscience is woven into the tapestry of our lives. 

The Brain Project transcends academic disciplines and is led by a dynamic steering committee that includes representatives from the community, each of Butler’s six colleges, students, trustees, the library, performing arts venues, Student Affairs, the Health and Recreation Complex, and several faculty members who are already using neuroscientific research in their curriculum. (Read more on Butler faculty neuroscience study in this issue’s faculty profile of Professor Tara Lineweaver.) 

Neuroanatomist Jill Bolte Taylor kicked off the initiative in September 2016 to a packed house in Clowes Memorial Hall. The Brain Project includes a yearlong speaker series, integrated coursework opportunities for students, faculty art exhibits, and connections in our Themed Living Communities in the residence halls. 

A central highlight of One Butler: The Brain Project is the installation of the “Big Brains!” This exhibit of 10 enormous fiberglass brain sculptures (5’x6’), commissioned by Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor, depicts neuroscience themes (mental health, concussion, food, etc.) and will be displayed on campus this April. 

Efforts have been coordinated with community partners, including the Eskenazi Center for Brain Care, Community Health Network, and others. 

Some of the topics explored this year include: 

  • Mental health’s cutting-edge research in schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s 
  • Creativity: music, art, and innovation 
  • Addictions, Brain Food, and Sleep 
  • Sports Wellness: prevention of traumas and concussions 
  • How we learn: education and neuroscience with an Educational Neuroscience Conference offering April 29

The Butler Brain Project seeks to distinguish Butler as an environment where academics, student life, interpersonal relationships, and physical and mental health are informed by knowledge of the human brain and how it works. It also aims to create a model for comprehensive, collaborative, and transdisciplinary exploration of a relevant topic that can be replicated and scaled to other campus environments.

Serving as a convener for neuroscience educators and clinicians from Central Indiana, we expect 40,000–50,000 students, faculty, staff, and community members will experience the One Butler: The Brain Project. We hope you can join us for this brain-boosting experience! Please visit www.butler.edu/brainproject for the most up-to-date information. You can also find us on Facebook under One Butler: Brain Project.

AcademicsCommunity

One Butler: The Brain Project

by Catherine Pangan MS ’99

from Spring 2017

Read more
AcademicsCommunity

Introducing the Hinkle Academy, a New Graduate Program

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jul 22 2015

Graduate students looking to become leaders in wellness, sport, and allied fields now have a new option: the Hinkle Academy, a joint online venture of Butler University’s Department of Athletics, College of Education, and Health and Recreation Complex.

The program begins in the fall, offering 12 credits of graduate coursework spread out over 11 months. Classes will expose students to a variety of sport and wellness careers and lead to a 12-hour certificate that can be used toward a Master’s in Effective Teaching and Leadership at Butler or a graduate degree elsewhere.

Tony Hinkle Statue“In my world of rec sports, the competition is such that if you don’t have a master’s, you’re really behind the eight-ball,” said Scott Peden, Butler’s Director of Recreation. “It’s an incredibly competitive marketplace for jobs.”

For more information, contact Mindy Welch, Program Coordinator, at 317-940-9550 or mwelch@butler.edu. More graduate information is available at https://www.butler.edu/admission/graduate/graduate-application-process.

Subject areas in the Hinkle Academy coursework begin with an investigation of the Butler Way ethos for effective leadership, establishing culture, and building community. Coursework will include marketing, special events, program planning, and facilities management. “Regardless of what specific branch you go into in wellness, you’re going to have to know budgeting and finance and sponsorships and legal aspects and a boatload of specific topics,” Peden said. “Those are good foundational competencies to have, regardless.”

Hinkle Academy also will include the Butler/Indy Lab, a three-day residential workshop at Butler University and in Indianapolis, during which students will be able to meet the people—and tour the organizations and facilities—that drive Indianapolis’s reputation as a sports capital.

A capstone, eight-week summer apprenticeship can be completed in a student’s home organization or community.

"The Hinkle Academy provides a unique portal for candidates with shared interests in education, sport, and wellness and diverse backgrounds, careers, and goals to study leadership through the lens of the Butler Way," College of Education Associate Professor Mindy Welch said.

The certificate work is appropriate for current and future Butler alumni; licensed teachers and coaches in all sports at all levels; volunteer coaches affiliated with schools, churches, community centers, and fitness centers; professionals employed in sport and wellness; and individuals seeking career change or entrepreneurial opportunities in education, sports, athlete development, fitness, recreation, and wellness.

Michael Freeman, Butler’s Associate Athletic Director for External Operations, said the online coursework and flexibility of the program schedule “should provide insight and education on how there are many ways to get the job done in sport.”

“It can work for all types of people, from recent grads looking to break in to sport, folks looking for a career change or those already in sport and looking for self-improvement,” he said. "We could see a very diverse group of students.”

Peden said having all classes online is perfect for people who are in the workforce and can’t take the time to return to school for two years.

“There are a lot of students who are graduating from undergraduate coursework and looking to see what’s next,” he said. “This is a unique niche.”

See Welch and Freeman talking about the Hinkle Academy on Inside Indiana Business.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

PeopleCommunity

Professor Kercood Receives Grant for Oral Hygiene Training Program

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 08 2015

Professor of Special Education Suneeta Kercood has been awarded nearly $25,000 by the Dental Trade Alliance Foundation to develop a video-based training program to teach families of special-needs children about oral healthcare and prepare them for visits to the dentist.

“There is a huge disparity in oral health care of children with intellectual/developmental disabilities,” Kercood said, “and after having spoken to numerous parents and medical practitioners, there is a great need for parent training, as well as training medical/health professionals to care for this special group of children (especially navigating through their physical and behavioral challenges).”

Throughout 2016, Kercood is collaborating with Dr. Ana Vazquez with Fishers Pediatric Dentistry, who specializes in providing services to children with special needs on the project.

She said oral health often is overlooked in the hierarchy of needs of children/adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities.

“Oral health is important, not just for basic activities related to food intake or communication, but can have implications for secondary health conditions, social interaction, and long term care, and thus needs to be addressed,” Kercood said.

Since 2002, the Dental Trade Alliance Foundation has awarded just over $1.5 million in grant funding to 74 projects designed to increase access to oral health care.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

PeopleCommunity

NCAA Selects President Danko for Committee to Shape Future of College Sports

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jul 08 2015

Butler University President James M. Danko will be among a group of college presidents, athletics administrators, faculty, students and conference commissioners to convene in Indianapolis August 4-5 to build the foundation for the future of college sports, the NCAA announced.
President Jim Danko

Participants were invited because of positions they hold in the Division I governance structure or affiliated organizations.

The Division I Strategic Summit participants include all members of the Board of Directors (including the student-athlete, athletics director, faculty athletics representative and senior woman administrator who serve on that group); Presidential Forum members from conferences that do not have representation on the board; the chair and vice chair of the Council; the chairs of the seven standing Council committees, the Committee on Academics and the Committee on Infractions; leaders from affiliated organizations who serve on the Council and the Board of Governors members from Divisions II and III.

The participants selected one of four strategic planning groups on which to serve that will study four different aspects of college sports. Each group will use outside experts as needed.

Each of the groups will focus on defining a specific area:

  • The Division I collegiate model of amateur athletics, including the key features of the Division I student-athlete experience and use of resources within athletics.How college sports should assist students while they are in college, including academic achievement and appropriate demands on time.
  • How college athletics should assist students to prepare for life after college, including those who wish to pursue athletics through professional pursuits and other high-level opportunities such as the Olympics.
  • The overarching principles for how the division should operate, including examining the current subdivision structure and the role of conferences.

Each strategic planning group will present background and analysis of its topic area to the summit participants in advance to help inform the discussion and ultimate creation of principles to guide the division’s decision-making in the future.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

Butler Elects Two to the Board of Trustees

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 20 2016

The Butler University Board of Trustees has elected Attorney Robert T. Wildman and Life Sciences executive Lynne Zydowsky ’81 to special one-year terms on the Board.

Both will be eligible for full three-year terms in June 2017.
Robert Wildman

Wildman is a member of the Business Services Group, the Venture Capital and Private Equity Group, and the Real Estate Group of Bose McKinney & Evans LLP. He is also in-house counsel for the Greg Allen Companies, which develop commercial estate projects in the Indianapolis area. In addition, Wildman is the President of his late father’s company, Roundhill Development Inc.; a real estate holding company.

Prior to joining Bose McKinney, Wildman was a partner at Henderson Daily Withrow & DeVoe in Indianapolis.

Wildman is a member of the Indianapolis Bar Association (business law and land use sections), the Indiana State Bar Association (probate, trust, and real property and business law sections), the American Bar Association, the Venture Club of Indiana (former board member), Cambridge Ventures (Investment Committee and Advisory Committee) and SVCapital (former Advisory Committee member). He is included in The Best Lawyers in America (2007–2016) and was named an Indiana Super Lawyer by Indianapolis Monthly magazine (2004). He currently serves on the finance committee of the St Vincent’s Foundation

He earned both his bachelor’s (magna cum laude, 1969) and juris doctor (1972) from Indiana University-Bloomington.

His wife, Jane E. Wildman, is the recently retired Student Services Coordinator for Counseling at Carmel High School. She has served on several civic boards focusing on education, including Promising Futures of Central Indiana and Indiana Student Assistance Professionals Inc.

Lynne Zydowsky is an experienced executive in the Life Sciences industry who has been involved in the launching and building of many successful companies.
Lynne Zydwosky

As President of Zydowsky Consultants, a consulting practice founded in 2003 offering services to emerging companies, she works with founders, investors, and management teams to build the foundations of life science companies.

With over 25 years of industry experience, she has played a key role in raising private capital, setting overall corporate strategies, and establishing and managing strategic alliances.

In 2011, Zydowsky, together with Joel Marcus and Deeda Blair, co-founded the Alexandria Summit, an invitation-only gathering that brings together the world's foremost visionaries from the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, medical, academic, financial, philanthropic, advocacy, and government to exchange ideas and shape future decisions about scientific development, policy and regulatory reform to tackle the most important global healthcare challenges and accelerate the discovery of life-saving therapies.

Zydowsky previously served as the initial President, Chief Operating Officer, and board member of Renovis Inc. (now Evotec), which she also co-founded. Prior to Renovis, she joined Exelixis Inc. as its first employee and held positions of increasing responsibility, including Vice President of Pharmaceutical Business Development. As part of the executive management teams, she contributed to the growth and development of both companies, which led to their initial public offerings. She also previously worked as a Senior Research Scientist at ARIAD Pharmaceuticals Inc. and GlaxoSmithKline.

Zydowsky serves as a member of the West Coast Board for buildOn, an international non-profit organization focused on breaking the cycle of poverty, illiteracy, and low expectations through its after-school, service-oriented programs for urban teens.

She earned her doctorate in Chemistry from the Ohio State University and was a National Institutes of Health (NIH) post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School. She earned her Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy from Butler University in 1981.

Zydowsky’s father, Robert C. Douthit ‘50 (COPHS), owned Douthit Drugs in Newton, Illinois, and her aunt, Patricia Henshaw, also attended Butler.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

Butler Elects Two to the Board of Trustees

The Butler University Board of Trustees has elected Attorney Robert T. Wildman and Life Sciences executive Lynne Zydowsky ’81 to special one-year terms on the Board.

Oct 20 2016 Read more
CampusCommunity

The First Tenant in the New Parking Garage: Scotty's

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 18 2015

Scotty’s Dawghouse will be the anchor tenant in Butler University’s new Sunset Avenue Parking Garage, leasing 6,400 square feet in the northeast corner of Sunset Avenue and Lake Road. The new restaurant—its name is a twist on the more familiar Scotty’s Brewhouse—is scheduled to open in February 2016, with construction to begin in November.

“We’re thrilled to bring one of Indiana’s most successful and popular restaurant concepts to Butler,” said Michael Kaltenmark, Butler’s Director of External Relations. “We listened to our students, employees, alumni, and Midtown neighbors and believe Scotty’s will be a great fit for the Butler community.”

Scotty's DawghouseScotty’s will serve lunch and dinner and seat 250-300 between its dining room and large outdoor patio. As with all Scotty’s locations, it is “all ages welcome” and family friendly. The new restaurant will be open seven days a week, from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. (midnight on Fridays and Saturdays). University officials expect that Scotty’s will be open late following major arts and athletics events.

“When I heard that we were even in the discussion as a possibility for this location, I could barely contain my excitement to be the first restaurant/bar on Butler’s campus,” said Scott Wise, President and CEO of a Pots & Pans Production, the management company for Scotty’s Brewhouse, Thr3e Wise Men Brewing Co., C3 Bar, and Scotty’s Brew Club. “And the location … I don’t know if it could be any better squeezed between Clowes Hall and Hinkle Fieldhouse! I’d say this is the best way to kick off our 20th year in business.”

Scotty’s Dawghouse will employ between 75-100 part time and full time positions. It will begin taking applications online in January 2016.
Butler’s new facility, scheduled to open for parking in August, has 17,000 square feet of retail space on the first floor of the five-story structure, as well as 1,033 parking spaces. Kaltenmark said Butler is still actively working with other potential tenants.

Scotty’s and the parking facility represent an important step in Butler’s ambitious plans for campus development. Last year, the University completed the renovation of Butler’s iconic Hinkle Fieldhouse. Just a block down Sunset Avenue’s newly enhanced streetscape, Butler and American Campus Communities are building a state-of-the-art housing facility, which is scheduled to welcome its first student residents in Fall 2016.

Future development plans include additional phases of student housing development and renovation, and new academic space to house Butler’s science programs and College of Business.

Donna Hovey, Vice President, and Gordon Hendry, First Vice President, from CBRE’s Indianapolis office represented Butler University as the leasing agent. The new mixed-use retail and parking garage being developed by Butler University offers suite sizes ranging from 1,200 to 8,400 square feet, many with patio and outdoor dining options. For more information, please visit http://www.cbre.us/butler-retail.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

AcademicsCommunity

Grant Helps Butler Create Student-Run Insurance Company

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 17 2015

The Butler University College of Business will establish a student-run insurance company with the goal of having the company fully operational by the 2019–2020 academic year, thanks to a $250,000 gift from MJ Insurance and Michael M. Bill.

The Butler business, known as a “captive insurance company,” will insure certain programs at Butler, perhaps including the live mascot, Butler Blue III, or physical damage to University vehicles.

Butler University's College of Business building June 26, 2013.College of Business Dean Steve Standifird said the idea behind the internal insurance company is to give students hands-on experience and prepare them for an industry that expects to need tens of thousands of new employees over the next seven years to replace workers who will be retiring.

“This captive insurance company builds on Butler’s model of experiential learning,” said Zach Finn, Clinical Professor & Director of the Davey Risk Management and Insurance Program in the College of Business, who will supervise the students. “We have students who manage a $2 million financial endowment, and many universities around the country do that. There’s no reason students with the proper setup couldn’t manage an insurance company.”

Finn said the program will give students the opportunity to look at risks that face the university, assess the financial impacts, and determine whether the risks would be best retained and paid for with university assets as they occur, through traditional insurance markets, or through a captive insurance company.

Students will learn how to write the insurance policy, what the coverage terms will be, how to finance the company, and more. They will be able to apply their risk-management expertise in accounting, investments and numerous other areas.

“We are excited about this partnership with Butler University and the Davey Program,” said Jon Loftin, President and COO, MJ Insurance. “Butler has consistently graduated students from the College of Business more prepared to enter the workforce due in large part to their emphasis on experiential learning and providing their students with the unique opportunity to apply the academic principles in a real-life setting.”

MJ and Bill’s initial gift will cover the minimum amount of capital that’s needed to fund a captive insurance company at its outset. The College of Business also will be soliciting gifts to fund the operating costs.

“The insurance industry has been very rewarding to me over my lifetime, and I appreciate all that it has given to me, my family, and the opportunity to be the founder of MJ Insurance, Inc. for the past 51 years,” said Michael M. Bill, chairman and founder of MJ Insurance. “If we can instill a path to the students via the kind of training that I had as a very young man, it will be not only rewarding to the students that graduate through the Butler University College of Business in Insurance and Risk Management, but will provide them with a livelihood and personal reward every day that they are in our industry.”

According to figures from the U.S. Bureau of Labor, the insurance industry will need to replace 104,000 insurance sales agents, 71,900 claims adjusters, 67,400 claims/policy processing clerks, 28,900 underwriters, 8,500 software developers/programmers, 7,500 computer/information analysts, and 6,900 actuaries by 2022.

Finn estimated that even if the approximately 50 colleges and universities that offer an insurance program were able to graduate about 50 students each year—an optimistic estimate, he said—that would still leave an enormous shortfall of people ready to step in and do the jobs.

“Our students, through this program, will graduate with those skills in hand,” Standifird said. “In an industry that is in desperate need of talent, we’ll not only be providing them talent, but talent that is much closer to being job-ready than they’re going to find anywhere else. That’s one of the big motivations for doing this—to give our students a significant advantage going into the workforce.”

Added Loftin: “We are encouraged by the increasing interest of the millennial generation in the insurance and risk management industry which has historically been viewed by college graduates as boring or stale compared to some other careers. We are finding that most young adults today are simply unaware of what extraordinary opportunities exists within this industry that often times align more closely with their career, financial and, most importantly, their life goals.

“Therefore, we believe that it’s merely a matter of creating awareness and educating these young adults of the career benefits and opportunities that do exist. We believe that many colleges and universities are sleeping on this industry that has a dire need for qualified talent. In fact, those universities that do have insurance and risk management programs are experiencing 100 percent job placement rates in most cases. Therefore, we cannot think of a better opportunity to assist our industry in generating interest in this field than by partnering with Butler University in creation of a student-run captive.”

 

Recent news coverage of this story:

http://www.captiveinsurancetimes.com/captiveinsurancenews/article.php?article_id=4154#.VgxJFbflvIU

http://www.insurancebusiness.ca/news/morning-briefing-college-to-train-nextgen-insurers-with-campus-insurance-business-194724.aspx

http://www.ibj.com/articles/54463-butler-plans-student-run-insurance-agency-as-lure-to-boring-field

http://www.indystar.com/story/money/2015/08/15/business-insider-want-secure-job-bet-insurance/31797013/

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

A Message from President James M. Danko: The Arts at Butler

President James Danko

from Spring 2016

In 2013, Butler University marked the 50th anniversary of the opening of Clowes Memorial Hall. Senator Richard Lugar—who had attended the opening night with his family in 1963—graciously recalled that special milestone. He described the Clowes Hall opening as a cultural and educational turning point; not only for Butler University, but for the City of Indianapolis. For Senator Lugar, the glittering, star-studded opening of Clowes Hall has always represented the opening of our City’s door to the modern era. As he became Mayor and Senator in the following decades, that door opened wider and wider—expanding to include professional sports, the convention industry, and so many other civic successes. But that first push happened here on the Butler campus in 1963—and it happened through the arts.

Now, as then, Butler University embraces the arts as a cornerstone of its academic offerings and campus life. Across the disciplines of Art+Design, Arts Administration, Dance, Music, and Theatre, Butler students in the Jordan College of the Arts (JCA) are challenged to grow as artists, critical thinkers, performers, and leaders. With the support of exceptional faculty and staff members—along with new learning and performance venues including the Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts—JCA students are thriving as never before. And Butler students across all fields of study have hundreds of opportunities each year to attend cultural events and arts performances right on their own campus.

Butler has also continued its strong tradition of serving as a community resource for the arts. In keeping with its mission, the University is proud to provide “intellectual, cultural, and artistic opportunities and leadership to Indianapolis and the surrounding areas.” Over 200,000 people attend arts performances at Butler each year. In the pages of this magazine, you will read about the staggering number of Hoosier schoolchildren who attend Butler’s Community Arts School, summer camps, and school matinees. Each April, Butler ArtsFest offers over 40 events that draw audiences of all ages from all over the region and beyond. 

For the benefit of students, alumni, and the State of Indiana, Butler University is more committed than ever to treasuring the arts as a crown jewel—one that is essential to Butler’s academic character and quality; to the inspiration and growth of each person who enters the Butler community; and to the past, present, and future of the great City of Indianapolis.

I hope you enjoy learning more in this edition. Bethanie and I look forward to seeing you at ArtsFest this spring. 

Sincerely,

James M. Danko

president@butler.edu

 

AcademicsCommunity

At Lab School, 22 Chinese Principals Are Students for a Day

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 04 2015

When 22 principals from China’s Zhejiang Province wanted to see how American elementary schools operate, they chose to spend a day at the Butler Lab School, which the University operates in partnership with the Indianapolis Public Schools system.

The Chinese visitors devoted Friday, December 4, to observing how the elementary school at 34th and Meridian streets manages to educate the students without concentrating so much on standardized testing.
Ron Smith, Principal of the Butler Lab School, visits with counterparts from China.

“In China, they have one curriculum for the entire province,” said Grace Kontur, Program Director for the Indianapolis-based Chinese Education Connection, which coordinated the visit. “Every school teaches the same thing on the same day. So for them to differentiate (like the Lab School does) is a very hard topic for them to understand.”

