Back

Latest In

Campus

Coronavirus
Campus

Coronavirus Information for the Butler Community

BY

PUBLISHED ON Mar 20 2020

The University’s incident response team is meeting regularly to assess conditions and develop response plans for a variety of possible scenarios. New or increasing outbreaks of COVID-19 are being reported on a daily basis and strict travel restrictions have been put in place for those countries with the most severe outbreaks (including China, Iran, Italy, and South Korea). Fortunately, most individuals who have contracted the virus have recovered without requiring significant medical treatment. We are reminded by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), there is no reason to panic—the key is to be prepared.

Butler Communications on Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Frequently Asked Questions

Coronavirus
Campus

Coronavirus Information for the Butler Community

Butler remains in communication with local and state health departments and has been taking guidance from the CDC

Mar 20 2020 Read more

Thank You, Bulldogs!

Dear Bulldogs,

Regrettably, but expectedly, the time has come. Sunday, May 31, 2020 will be my last day as the official mascot of Butler University. And as the sun rises on Monday, June 1, I will be embarking on my journey in my new role as Mascot Emeritus, while my young protege, Butler Blue IV (Blue), assumes the helm at what has become one of the most prominent positions in college sports.

I knew this day would come. I even announced so much back in October of 2019. However, the sting of retirement has become all the more painful given how things turned out this spring. Like our students, especially the graduating Class of 2020, I’m grieving the loss of this past semester, including the pomp and circumstance, a big finale for my One Last Trip campaign, and of course, a proper farewell.

But I won’t let these disappointments—just a blip on the timeline of my eight-year career—dampen a splendid run as your mascot. From training under the great Butler Blue II, to blazing my own trail as Top Dawg, to showing Blue IV the ropes—plus all of the highs, the lows, the days, and the miles in between—it’s been a dream.

You’ve given me the opportunity to be the hardest working dog in the business, and in the process, you’ve also made me the luckiest dog on the planet.

 

 

As I hang up my letter sweater, I now transition to life away from the limelight. Admittedly, it’s not a transition I’m embracing: I’ve never known anything but the working dog life. This recent quarantine has given me a glimpse into what lies ahead, and it’s been an abrupt and jarring adjustment for a dog like me.

Fortunately, I have the Kaltenmark family to tend to my every need as I will remain their loyal and loving family dog, just as I have since they adopted me as a seven-week old puppy. This summer, the Kaltenmarks and I will be moving off campus to a new home (complete with my own custom-built dog house under the stairs) on the northside of Indianapolis in order to make way for Blue and the Krauss family. Don’t worry though, even though I’m retiring and moving a few miles away, I’ll still be around and will loosely maintain my social media accounts so that you can keep up with me.

Meanwhile, my caretaker, Michael Kaltenmark ‘02, will continue his role at Butler as Director of External Relations, but will relinquish the leash after 16 years of dedication and service to the Butler Blue Live Mascot Program. Evan Krauss ’16 will take over mascot-handling duties for Blue, with support from his wife, Kennedy.

Despite the interruptions and adjustments caused by this global pandemic, I can assure you that Blue is more than ready to take over. He’s a capable young fella who has shown the potential for greatness. I’m excited for him and our Butler family. He has a bright future, and I trust you’ll embrace him just as warmly as you have me.

Speaking of which, thank you for everything these past eight years. It’s been an honor and a pleasure. I can only hope that at some point along the way, I’ve lived up to your expectations, made you proud of Butler University, and maybe even brought a smile to your face.

So for now, forever, and as always, Go Dawgs!

 

 

 

 

 

Trip

P.S. Class of 2020, I’m saving one last curtain call for you! I’m looking forward to seeing all of you at Hinkle Fieldhouse in December for that commencement ceremony.

Trip
Campus

Thank You, Bulldogs!

Trip shares some final words ahead of his last day as Official Mascot: Sunday, May 31, 2020

Q&A with Butler Blue III aka "Trip"

As Butler Blue III  aka “Trip” gets ready to wrap up his time as the University's live mascot, we asked him a couple of questions about his career highlights, retirement plans, and advice for the new guy.

 

Butler: It seems like just yesterday you were the young pup on campus, and now you’ve reached retirement. Can you put the past eight years into words?