Kontur left it to Ena Shelley, Dean of Butler’s College of Education and designer of the Lab School, to explain.

With Kontur translating, Shelley told the visitors that “all children are capable, competent, and powerful learners.” It’s up to schools, she said, to “instill a sense of wonder” in the students. “Focus on the strength of the child and build from there,” she said.

In explaining how Lab School learning works, Shelley shared the example of a teacher who showed her student Van Gogh’s painting “Sunflowers” and asked them to draw their own version. That was supplemented by a lesson on Van Gogh, which got the students interested in his painting “Starry Night,” which segued into a discussion of the constellations, which turned into a math lesson about how many stars are in specific constellations, which resulted in a visit to Butler’s Holcomb Observatory to see the stars, which caused one of the English as a Second Language students to start speaking more because he was so excited.

“It opened him up,” Shelley said.

All well and good, the visitors said. But how is student progress evaluated?

Lab School Principal Ron Smith ’88 MS ’96 said student evaluations combine quantitative data—gathered through testing—with qualitative data that measures whether the children have learned. Those qualitative measures include examining student work and recorded discussions with individual students to see what they have learned.

As for teachers, they are evaluated based on formal observations by the principal—that counts for 60 percent—and how the teacher did on goals established at the beginning of the year (40 percent).

This was difficult for the Chinese to understand because they’re accustomed to everything being measured, Kontur said.

But they’re trying.

“They really want to update,” she said. “They really want to keep improving their system, so they want to learn what’s over here that they can bring it back to China.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

archive
Community

Academic All-Americans? Family Atmosphere? We've Got That

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 24 2016

Butler basketball is about much more than wins, as two recent newspaper stories note.

General Hinkle ExteriorIn the Indianapolis Business Journal, sports columnist Mike Lopresti wrote that Butler's success off the basketball court over the last 10 years is unrivaled in Division I. The Bulldogs have had seven Academic All-Americans since 2007, more than any other Division I school. In his February 20 column, Lopresti looked at Butler's past Academic All-Americans and what they've been doing since graduation.

In the February 21 Boston Globe, Gary Washburn reported on the bond that occurred with former Coach Brad Stevens and his players—including Gordon Hayward and Shelvin Mack, both of whom play for the Utah Jazz. Hayward said about Stevens, who left Butler to coach the Boston Celtics: “He’ll always be family no matter where we’re at and that’s why we love playing at Butler.”

Investing in Community

Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

After 20-plus years as a cardiologist, when he could be spending retirement on a beach somewhere overlooking the bluest water, Dr. David Dageforde '70 instead is working to improve the physical, spiritual, psychological, and social well-being of residents in the west Louisville neighborhood of Shawnee.

He's inside the Shawnee Christian Healthcare Center—a clinic he helped start in 2011 and whose board he chairs—showing visitors the medical exam rooms, the expanded space for mental-health counseling, and the offices and desks for the staff of around 30 and volunteers that include his wife, Emily '73.

There's also the new dental clinic that's a couple of doors down, a garden across the street that local residents can use to grow their own vegetables, and three clinics the center runs at neighborhood schools.

"I read a book that said: 'Take care of all the health and do nothing for the villagers and you've gained nothing. Give the villagers all the community help they need but don't take care of their health and you've got nothing,'" Dageforde said. "So we do medical care and community engagement."

Approximately 18,000 residents live in the Shawnee neighborhood. More than 60 percent live at 200 percent or less of the federal poverty rate. In 2017, the clinic will have served about 4,000 patients—1,000 more than the previous year.

"A lot of us have been in this community for 50 years or more and have been involved in community service," said Loueva Moss, who's both a patient and a Shawnee Center board member. "Dr. David has taken us to another step."

*

Dageforde grew up in Anderson, Indiana. In ninth grade, he wrote a paper about three potential careers for him—the three M's, he called them: Medicine, music, and minister.

As a junior in high school, he gave a sermon. "It stunk, and I thought I could never do that." When he got to Butler in 1966, he was in the band for one semester. "I thought I was good till I heard other students practicing. I thought I'd end up teaching flutophone in a cornfield somewhere. So pre-med became an easy choice."

And the Butler professor who showed him the way forward—"The man who changed my educational life"—was H. Marshall Dixon, who taught Theoretical Physics. Dageforde took that course during sophomore year, and he memorized everything he thought he needed to know for the first test.

He got a C.

He remembers Dixon saying, "David, you haven't learned how to think. I'm going to teach you how to think."

Dixon asked questions that weren't in their notes. He would say, "David, maybe I didn't discuss it in the notes. Maybe none of it applies to the equations that you memorized. But maybe if you think of the equations, maybe you can think this thing through and project an idea and then put it together."

"He opened up my whole mind," Dageforde said." Memorizing, which is a lot of what medicine is, isn't always the way to go forward. It's to think."

While Dageforde was learning that, Emily '73 was in Kingsport, Tennessee, where her father worked for American Electric Power Co. One summer, his company had a marketing meeting in Indianapolis. Butler was on the tour of the city.

"It was different," she said. "A lot of my peers in high school would go to the University of Tennessee in Knoxville or to girls' schools in Virginia. That didn't interest me at all."

She came to Butler to study Home Economics with an emphasis in Merchandising and Textile Design, planning to work as a buyer. The night her parents dropped her off, she attended a campus mixer where a senior walked up to her and said, "Let's show 'em how to dance."

Nine months later, they were married.

David went on to the Indiana University School of Medicine while Emily finished up at Butler.

"I know I got a great education at Butler," she said. "It was a great start to a life. I would do it again. My reason for wanting to go there was to step out of my comfort zone, step out of the little box you sometimes get put in, and go somewhere where you could try new things, meet new people, and have new experiences. Butler helped me along with that."

*

After David finished his residency at Baylor College of Medicine and fellowship in cardiovascular disease at Georgetown University, the Dagefordes moved to Louisville in 1979. He loved interventional cardiology and being part of CardioVascular Associates, a huge practice of 250-plus staff that included 20-plus doctors. He thought he'd do that until he was 70. Emily, meanwhile, earned her MBA at the University of Louisville.

Then, in 1994, David took his first overseas medical mission trip to Ethiopia, where he met missionaries Ray and Effie Giles.

"They transformed my life," he said.

Dageforde was impressed and affected by the Gileses' work and how they could do so much—handling cases of typhoid, malaria, and rheumatic fever—with relatively little. At the end of that first trip, Ray Giles told Dageforde, "He who drinks from the African stream will always return."

David realized that giving money to his church and having Emily give her time teaching Bible study was not enough.

He returned to Louisville and immediately resigned as Practice Manager to work part time and devote himself to medical missions. Four years later, he quit outright, at age 52. He, Emily, and their children, Sean and Leigh Anne, subsequently went on multiple mission trips to Africa and Romania, and he's been to China, India, Guatemala, and Thailand.

Then in 2005, someone showed him the healthcare statistics of west Louisville. "It was as bad as what you see overseas," he said. Shawnee had no primary care doctor; cancer rates twice as high a rate as where the Dagefordes live, 11 miles away; and heart disease two and a half times higher.

He decided to develop a Christian healthcare clinic in the neighborhood. They got together like-minded people and neighborhood residents, many of whom were skeptical.

"I thought it was a real far-fetched idea," said Rudy Davidson, a Shawnee Christian Healthcare Clinic patient and board member. "What really convinced me was his commitment to the effort. He believes in what he's doing to the point that he worked his ass off. I'm going to say it just like that: He's worked his ass off to make this thing work. We'd get 10-page emails at 3:00 AM explaining this and that. But all of that is what it took. He mobilized a lot of people and got the resources."

*

The clinic opened in 2011, thanks to financial support from Louisville-based Norton Healthcare and Southeast Christian Church, donated construction work by a fellow church parishioner, significantly reduced rent from Tony French, the owner of the neighborhood strip mall, and the efforts of dozens of volunteers.

But from 2011–2015, the operation struggled financially. "I maybe quit being chair 200 times, 400 times," Dageforde said. "We got down to our last $30,000 once," and there were times that he had to cut staff. The board would draw Dageforde back.

"I was concerned about his physical health because I could see the strain on him," board member Loueva Moss said. "What turned it around was getting resources—getting federal money, writing grants, plus the community buying into the concept and coming for care."

The federal money came when the Shawnee Center was designated as a Federally Qualified Health Center. Phyllis Platt—who started as a volunteer with the clinic and became its CEO in 2015—wrote the grant that brought in more than $600,000, about 40 percent of their budget. The remainder comes from patient fees ($25 and up, depending on a person's ability to pay), other grants, and donations.

Platt said she always felt confident that the clinic would grow and thrive because "when the Dagefordes are in, they're all in."

"Once he made the commitment, he was really invested in thinking about it all the time, talking to the right people all the time, being wherever he needed to be all the time," she said. "I think just to see their generosity in time and effort—Emily doesn't need to come here two days a week and call patients who don't show up for appointments—but it's another example of the willingness to give and to be invested on every level in a project that's obviously very dear to them."

*

In the past year, Shawnee Christian Healthcare Center has expanded from 2,600 square feet to more than 6,000. It's added mental-health counseling and plans to add a second doctor and dentist. The budget for 2018 will be around $2 million, including a federal grant of $800,000.

"The exciting part is how much we've become part of the community," Platt said. "Every day, we have the ability to impact individual people but also the potential to change a neighborhood."

Board member Rudy Davidson said the neighborhood is, indeed, changing. The strip mall where the clinic is located is starting to attract others businesses, and there are a Pizza Hut and a Dollar Store opening nearby.

"The center gave community people a sense of confidence—something they could see instead of just talk about," he said.

On a typical day, the Center's entryway is bustling. Hallways are crowded with patients and staff moving back and forth. Patients often know each other because they're from the community, so if you're in the lobby—and especially if there's a baby—the Center turns into something of a community gathering place.

In many cases, the clinic is seeing patients for medical needs. But not always. Often times, the people who come there need referrals to resources that can provide help. David proudly recalled helping a patient whose car had fallen apart connect with a local mechanic who donated a used car.

Emily said her favorite moment at the Shawnee Center came when she bumped into a patient outside the Center who was walking her baby boy in a stroller. The woman recognized her and thanked her for the support the clinic had provided—first, when her mother died, and then when the baby was born.

"She said, 'I just love you all. You have done so much for me.'" Emily said. "For me, that just encapsulates what we do here – it's to touch people's lives and make a difference in their lives. People are important, and you need to not treat them as a global issue but as a personal issue. To be able to be influential in a positive way—that's what the work at this clinic is about."

Community

Investing in Community

"I thought I was good till I heard other students practicing. I thought I'd end up teaching flutophone in a cornfield somewhere. So pre-med became an easy choice."

Investing in Community

Marc D. Allan MFA ’18
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Community

Butler University Mourns the Passing of Andrew Smith

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 12 2018

Update: A celebration of Andrew Smith's life will be held on Sunday, January 17, at 5:00 PM at Traders Point Christian Church, 6590 South Indianapolis Road, Whitestown, Indiana. Doors will open at 4:00 PM.

 

Butler University President James M. Danko and Vice President and Director of Athletics Barry Collier released this message to the Butler community on January 12:

Dear Butler Community,

We are profoundly sad to share the news that Andrew Smith ’13 passed away today. He was 25.

Andrew represented the best of Butler, both in the classroom, where he was an Academic All-American, and on the basketball court, where he helped lead our Bulldogs to back-to-back appearances in the national championship game.

As many of you know, Andrew was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in January 2014, and with leukemia late last year. He fought valiantly. As in all aspects of his life, Andrew gave his all, all the time.

What made Andrew so special was the way that he genuinely cared for others. Within his large frame was an even larger heart. He is, was, and always will be a Bulldog.

The Butler community is proud to have been part of Andrew’s life, and our thoughts are with his wife, Samantha; his parents, Debbie and Curt; and the rest of his family. Information about services is pending, and we will share details with the Butler community as we learn more.

Sincerely,

Jim Danko and Barry Collier

CampusCommunity

Visiting Writers Series Presents Lev Grossman

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 07 2015

Lev Grossman, author of the Magicians trilogy, will speak in the Atherton Union Reilly Room on February 17 at 7:30 PM as part of Butler University’s spring 2016 Vivian S. Delbrook Visiting Writers Series.

Admission is free and open to the public to all events in the series. For more information, call 317-940-9861.

Lev GrossmanGrossman's Magicians trilogy, a New York Times #1 best seller, has been published in 25 countries. It was recently acquired by NBC/Universal for a television series, with a pilot episode officially ordered for the SyFy channel. For the past decade, Grossman has been both the book critic and the lead technology writer at Time, covering virtually every cultural and technological revolution of the new millennium. (A graduate of both Harvard and Yale, he was the first journalist to make a call on the iPhone!)

When Time chose “You” as its Person of the Year 2006, Grossman wrote the story; he did it again in 2010, covering Mark Zuckerberg. Grossman has interviewed and profiled the major drivers of cultural change in the Internet era, from Steve Jobs to Jonathan Franzen to John Green. He has also written for Wired, The Believer, and The Village Voice and many others.

He will be followed in the spring series by novelist/short-story writer Benjamin Percy (February 29, Schrott Center), poet Claudia Rankine (March 17, Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall), and poet/National Book Award winner Marilyn Hacker (April 5, Clowes Memorial Hall, Krannert Room).

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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CampusCommunity

Professor Rao's Artwork Is All Over Indy This Summer

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 28 2016

Summer break? What summer break?

Just as school is letting out, Art + Design Associate Professor Gautam Rao finds himself participating in three upcoming high-profile events.

IMG_9090The first is the Indianapolis Museum of Art’s miniature golf course, which opens to the public May 10. The course features 18 holes designed by local and regional artists, including Rao, who designed a hole called “Poplar Mechanics.” Rao’s design is inspired by Indiana’s woodlands and celebrates the state tree, tulip poplar, and the verdant forests of Brown County. It features abstract trees that recreate Indiana’s landscape in a subtle, artistic manner.

Rao also was one of 33 Indiana artists selected to design an artwork as part of the Welcome Race Fans project for the 100th running of the Indianapolis 500. These works will be exhibited all over town. His piece has appeared at the Indianapolis ArtsGarden, the International Airport and the Harrison Center for the Arts.

“For me, being an artist is about making a career and a life,” Rao said. “Finding a balance between the two can be a challenge. My project features original lettering and a typographic sculpture. And who better to welcome race fans than my twins, born in Indianapolis, little Hoosiers who we will be one in May. This photograph represents my artistic life in its entirety– my twins, and my art. Welcome Race Fans!”

rao_welcome race fans_finalAnd Rao will be exhibiting an outdoor artwork in this year's Installation Nation at the Indianapolis Art Center. Installation Nation is a 23-day exhibition presented by Primary Colours featuring site-specific art installations to be located on the grounds of the Indianapolis Art Center’s 9.5 acre ArtsPark.

Rao joined the Butler faculty in 2004. He is originally from Washington, DC, and has also lived in Bangalore, India. He earned a BFA at Boston University in 1999 and an MFA from the University of Pennsylvania in 2002. His distinctions include a Susan Coslett Cromwell Traveling Fellowship, and awards from the Marie Walsh Sharpe Foundation and the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts.

He recently exhibited his work at the Art Director's Club in New York, the Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art, The South Bend Art Museum, The Swope Art Museum, and in Typeforce 5 in Chicago.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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Community

Butler Partners With Be The Match to Honor Andrew Smith

BY

PUBLISHED ON Mar 22 2016

Butler University has entered into a partnership with Be The Match, which operates the national bone marrow registry, honoring the late Butler Bulldog Andrew Smith, who bravely fought a two-year battle with cancer. As an element of the partnership, Butler’s live bulldog mascot, Blue III (commonly referred to as “Trip”), has been named a national ambassador for Be The Match.

Andrew and Samantha Smith

The partnership’s goals are to raise awareness about the registry and add enough members to the Be The Match registry to be the equivalent of saving 44 lives, in honor of Smith who wore #44 during his time at Butler. With a 1:430 ratio of registrants to matches, 18,920 new and available Be The Match registry members are needed to meet this goal.

“What made Andrew special was the way that he genuinely cared for others, and we are proud to be in a position to raise awareness of his behalf,” Butler University Athletics Director Barry Collier said. “In collegiate athletics, we have the opportunity to shape young people’s lives. Through this partnership, we now have the opportunity to save lives as well.”

Every three minutes, someone is diagnosed with leukemia, lymphoma, sickle cell, or another life-threatening blood disease. In some cases, a marrow transplant is the only cure. In 70 percent of cases, no family member is a donor match, so they turn to the Be The Match marrow registry. Nationally, the Be The Match registry has over 13 million members, but it is in desperate need of more young adult members who are available when called up to donate their marrow.

“We applaud and are so very appreciative for the Butler community channeling the wishes of Andrew to help Be The Match save more lives, said Mary Halet, Director of Donor Services at Be The Match. “The effort truly reflects the spirit, kindness and caring for others that Andrew lived his life by every day. We are honored and committed to carry on his legacy to help more patients in need.”

Smith was a beloved member of Butler University’s two-time NCAA Finals men’s basketball team. On January 12, 2016, at the age of 25, he died after a two-year battle with cancer. After being diagnosed, then beating cancer in 2014, Smith’s cancer returned, requiring a bone marrow transplant on October 19, 2015. Throughout his battle, he and his wife, Samantha, worked to raise awareness for the bone marrow registry.

“I am beyond thrilled to see this partnership coming to fruition,” Samantha Smith said. “Andrew would have been so proud and humbled to know his battle would ultimately give rise to much needed awareness of this cause.”

Those interested in learning more about the registry and how to become a member can text “ANDREW” to 38470 or visit join.bethematch.org/Andrew1.

The #9 seed Butler men’s basketball team advanced to the second round of the 2016 NCAA Tournament before its loss to #1 seed University of Virginia on Saturday.

 

Media contact:
Krissi Edgington
kedgingt@butler.edu
317-940-8241

AcademicsCommunity

Butler Students Head to Asia, Thanks to Freeman Grant

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 11 2015

Butler University has been awarded a $339,000 grant from the Freeman Foundation to support undergraduate student internships in East and Southeast Asia in 2016 and 2017.

The money will be used to send 20 students to Shanghai in 2016 and 20 to Shanghai, 10 to Beijing, and 10 to Singapore during summer 2017. The grant provides $5,000 per student to offset the cost of their travel and housing costs.
Grace Lewis interned at the pharmaceutical company Eisai China.

In addition, the grant provides financial support for students who are already in East Asia on a semester study-abroad program and can fit in an internship into that time.

The summer internships are six weeks long. A Butler faculty member will be on hand at the beginning of the semester to get the students settled.

“This grant is great news for our students,” said Jill McKinney, Butler’s Director of Study Abroad in the Center for Global Education. “There are many logistics that go into an exciting program like this. It hits much of what the Butler 2020 plan wants for students, which is high-impact programs. This is an innovative blend of two kinds of high-impact programs: study abroad and internships. As we strive to send off students to have a meaningful impact on the world, I think graduates who have broader worldview and have had internship in one of the leading economies in the world could have a distinct advantage personally and in the job market.”

McKinney said Butler is one of only 23 universities in the United States to earn this kind of support from the Freeman Foundation. During the summer of 2015, Butler sent 19 students to intern in Shanghai and Hong Kong, thanks to a $99,500 Freeman Foundation grant.

The Freeman Foundation, based in Stowe, Vermont, is dedicated to augmenting international understanding between the United States and the nations of East Asia. The foundation “provides real work experiences in real work settings with direct interaction with local people in East and Southeast Asia.”

Grace Lewis, a senior majoring in Pharmacy and minoring in Chinese, said her internship at the pharmaceutical company Eisai China Inc. taught her about the pharmaceutical industry and drug marketing, and also gave her insight into healthcare in China.

“At the conclusion of my internship, I realized that the industry is a viable option for my future career,” she said. “Living and working in China greatly contributed to my personal growth. Particularly, my sense of independence grew much more than I had anticipated.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

Bone Marrow Registry, Blood Drives to Honor Andrew Smith

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 24 2015

The Butler University community, Indiana Blood Center, and Be the Match Indiana have teamed up to host a blood drive and bone marrow registry drive Tuesday, September 29, at Hinkle Fieldhouse. The event is being organized in honor of former Butler men’s basketball standout Andrew Smith and his continuing fight against cancer.

Andrew and Samantha SmithFrom 4-8 that night, donors are encouraged to visit Hinkle Fieldhouse on the Butler University campus to donate blood in Smith’s honor. The community is also encouraged to join the bone marrow registry, which is a simple process of completing paperwork and a cheek swab. To join the registry, a person needs to be between the ages of 18 and 44, willing to donate and meet health guidelines.

"Samantha and I want to use the platform we have been given, and the information we have learned going through the process ourselves, to inform people how important this really is,” said Smith. “People, unfortunately, will pass away waiting for someone on the registry; not because there isn't a way to help them, but simply because the right person is not on the list. Butler University has meant so much to us over the years, and partnering with them to promote such an important cause that has directly affected our lives so much, is amazing. The community has been behind us the whole way, and this is just one way that we want to give back a little bit."

Smith was diagnosed with cancer in 2014 and spent the better part of that year fighting, nearly dying, and eventually beating the disease. Over the summer, Smith learned the cancer had returned. His doctors have ordered chemo and—this time around—a bone marrow transplant. He will undergo that procedure on October 19.

Through the Indiana chapter of Be the Match, the registry that facilitates matches between patients and donors, a bone marrow donor was identified. As he undergoes treatment and the subsequent recovery, doctors may administer blood transfusions to help his body.

“All of us at Butler continue to look for ways to support Andrew and Samantha as they battle this,” said Butler men’s basketball coach Chris Holtmann. “Donating blood and registering for the bone marrow database are two great ways to showcase that support. I’ve registered in the bone marrow database and the process is incredibly easy. We’re excited to be part of this event and help to increase the impact that Andrew and Samantha can have on this cause.”

To make an appointment to donate or for questions about the drive, visit https://www.donorpoint.org/donor/schedules/drive_schedule/98046 or contact Dotti Laas at 317-407-2124. There are donation times available in addition to those listed for appointment purposes. For those who want to join the bone marrow registry but can’t attend the event at Hinkle Fieldhouse, please visit http://join.bethematch.org/Andrew.

 

Important Facts to Know About Donating Blood and the Bone Marrow Registry

  • Cancer patients often receive transfusions during treatment
  • The need for blood is constant—Indiana Blood Center needs to see 550 donors every day to meet hospital needs
  • No synthetic substitute for blood exists—only donations from volunteer donors can save lives
  • It is the blood on the shelf that saves lives and Indiana Blood Center’s average inventory is about a three day supply
  • Annually, more than 10,000 people are diagnosed with a life-threatening disease for which the best option for a cure is a bone marrow transplant
  • More than 70% of patients do not have a matching donor in their family
  • Be the Match Indiana facilitates 40-50 matches each year
Community

Ushering in the Indianapolis Bicentennial, With Butler's Help

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jun 02 2015

Nine emerging leaders—including Butler University Sustainability Coordinator McKenzie Beverage and 2014 graduates Aaron Harrison and Samantha Helferich—will play a pivotal role in setting the stage for implementing the Bicentennial Plan, a visionary, community-unified component of the Plan 2020 initiative and the future of Indianapolis-Marion County.
McKenzie Beverage

Last year, the CityCorps Fellowship program was designed to generate new ideas around defined themes — Choose, Connect, Love, Serve and Work – which were relevant to Plan 2020 committees. This year, Plan 2020 is shifting into the next phase, turning research, data, and ideas into tangible action steps towards improving neighborhoods, increasing connectivity, advancing workforce development and promoting civic engagement in Marion County.

These 2015 Fellows will work to inform technical plans of the city (like the Comprehensive and Regional Center Plans), build capacity for a movement (like #loveindy), and supplement capacity for implementing partners.

Beverage’s focus will be Planning for Resiliency in Indianapolis. This fellowship will lay the groundwork for a resiliency master plan that builds the capacity of Indianapolis residents, communities, businesses, and systems to survive, adapt, and grow regardless of the chronic stresses or acute shocks they experience. It will assess environmental, economic, and social risks confronting Indianapolis, identify related assets, analyze current programs, and recommend a decision‐making framework.

Beverage will facilitate a process to effectively identify, convene, educate and engage stakeholders on the information and tools needed to develop a resiliency plan. A report with the outcomes of this process will be produced.

Harrison and Helferich will work on A Collective Effort: Utilizing and Leveraging the Intellectual and Civic Capacity of Indy’s Youth. Their fellowship creates an executable strategy for engaging Indianapolis’s youth in our city’s efforts to develop and implement the strategic framework necessary to make it a better place to live, work, serve, love, and connect.

This work will create a plan for a scalable program that: (1) utilizes project‐based curriculum co‐developed by Indianapolis educators, entrepreneurs, and community innovators to empower students (grade range to‐be‐determined K - 12) to view their world through the lens of an entrepreneur or community innovator; (2) tasks students with developing solutions to the priorities inspired by those within the Bicentennial Plan; and (3) aligns with Indiana Academic Standards, with a particular emphasis on STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) and the arts.

“The fellowship program is a nationally distinctive element of Plan 2020 and will support the committees through cutting edge research and thought creation,” said Brooke Thomas, Deputy Director for the Greater Indianapolis Progress Committee. “The Fellows will do more than just brainstorm new ideas, they will operationalize their ideas and deliver something that is both innovative, but also supported by data and research.”

CityCorps Fellows were selected through a Request for Proposals (RFP) process issued by Plan 2020. Proposals were evaluated based on the contribution their ideas had on envisioning and improving the future of Indianapolis and addressing specific needs set forth by the Plan 2020 team.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

President Danko Issues Statement on 'Religious Freedom' Law

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 01 2015

On March 26, Indiana Governor Mike Pence signed the controversial "Religious Freedom Reform Act" (RFRA).

The result was a backlash that spread across the country.

Butler President James M. Danko was the first university president to speak out against the law. (See President Danko discussing the "Religious Freedom" act on MSNBC here and here.)

This is the statement he issued on Sunday, March 29:

As president of Butler University I am particularly sensitive to the importance of supporting and facilitating an environment of open dialogue and critical inquiry, where free speech and a wide range of opinion is valued and respected. Thus, it is with a certain degree of apprehension that I step into the controversy surrounding Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA).

However, over the past week I have heard from many Butler community members—as well as prospective students, parents, and employees—who have expressed concerns about the impact this law may have on our state and our University. As such, I feel compelled to share my perspective and to reinforce the values of Butler University.

President DankoWhile I have read a variety of opinions and rationale for RFRA, it strikes me as ill-conceived legislation at best, and I fear that some of those who advanced it have allowed their personal or political agendas to supersede the best interests of the State of Indiana and its people. No matter your opinion of the law, it is hard to argue with the fact it has done significant damage to our state.

Like countless other Hoosier institutions, organizations, and businesses, Butler University reaffirms our longstanding commitment to reject discrimination and create an environment that is open to everyone.

Today, more than ever, it is important that we continue to build, cultivate, and defend a culture in which all members of our community—students, alumni, faculty, staff, and the public—can learn, work, engage, and thrive. It is our sincere hope that those around the country with their ears turned toward our Hoosier state hear just one thing loud and clear—the united voice of millions who support inclusion and abhor discrimination.

Butler is an institution where all people are welcome and valued, regardless of sexual orientation, religion, gender, race, or ethnicity; a culture of acceptance and inclusivity that is as old as the University itself. Butler was the first school in Indiana and third in the United States to enroll women as students on an equal basis with men, was among the first colleges in the nation to enroll African Americans, and was the second U.S. school to name a female professor to its faculty.

I strongly encourage our state leaders to take immediate action to address the damage done by this legislation and to reaffirm the fact that Indiana is a place that welcomes, supports, respects, and values all people.

Community

Want Summer Camps? Check Out Butler Community Arts School

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 10 2016

Butler Community Arts School this summer will offer more than a dozen camps for children—and a couple for adults—interested in the arts.

The offerings include six new camps: Ballet Summer Intensive; Brass Camp; Oboe Camp; Oboe Reed Workshop; Saxophone Camp; and Voice Camp.

Butler commmunity arts school June 21, 2010.All camps take place on the Butler University campus. For more information, call 317-940-5500 or visit https://www.butler.edu/bcas/summer-camps.

Here are the camps, dates, and ages ranges.

-Adult Big-Band Workshop: June 5-10 (evenings), ages 18 and older. This workshop provides the opportunity for adults with intermediate to advanced skills on their instrument to participate in a true big-band learning experience under the direction of a professional staff, including Mark Buselli and Matt Pivec. Performance charts will be selected from those typical of Basie, Miller, Nestico, Ellington, Kenton, and Holman. Bands will consist of saxophones, trombones, trumpets, piano, bass, guitar and drums.

-Arts Camp 1 & 2: June 27-July 1 or July 18-22 (1:30 PM—5:30 PM), ages 7-11. Butler Arts Camp is designed for students who wish to explore all of the arts—music, visual art, theatre, and dance—in fun, hands-on activities with Butler students.

-Ballet Summer Intensive: July 10-30, ages 13-18. Join Butler dance faculty, under the artistic direction of Marek Cholewa, for our brand new pre-professional dance intensive on the beautiful campus of Butler University. The three-week intensive will have a classical ballet focus with additional classes in pas de deux, character, modern, jazz, and repertoire. The intensive will conclude with a final performance on Saturday, July 30.

-Bass Camp (upright bass): June 12-17, ages 12-21. Camp will include: daily stretching and movement; classes on bass technique; master classes; bass chamber ensembles; and private lesson(s) with camp faculty. Finale concert will feature all campers. One year of prior bass study required.

-Brass Camp: July 17-21, ages 12-18. The Butler Brass Camp will feature daily private lessons and group instruction with Butler University brass faculty and students. In addition, campers will have the opportunity to participate in a brass choir as well as chamber music groups. One year of prior study on instrument required.

-Jazz Camp: July 10-15, ages 12-18. This weeklong jazz camp provides the opportunity for youth in rising grades 7-12 to participate in a fun and intense jazz-learning experience under the direction of professional staff led by Matt Pivec, Director of Jazz Studies at Butler University. The faculty will include local jazz professionals. Sessions may include combo rehearsals, big-band rehearsals, jazz improvisation, jazz history, and instrument-specific master classes. The week culminates with a 3:30 PM concert on Friday featuring all of the campers. One year of prior study on instrument required.

-Oboe Camp: July 17-21, ages 12-18. Each day will consist of warm-ups, private lessons, ensemble work, reed-making and more. You will even learn how to play the bigger oboe (the English horn) and find out secrets the pros use to sound your very best every time you play. One year of prior oboe study required.

-Oboe Reed Workshop: July 22-23, ages 15 and up (including adults). Nine hours of intensive oboe reed-making. The workshop is open to all levels, but participants should have some prior reed-making experience. During the workshop, participants will learn how to select and gouge cane, shape and wrap a reed, and finish and play on their own reed.

-Piano Camp 1: June 19-24, ages 12-18. Students should have at least one year of prior piano study. All students receive daily private lessons and master classes. Other sessions include theory, ensemble, music history, sight playing, and guest speakers and performers. Optional classes may include dance, improvisation, composition, and steel drum ensemble.

-Piano Camp 2: June 27-July 1, ages 7-11 (9:00 AM-12:30 PM). Designed for students with at least one year of piano study, campers will be divided into smaller groups based on age and repertoire level. Activities will focus on music skills that are appropriate for students in each respective group. Our intent is to maintain interest, stimulate imagination, and provide attainable challenges. Classes may include repertoire, ensemble, music theory, and games.

-Saxophone Camp: July 17-21, ages 12-18. The Butler Saxophone Camp is designed to provide focused attention on individual as well as ensemble saxophone playing. Students will have the opportunity to work on saxophone fundamentals, take private lessons, play in a saxophone quartet or trio, and participate in a large saxophone ensemble. Participants will work directly with Butler University saxophone faculty Heidi Radtke and Matt Pivec, as well as Butler saxophone students. One year prior saxophone study required.

-Snare and Tenor Camp: June 17-19, ages 12-21. It is recommended that participants have at least two years of prior study on snare drum; prior marching percussion experience is helpful. This drum-corps-style camp weekend will feature one-on-one and group instruction for snares and quads with Jeff Queen and Bill Bachman.

-Strings Camp: July 18-23, ages 7-11 (9:00 AM—12:30 PM). Designed for students with at least a year of strings study (violin, viola, cello, upright bass), campers will be divided into smaller groups based on age and repertoire level. Activities will focus on music skills that are appropriate for students in each respective group. The intent is to maintain interest, stimulate imagination, and provide attainable challenges. Classes may include repertoire, orchestra, music theory, and games.jazzcamp0714 small

-String Scholars Camp: June 19-23, ages 12-18. The String Scholars camp features: daily orchestra rehearsals and finale concert with Richard Auldon Clark, conductor of the Butler Symphony Orchestra; daily sectionals and technique class with Butler faculty and music majors; other typical college music classes such as music theory and electives. Additional classes typically include drumming, dance, and keyboard. Special sessions will be held on topics of college readiness and access, including how to prepare for an audition, choosing a major or college, financial aid, career paths in music, and more. One year prior strings study required.

-Theatre Camp: July 10-15, ages 12-18. Join Butler Department of Theatre faculty, staff, alumni, and students for a fun, hands-on camp that covers all aspects of theatre - acting, stage movement, voice for the actor, costume, scenic and lighting design. No experience necessary.

-Total Percussion Camp: June 12-16, ages 12-18. All students will receive instruction on snare, drum set, timpani, mallets, world percussion, steel drums, and concert percussion. One year prior study on snare drum required.

-Voice Camp: July 17-22, ages 15-18. This new camp is a great opportunity to work with Butler's voice faculty on solo performance skills, in preparation for college auditions, competitions, and personal growth as performers. One year prior vocal or choral study required.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

The Butler Student Experience: Success in Motion

President James Danko

from Fall 2016

President Jim Danko talks to student and parentWhen I speak about the tremendous progress evident on Butler’s campus—whether in the context of improvements to our academic facilities, the new Fairview House, the beautification of Sunset Avenue, or the parking structure and its restaurants—I often comment that the real excitement lies not in the buildings themselves, but in what’s happening inside those buildings. Ideas are born, minds are awakened to new ideas, lifelong friendships begin, and future vocations become visible. Indeed, this is all true; but it’s not entirely accurate. In fact, a great many of the wonderful things which are integral to the Butler student experience happen outside the confines of our campus.

A Butler education occurs through a variety of methods, places, and people. Our students are traveling the globe, volunteering throughout our city, and discovering their own strengths through challenging academic experiences, themed learning communities, and advising partnerships with their professors. Our alumni and friends are mentoring Butler students, hiring them for internships and jobs, and contributing the funds our University needs to provide world-class learning resources now and in the coming years—including the new Andre B. Lacy School of Business, a renovated and expanded complex for the sciences, and another new residence hall. On campus and off, Butler students are truly moving forward—and doing so with a level of humility, community-mindedness, and commitment that can only be described as The Butler Way. I welcome you to share in this exciting momentum as you read this edition of Butler Magazine.

Sincerely,

James M. Danko

president@butler.edu

Community

Butler, Blind School Students to Plant Trees for Bees

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 15 2015

Students from the Butler University World of Plants class and the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ISBVI) will work together on a tree-planting event on Tuesday, October 20, from 10:00-11:30 AM and 2:30-4:00 PM.

At the “Trees for Bees” event, students will plant trees to enhance the pollen sources for ISBVI bee hives.

A swarm of European honey bees clinging to a tree

The event is the result of a 2015 Tree Campus USA Mini-Award received by Biology Instructor Marva Meadows. She said the class project is trying to address some of the nutritional problems by planting 20 new species of trees and shrubs that are honey bee friendly.

“Honey bee hives will benefit by having a diversity of pollen and nectar planted close to the hives themselves,” she said. “This may allow the bees to resist some of the other stresses that are plaguing hives around the world. Our teams of Butler and ISBVI students have been learning about flowers and honey bees together and will culminate in planting their chosen tree on Tuesday.”

Honey bees are responsible for one-third of our food, Meadows said. Agricultural production of almonds, berries, fruits and vegetables are a direct result of honey bee pollination.

Unfortunately, honey bees are in decline from a number of pressures including Colony Collapse Disorder which may be caused by new parasites and pathogens like Varroa mites, nosema fungi and deformed wing virus, she said.

“No one is sure about how the liberal use of pesticides may be causing additional stress to the hives. And nutritional problems caused by a lack of variable pollen and nectar sources may also be weakening honey bees.”

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Arts & CultureCommunity

JCA, Indiana Arts Commission Forge Partnership

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 02 2015

Butler University’s Jordan College of the Arts has forged a partnership with the Indiana Arts Commission to become the IAC regional granting office for central Indiana, covering Boone, Hamilton, Hancock, Hendricks, Johnson, Marion, and Shelby Counties.
Lilly Hall

Butler’s role through 2017 will be to set up independent citizen advisory panels that will review grant applications. The citizen panels adjudicate and score grant applications, and the state awards the grant funds. Last year, the state awarded about $400,000 in grants to Indianapolis-area arts groups.

“We are excited about having the Jordan College of the Arts at Butler University join this new partnership arrangement for Region 7,” IAC Executive Director Lewis C. Ricci said. “The College has a long history in, and commitment to, the arts in this region.”

Jordan College faculty and staff will also provide technical assistance and guidance to on public funding to artists and arts organizations of all sizes.

“I’m excited for the opportunity this will provide for our students,” said Susan Zurbuchen, Associate Professor of Arts Administration. “The students will learn about how public money is disbursed, and they’ll have hands-on opportunities to be part of the process.”

Zurbuchen said she believes no other undergraduate arts administration program has such a hand in grant administration.

Ronald Caltabiano, Dean of Butler’s Jordan College of the Arts, said the partnership with the Indiana Arts Commission “helps to strengthen our academic programming and further reinforces Butler University’s role as a nexus for arts in central Indiana. This is a tremendous opportunity for our students and for Butler.”

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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Community

Officer Davis: 'A Hero Who Made the Ultimate Sacrifice'

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 22 2014

Butler University Police Officer James Davis, who was killed in the line of duty on September 24, 2004, was remembered on the 10th anniversary of his death as “a professional, friendly, and caring individual” and “a hero who made the ultimate sacrifice for this campus, the Butler-Tarkington neighborhood, and the city of Indianapolis.”

Assistant Chief Andrew Ryan and the family of Officer James Davis, at the unveiling of the sign remembering Davis outside Hinkle Fieldhouse
Assistant Chief Andrew Ryan and the family of Officer James Davis, at the unveiling of the sign remembering Davis outside Hinkle Fieldhouse

 

“If there is anything we can do to show our continued thanks for James, it is to make sure we never forget him,” Assistant Police Chief Andrew Ryan told an audience of about 75 that included Davis’s widow, Veleda; their children Josiah, Jarren, and Jaedyn; Veleda Davis's parents; police officers; administrators; and others outside Hinkle Fieldhouse, where Davis was killed.

To remember Davis, a sign was unveiled in his honor as part of the Fallen Officers Legacy Project, which memorializes officers killed in the line of duty. In addition, the Holcomb Carillon bells chimed 10 times in recognition of the 10th anniversary.

Butler President James M. Danko said the community owes Davis a great debt for his bravery and sacrifice.

“I know from his reputation that he was a courageous and kind police officer,” Danko said. “And, I know, from looking at his family members here today, that he was a loving husband and father.”

Josiah Davis, who was 8 at the time of his father’s death and is now a high school senior, said his father was an “optimistic, caring, and strong person,” who loved being a police officer. Josiah thanked the Butler community for being there for him and his family.

“It was a little hard for me to cope with the death of my father,” he said, “but the Butler University community took us all in. They gave me math tutoring, and, whenever I or anyone in my family needed anything, they were there as soon as possible, with big, embracing arms and wide smiles.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

PeopleCommunity

Isn't This Lovely: Butler Students to Sing With Stevie Wonder

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 06 2015

Four members of Butler University’s Voices of Deliverance gospel choir have been invited to sing with Stevie Wonder on Saturday night at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in downtown Indianapolis.
RaeNosa Hudnell, Murjuana Mutuwa, Jeremy Washington, and Elisha Wright will be singing with Stevie Wonder.

Senior Jeremy Washington, an Organizational Communications and Leadership major from Hammond, Indiana; Elisha Wright, a sophomore Exploratory Studies major from Indianapolis; graduate student RaeNosa Hudnell, a Creative Writing major from Grand Rapids, Michigan; and Murjanatu Mutuwa, a first-year International Business major from Cedar Lake, Indiana, will join the 1989 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee and his band for three songs—“Pastime Paradise” and “Another Star” from his Songs in the Key of Life album and a cover of Curtis Mayfield’s “People Get Ready.”

Valerie Davidson, Butler’s Director of Diversity Programs and the faculty adviser for Voices of Deliverance, said she received a call on Thursday, November 5, from Wonder’s people, asking about singers. They told her that, at each tour stop, they like to invite local singers—ideally from colleges—to perform.

“When Miss Valerie notified me of the news, I was speechless!” Washington said. “For me, Stevie Wonder is more than just a flawless voice but a role model and symbol to the realization that nothing can hold greatness back.”

The students will be at the arena for rehearsal Saturday at 4:00 PM. At 4:30 PM, Wonder is scheduled to join them to rehearse and for soundcheck.

This is the third time in recent years that Butler students have been invited to sing with a superstar performer. In 2012, 22 members of the Butler Chorale sang with Madonna during halftime at the Super Bowl. And this past July 4, 26 members of the Chorale accompanied the Rolling Stones onstage at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

CampusCommunity

Coming Soon to the Sunset Avenue Garage: Pita Pit

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 30 2015

Butler University has signed its second retail customer for the Sunset Avenue Parking Garage—a 1,400-square-foot Pita Pit franchise owned by 2003 Butler graduate Travis Sealls.

Pita Pit, “a fresh, healthy alternative to fast food,” will open in late February or early March. The restaurant will seat approximately 20 inside and will have an outdoor patio that will accommodate 20-30.

Trip at Pita PitSealls said Pita Pit will deliver on campus and the surrounding neighborhood. It will be open for lunch and dinner, and offer beer and wine.

“Butler holds a special place in my heart,” he said. “I met my future wife, Whitney ’03, at Butler, and now we have three wonderful kids. From a business standpoint, Pita Pit is a perfect college campus addition. The first Pita Pit was founded at a university. We will offer a quick and healthy alternative to the normal campus culinary scene.”

Sealls, whose degree is in Finance, got into the restaurant business after working as a budget analyst at the University of Albany (New York) while Whitney went to medical school at Albany Medical College. She is now in scientific communications for Eli Lilly and Co. They moved back to Indianapolis in 2008.

Sealls has owned and operated the downtown Indianapolis Pita Pit store since 2009 and was the franchisee of the year in 2013. He also owns another restaurant, Punch Burger, which opened in Indianapolis in 2012 and expanded to Carmel in 2015.

Butler’s new facility, which opened for parking in August, has 17,000 square feet of retail space on the first floor of the five-story structure, as well as 1,033 parking spaces. In August, the University announced that Scotty’s Dawghouse would be the anchor tenant in the garage, taking 6,400 square feet in the northeast corner of Sunset Avenue and Lake Road. Scotty’s is scheduled to open in February.

Donna Hovey, Vice President, and Gordon Hendry, First Vice President, of CBRE’s Indianapolis office represent Butler University as the leasing agent. The new mixed-use retail and parking garage offers suite sizes ranging from 1,200 to 8,400 square feet, many with patio and outdoor dining options. For more information, visit http://www.cbre.us/butler-retail.

Pita Pit started in Canada in 1995 and moved into the United States in 1999. Its U.S. headquarters are in Coeur D’Alene, Idaho.

"We're excited to bring Pita Pit to campus,” Butler Director of External Relations Michael Kaltenmark said. “They are a perfect fit for Butler's new parking facility, both literally and figuratively. With the ability to occupy an ideal footprint of prominent storefront space along Sunset Avenue, Pita Pit provides the convenience, quality, and variety that Butler's students, faculty, staff, and neighbors have requested."

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

A Message to Chrissie Hynde: Rape is Never the Survivor's Fault

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 28 2015

Sarah Diaz, the coordinator of Butler’s Victim Advocate Program, cringed when she read what musician Chrissie Hynde said about having been raped—that being assaulted was her own fault.

“If you don’t want to entice a rapist,” Hynde, the leader of the group the Pretenders, was quoted as saying, “don’t wear high heels so you can’t run from him. If I’m walking around in my underwear and I’m drunk? Who else’s fault can it be?”

Sarah Barnes DiazDiaz’s response: “I would hate for any survivor to internalize that as their truth, for them to believe that because the circumstances were similar in their situation that they should also believe that it’s their fault. When people have that public voice, there’s a real responsibility to think about the consequences of the words they choose to use.”

Diaz, now in her ninth year at Butler, deals with campus sexual assaults and educates students about consent, bystander intervention, and the importance of supporting survivors of sexual trauma. She said victims should never be blamed, no matter what the circumstances.

“There’s a place for risk reduction," she said. "It’s important for us to be aware of our surroundings to the best of our abilities, but when there is a sexual assault, it’s because someone has decided to take advantage of another person.”

Diaz said Butler works hard to prevent sexual violence. The University has:

-A full-time victim advocate – Diaz – who’s available 24 hours a day. She helps sexual assault survivors find community resources, takes them to hospital, and counsels them about their options.

-A student organization formed last year called The Stand Tall Project, which sends the message to survivors that “we believe you, we support you, you’ll get through this.”

-Campus programming, including panels with students who’ve experienced interpersonal violence and resource information for faculty, staff, and students. Diaz is coordinating several programs and agency spotlight booths on campus this month as Butler recognizes domestic violence awareness month.

In addition to her work at Butler, Diaz also is active citywide in programs that work toward building safer communities.

On August 28, she was recognized by the Legacy House as a Community Champion. Legacy House, which provides free counseling, therapy and prevention work in the community for survivors of any kind of violence and their family members.

And on October 16, the Domestic Violence Network will recognize her as the 2015 Outstanding Advocate for her work in the community. The Domestic Violence Network is an umbrella organization with the mission to engage the community to end domestic violence through advocacy, education, and collaboration..

“I have worked really hard to be collaborative and to get some conversations started,” she said. “Now we’re able to have better conversations about rape and sexual assault and not just share some statistics. Really, really, we are working to engage students to understand the role they can play in preventing sexual assault from happening.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

On Theatre Day, All of Butler's a Stage

BY Evie Schultz ’16

PUBLISHED ON Sep 29 2015

Michael McClellan, a senior at Roncalli High School in Indianapolis, wants to be a filmmaker. But when he heard about Butler’s first-ever Theatre Day on September 19, he couldn’t resist signing up.

100 high school students at Clowes Memorial HallAlong with over 100 other high school students from Ohio, Illinois, Kentucky and Indiana, McClellan was able to experience a day in the life of a Butler theatre student.

He says the one-on-one instruction with professors and college students inspired him to be himself both onstage and off.

“They were talking about, ‘We don’t want to see your characters, cause anyone can do a character. We want to see who you are and what you can bring to this college,’” he said.

Theatre Day was the brainchild of LaKisha Cooper, an administrative assistant in Butler’s Theatre Department. She dreamed up the idea as a way to expose high school students to the program while allowing Butler’s theatre majors to shine.

“Our students don’t realize the great work they do, and I wanted others to see that,” she said. “This is a great place to go to school.”

Theatre major Kristen Gibbs ’18 agrees. She says the day was the perfect opportunity for high school students to experience actual theatre classes with college professors - an opportunity she wishes she could have had.

“During my audition, they didn’t have enough time to tell us everything that was in the curriculum,” she said. “I feel like coming here on this day and getting a little taste of everything, even if it was just a snapshot, I feel like that would have benefitted me a lot.”

In a makeup class, students were able to paint each other’s faces like zombies. In an acting class, professor Elaina Artemiev led students through an exercise, and voice, movement and lighting classes completed the lineup.
Theatre Professor Elaina Artimiev (white jacket) leads a group at Theatre Day.

At the end of the day, a few lucky ninth- through 12th-graders were picked out of the crowd to perform their monologues for three professors in a mock “audition” in the Schrott Center.

After each performance, students applauded their peers with supportive whoops and cheers. The professors provided instructive criticism and tips for the students to improve their monologues, providing the perfect finale to an educational day.

“This is a great process to let them see an audition,” Adam Bridges ’18 said. “It’s really cool because it’s terrifying the first time you do an audition process.”

And although the day was jam packed with educational sessions, according to Gibbs and Bridges, the high schoolers’ favorite part of the day wasn’t a particular class or session.

Rather, it was waffle day in the cafeteria. On Theatre Day, even Atherton’s a stage.

Community

On Theatre Day, All of Butler's a Stage

More than 100 students from four states visited Butler for Theatre Day.

Sep 29 2015 Read more
Community

Visiting Writers Series Presents Poet Dean Young

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 13 2015

The Vivian S. Delbrook Visiting Writers Series concludes its fall 2015 series with poet Dean Young on Monday, November 16, at 7:30 p.m. in the Robertson Hall Johnson Board Room.

All events in the series are free and open to the public. For more information, call 317-940-9861.

Dean YoungYoung, who earned his MFA from Indiana University, is recognized as one of the most energetic, influential poets writing today. His numerous collections of poetry include Strike Anywhere (1995), winner of the Colorado Prize for Poetry; Skid (2002), finalist for the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize; Elegy on Toy Piano (2005), finalist for the Pulitzer Prize; and Primitive Mentor (2008), shortlisted for the International Griffin Poetry Prize.  He has also written a book on poetics, The Art of Recklessness: Poetry as Assertive Force and Contradiction (2010).

Young’s awards include the Academy Award in Literature, a Stegner Fellowship from Stanford University, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. His poems have been featured in Best American Poetry numerous times.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

Community

Butler Chorale Members Are Back For An Encore

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jul 27 2015

He left Butler nearly 20 years ago, but, from 1986–1996, Michael Shasberger provided his students in the Butler Chorale with great memories—including five international tours and the staging of Handel’s “Messiah”—along with instruction that still guides them today.

The memories are so strong, in fact, that over the July 24–26 weekend, about two dozen of Shasberger’s former students came from all over the country to reunite and sing with him again in Indianapolis.
Former members of the Butler Chorale returned to Butler to sing with their former conductor, Michael Shasberger.

“He’s probably one of the finest choral conductors I’ve ever worked with, and I’ve worked with a lot of conductors,” said Sam Hepler ’94, a professional singer and musician based in New York City. “He’s a wonderful man and was a wonderful teacher—and I’m sure he still is—and he brought the best out of all of us.”

Shasberger and his former students rehearsed on Friday and Saturday for a Sunday performance at North United Methodist Church. The song selection included some numbers they performed in the student chorale, as well as a few more current pieces.

Mary Scheib ’96 organized this reunion, the second time Shasberger’s Butler students have gotten back together. (The first was in 2009.) These days, Scheib, who lives in Nashville, Tennessee, sings as a freelancer and has a day job in professional development at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

Although some of the reunion participants had never met each other because their years in school didn’t overlap, they were “bound by the shared experience of Michael Shasberger,” Scheib said.

“Dr. Shasberger has such a style with singers to not only make them comfortable singing in their own way—in their own voice, rather than in a choral voice—but to inspire them to sing better,” she said. “That created such an environment of growth while you’re here for four years that everybody wanted to come back and experience that again. Not to mention all the friendships that are forged and funny stories that happen along the way.”

Shasberger, who now teaches and conducts at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California, estimated that about half the participants in this reunion are active as professional singers. Some still sing on the side, and some have found completely different careers.

What they have in common is “a wonderful sense of community. An incredible spirit ran through the group. It’s really affirming, and a real delight. And it’s so great to see them. They look fabulous, and they have so much energy, and, as I told them last night, ‘You’re all as old as I was when I was here.’”

As for Butler, it’s a far different place than they left.

“Butler looks fabulous,” Shasberger said. “The facilities are what we always talked and dreamed about and planned for. But what I’ve learned over the course of a 40-year career is that the work that really matters is the work that you leave that continues to prosper. And to see that here is really exciting.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Arts & CultureCommunity

Visiting Writers Series Presents Laila Lalami

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 06 2015

Author Laila Lalami will speak in the Atherton Union Reilly Room on Tuesday, October 13, at 7:30 PM as part of the Vivian S. Delbrook Visiting Writers Series.

The event is free and open to the public without tickets. For more information, call 317-940-9861.Laila Lalami

Lalami is the author of the novels Hope and Other Dangerous Pursuits, which was a finalist for the Oregon Book Award; Secret Son, which was on the Orange Prize longlist, and The Moor’s Account, which was a New York Times Notable Book, a Wall Street Journal Best Book of the Year, a nominee for the Hurston-Wright Legacy Award, and a finalist for the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

Her essays and opinion pieces have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post, The Nation, the Guardian, the New York Times, and in many anthologies. Her work has been translated into 10 languages. She is the recipient of a British Council Fellowship, a Fulbright Fellowship, and a Lannan Foundation Residency Fellowship. Lalami is a professor of creative writing at the University of California at Riverside.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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Community

Meet the New Butler Aphasia Community

BY

PUBLISHED ON Mar 21 2013

Students playing games using their non-dominant hands, partners working together to find locations on a map, students and their partners creating beautiful works of art—this is the new Butler Aphasia Community.

Members of the Butler Aphasia Community participating in a painting party

About 11 students in Butler University’s Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) Department began working with Indianapolis residents afflicted with aphasia—impairment of the ability to use or comprehend words, usually as a result of a stroke or other brain injury—on Feb. 14.

The clients come to Butler’s campus to meet with the students in the CSC clinic in Jordan Hall every Thursday evening. The Butler Aphasia Community provides a place for aphasia patients to practice the skills they have learned in therapy following a stroke.

“Usually there’s nowhere to go once therapy has ended, so this allows students to get experience working with patients,” CSD instructor Mary Gospel said. “They essentially help the patients re-enter their lives.”

A person with aphasia may have difficulty retrieving words and names or following a conversation, but their intelligence is basically intact. The Butler Aphasia Community offers student-run entertainment and learning activities that provide opportunities for 18-24 people with chronic aphasia to communicate in a comfortable and encouraging atmosphere.

Butler Art and Physical Education students and faculty also lead and organize activities with the clients.

Gospel received a $3,000 seed grant for the pilot program, as well as $2,250 from the Indiana Campus Compact, and $750 from Butler University, to begin developing the Butler Aphasia Center.

Over the past 10 years, close to 100 Butler CSD students have attended a local aphasia support group’s monthly meetings, to play games and converse with the clients. Gospel usually expects students to attend at least one support group meeting, but many have continued attending.

“The clients are the teachers of our students,” Gospel said.

According to Gospel, it is unusual for communication sciences and disorders undergraduate students to have so much hands-on experience working and interacting directly with clients. The Butler Aphasia Community allows more interaction between clients and students and gives students valuable experience with clients.

Every meeting also includes time for conversation when clients can tell their partners about their lives and their recovery.

“Clients’ honesty and bravery has added a new dimension to the students’ education,” Gospel said. “In return, students have given back by attending clients’ knitting groups, taking valentines to their nursing homes, and having dinner with them.”

Media contact:
Molly Kordas
(708) 691-8789
mkordas@butler.edu

 

Community

Forbes Magazine Lauds Butler's Commencement

BY

PUBLISHED ON May 14 2015

Forbes magazine contributor James Marshall Crotty came to campus for commencement and filed a story in praise of speaker Eva Kor's "never give up" message and Butler's approach to education.
James Marshall Crotty

He concluded: "Indeed, as we prepare our students for a tech-driven future, let’s remember the perennial attributes of what made this nation great: service, humility, self-reliance, basic human decency, and a deep remembrance of history chased by the enduring power of forgiveness. Calm, quiet, and humble schools like Butler University are showing us how to model those values every day of our lives."

Read the full story here.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

Butler Community Arts School Adds 3 New Programs

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 14 2015

The Butler Community Arts School will introduce three new programs in 2016—youth theater, music composition for high school students, and summer ballet intensive for pre-professional dancers.

“We added these new programs for 2016 because the community has been asking,” said Karen Thickstun, Director of the Butler Community Arts School. “We have a strong history of providing high-quality music programs to the greater Indianapolis community utilizing Butler students and faculty. These offerings will broaden our reach and allow more youths to participate in our arts programming.”

For questions and registration information, email the Butler Community Arts School at bcas@butler.edu or call 317-940-5500.Butler Community Arts School - Jazz Camp

More information about each program follows.

-Butler Youth Theatre Program, for ages 9-14, will allow students to explore the building blocks of theatre under the direction of Butler Theatre faculty and alumni. No prior experience is necessary.

The program will run for nine Saturdays beginning January 16—9:00-10:15 AM for ages 9-11 and 10:30-noon for ages 12-14—at in Lilly Hall on the Butler campus.The cost is $135 for students 9-11 and $145 for students 12-14.

Both sessions end with a performance by each group.

-Butler Youth Composition Program, for students 14-18, is a three-session workshop presented by Butler composition majors and graduate students under the director of Professor of Music Michael Schelle. No prior composition experience is required, but students must have one year of prior study on a musical instrument or voice and be involved in a music program or lessons.

The sessions will take place from 1:00-2:30 PM January 23, February 13, and March 5 in Lilly Hall on the Butler campus, with a final performance on March 19.

Tuition is $55.

-Summer Ballet Intensive, a three-week intensive program for pre-professional dancers ages 13-18, will take place from July 10-30. The tuition is $3,000, which includes room and three meals a day. A commuter option is available.

Dance Professor Marek Cholewa will serve as the Artistic Director of the program, which will have a classical ballet focus with additional classes in pas de deux, character, modern, jazz, and repertoire. The program will conclude with a final performance on Saturday, July 30.

The Dance Department has announced the establishment of a Butler Dance scholarship for a promising young dancer who attends this summer intensive program. Eligibility requirements will be included in the registration materials. Registration is at butler.edu/bcas.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allanmallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

The Biggest BITS Ever: 1,200 Bulldogs Hit the Streets

BY Evie Schultz ’16

PUBLISHED ON Aug 31 2015

Senior Emma Kortebein spent Saturday morning whitewashing an Indianapolis woman’s fence at her house along 38th Street as part of Bulldogs Into the Streets, Butler’s annual day of serving the community
Seniors Sam Marulli and Claire Thoma laid the bricks for a compost pile at the Butler lab school.

Kortebein and a group of her peers also helped fix a chandelier inside the woman’s home. When they were done, the group came back to Butler to eat lunch and chat about their experience.

“It was so rewarding,” Kortebein said. “We did it with alumni, with people of all ages. I think it was better this way, and I think we should do it more often. It’s a great way to bond with the community.”

In past years, only new students participated in BITS. This year, the program was expanded to include volunteers of all ages—with incredible results. Over 1,200 new and returning students, faculty, staff, alumni, and members of the Butler family headed out to about 25 service sites in the city. Their combined 2,400 hours of service are estimated to be worth over $50,000.

Though volunteers spread out all over Indianapolis, some service projects took place just blocks from campus.

At Shortridge High School, volunteers worked organizing sheet music, decorating class space and refurbishing one of the front doors. And across the street at the Butler Lab School, Courtney Rousseau ’03 spent the morning volunteering in the garden with her daughter. Rousseau now works in Internship and Career Services, and her daughter attends the Lab School.

Volunteering alongside other members of the Butler community was a no-brainer, she said.

“It’s good to see all of the students and everyone come together,” she said.

Freshman Cole Seager had a similar experience. He was inspired to sign up for BITS by older students he met during orientation last week. As he spent the morning laying mulch outside the Lab School, he reflected on the impact the volunteers were able to make in such a short amount of time.

“I like the difference it makes in people’s live,” he said. “It only takes us two others to do what it might take these places three weeks. It makes my day.”

Community

Carnegie Foundation Recognizes Butler's Community Engagement Efforts

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 07 2015

Butler University has been selected to receive the Carnegie Foundation’s 2015 Community Engagement Classification, a distinction that recognizes the University’s efforts to connect with the Indianapolis community.

This designation acknowledges the ongoing involvement of college students, staff, faculty, and community partners in working together to improve the quality of life in Central Indiana and beyond.

clear1x1Carnegie Foundation"The classification recognizes our commitment to partnering with communities as we provide experiential learning opportunities,” Butler University President James M. Danko said. “Our students connect with the community, and together we serve the common good."

In the award notification letter to the University, representatives of the Carnegie Foundation noted Butler’s application “documented excellent alignment among campus mission, culture, leadership, resources, and practices that support dynamic and noteworthy community engagement.”

“The importance of this elective classification is borne out by the response of so many campuses that have demonstrated their deep engagement with local, regional, national, and global communities,” said John Saltmarsh, Director of the New England Resource Center for Higher Education. “These are campuses that are improving teaching and learning, producing research that makes a difference in communities, and revitalizing their civic and academic missions.”

Butler is one of 361 institutions nationwide to receive the Community Engagement Classification—and one of 240 selected for 2015.

In earning the Carnegie classification, Butler is cited for programs such as its Indianapolis Community Requirement (ICR), a unique component of Butler’s core curriculum through which all students take at least one course that involves active engagement with the Indianapolis community. More about the ICR is here.

Other programs across Butler's six colleges also encourage community engagement, including:

  • The Butler-Shortridge partnership, engaging Butler faculty and students in various curricular and programmatic collaborations with Indianapolis Public Schools' Shortridge Magnet High School for Law & Public Policy.
  • The Early College Program, which brings select Shortridge juniors and seniors to campus each semester to earn college credits and contribute to the Butler community.
  • Partnerships with local organizations such as the Martin Luther King Jr. Community Center, The Immigrant Welcome Center, and A Caring Place.
  • The Butler Community Arts School, which provides low- and no-cost music and arts education to hundreds of students across the community.
  • The Community Screening Practicum, through which Butler students in the Communication Sciences and Disorders program conduct speech, language, and hearing screenings for children enrolled in Indianapolis community schools.
  • Generation Rx, a joint effort of Butler Student Association of Pharmacy and students of the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences that strives to educate and raise awareness about prescription drug misuse.
  • Writing in the Schools, a collaboration between Butler’s Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program and Shortridge Magnet High School, has worked directly with more than 300 of Shortridge’s 900 students.
  • The Butler Business Consulting Group, which helps Indiana companies and the Butler College of Business grow by leveraging our depth of experience and breadth of resources in a spirit of teaching, learning and caring.

Danko said Butler-Indianapolis connections help students learn about themselves and others, while engaged in meaningful community service.

“This experience,” he said, “is an investment in their future as engaged citizens who will continue to recognize diverse viewpoints, understand the value of collaborating with others, and work together on solutions to problems.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

What to See in Indy? Holcomb, Holcomb, Hinkle

BY

PUBLISHED ON May 01 2015

Butler University is well represented in the new book 100 Things to Do in Indianapolis Before You Die. And not just because it’s written by Ashley Petry, who went to preschool at Butler, earned her MBA here in 2006, and is finishing her MFA in Creative Writing.

No, Petry said, Butler gets its due because Hinkle Fieldhouse, Holcomb Gardens, and the Holcomb Observatory and Planetarium fit the bill. (Plump’s Last Shot, the Broad Ripple restaurant owned by Bobby Plump ’58, is another of the 100.)

100 Things to Do in Indianapolis Before You Die“Butler’s campus is right in the heart of Indianapolis, but many people don’t know about the assets we have here—destinations that can appeal to both visitors and Indy residents,” she said. “I hope this book can help spread the word.”

Petry said that after getting the assignment from publisher Reedy Press, she began compiling a list of places to see and things to do in the areas of food and drink, culture and history, sports and recreation, shopping and fashion, and music and entertainment.

About 80 of the 100 turned out to be things she’d already written about as a freelance travel and food writer for Conde Nast Traveler, Midwest Living, the Indianapolis Star, and other publications. Others were recommendations from friends.

In doing the research, she took her first visits to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame and Museum and duckpin bowling in Fountain Square. She also saw Crown Hill Cemetery as more than just a burial site.

“They have great tours and beautiful architecture,” she said. “A lot of people wouldn’t think to go there for a picnic, but the view from James Whitcomb Riley’s grave at the top of the hill is gorgeous at sunset.”

Petry spent last fall researching and writing the book. She said getting to be a tourist gave her a new appreciation for her hometown.

“When you live somewhere, sometimes you take it for granted,” she said. “Writing this book gave me a reason to do the things I’ve been meaning to do.”

The book 100 Things to Do in Indianapolis Before You Die is currently available online at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. The official release party is Friday, May 22, at 7:00 p.m. at Indy Reads Books. It is open to the public. Petry will be signing books, and there will be an Indy trivia contest complete with prizes from the 100 Things list.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

PeopleCommunity

Learning About Service, the Butler Way

BY Evie Schultz ’16

PUBLISHED ON Dec 21 2015

At first, the concept seems difficult. How do you help third-graders understand what service means?

But for Early and Middle Childhood Education Professor Arthur Hochman and his early elementary education class, the challenge is often the most important part of the lesson plan.

Kat Welch '17 and her students.

For a little over five weeks this semester, Butler students were paired with Crooked Creek Elementary School third-graders in groups. The Butler students were responsible for creating lesson plans and guiding the elementary schools students through projects to discover what service is.

“Every semester I like to work with a local public school in coming up with something special that's going to have a feeling of culmination and importance, so that these third-graders will have an experience they will never forget,” Hochman said.

In past years the projects have varied. Students and children have organized a flash mob to honor a teacher or come to Butler for a day to present research they've done.

This year, the lesson took a different turn as the third-graders worked together to create their own magazine called Helping Hands. It was published within another local kids magazine, Inspired.

Kat Welch and ’17 and Allison Behling ’18 are two of Hochman’s students who worked at Crooked Creek.

Under the guidance of teachers such as Megan Shuck Rubey ’12 and Kristen Vannatta, they helped students create artwork, conduct interviews, and come up with ways to serve their teachers.

Welch’s group created an autograph book for one teacher and wrote a poem for another.

“It was neat to see how it was really important to them that the teacher liked it and that it was special for them,” she said. “We made a point to teach them that it was anonymous. At first they struggled with that, but then came to realize it's more about the act of doing than getting recognition.”

Hochman said the children are motivated to work on a deeper and higher level when there is an incentive of being able to achieve something important, such as serving and creating an actual published magazine.

“It’s the idea of getting kids to do work that’s in context, that’s real,” Hochman said. “It gives you an impetus to do great work, as opposed to ‘You need to learn multiplication so you can learn division so you can learn algebra,’ which when you’re little feels a little hollow.Coloring page

“But if it’s ‘You need to do a good job because you want to do a good job because there’s something at the end of the tunnel that’s meaningful for you,’ as a third-grader there’s power in that.”

After finishing the magazine and sending it in for publication, the Butler students returned to surprise their third-graders on the final day. The students gathered to see their final product projected up at the front of the classroom, and a special guest even came to visit: Trip, the Butler bulldog mascot.

Together, they celebrated their published magazine and the new bonds formed between the Butler students and their third-graders.

“We had third-graders crying,” Hochman said. “The attachments are very real.”

“It was very sweet,” Behling said. “But I think I was even more excited about Trip than they were.”

Not only did they come away with new friends, Behling and Welch said they came away with teaching experiences they will never forget.

“For me, I loved seeing the progress that was made,” Welch said. “The first or second day we were there, we asked them what service was. They all said out of order signs or drew stores. But by the end of the project, they talked about how it was important to do things anonymously for others.”

Behling said she noticed even more changes in herself.

“I kind of went in expecting for me to have my place, for everything to go my way, and obviously that doesn't always happen, especially with kids,” Behling said. “My biggest takeaway was not everything has to go right the first time and sometimes you just have to try again.”

Sounds a lot like the Butler Way.

Arts & CultureCommunity

Butler to Hold Peace Festival

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 08 2015

Butler University will hold a Peace Festival October 19–22 that will feature discussions about topics such as sustainability and the Darfur refugee crisis, and culminate with an address by Holocaust survivor Eva Kor called “The Triumph of the Human Spirit: From Auschwitz to Forgiveness.”
Butler's Peace Pole stands between Jordan Hall and Atherton Union.

“The purpose of the Peace and Conflict Studies Program is to reach out to students of all backgrounds and show that social justice issues, as well as opportunities to promote reconciliation and peace, can exist within many different parts of life,” said Annika London ’17, the coordinator of the festival. “We want the Peace Festival to reflect on that concept by giving students a chance to learn about some of the biggest current conflicts here and abroad, and how they can participate in making a positive change both as individuals and as a community.”

Here is the schedule of events:

October 19–22
• “Remembering Our Youth,” Boots Display by Veterans for Peace, Chapter 49, 11:00 AM–2:00 PM, at the Peace Pole outside Starbucks.

October 19
• “2016: Can Elections Make Room for Peace?” Panel Discussion with Veterans, Students, and Peacemakers, 7:00 PM, Pharmacy Building room 150.

October 20
• Yoga at the Blue House, 8:00–8:45 AM, Center for Faith and Vocation.
• “Privilege and Opportunity, It’s All in the Game,” with Professors Vivian Deno and Terri Jett, 4:30–6:30 PM, Pharmacy Building room 106B. Snacks provided.
• Luminaries for Domestic Violence Awareness, 8:00 PM, at the Peace Pole.

October 21
• Darfur Women Information Table, 11:00 AM–1:00 PM, Starbucks.
• Sustainable Indiana 2016, followed by a dance piece by the Movement Exchange called “On the Edge,” 4:30–5:30 PM, Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall.

October 22
• Thoughts and Prayers for Peace, 12:20-12:50 PM, at the Peace Pole.
• Beyond Right and Wrong, film screening sponsored by the Desmond Tutu Center for Peace, Reconciliation, and Global Justice, 6:30 PM, Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall.
• “The Triumph of the Human Spirit: From Auschwitz to Forgiveness,” an address by Holocaust survivor Eva Kors, Celebration of Diversity Distinguished Lecture Series, 7:30 PM, Clowes Hall. Free tickets available at Clowes box office.

For accessibility information or to request disability-related accommodations, please visit, http://www.butler.edu/event-accommodations/.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

Statement from President Danko on the Passing of Amos Brown

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 07 2015

Amos BrownThe Butler University community is saddened to learn of Amos Brown's sudden passing today in Chicago. Amos was an extraordinary civic leader who helped bridge cultural divides and create greater understanding in our city. He was also a great friend to Butler, serving for decades as the master of ceremonies for our Celebration of Diversity Distinguished Lecture Series. Our hearts go out to his family and friends. He will be missed.

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Community

Bobby Fong Remembered for His Many Contributions to Butler

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 30 2014

The event began with a video tribute that looked back at his 10 remarkable years at Butler and ended with the crowd singing “Take Me Out to the Ballgame.”

In between, speaker after speaker rose to celebrate the life of Bobby Fong, Butler’s 20th president, who died September 8 in Collegeville, Pennsylvania, where he had been serving as president of Ursinus College for the previous three years.

President Danko was among the speakers to honor Bobby Fong.
President Danko was among the speakers to honor Bobby Fong.

 

“The secret to my father’s success is that he loved you,” Fong’s son Colin told an audience that included his mother, Suzanne, September 28 at Clowes Memorial Hall. “He loved you all, just as he loved his own family, and lived to see you succeed.”

Colin Fong was the last of nearly a dozen speakers, a lineup that included 21st President James M. Danko, former Indianapolis Mayor Bart Peterson, College of Education Dean Ena Shelley, Political Science Professor Margaret Brabant, trustees, and alumni. Levester Johnson, Vice President for Student Affairs, served as master of ceremonies; the Butler University Chorale provided musical interludes.

The speakers honored Fong’s achievements, which included balanced budgets, construction projects, and setting a warm, gentle tone for the University. They told stories about baseball and Oscar Wilde—Fong loved the New York Yankees and was an Oscar Wilde scholar. They praised his ability to connect with people in every walk of life, and expressed appreciation for the ways he touched their lives. Former Trustee Albert Chen urged the audience to “raise your hands in the air and say, ‘Well done.’ ”

Here are some other comments from the event:

James M. Danko: “His legacy of achievement, after 10 years of service on this campus, was remarkable. From academic excellence to facility improvements to higher levels of community engagement, Bobby Fong successfully led the transformation of Butler University from good to great and from a regional presence to a national one.”

Stephen Briganti ’64, who led the search committee that hired Bobby Fong: “The last candidate of the day was a man named Bobby Fong…. Bobby had a pad in front of him, and he told us what he thought Butler needed—before we had a chance to tell him what we wanted. And remarkably, what he said precisely matched the goals that we would challenge him with: 1. Balance the budget. 2. Raise the academic standards of Butler to higher levels. 3. Raise money. 4. Raise more money. Bobby then proceeded to interview us. And that was it. We had our president.”

Bart Peterson: “Bobby’s stated goals were to lift Butler University academically and financially, to enhance the quality of student life, and to integrate the University into the life of our city. This latter was the first thing that he said to me when he met. He did all of these things, of course.”

Ena Shelley: “When Butler University was approached by (Indianapolis Public Schools) Superintendent Eugene White to develop a partnership with Shortridge Magnet High School, Bobby immediately said yes…. When Butler was presented with the opportunity to open the IPS-Butler Lab School, Bobby once again immediately jumped at the chance…. He believed in my colleagues in the College of Education. He believed in all of us. He believed in me as the Dean. And most importantly, he believed that every child deserves the opportunity to a high-quality education.”

Margaret Brabant: “Waple Cumberbatch works in Butler University’s Building Services. She told me that the year she received Butler University’s Top Dawg Award that she and the other recipients of the award were invited to Bobby and Suzanne’s home for dinner. She said that he took the time to ask her what she wanted to drink and insisted that he be the one to bring her her drink. She said, ‘During dinner he insisted that I sit right next to him—right next to him!—and he talked to me throughout the dinner.’ And with lingering wonderment, she looked at me and said, ‘He treated me like I was someone special.’ Which, of course, she is.”

Todd Bolster ’05: “It’s very rare to meet someone with the innate combination of remarkable intellect and sincere kindness. I think that’s what I’ll remember Bobby for the most. It was as easy for him to talk about Mariano Rivera’s abilities as a closer as it was to passionately debate his views on the transformative power of education. He meant a lot to me as a friend, he meant a lot to me as a student, but I think as much as anything, I will learn and take away his ability to lead from within.”

Warren Morgan ’06: "I remember having a one-on-one with Dr. Fong during my sophomore year at Butler. I shared with him some challenges I was facing and asked him for some advice. After intently listening to my concerns, he gave me some advice that I still follow to this day. He said, ‘Warren, you are a strong leader. Do not allow the challenges to interfere with your destined success. Follow your chosen path, and be the best Warren and leader you can be.’ ”

Laura Michel ’08: “ ‘Personable,’ ‘visible on campus,’ ‘student-centered and ‘forward-thinking’ are all phrases that describe the student perspective of Dr. Fong during his time at Butler University. Dr. Fong truly enhanced the quality of the student experience during his tenure at Butler. Dr. Fong was passionate about listening to student suggestions and ideas and strived to make decisions based on what the students and campus needed.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

800 Bulldogs Heading Out Saturday to Serve Indianapolis

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 26 2015

More than 800 representatives of Butler University are expected to volunteer for the 2015 Bulldogs Into the Streets (BITS), Butler’s annual effort to give back to the city of Indianapolis, on Saturday, August 29, from 10 AM to 1 PM.

This year, the program has been moved to the weekend to accommodate not only student volunteers but faculty, staff, alumni, campus partners, and members of the Butler-Tarkington neighborhood. They will fan out to about 25 service sites in the city, donating 2,400 hours of service worth an estimated $55,368.

Bulldogs Into the Streets“For years, we have held BITS on the day before classes started and asked only first-year students to volunteer,” said Caroline Huck-Watson, Director of Butler’s Office of Programs for Leadership and Service Education. “Our sophomores, juniors, seniors, faculty, and staff would tell us that they wanted to participate too, so this year we moved it to a weekend day so that all Bulldogs can be part of a great day of serving with our neighbors and city.”

This year’s service sites are:

BTNA/Midtown: Heritage Place of Indianapolis Inc.; Boulevard Place Food Pantry; MLK Center; Lab School; Tarkington Park; Shortridge High School; Andrew Ramsey Park; Gleaners – Methodist Church; IPS 43-James Whitcomb Riley Elementary School; Indianapolis Public Library – College Avenue Branch; AIM (Aftercare for Indiana).

Indianapolis: Children's Bureau Inc.; Holliday Park; Ronald McDonald House; Exodus Refugee Immigration Inc.; Wheeler Mission Ministries; The Lord's Pantry at Anna's House; The Villages; Gleaners-Fervent Prayer; Indianapolis Zoo; Thrifty Threads; Auntie Mame's; St. Vincent De Paul distribution center; St. Vincent De Paul food pantry; Salvation Army Eagle Creek.

The Tarkington Park project is part of the Great Places 2020 initiative, which is intended to transform neighborhoods and spur urban revitalization. BITS volunteers will be working with Keep Indianapolis Beautiful on this project.

BITS participants will be tweeting using the hashtag #ButlerServes.

BITS is in its 21st year, but Huck-Watson said volunteerism is a year-round effort at Butler. Participants in BITS are encouraged to continue to be involved in volunteer activities through:

  • The Volunteer Opportunities Fair, featuring representatives from dozens of local non-profit organizations. This year’s fair is September 16.
  • The Butler Volunteer Center’s Listserv. Volunteers can register for a weekly listserv that has information on a variety of projects.
  • Student Government Association Service and Philanthropy Board. Students can take a role in the new SGA Service and Philanthropy Board, and help the University continue to commit to service.
  • Alternative Breaks. Fall and Spring alternative breaks allow students to do volunteer projects in other areas of the country.
  • Indianapolis Community Requirement courses, which combine classroom-learning with service.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

danko young

From the President

President James M. Danko

from Fall 2017

The more things change, the more they stay the same.

                                                      —Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr

Butler University’s forward momentum is palpable. You can see it in the construction of learning and living spaces and in the record-high national interest in a Butler education has reached a record high: the University received 15,000 applications in 2016, an increase of 50 percent over the previous two years. You can sense it when our student-athletes step onto the field or the court. You can feel it in the energy of newly formed learning communities. You can hear it in the laughter of the more than 35,000 Hoosier schoolchildren who come to Clowes Hall each year to see their first matinee. And above all, you can see it in the realization of our academic mission. Butler students are achieving the kind of intellectual and personal growth that prepares them for meaningful, successful lives after graduation. They are traveling the world, serving others, and collaborating with faculty on research and scholarship. They are rolling up their sleeves and gaining experience in the industries and disciplines that interest them. Our alumni are building outstanding careers, enriching their communities, and giving back to support a new generation of Butler students.

When an institution is moving forward so swiftly, it’s important to periodically step back to reaffirm and celebrate its foundational culture. Indeed, the more things change at Butler, the more our University’s traditions and core values remain the same. Butler began as our founders’ effort to champion inclusivity and equality among all people. Today, we continue to strive for these priorities. Outstanding undergraduate education has always been at the heart of our mission, and this focus continues today. Generations ago, Hinkle Fieldhouse came to life with cheering fans. Today, the electricity in Hinkle is only getting stronger. And Butler’s historical commitment to serving as a cultural and educational resource to Central Indiana is more robust than ever.

As you read this edition of Butler Magazine, I hope you enjoy this look at Butler’s past and present, and reflect upon your own role in shaping the Butler story. Whether your impact was large or small, your presence on this campus changed it. And for that we are grateful.

James M. Danko
President

president@butler.edu

danko young
Community

From the President

by President James M. Danko

from Fall 2017

Read more
Community

Butler Ties For First Place As Most Innovative School in the Midwest

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 08 2015

Butler University tied for first place as the Most Innovative School among Midwestern Regional Universities, according to the U.S. News and World Report Best Colleges rankings for 2016. The rating, released today, is the result of voting by college presidents, provosts, and admissions deans, who were asked to nominate the colleges or universities that are making the most innovative improvements in curriculum, faculty, students, campus life, technology, or facilities.

“We added this ranking so that college officials could pick schools that the public should be watching because of the cutting-edge changes being made on their campuses,” the magazine reported.
Butler University's Jordan Hall exterior June 6, 2014

Butler President James M. Danko, who has stressed the importance of innovation since taking over the University four years ago, said that entrepreneurial spirit and commitment to undergraduate, residential education pervade Butler University.

“We are fostering the kind of cross-disciplinary, creative thinking that enriches our campus and serves our students well throughout their lives,” Danko said. “I am pleased to see that other universities have taken note of our efforts.”

Butler also finished No. 7 in the Midwest for Best Undergraduate Teaching, which ranks schools that emphasize undergraduate education, as opposed to the postgraduate research that is a priority at many universities.

And Butler again finished in the Top 15 schools rated a Best Value in the Midwest. This calculation takes into account a school’s academic quality, based on its U.S. News Best Colleges ranking, and the 2014–2015 net cost of attendance for a student who received the average level of need-based financial aid.

Butler also finished among the best schools in four other categories:

-No. 2 overall among Midwest Regional Universities, the sixth consecutive year Butler has received this designation.

-No. 2 in the Midwest under Best Colleges for Veterans—top-ranked schools that offer veterans benefits “that can help them make pursuing a college education more affordable,” according to the magazine.

-One of the nation’s Best Undergraduate Business Programs, based on surveys of business-school deans and senior faculty.

-Again on the list of A+ Schools for B Students—“colleges and universities…where spirit and hard work could make all the difference to the admissions office.”

In addition, U.S. News invited college presidents, chief academic officers, deans of students, and deans of admissions from more than 1,500 schools to nominate stellar examples of “academic programs to look for.” Butler finished among the top schools in the country in the categories of first-year experience (ways to connect first-year with faculty or staff on a regular basis), internships, undergraduate research, service learning, and study abroad.

“These rankings are a testament to our students’ success and to the tireless work of our faculty and staff to engage and support them,” Danko said. “Our academic excellence, innovative approach, and educational outcomes have laid a firm foundation for continued achievement and recognition.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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Student LifeCommunity

Bulldogs Break Out of the Bubble and Into Indianapolis

BY Savary Koller

PUBLISHED ON Aug 26 2014

By Sarvary Koller

The temperature hovered around 90 degrees as freshmen Sidney Parrish and Julia Thomas pruned trees at Indianapolis’ Holliday Park. Parrish and Thomas volunteered at the park as a part of Bulldogs Into the Streets (BITS), an annual freshman orientation public-service program organized by Butler University’s Volunteer Center.

[caption id="attachment_20709" align="alignleft" width="290"]Sara Patel, left, an accounting major from Western Springs, Illinois, and Sidney Parrish, a pre-pharmacy major from Indianapolis, help prune trees at Holliday Park as part of BITS. Sara Patel, left, an accounting major from Western Springs, Illinois, and Sidney Parrish, a pre-pharmacy major from Indianapolis, help prune trees at Holliday Park as part of BITS.[/caption]

Gardening and cleaning up Holliday Park on a humid, summer day made for exhausting work, but the two said they loved the opportunity to venture out of the Butler bubble and make a difference in the surrounding Indianapolis community.

“It’s been a lot of fun,” Thomas, a business major from Bay Village, Ohio, said. “I’ve gotten to meet a lot of new people, and it helps involve us in Indianapolis. A lot of us aren’t from the area, so it’s helped to transition us to living here.”

“We’ve connected more as a group,” added Parrish, a pre-pharmacy major from Indianapolis, Indiana. “I came in today not knowing anybody, and now I’ve already made friends with new people in my class.”

Holliday Park Volunteer Coordinator Katie Neill said the 15 Butler volunteers transformed the park’s playground area by pulling weeds, raking mulch, trimming trees, and sweeping sidewalks. With a full-time park staff of four, Neill said she is grateful for the students’ hard work.

“Our playground does need help,” Neill said. “Every year, we try to have a project that shows the students that they’ve made a difference. We depend on volunteers for everything, and we love when the students come out and help keep the park looking nice for the community.”

Sam Thomas, Volunteer Center Events Coordinator and sophomore Political Science and Economics major, spent most of last semester and this summer being called “the BITS guy” as he worked with places like Holliday Park to coordinate volunteer projects for BITS participants.

About 545 volunteers donated their time to 19 agencies across the greater Indianapolis area this year, but Thomas said BITS is about more than just service work.

“The 1,500 hours of community service is awesome,” Thomas said, “but what BITS does is show freshmen that they can make a difference in their new home and community right off the bat during their first week on campus.”

Freshmen Moriah Riggs and Nicolina Cecere said they, too, appreciated their BITS experience at Joy’s House Adult Day Service in Broad Ripple as new Butler Bulldogs looking to get acclimated in Indianapolis.  

Riggs and Cecere spent time playing bingo and conversing with visitors to Joy’s House, an adult day service for community adults with physical and mental disabilities who are no longer able to stay at home safely.

[caption id="attachment_20710" align="alignright" width="400"]Butler volunteers visiting 19 agencies on Tuesday, including Butler volunteers visiting 19 agencies on Tuesday, including Chapel Glen Elementary School.[/caption]

“It’s nice to just talk to the people here,” Cecere, a sociology major from Minneapolis, Minnesota, said. “It’s cool because not only do we get to go out in Indianapolis, but we get to meet other people from our class and the community. I didn’t know any of these people before today.”

Candace Preston, Joy’s House caregiver and Program Manager, said the house guests love the opportunity to meet and interact with the Butler students.

“They love seeing a set of different faces,” Preston said. “They see us Monday through Friday all day, and now they get to spend time with new people. Plus, it benefits the Butler students by showing them that old people aren’t scary or boring. We have some volunteers who come for a couple hours and then decide to come back.”

Thomas said the goal of BITS is to recruit freshman volunteers and encourage them to take advantage of future service opportunities in Indianapolis.

According to Thomas, the Volunteer Center will host a Volunteer Opportunities Fair on September 5 to provide an experience where students can discover new community volunteer options. The fair will include many of the agencies that hosted students during BITS this year.

“Hopefully we’ll get some BITS volunteers signed up for more service activities at the fair,” Thomas said. “This program is mutually beneficial for both students and service agencies in our community.”

 

Community

President Danko: All Should Feel Safe, Valued, Celebrated

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 13 2015

In light of the situation at the University of Missouri and other campuses, President Danko issued this statement:

Dear Butler Community Members,

Earlier this year, I spoke out against Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA). This act uniquely damaged the spirit and global reputation President Jim Dankoof the Hoosier State. Its discriminatory agenda directly contradicted Butler’s values of fairness and inclusivity, and I felt compelled to publicly comment in that case in the hope of inspiring action and dialogue.

Similarly, I feel compelled to share my thoughts with you now about the changes taking place at the University of Missouri and other campuses across the country this week. The aspiration of students at these institutions is that which forms the heart of Butler University’s founding and current values: the realization of a just society, in which all people are respected and valued equally.

Archbishop Desmond Tutu came to our campus in 2013 and spoke to us about peace, forgiveness, and reconciliation when we opened a Center in his name. As members of a learning environment that values critical inquiry, we recognize that his message of compassion and humanity rings true. At the same time, we realize that social justice is the cornerstone of peace.

The United States grapples with a history of discrimination and oppression. Today, college students across the country continue to live with the very real consequences of that history. Despite the progress we have made as a great nation, we have much work to do to become a truly just society. As our country continues to struggle to address injustice, it is incumbent upon us, as Butler University community members, to be leaders of dialogue, pathfinders to solutions, and models of civility. This leadership can be assumed by any and all of us, including faculty, staff, students, and alumni.

Our Butler values put us in a strong position to assume such leadership. Butler was founded by abolitionists who wrote into our University charter that we would be “a non-sectarian institution free from the taint of slavery.” Gertrude Mahorney, Butler’s first African-American graduate, earned her bachelor’s degree in 1887. Sigma Gamma Rho was founded on Butler’s campus in 1922. Butler was the first college in Indiana to admit women and men on an equal basis, and established the first endowed chair in the nation specifically designated to be filled by a female professor.

I do not cite these facts to encourage us to rest on our laurels; rather, I believe we should be inspired by our shared history of, and commitment to, social justice and the eradication of discrimination in its many forms, both insidious and overt. I challenge all of us to recommit to our founding vision. I challenge us to strive, each day, to more fully understand each other’s experiences. I challenge us to find positive and constructive ways for Butler to be a national leader in finding real solutions to these long-standing issues.

I would like to acknowledge the efforts of Provost Kathryn Morris, Vice President Levester Johnson, and Associate Professor Terri Jett, Special Assistant to the Provost for Diversity and Inclusivity, who are leading concerted efforts to ensure that our community is a just, fair, and safe place in which all people may thrive equally. We are also extremely fortunate to have many other faculty members with expertise in social justice issues, who are working extremely hard toward this goal. Most importantly, our students are engaged in a wide range of social-justice initiatives, both at the curricular and extracurricular level, which empower them to effect positive change and make a real difference.

While all these activities are extremely important, I believe we can work even harder, and do even more, to live our founding Butler mission each day. Please join me in redoubling our efforts to that end, in support of the rights of every person—in our own learning community and in those across our nation—to feel safe, valued, and celebrated.

As always, I welcome your thoughts and questions.

James M. Danko, President
Butler University

Community

Butler University Celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 16 2015

The Butler University Celebration of Diversity 2015 proudly presents the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration “Preserving the Legacy – Fulfilling the Dream” January 17-30 at various locations on and around campus.

Below is the schedule. For more information on these events, contact the Office of Diversity Programs at 317-940-6570.

Martin Luther King Jr.January 17

11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

The Peace Learning Center’s 17th Annual “Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Festival” celebrating the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Enjoy music, dance, poetry, a community fair, and a free lunch. The festival will be held at the Christian Theological Seminary, 1100 West 42nd Street. Admission is free. For more information, contact the Peace Learning Center at 317-327-7144.

January 19

Noon

Songs of Freedom and Celebration Carillon Concert, honoring the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., performed by William E. Engle, University Carillonneur. The concert will take place in Holcomb Gardens, on the Butler University campus.

10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

MLK Day at the Indiana State Museum. All are invited to join the Indiana State Museum in celebrating the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with demonstrations, activities, and performances throughout the day. Admission is free with each canned good donated to Gleaners Food Bank.

11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

All are invited to celebrate the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at the Indianapolis Museum of Art., 4200 North Michigan Road. Enjoy a day full of interactive activities to honor Dr. King’s legacy, including gallery tours, games, art activities, and continuous film screenings designed for all ages. Admission is free. For more information, call 317-923-1331, ext. 214.

6:30 p.m.

“Fulfilling the Dream,” a candlelight reflection honoring the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The ceremony will be held in the Efroymson Diversity Center, Atherton Union 004.

January 20    

7:00 p.m.

Diversity Expressions Series, celebrating films on the Civil Rights Movement, presents

King: A Filmed Record…Montgomery to Memphis (1970), an Academy Award-nominated documentary that follows the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his decades of civil rights activism. Narrated by Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward. The screening will take place in the Efroymson Diversity Center. Refreshments will be served.

January 22

7:00 p.m.

The Diversity Expressions Series presents Four Little Girls (1997), Spike Lee’s critically acclaimed documentary that chronicles the story of the four young victims of the Birmingham church bombing. The screening will be held in the Efroymson Diversity Center. Refreshments will be served.

January 24
6:00 p.m.

“Stand Together for Justice, a prayer vigil and interactive discussion on “knowing your rights,” with the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department. The event will be held in the Reilly Room, Atherton Union. Sponsored by the Black Student Union.

January 27

7:00 p.m.

Diversity Expressions Series presents Freedom Riders (2010), the critically acclaimed documentary by Stanley Nelson that chronicles the inspirational story of American civil rights activists’ peaceful fight against racial segregation on buses and trains in the 1960s. The screening will be held in the Efroymson Diversity Center. Refreshments will be served.

January 28

6:00 p.m.

I Can’t Breathe! What Would King Do? A dialogue to explore the impact of Dr. King’s philosophical perspective on contemporary societal issues, with a focus on the resurgence of social and political activism. The dialogue will be held in the Efroymson Diversity Center. Refreshments will be served.

January 29

7:00 p.m.

Gospel in the DC, an evening of music, praise and fellowship, featuring Butler’s Voices of Deliverance Gospel Choir. The performance will be held in the Efroymson Diversity Center. Co-sponsored by Diversity Programs and the Voices of Deliverance Gospel Choir.

Film Screenings and Dialogue

Continuous Screenings will be held in the Efroymson Diversity Center, Atherton Union, Room 004

January 20
The Speeches Collection, Volume 1 (2002). Follow Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s electrifying speeches from his early days as a young pastor in Montgomery to the march on Washington.

January 22

Martin Luther King Jr. The Man and the Dream (1997). A&E Biography profiles Dr. Martin Luther King, providing rare footage and exclusive interviews go beyond the myths and bring his story to life.

January 27

KING: Go Beyond the Dream to Discover the Man (2008). A&E History takes viewers through the extraordinary life and times of America’s civil rights visionary.

January 30

Eyes on the Prize, Part 1 (Episode 6)Bridge to Freedom: 1965 (1987). PBS’s groundbreaking documentary on the American civil rights movement. This episode covers Bloody Sunday and the historic Selma-to-Montgomery march.

Butler University's "Celebration of Diversity 2015" Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday activities are sponsored by the Black Student Union, Efroymson Diversity Center, Voices of Deliverance Gospel Choir, Student Government Association, R.E.A.C.H., Clowes Memorial Hall, Division of Student Affairs, Peace Learning Center Inc., Indianapolis Museum of Art, Morton-Finney Leadership Program, and the Office of Diversity Programs.

The Celebration of Diversity Distinguished Lecture Series is a Collaborative Diversity Initiative between Butler University and the Office of the Mayor, City of Indianapolis, with generous support from the Eli Lilly and Company Foundation, Citizens Energy Group, Indianapolis Power & Light Company, Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Old National Bank, The Kroger Company, Radio One, and The Columbia Club.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

Prosecutor Names Butler 'Crime Fighter of the Year'

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 04 2015

Butler University is the 2015 recipient of the Marion County Prosecutor’s Crime Fighter of the Year Award, presented on August 4 by Prosecutor Terry Curry to Butler University Chief of Staff and Executive Director of Public Safety Ben Hunter, Assistant Professor Brandie Oliver and Butler University Police Department Detective Bruce Allee.
Butler University was presented with the Crime Fighter of the Year Award at the 32nd annual National Night Out Kick-Off Ceremony on August 4. Pictured, from left, are Assistant Prosecutor Kristen Martin, Deputy Prosecutor Ryan Mears, Butler Assistant Police Chief Andy Ryan, Detective Bruce Allee, University Chief of Staff and Executive Director of Public Safety Ben Hunter, Assistant Professor Brandie Oliver, and Butler Assistant Police Chief John Conley.

Speaking at the 32nd annual National Night Out Kick-Off and Crime Fighter of the Year Award Ceremony, hosted by the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, Curry said Butler was chosen for the school’s work in improving the success of youth and families by addressing truancy, bullying, and through other crime prevention initiatives.

In 2013, Butler University partnered with the Marion County Prosecutor’s Office to present the “End Bullying Now” forum. The event provided an opportunity for experts to educate parents, caregivers and educators on the educational, legal and psychological effects of bullying. Curry said his staff has utilized this information in the office’s outreach efforts with young people across the county, sharing solutions for prevention and intervention in bullying through the office’s CyberSafe program for students and their parents.

Butler and Oliver have also been instrumental in efforts to address truancy in Marion County. Recognizing that truancy often is a result of other family issues, the Marion County Prosecutor’s Office set the goal of finding productive consequences for children who do attend school regularly and their parents. Oliver and Butler graduate students created and implemented a four-part parenting class that was court ordered as a condition of a diversion agreement for parents. Butler students also created and implemented a program for middle school students who were truant from school.

Butler University Police Department was recognized for implementing a successful anti-alcohol diversion program for university students, spearheaded by Detective Bruce Allee. Minor alcohol offenses by students on campus can be addressed through a pre-diversion program which requires students to participate in an impact panel and community service.

“We’re proud of the work that Dr. Oliver and Detective Allee have done,” Hunter said. “Indianapolis is our home, and Butler’s home, and we want to do whatever we can to make this a world-class city.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

Butler Prepared to Thrive in Challenging Times, Danko Says

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 28 2015

Declaring that “the state of our University is stronger than ever,” Butler President James M. Danko said in his State of the University speech on September 25 that Butler “is well positioned not only to survive these challenging times, but to thrive in them.”
Butler University President JIm Danko speaks at Clowes Memorial Hall on September 25.

“Today’s students—especially those considering an institution like Butler—expect and deserve to be immersed in an environment where they can learn, grow, and contribute each and every day,” he told the audience at Clowes Memorial Hall. “Through our focus on innovative teaching, close relationships with faculty and staff, diversity and inclusivity, experiential education, global education, and service learning, I believe we already provide our students with one of the most engaging and valuable educational experiences in the country.”

Danko pointed to the University’s ability to innovate and successfully launch new programs—including, most recently, those in Interactive Media, Sports Media, Music Performance & Education, Musical Arts, Jazz Studies, Astronomy & Astrophysics, Environmental Studies, Recreation and Sports Studies, Healthcare and Business.

Butler also launched new graduate programs, including the Butler-Schwab MBA partnership, the Physician-Assistant Program shift to a standalone Master’s Degree, and seven new non-degree certificate programs within the College of Education.

Danko said both he and the Board of Trustees are bullish on Butler’s future, as evidenced by the trustees’ approval earlier in September for “the planning and design of world-class facilities for the sciences and business.”

Danko said while a college degree “continues to be one of the best long-term investments you can make, the issues of prohibitive cost and student debt are very real.”

But he is encouraged by the growth in first-year enrollment this year and the trend that an increasing number of Butler students are graduating on time, rather than returning for a fifth year.

“More than ever before, today’s students and parents are focused as much or more on the expected outcomes of a college education as they are on the educational experience itself,” he said. “And at Butler, we are well positioned to deliver on both. By continuing to strengthen the Butler experience and focusing intently on key learning and career outcomes, we can build upon Butler’s already stellar record of preparing students for continued study, successful careers, and meaningful lives.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

'Make Change' Program Expands Again

BY

PUBLISHED ON May 18 2015

Make Change, the Butler University Center for Urban Ecology program that generates “credit” for doing good for the environment, has added new activities that participants can do to earn redeemable currency.

changeVolunteering with Keep Indianapolis Beautiful at select events, dropping off old electronics at RecycleForce, and enrolling in the IPL Green Power option are some of the new ways to earn credit. Also, Make Change has developed a partnership with Circle City Rain Barrels to offer discounted rain barrel-building workshops every third Saturday through August.

The full list of activities can be found at makechangeindy.com.

In addition, participants in the Make Change program are now able to spend the currency at eight businesses in Fountain Square and the Near Eastside, thanks to a SustainIndy Community Grant that runs through November 1.

The new business partners in the program are People for Urban Progress, Rocket 88 Doughnuts, VeloWorks Urban Cyclery, and Wildwood Market in Fountain Square, and Little Green Bean Boutique, Metta Yoga, Pogue’s Run Grocer, and Khaos Company Theatre on the Near Eastside.

Each hour of activity a person does is worth $10 in aluminum coins specially created for this program. Also available are quarter-hour coins that equal $2.50 worth of activity.

The program has been operating in Midtown since 2012 and will continue to run there. Businesses currently accepting the currency include Unleavened Bread Café, The Children's Museum of Indianapolis, Freewheelin' Community Bikes, Fall Creek Gardens, Duos Kitchen, KI EcoCenter, Agrarian, Indy Upcycle, Good Earth Natural Foods, Broad Ripple Brew Pub, and the Center for Urban Ecology Farm at Butler.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

President Danko's Mid-Year Update

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 12 2015

One year ago, we introduced the Butler 2020 Vision—the culmination of two years of discussion and feedback from Butler students, faculty, staff, and alumni. Twelve months later, we have made major strides and are poised for great achievement in the months and years to come. I would like to begin the year by sharing updates on key accomplishments and opportunities—all made possible by your support and engagement, and that of the entire Butler community.

Jim DankoAcademics
The first platform of the Butler 2020 Vision outlines our strategy to distinguish Butler through innovative programs and a strengthened commitment to community engagement, experiential learning, and international education. 2014 brought exceptional recognition of our work in these areas, as U.S.News recognized Butler as one of the top schools in the country for undergraduate education that supports student success. Butler—listed among the nation’s best for internships, undergraduate research, service learning, study abroad, and first-year experience—was one of only three universities in the United States recognized in five or more categories, and was recognized in more categories than all other Indiana schools combined.

The New Year has already brought further affirmation of Butler’s efforts, as the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching recognized Butler with its Community Engagement Classification, which acknowledges colleges and universities that have gained national distinction by developing mutually beneficial partnerships with local organizations and surrounding communities.

These accolades reflect the exceptional work of faculty and staff across the University. In the year to come, we will continue to build upon these accomplishments as we launch new programs, expand online offerings, continue to fund innovative initiatives, and further distinguish Butler within a crowded higher education landscape.

Health and Safety
There is nothing more important than the health and safety of our students. With the topic of sexual violence front and center at college campuses around the country, Butler has taken proactive steps to build a Community of Care. In 2014, we expanded student programming focused on education and prevention, collaborated with government stakeholders and peer institutions, and worked to improve Butler’s sexual assault policies, procedures, and enforcement efforts.

Last spring, we announced plans to create a commission of students, faculty, and staff to build upon current efforts to stop sexual violence at Butler. The Presidential Commission on Sexual Assault—which includes representation from students, faculty, and staff from across the University—will meet actively throughout 2015 and provide Butler’s leadership with ongoing recommendations to improve assessment, education, and prevention.

At last year’s Convocation, it was inspiring to watch our incoming students stand together and take the #ButlerPledge to care for one another and keep each other safe. I am proud of our community’s efforts to uphold these commitments and look forward to a safe and healthy 2015 at Butler University.

Leadership
We are fortunate to welcome two new members to the University’s leadership team in 2015—VP for Advancement Jaci Thiede, and VP for Enrollment Management Lori Greene. Jaci and Lori bring significant talent and experience to Butler and I am confident they will help lead their divisions and—in partnership with our existing leadership team—our University to great success in the years to come.

Congratulations also to Chris Holtmann, who was named men’s basketball Head Coach on January 2. Coach Holtmann has done a tremendous job leading the team in recent months and we are confident in his leadership—and that of all athletic coaches and staff—as our Bulldogs complete their second year of BIG EAST competition. We appreciate Brandon Miller’s many contributions to Butler over the last 18 months, and wish him well.

Campus Environment
Following the 2013 completion of the Schrott Center for the Arts and West Campus infrastructure improvements, we made major strides in 2014 toward advancing Butler’s educational mission through superior campus amenities.

In April 2014, the University—in partnership with the City of Indianapolis—broke ground on the Sunset Streetscape Project, intended to beautify the eastern border of Butler’s campus, while improving safety and sustainability. The bulk of the project was completed this fall, with finishing touches scheduled for this spring, prior to Commencement.

In September, we broke ground on a multi-use parking facility that will address long-standing parking concerns and bring new dining and retail options to Butler’s campus. The five-story facility, expected to open in August, will house 1,038 parking spaces and 15,000 square feet of retail space.

Thanks to the generosity of thousands of supporters, the Campaign for Hinkle Fieldhouse formally concluded at the end of 2013 and raised approximately $18 million for the preservation and enhancement of Butler’s 86-year-old national landmark. Renovations—many focused on supporting student-athlete well-being and academic success—were completed in October, in time for the 2014-2015 basketball season. The team did an incredible job maintaining Hinkle’s charm, while providing modern amenities to athletes and fans, alike. If you haven’t yet seen the updates, I encourage you to attend a men’s or women’s basketball game this year.

Also in 2014, the University entered an agreement with American Campus Communities (ACC), a national leader in campus housing, to develop world-class residential facilities to serve the next generation of Butler students. The first phase of development will begin this March, when the University and ACC break ground on a state-of-the-art 630-bed residential facility along Sunset Ave. north of ResCo. This facility, which will also feature a large community space at Sunset and Butler Way, is scheduled to be complete by fall 2016. Planning is underway for future phases of housing development, which will ultimately include the renovation or replacement of beds in Schwitzer, Ross, and ResCo.

For a closer look at the impact these projects will have on Butler’s campus aesthetic, click here. In the long term, these projects are all necessary precursors to planned expansion and modernization of academic spaces. The Science Commission made great progress in 2014 on its recommendations for developing state-of-the-art science facilities in Gallahue and Holcomb, while a new task force began planning for a new academic building to house the College of Business and additional programs.

As Butler builds and grows, we remain committed to sustainability. In August 2014, the University approved and submitted a Climate Action Plan as part of the American Colleges & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment, which we signed in 2012. The plan, which will require extensive collaboration among campus stakeholders, outlines short- and long-term strategies to achieve climate neutrality by 2050.

Final Thoughts
At Butler’s December board meeting, our trustees expressed great confidence and enthusiasm in the University’s vision, strategy, and progress to date. They also acknowledged the significant challenge ahead as we seek to grow and distinguish Butler in the face of demographic and marketplace shifts that will confront higher education in the coming years. I share our trustees’ confidence in Butler’s future, and I am thankful for the great people of Butler—our students, faculty, staff, alumni, and friends—who make this future possible. Thank you again for all you do for Butler University, and I look forward to working alongside you to accomplish great things in 2015 and beyond.

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Community

Butler Library Faculty Help Shortridge Students with Senior Projects

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 16 2014

When seniors at Shortridge Magnet High School start work on their required Senior Service Learning Project, they—and their teachers—will be backed with help from several members of the Butler library faculty.

Under the leadership of Associate Dean of the Libraries Sally Neal, and with the support of Dean Julie Miller, members of the Butler libraries faculty designed and delivered customized workshops for Shortridge faculty, staff, and students to guide them through the research paper that is part of their service learning project. 

On Jan. 10, the Butler library faculty provided a research skills workshop for the Shortridge faculty mentors who are shepherding the Shortridge students through this first-time project.

“The Butler librarians shared some of their best tips for helping students locate the resources they will need for their research,” Neal said.

Strategies shared included how to write a strong thesis statement; identifying terminology/keywords for searching; considering the types of information sources needed (primary, secondary); identifying the information tools available for searching; and, finally, database searching strategies. 

On Jan. 17, the library faculty will present to the Shortridge students directly. The Shortridge students are at various points in the research process, so Butler librarians will present an overview on developing a strong thesis statement and good keywords. They will then work with the students in small groups based on where they are at in their research process. 

“Working with the Shortridge seniors will provide us with the opportunity to learn where they are at in their information literacy/research skill learning and to share with them how building on these skills is necessary not only for college but for lifelong learning,” Neal said. “We are excited about the opportunity to work with students outside Butler who may become Butler students themselves!” 

Butler University faculty collaborated with the Indianapolis Public Schools and community representatives to develop and open Shortridge Magnet High School for Law and Public Policy in 2009. The school offers a rigorous Core 40 college preparatory curriculum for grades 6-12, engagement with social justice issues, and exploration of legal and public service careers.

Butler students and faculty work with Shortridge counterparts in mentoring and tutoring, curriculum planning, after-school programs, professional teacher development, and an Early College Program.

Butler faculty participating in this project with Neal include Sally Childs-Helton, Janice Gustaferro, Tim Hommey, and Teresa Willliams.

Julianne Miranda, director of Butler’s Center for Academic Technology, also is a partner in this venture. She will assist in devising ways in which Information Commons student staff might assist the Shortridge seniors in later stages of preparing their presentations.

The Senior Serving Learning Project is designed to be a culmination of the Shortridge students’ experience at the law and public policy magnet school. Seniors have the opportunity to work with a community organization that specializes in a particular area of law or public policy.

They’re required to complete 80 hours of service that focuses on legal or public policy issues. They then write and present their projects to a panel of judges. Their work is supposed to be at or near college level.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
(317) 940-9822

Community

Students Take Responsibility for Keeping Each Other Safe

BY Sarvary Koller ’15

PUBLISHED ON Apr 06 2015

Hannah Hendricks’ experience with sexual assault hits especially close to home for Butler students—she was raped during her first year on campus.

“Students know that sexual assault exists,” said Noelle Rich, founder of Stand Tall, a student organization dedicated to awareness and prevention of sexual assault. “But not everyone knows it exists on our campus. Having Hannah hear to talk about it as someone who’s been a Butler student, gone to the campus Starbucks, studied on the Mall—it brought the issue back here. It could happen to any of us.”
Noelle Rich and Austin Del Priore emceed and helped organize the "It's On Us" Butler kickoff.

Hendricks came to speak as a part of the “It’s On Us” Butler Kickoff event on Monday, March 30, in which students signed a pledge to end campus sexual assault.

The pledge is a part of President Barack Obama’s national “It’s On Us” campaign, and it encourages “a personal commitment to help keep women and men safe from sexual assault. It is a promise not to be a bystander to the problem, but to be a part of the solution.” (Take the pledge here.)

Butler’s event, organized by the Student Government Association’s Council on Presidential Affairs (CPA) with involvement from the Presidential Commission on Sexual Assault and the Stand Tall student organization, kick-started the university’s involvement in Sexual Assault Awareness Month this April.

The event was part of a larger initiative to eradicate sexual assault on campus. (Check out the SGA “It’s On Us” video here.)

Over 500 students gathered in the Atherton Union Reilly Room to sign the pledge and learn more about the nature of sexual assault, how to prevent it, and where to find help or information.

Austin Del Priore, SGA President of Administration, emceed the event with Stand Tall founder Rich, and he said he was thrilled by the heavy turnout.

“I was immensely proud of the campus community for uniting around such an important cause,” Del Priore said. “Butler students are involved in so many different clubs and organizations, but we all share the fact that we belong to the greater Butler community. I believe we all have an obligation to make that community a safe place for everyone.”

Campus representatives from Counseling and Consultation Services, the Victim Advocate, and University police participated in the event to demonstrate the support available to students on campus and the university’s dedication to creating a safe and healthy campus environment.

But sexual assault exists everywhere, not just on a college campus.

Representatives from several community agencies, including the Julian Center, Legacy House, Domestic Violence Network, and Center of Hope, joined the event to speak about the availability of community resources to students and survivors of assault. Each organization addressed the group of attendees, and students were able to connect one-on-one with agency leaders at the conclusion of the program.

Sarah Diaz, Coordinator for Health Education and Outreach Programs, said she hopes the involvement of community agencies encourages students to reach out for information and discover new ways to make an impact in Indianapolis and beyond.

At the end of the event, students left armed with the resources, community connections, and an “It’s On Us” T-shirt to act as crusaders in the effort to end campus sexual assault.

Rich said she is excited to see the rapid growth of sexual assault awareness on campus. From the start of her Stand Tall photo project last semester to becoming a recognized and valuable student organization this semester, Rich said she hopes the momentum keeps up.

“To see it all come together has been really cool for me,” Rich said. “We are putting on the same T-shirt, promoting the same cause. We are all Butler students coming together to be on the side of change on our campus.”

Community

Butler Issues Statement on RFRA Change

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 02 2015

Butler University issued the following statement after the legislature voted to change Indiana's divisive "Religious Freedom" law:

This Organization Serves EveryoneButler University applauds and supports today’s proposed revisions to Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act. They represent a strong step forward and make clear that discrimination has no place in Indiana.

The people of Indiana often talk about “Hoosier values.” Butler University reflects the best of those values. We believe that all people should be welcome, regardless of sexual orientation, religion, gender, race, or ethnicity. Ours is a culture of acceptance and inclusivity that began with our abolitionist founder in 1855 and continues to pervade the Butler University community today.

The outpouring of support and advocacy across Indiana over the last several days is clear evidence that these Butler values are shared by institutions, businesses, and citizens across our great state.

Now the real work begins—to build upon today’s efforts to ensure our state is forever free from the taint of discrimination, and to restore our state’s reputation as one of the nation’s best places to live, visit, and do business.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Community

Butler Celebrates Founder's Week, February 1-7

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 26 2015

One hundred and sixty years ago, Butler University was founded on the principles of diversity, equality, innovation, and access. Those characteristics are still vital today as we seek to recapture and reclaim the values of Ovid Butler.

Join us the week of February 1-7 as we celebrate Ovid Butler's legacy with these Founder's Week events:Ovid Butler

Sunday, February 1
Honor a Butler Hero Fund Drive
Make a donation to the Butler Fund in honor of a member of staff, faculty or student body who exemplifies Ovid Butler’s belief in diversity, equality and inclusivity.
Suggested pledge: $18.55

Monday, February 2
Founder’s Week Kick-Off
3:00 p.m., Irwin Library Collaborative Space
Welcome by Provost Kate Morris and President Jim Danko
Photo unveiling ceremony at 3:30 p.m.
Coffee, tea, cookies provided

Founder’s Week Keynote Speaker
Dr. Leslie Nardo-Ashburn, Associate Professor of Psychology, IUPUI
4:00 p.m., Irwin Library Collaborative Space

February 3
Butler vs. St. John’s men’s basketball game
7 p.m., Hinkle Fieldhouse
Founder’s Day giveaways at the game

February 4
ACLU First Wednesday Panel Discussion (BCR Event)
"What Would Ovid Butler Do: Today's Movement for Better Policing and Racial Justice"
11:30 a.m. Lunch and check in Robertson Hall
Noon event in Robertson Hall or Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall
Moderator: Erica Smith, Columnist, Indianapolis Star
Panelists:
Kelly R. Eskew, ACLU of Indiana staff attorney
Benjamin Hunter, Public Safety Director, Butler University (former IPD officer and current member of the Indianapolis City-County Council)
Regina Marsh, Executive Director, Forest Manor Multi-Service Center
Monica Solinas-Saunders, Assistant Professor of Public Affairs, IU Northwest

Indianapolis Illustrator Michele Wood book signing
4:00-6:00 p.m., Irwin Library Collaborative
Chasing Freedom: The Life Journeys of Harriet Tubman and Susan B. Anthony by Nikki Grimes

Movie: “Dear White People!” (R.E.A.C.H./SGA event)
6:00 p.m., Efroymson Diversity Center in Atherton Union lower level
Discussion will follow with Professor Terri Jett from the Political Science Department

February 5
Founder’s Grant Winners Presentations and Honor a Butler Hero
Noon, Starbucks
What Would Ovid Butler Do? Game, Demia Butler, poster presentations
Pizza will be served

Comedian Mo Amer (R.E.A.C.H./SGA event)
5:30 p.m., Reilly Room
Palestinian-American standup comedian whose work promotes understanding of differences.
Free food available

February 6
Butler vs. DePaul women’s basketball game
11:30 a.m., Hinkle Fieldhouse

Food Truck Friday
11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., Hinkle Fieldhouse parking lot

Pride Party (R.E.A.C.H./SGA event)
5:30 p.m., Efroymson Diversity Center

February 7
Butler vs. DePaul men’s basketball game
3:30 p.m., Hinkle Fieldhouse
Founder’s Day giveaways at the game

Events starting February 2 and going all week:

Irwin Library
Founder’s Week exhibit showcases history of Butler University.
Interactive Race Kiosk: we are all part of the human race.
Cut-outs of Ovid Butler and his daughter, Demia Butler- tweet a photo!

Why Founder’s Day? Video
Showcases why we celebrate Founder’s Day.

Founder’s Week Twitter Contest
Question of the Day: Tweet your answer to #standwithovid
(A Starbucks gift card will be given to two randomly selected winners each day, chosen from all appropriate responses.)

Founder’s Week Challenge Card
Participate in key events and activities and get your challenge card stamped. Pick one up at the library.
(Two iPad minis will be raffled to one student and one faculty/staff member randomly selected from those with five stamps or more on their cards by the end of February 6.)

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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Community

In This Program, Young Writers Find Their Voice

BY Sarvary Koller '15

PUBLISHED ON Oct 16 2014

As students trickle into room 238 at Shortridge Magnet High School, stagnant silence grows to a dull roar of laughter and chatter. Butler University students and Shortridge students catch up over peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, then get to the task at hand: creative writing.

Today, they will be crafting their own parodies.

Butler MFA graduate student Luke Wortley leads an impromptu poetry slam as part of the Writing in the Schools program.
Butler MFA graduate student Luke Wortley leads the weekly poetry slam as part of the Writing in the Schools program.

 

One student writes and performs a parody of Miley Cyrus’s “Wrecking Ball,” reflecting upon the human contribution to global warming and the destruction of our planet. Another student exercises her imagination to rewrite One Direction’s “You and I” from the viewpoint of a love-struck fan.

It took less than 15 minutes for the cluttered science classroom to transform into a collaborative, energetic writer’s studio. The students spent the afternoon writing and laughing and writing some more. No idea is rejected ­– all are important and supported.

Their activity is part of Writing in the Schools, a product of the Butler University and Indianapolis Public Schools partnership. The program meets twice a week at Shortridge, with Butler students enrolled in EN455-S Writing in the Schools offering student-to-student mentorship to Shortridge youth.

The writing prompts vary each week, and all students are encouraged to perform their work in front of the class at the end of the session.

The program was initiated in 2011 under the guidance of Susan Sutherlin, Butler English Department Director of Peer Tutoring, to provide students the opportunity to work in the community with liberal arts and encourage written creativity among local youth.

“We are all writers,” Sutherlin said. “We deeply believe in and are committed to creative writing and fostering that form of expression.”

Sutherlin taught and developed the program during its first two years before passing on the baton to Butler faculty member Chris Speckman, who served as her graduate assistant while still in Butler’s Masters of Fine Arts Creative Writing program.

Speckman, EN455-S professor and Writing in the Schools director, is entering his second year as the leader of the program. He hopes to build a community of writers where people from different walks and stages of life can connect through creativity and shared experiences. Room 238 is a nonjudgmental space where all students are encouraged to find their voice.

“This program is not the outsider coming in and bestowing all the knowledge on the lesser,” Speckman said. “We are doing this with them. We are a community of writers where we are all equals. Butler students and Shortridge students. We do it to discover things about ourselves.”

Wortley and Shortridge senior Paula Cloyd
Wortley and Shortridge senior Paula Cloyd

MFA graduate student Luke Wortley, in his second year as a graduate assistant, has found particular meaning in the Writing in the Schools program. He chose to attend Butler because of the one-of-a-kind opportunity to mentor high school students through creative writing.

“I’d never really worked in a setting like this where you work with kids that come from such different walks of life,” he said. “It’s instructive about the world. It’s helped give me some perspective, which is huge.”

Wortley said he never gets tired of watching the Shortridge students break down their barriers as they cultivate relationships with Butler students and learn to understand their written voice.

He experienced this transformation firsthand while working with Shortridge senior Paula Cloyd, a veteran of the program who has participated since its inception. He worked with Cloyd as she wrote a poem called “Speak” that eventually won the 2013 IUPUI Poetry Contest. (read her poem here)

“It was that first connection where we produced something really beautiful together,” Wortley said. “We instantly formed this relationship.”

With a newfound passion for public education, Wortley said he now hopes to become a high school teacher and remain involved in after-school programs for youth. He credits this decision to his experience with Writing in the Schools.

“It’s the single most meaningful thing I’ve ever done,” Wortley said. “It’s fulfilling in a way that I wouldn’t have gotten from anything else. It’s not only informing me as a writer, it’s informing me as a person.”

 

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Community

Love That Took Root in Holcomb Gardens Finds a New Way to Bloom

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 22 2014

On September 22, 1974, Sharon Leininger ’70 and Michael Nemeroff got married in Holcomb Gardens.

Forty years later, they returned—this time to plant a Japanese maple tree to commemorate their 40th anniversary.

_BS21843“At first, I was going to make this a surprise,” Mike said, “but everything else we’ve done in our marriage has been a partnership. So about a year ago, I asked her, ‘Would you like to do this?’ She thought about it and decided she would, and we made every decision together along the way—which is the way we do everything.”

The Nemeroffs first met in Indianapolis in 1972 when he was in the Army and she was working in politics. “She didn’t like someone like me at the time,” Mike said.

About a year later, they met again, this time in Washington, D.C. “She liked me better then,” he said.

They got married a year later, with Doug Petersen, Nemeroff’s college roommate and a Presbyterian minister, performing the ceremony. On Monday, Petersen was back, along with his wife, Anne, to help the Nemeroffs celebrate.

The tree planting idea was in the works for a year and a half. Mike Nemeroff contacted Graham Honaker, Senior Development Officer, who made the arrangements, which included a sparkling wine toast and flowers.

“It’s a nice way to celebrate 40 years,” Honaker said.

The Nemeroffs, who made a gift to Butler in honor of their anniversary, agreed.

“We’ve raised three kids together—she’s done most of the work—our kids are very successful, and we’ve been happy together the whole time,” Mike said. “Based on a sample of one, I think Butler women are pretty terrific.”

“It was special to be married here,” Sharon said. “This is very lovely.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

Gateway to Success

 

The YMCA of Greater Indianapolis has a problem. With each passing year memberships— family, two-person household, and single—are declining. For an organization that relies on these fees to operate, reversing this nearly decade-long slide is critical.

So, when Gregg Hiland, Executive Vice President and Chief Operations Officer of the YMCA, set out to address the issue, he was excited to have 27 helpers. Enter, the newest batch of Butler University MBA students.

This is MBA 505, the Gateway Experience—the first on-campus course in the program after they finish their online prerequisites—and it is a trial by fire. Meet new people, learn to work together, examine a problem, come up with recommendations, and deliver those recommendations directly to the leaders of the organization.

All in one day.

Over 800 students have gone through the class since 2006, helping more than 20 different businesses tackle a specific problem. The future MBAs are put through the wringer for a specific reason.

"Having only 24 hours helps students realize that time can't be the excuse for coming up with great solutions," says Marie Mackintosh '06, who is both the Chief Operating Officer of EmployIndy, which delivers workforce services and training to Marion County residents, and the professor who has taught the course for the past four years. "It simulates the pressures of the real world where you have to juggle many different priorities, and the trial by fire forces teams to gel quickly and leverage each other’s strengths. Or learn from their failures.”

They get a little preparation beforehand, in the form of a two-page background briefing on their issue and a session with Butler Business Librarian Teresa Williams to learn about conducting background research. Each team is assigned a facilitator who provides advice and feedback on what they did well and what they need to work on.

Then the rush begins.

The Butler University MBA promises that students get ample opportunities to apply classroom concepts to real-world situations—and that explains why 27 new participants in the program are spending their first day of class fanned out across Indianapolis.

For the next 24, breathless hours, they've been grouped in teams of five or six students—strangers to each other previously—and asked to help the YMCA of Greater Indianapolis reverse a nearly decade-long slide in family memberships.

*

The class starts at 5:30 PM on Thursday with a big dinner and introduction to the organization. Hiland, Executive Vice President and Chief Operations Officer of the YMCA of Greater Indianapolis, lays out the problem: Since 2014, the number of two-adult member households has dropped from 12,746 to 10,281. The number of one-adult households is down from 3,784 to 3,353.

This is a trend nationwide, not just in Indianapolis, he says.

"We want recommendations from you that will be actionable, something that will help us," Hiland tells the group.

For the next 45 minutes or so, the MBA students pepper him with questions: Are outside vendors allowed in? How are you marketing? Do you survey the people who quit? And so on.

"I'm enjoying the idea of getting to make a presentation to people who can really make a difference," says Taylor Cagle, a Financial Analyst with Roche Diagnostics. "It feels like you're putting in work and getting value out of that work. This isn't an academic exercise."

*

The teams are given more time that night and some the next morning to confer before they get into vans and head to one of five YMCAs in the city (there are 12 YMCAs in greater Indianapolis.)

They arrive at their locations around 10:00 AM, and then it's up to them how to use the next two hours. For Team Holcomb (each group is named for a Butler building), the six students spend that time touring the Arthur Jordan YMCA on the north side of Indianapolis. They interview staff and talk to members about their experience at the Y.

Team member Alyssa Rudner, a Client Success Manager for a software company, talks to a member-services representative and finds that one of their biggest challenges is that there isn’t a method in place to schedule exercise classes in advance.

"If I'm paying $80 a month, I want to know that if I show up to the Y, I'm going to be able to take the class that I want to take," says Rudner.

There's one recommendation for her team to share: explore a scheduling system that goes beyond physical passes.

Cagle, another member of Team Holcomb, finds it surprising that the Jordan Y sometimes turns away parents looking for preschool programs due to lack of space. He looks around the facility and sees plenty of places to add new preschool programs.

That becomes another recommendation for the team: expand preschool offerings.

"If you can do that here," he said. "You're really separating yourself from the Lifetime Fitnesses, the LA Fitnesses. I think it would be really beneficial."

Andy Starling agrees. He's the Senior Membership Director at the Y, and he thinks the perspective of these business-minded outsiders is going to help.

"I've worked at the Y for more than six years, and you get tunnel vision a little bit," he says. "We always try to be innovative, but they brought up some things I hadn't thought about.

*

The teams return to Butler around 1:00 PM. They adjourn to their respective "war rooms" and, over boxed lunches, get to work. They have about three hours to hash out their ideas and prepare both a sheet of brainstormed recommendations and a PowerPoint they'll use as part of a rigidly-timed 10-minute presentation.

They also need to prepare what they're going to say and how they're going to say it, and the deadline comes quickly.

"We were five individuals who didn't know each other 24 hours before presenting," Chancellor Collins, a Product Manager in Marketing at Roche Diagnostics and member of Team Lilly, says. "It's funny, because you quickly figure out roles and responsibilities, and strengths, and different ways to play off each other, and I think we did a great job of that in that 24-hour period."

At 4:30 PM, the teams assemble in Gallahue Hall 108, a lecture hall, where seven representatives of the Y—including retiring CEO Eric Ellsworth—are ready to listen. There's a notable buzz among the students.

"I love the energy in this room," says Mackintosh.

For the next 90 minutes, the teams take their turn presenting their findings and watching their counterparts.

If the students are nervous, they don't show it. The presentations go off remarkably well across the board. The Y comes away with a long list of useful ideas.

"I want to hire all of these people," says Ellsworth.

Hiland praises the group for their fantastic work and innovative ideas. He was impressed with how deeply the students dove into the issue in only 24 hours. In the future, he wants to put the students’ concepts into practice at local Ys.

“We're committed to implementing and trying some of these ideas—either in pilots at certain centers or potentially across the organization,” he says.

*

In the end, Team Lilly—Chancellor Collins, Danny Lawton, Davina Isaacs, James Pokryfky, and Swetha Vaddi—won Butler goodie bags and, more importantly, bragging rights. They made suggestions that included installing a kiosk, at a cost of $1,000, to allow members to give instant feedback, offering incentives for positive reviews on Google, and instituting a holistic approach to wellness.

"The judges appreciated Team Lilly’s focus on retention and their financial implications," Mackintosh says. "They thought they did the best job of telling the story of their problem-solving process and had good ideas of how to increase retention of family memberships in particular."

Collins says the team owed credit to its facilitator, Marcelle Gress, an Executive Coach at Butler. She advised them to make time to practice their presentation a couple of times. They listened, and rehearsed twice.

"If she had not held our feet to the fire to carve out 30 minutes before we had to turn in our presentation, I don't think it would have gone so smoothly," says Collins.

In the end, Team Lilly celebrated with high-fives, fist bumps, and some wine.

"This really was a good experience and exposure to what we'll be going through in the Butler MBA program in terms of looking at complex cases and having to think through ways to solve problems," Collins said. "I think that's what the Butler MBA is going to prepare us for the most—how to think differently about ways to solve real-world problems."

 

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Gateway to Success

This is MBA 505, the Gateway Experience—the first on-campus course in the program—and it is a trial by fire.

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Community

See a Free Showing of 'Mentor,' A Film About Bullying, at Butler

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 16 2014

Butler University’s College of Education and College of Liberal Arts and Sciences present a free public screening of the documentary “Mentor,” about two high school students who were bullied so severely that they died by suicide, January 27 at 7:30 p.m. in the Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts.

The film, written and directed by Butler Visiting Professor Alix Lambert, focuses on the families of Sladjana Vidovic and Eric Mohat, who sued Mentor (Ohio) High School administrators for ignoring the bullying that led to the death of their children.

mentor for ButlerIn all, five Mentor students killed themselves from 2005 to 2010.

“ ‘Mentor’ is both heartbreaking and soberly resolute in its inquiry into the institutional forces and ‘culture of conformity’ that fail young members of our communities,” Filmmaker Magazine wrote.

Brandie Oliver, Assistant Professor of School Counseling in Butler’s College of Education, said she wants the community to see the film “because we need to continue to address the topic of bullying.”

“This film provides a platform to engage in critical dialogue surrounding the devastating impacts bullying can have on a community,” she said. “As educators, we need to continuously work to build school cultures that are teaching kids the pro-social behaviors that result in the development of kind, accepting, and productive citizens in our communities."

Lambert’s previous documentaries include “Mark of Cain,” a documentary about Russian prisoners that was nominated for an Independent Spirit Award and aired on Nightline, and “Bayou Blue,” a look at the families of the victims of a Louisiana serial killer. She also has worked on the HBO series Deadwood and John From Cincinnati as a writer and producer.

Lambert said she made “Mentor” as a way to put the issue of bullying in context.

“For me, the word ‘bullying’ is a problem because people just think it’s like, ‘Oh, kids get called names,’” she said. “And then, you’re like, ‘Well, but this girl was eating her lunch in the bathroom stall and being pushed down the stairs and touched inappropriately.’ And then the fact that kids came to her funeral parlor and made a MySpace page about how ugly her dress was. I mean, who does that? This is not teasing on the way home from school. It’s a shocking, shocking thing to do.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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She Won a Contest. Now the Kids Are Having a Ball

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 19 2014

Jill B. Allen ’13 needed physical education equipment and resources for her Movement Studio classroom at the Butler Lab School and, thanks to the participants in the NFL PLAY 60 DonorsChoose.org Showdown, she’s getting it.

lab school picAllen’s class will receive an array of volleyballs, basketballs, soccer balls and other gear after her project, called “Help Us Get Moving in Class and at Recess!,” was featured in the NFL/DonorsChoose competition. The NFL Play 60 Rush initiative is a weekly contest that pits two deserving youth health and fitness projects from the corresponding cities who play on Monday Night Football against each other each week. Fans vote for the winner.

“My students are diverse and love being able to explore in multiple ways,” Allen wrote on the NFLRush website. “That is why I am requesting movement manipulatives, balls, and other PE equipment so my students can learn the importance of physical activity, living a healthy life, and what it means to be skillful.”

Allen’s project won against a school from Queens, New York, which will receive 50 percent of the money it requested.

“This is a new program and I'm starting from scratch,” Allen said. “The kids only have about six items to play with at recess and some of the equipment is too young for them. This will really build our physical education and recess equipment base.”

Mindy Welch, Coordinator of the College of Education’s Human Movement and Health Science Education (HMHSE) program, said Allen has established “a remarkable impact” at the Lab School.

“Securing the funding for this DonorsChoose project is simply one fine example,” Welch said. “Through Jill's leadership, initiative, and innovations, she is really helping to build community in new ways through the Movement Studio curriculum.”

Allen was one of six Butler juniors who were in an inaugural physical education practicum at the Lab School in the spring 2012. HMHSE students and faculty have provided the school’s only movement education since then, until Allen was hired this fall.

Welch, who is on sabbatical this fall, is working with Allen to develop the Movement Studio curriculum.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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Community

For Families at St. Vincent Heart Center, Mozart While They Wait

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 14 2014

By Sarvary Koller '15

Piano melodies of Chopin, Mozart, and Gershwin drift through the air as Patricia Smith walks into the St. Vincent Heart Center lounge to wait for her husband during his surgery.

She enters the atrium, makes a beeline past the blaring television and concerned families, and takes a seat to listen as Butler University Adjunct Piano Professor Anna Briscoe performs.

Anna Briscoe said her performances at the St. Vincent Heart Center helped soothe anxious families.
Anna Briscoe said her performances at the St. Vincent Heart Center helped soothe anxious families.

 

“It’s soothing while you have to wait and wait and wait,” Smith said. “This place is noisy, but it covers that up. I think the music maybe keeps people from talking so loud.”

Briscoe plays at the Heart Center as a part of a new partnership between the hospital and the Jordan College of Arts School of Music. Faculty and student musicians will play informal lunchtime concerts at the Heart Center each week to share the power of music for healing and relaxation.

Susan Jacques, hospital chaplain, said the Heart Center agreed to host the concerts to support the spiritual health of families and loved ones waiting nervously in the lounge.

“This is a high-anxiety place,” Jacques said. “Your heart is life or death. Music is a way of feeding people’s souls to help them calm down a bit. It lifts their spirits.”

Briscoe said she enjoyed her first time playing piano at the Heart Center. She has played at retirement centers before, but she said she thinks her music has a different kind of impact here—it helps people relax and remember to just breathe.

“These people aren’t all obviously listening, but they are,” she said. “People go on their way, but if my music just for a moment lifted somebody, that’s wonderful.”

Larry Shapiro, Professor of Violin, said the idea for this partnership developed after Chuck Goehring, his longtime friend from St. Luke’s United Methodist Church, proposed that the School of Music send student and faculty musicians to the hospital to heal through music.

Goehring underwent open-heart surgery at the Heart Center about six years ago, and Shapiro said his friend was bent on giving back to the hospital after his incredible care. Shapiro presented the idea to Lisa Brooks, Chair of the School of Music, and Ronald Caltabiano, Dean of the Jordan College of the Arts, several weeks ago, and they supported the idea.

The partnership is new to Butler this fall semester, but the School of Music aims to provide the hospital with a student, a faculty member, or a small chamber ensemble to play music on a weekly basis.

Ben Abel ’16, concertmaster of the Butler Symphony Orchestra, will play violin at the Heart Center sometime this week. Others scheduled to perform this month are guitar student Patrick Wright and former violin student Tricia Frasure.

Briscoe said she is already looking forward to a full season of festive music at the Heart Center.

“I just can’t wait to come back during the holidays,” she said, “for Christmas carols and Nutcracker selections.”

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President Danko's Statement Regarding Abdul-Rahman (Peter) Kassig

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 16 2014

Butler University President James M. Danko today released this statement regarding Abdul-Rahman (Peter) Kassig:

Abdul-Rahman (Peter) Kassig had traveled to Lebanon in 2012 to provide medical and humanitarian assistance to those in need. He founded Special Emergency Response and Assistance, an aid organization for Syrian refugees. He approached life selflessly and courageously, and he upheld the Butler ideal of trying to make the world a better place.

The Butler community joins millions around the world in prayer and support for the Kassig family and for Abdul-Rahman's cause in the Middle East.

James M. Danko
President, Butler University

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Community

Six from Butler Named to IBJ's 40 Under 40

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 05 2013

Butler is well represented in the Indianapolis Business Journal’s 40 Under 40 Class of 2013, with five graduates and the director of the University’s Center for Urban Ecology among those selected.

The honorees with Butler ties are:

-Linda Broadfoot ’98, executive director of the Indianapolis Public Schools Education Foundation.

-Tim Carter, director of Butler’s Center for Urban Ecology.

-Claudia Fuentes MBA ’07, Marion County treasurer.

-Chris Gahl ’00, vice president, Marketing and Communications, Visit Indy.

-Laura Henderson ’00, executive director, Growing Places Indy.

-Andrew Held MBA ’08, president, PCD Capital Group LLC.

To read their stories, go to http://www.ibj.com/forty-under-40 and click on their photos.

Criteria for selection include the level of success a nominee has achieved in his or her chosen field, their accomplishments in the community, and the likelihood the nominee will stay in Indianapolis and build on those achievements.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
(317) 940-9822

An Innovative Partnership

Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

from Spring 2018

Tim Valentine and Joshua Gaal started Train 918, their video-production company, at Butler. But after graduating in 2016, they needed a home base.

They found it at the Broad Ripple Speak Easy, which bills itself as "a place for entrepreneurs to create, collaborate, and learn."

The Broad Ripple Speak Easy only offers community space, though, and with their business growing, the Train 918 partners needed dedicated office space. So they moved to the downtown Indianapolis Speak Easy—of which Butler University is a founding partner—where they have an office and a secure place for their equipment. Not only that, but they work alongside lawyers, graphic designers, programmers, and others trying to build new businesses. The opportunities to collaborate are abundant.

"What's nice about the Speak Easy is the community," Valentine said. "If you ever have a question, there's tons of people that are here as resources. I can't tell you the amount of times I get up and walk across to the guy next door, who's a venture capitalist, and ask him a question about an email I'm going to send or a marketing strategy or anything like that. Everyone's here trying to help each other out to get to that next step."

Butler got involved with the Speak Easy in 2016 when the business was looking to expand beyond its Broad Ripple location. Andy Clark MBA '99, a founder of the Broad Ripple Speak Easy, approached the University with the idea of a partnership downtown.

Melissa Beckwith, Butler's Vice President for Strategy and Innovation, Chief Information Officer Pete Williams, and Lacy School of Business Dean Steve Standifird saw the potential.

"What an interesting opportunity from the standpoint of experiential education," said Beckwith, who's now a Speak Easy board member. "If you have this very entrepreneurial co-working space with all of these companies, it is another way to connect Lacy School of Business students into the working environment of these companies. There are all kinds of possibilities for internships and job placements. It's another way to connect our students with the business community."

The downtown Speak Easy, located at 47 South Meridian Street, is situated in a 12,000-square-foot space. With its exposed brick and pipes, rustic woodwork, and large common area where members can avail themselves of coffee and beer, it looks like something you'd expect to see in Seattle or Silicon Valley.

Travis Herring, Speak Easy Experience Manager, said the downtown venue has 17 offices with tenants. (Over all, the Speak Easy now has about 1,000 members and five locations in Central Indiana.)

Herring sees the space as a middle ground for fledgling businesses for whom working from a coffee shop might not be conducive to doing business but renting a large office might be too expensive. Membership costs $75 a month, or $750 a year (office space is additional), and gives members access to community space in the five Speak Easy locations.

Valentine said the office that Train 918 rents for about $1,200 a month has been "100 percent worth it. We as a company make that back monthly—easily—just by the connections that we make."

Beckwith said the Speak Easy partnership has been worth it for Butler too. Butler students have been able to get involved with companies housed at the Speak Easy. Representatives from some of the companies have come to campus to work with students in the Real Business Experience classes. The Small Business Development Center, which became part of Butler on January 1, is housed in the Speak Easy. And the Speak Easy and Butler's Executive Education program are working to develop a non-degree certificate program for Speak Easy members.

"There are so many benefits for us partnering with startups and creating synergies we can potentially offer beyond academic," she said. "This is giving us an opportunity to be in the middle of a lot of companies."

Community

An Innovative Partnership

"Everyone's here trying to help each other out to get to that next step."

by Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

from Spring 2018

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COE Efforts Earn National and Local Attention

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 22 2014

The good work being done by the Butler University College of Education (COE) has earned national and local attention.

Author Marla Olthof, who spent time at IPS/Butler Laboratory School in 2012 to learn about its outdoor education efforts, has featured the school in her new book, Gardening with Young Children: Second Edition of Hollyhocks and Honeybees.

The Lab School is featured in a two-page spread on pages 106-107, and numerous photographs of Lab School students are displayed throughout the book. The Lab School’s “edible schoolyard” project was funded in part through a $12,000 Dow Promise Grant to Butler. COE students developed the grant proposal and the initial Lab School gardens last spring as part of a “Leadership in Education” course.

The COE collaborates with Indianapolis Public Schools in the Lab School's curriculum development and operations. All faculty hold Butler education degrees.

Also, an early childhood documentary called Little Children, Big Returns, featuring interviews with Dean Ena Shelley and Ted Maple ’01, will air May 8 at 9:00 p.m. on WFYI-1 (Channel 20). Maple is president and CEO of Day Nursery, which operates seven Indianapolis-area child care centers that provide care daily to more than 750 children ages infant to 6 years old.

The documentary delves into the positive business and financial impact properly funded pre-kindergarten programs have on the state. Preview it here: http://youtu.be/sh5SzlOxRm0.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

Community

Caring for Our Community at the Community Outreach Pharmacy

BY Marc Allan MFA ’18

PUBLISHED ON Mar 13 2019

The man’s blood pressure is 160/88, which is one reason Butler University Pharmacy student Michael Grim is sitting beside him on a folding chair, explaining why it’s important for the man to take his medicine and an 81-milligram aspirin as prescribed.

Grim sits with the man for a few minutes to make sure he understands. When he’s sure the man does, Grim hands over a bag containing his prescription.

It’s a scene that will play itself out a few dozen times on this particular Saturday, when Grim and five of his Pharmacy classmates are volunteering at the Butler University Community Outreach Pharmacy (BUCOP) on the eastside of Indianapolis.

From 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM on Saturdays, BUCOP volunteers are an integral part of the IU Student Outreach Clinic, which provides care for underserved people who live in the area near the Neighborhood Fellowship Church, 3102 East 10th Street.

Here, inside the church, Butler Pharmacy students join University of Indianapolis students studying Physical Therapy, and IU students training in medicine, dentistry, occupational therapy, social work, ophthalmology, law, and other areas, to get practical experiences in the field.

In 2018, 217 Butler Pharmacy volunteers filled 3,275 prescriptions for 1,047 patients—some were repeat visitors to the Community Outreach Pharmacy. Mostly it's preventative medicine—for diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and acute sicknesses like strep throat.

BUCOP spent over $9,500 on medications and medical supplies. It also works with partners like CVS, which donated vials, and Walgreens, which donated flu shots.

"We’ve had some patients who are so happy with the students that they cried in gratitude," says Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice Kacey Carroll '12, who serves as BUCOP faculty advisor. "I think that’s meaningful for the students to see their impact. Some come just to  say 'hi' and 'thank you.' One patient didn’t understand what high blood pressure meant. Our student spent an hour with her to explain. No one had done anything like that with the patient before. Though it took a long time, it was time well worth it."

*

On this particular Saturday, there are no tears—just grateful patients. Grim and Kate Gordon, another P2 Pharmacy student, are the managers today. Their job is overseeing the operation and working with patients to explain their medicines.

"It's really cool being with all these other areas of practice," Grim says. "We communicate with the medical team all the time."

To their left is Alyssa Mason. She's training to be a manager, so she's watching what Gordon is doing. At the tables behind them, Tyler Kennedy is reading the prescriptions, instructions, and dosages written by the doctor so she can make the label. Rachel Robb is recording prescriptions in the database and printing their labels to pass on to fillers so they can fill them. And Lauren Schmidt is filling prescriptions and giving them to the pharmacist to check.

The pharmacist today is Bradley Carqueville Pharm.D. '17, who's in his second year of residency with Community Health Network, specializing in ambulatory care. Carqueville had volunteered at the clinic when he was a student; now he's the licensing professional, double-checking what the students are doing.

"I let the students run the show," he says. "They're supposed to do all the counseling, they do all the filling, and the documenting. I'm just here making sure everything is right, but I'm supposed to be in the background."

If the students have questions, they can ask Carqueville or the two Medication Therapy Consultants in the next room. Today, that's Chandler Howell and Nichole Barnard, both of whom are set to graduate in May.

"It's rewarding to be here, knowing that it's a great thing for the community," Howell says. "It's also rewarding to work with the medical team. You have so many opportunities to work with so many professions so closely. It gives you more experience working with the entire team, and I think it helps seeing what the other professions are doing, their thought processes."

"Rewarding" is a word that comes up often in conversations with the student volunteers. Grim tells the story of a patient on oxygen who was out of the inhalers he needed to breathe. He helped him fill out the paperwork to get the man what he needed.

"For me, what's most rewarding are the educational aspects—being able to talk to the patients after we fill the medications and counsel them on specific things," Gordon says. "For example, one time a lady picked up a medication for her cholesterol. I started asking her questions about it and she was like, 'I don't know why I have to have a cholesterol medication. Everybody has cholesterol.' I was able to explain that there's bad and good cholesterol, and this medication helps lower her bad cholesterol. It's rewarding to build connections with the patients."

*

The IU Student Outreach Clinic, which celebrated its 10th anniversary on February 14, was founded by Indiana University Dr. Javier Sevilla M.D., who wanted to create a free, student-led clinic in a neighborhood that desperately needed doctors. According to the clinic's website, among the 15,000 homes in the area, half live at or below the poverty level and report unmet health needs due to cost, lack of transportation, lack of a primary care provider, or unemployment.

At first, the clinic provided only medical care. The student-doctors would write prescriptions and church leaders would reach into their pockets and do the best they could to help the patients. Within a couple of months, Sevilla invited Butler's College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences to participate.

"Once that happened," says Sevilla, "there was a cascade of other partners who were waiting. Butler has been key to making this clinic the largest, most vibrant student-run clinic in the nation."

Jim Strietelmeier, the church elder who oversees the clinic, says Butler "has gone far and above what anyone would have expected."

"When I speak to the pharmacists," Strietelmeier says, "I tell them what Martin Luther King Jr. said: 'Everyone can be great because everyone can serve.' Pharmacists are by far the servants of the crowd. They take instruction and then give what's necessary."

*

Kacey Carroll was a Butler Pharmacy student when BUCOP started and has been the advisor since joining the Butler faculty in August 2017.

She remembers realizing as a student that there are so many barriers to healthcare — "unintended barriers," she says, "but it doesn’t mean that any person is any less deserving of receiving healthcare."

"If there’s anything I can do with the knowledge that I’ve gained to help people improve their life and improve their health, I want to do that. So it helped instill in me a need and a want to reach out to the community and use this skill that I have to give back."

What she often hears from students who volunteer through BUCOP is about how much they appreciate experiencing the practical application of what they learned in class. The common refrain is: "We talked about this in class, but once I did it, I see that it matters and it made a difference."

As Javier Sevilla says: "It is a beautiful, beautiful service learning opportunity for all of us."

Community

Caring for Our Community at the Community Outreach Pharmacy

Here, Butler Pharmacy students get practical experiences in the field.  

Mar 13 2019 Read more