Blue III: Time flies! Especially when each calendar year counts for seven canine years. I struggle to put it all into words. It’s been the most amazing experience you could ever imagine. All dogs should be so lucky. I’ve lived the best life. Makes me wish I could live forever.

What have been some of the highlights of your mascot career?

Well, vomiting on the court at Madison Square Garden before a BIG EAST Tournament game comes to mind. That sort of put me on the map. But there’s so much more than that, like pioneering surprise Butler Bound visits with prospective students, serving on Eskenazi Health’s pet therapy team, welcoming Butler’s largest-ever class, organizing the Canine Party to make a run for President of the United States, being featured by the likes of The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, NBC Nightly News, and CBS Evening News, standing on the sidelines for multiple victories over top-ranked teams, and accompanying the Butler men’s basketball team for a Sweet 16 run—just to name a few.

Just look at my Instagram feed. It’s an eight-year highlight reel. And the cool thing is, one of my biggest projects has yet to drop. Stay tuned!

Any regrets?

Oh sure, there are some moments I’d like to do over again, but wouldn’t we all? My biggest regret has been the effects of this global pandemic on all of the things we had planned for my last weeks on the job. From no BIG EAST and NCAA Tournaments, to no May Commencement, and everything in between, our plans were dashed. But that’s not unique to me, so I can’t complain about it. I just regret the circumstances of it all. My hope is that we can still hold Commencement in December so that I can walk that stage with the Class of 2020. I want that for them, and I feel like that could redeem this situation a little bit.

What advice do you have for Butler Blue IV?

People will want to compare you to me and our previous Dawgs. Don’t listen to them. You just worry about doing this job your way, with all of your heart, and you’ll leave your own legacy at Butler. You’ll also end up paving the way for the next Bulldog to come after you, which is the circle of mascot life. Because, after all, those of us who have come before you are now 100 percent behind you.

What do you have planned for retirement?

Well, I’m a dog who likes to be busy, so I’m hoping I can find some things to keep me active and distracted. In other words, I’m not one to just sit around the house. Needless to say, this quarantine situation has been tough for me. Speaking of home, however, we are moving off campus to a new home on the northside of Indianapolis. So, that’s exciting. I’m looking forward to exploring our new neighborhood, and our contractor is even building me a custom Dawg House under the stairs. I can’t wait for that!

If you could do one more thing as mascot, what would it be?

Just one? Given all of the cool things I’ve been able to do as mascot, that’s a really tough question. But there’s nothing better than game day at Hinkle Fieldhouse. I’d give anything for just one more men’s basketball game in the old barn and the chance to run down my bone in front of a sold-out crowd of 9,000 people. I’ve lived for those moments.

What do you hope your legacy as mascot will be?

I hope people will remember me for the spirited, passionate, fun-loving, charismatic, and loyal Bulldog I’ve been. I’ve brought my own style and personality to this job, and in some respects, did it my own way, but with respect for the traditions. I think it turned out alright.

Trip
Campus

Q&A with Butler Blue III aka "Trip"

We wanted to ask Trip a couple of questions about his time as our official mascot before he officially hangs up the collar

ethics series
Campus

Lacy School of Business Launches New Podcast as Part of Ethics Series

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 28 2020

INDIANAPOLIS—The Lacy School of Business Ethics Series, presented by Old National Bank, is launching a new three-part podcast series featuring conversations with top business leaders as they explore how COVID-19 is affecting the way they work and the communities they serve.

The series kicks off with Old National Bank Chairman and CEO Jim Ryan in a conversation with Hilary Buttrick, an Associate Dean in the Lacy School of Business.

“When we launched this ethics series in February with whistleblower Tyler Schultz, we weren’t planning on the leap to podcasting” Buttrick says. “With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, we felt like more than ever, the question is, ‘How do we lead ethically in times of crisis?’ With access to three companies in our backyard that are listed among Ethisphere’s World’s Most Ethical Companies, being able to share their insights and conversation over a broad, accessible platform seemed to be the best way to continue our series.”

The other two conversations will be with Andrew Penca, Executive Director of Supply Chain, Engine Business at Cummins, and Melissa Stapleton Barnes, Senior Vice President, Enterprise Risk Management and Chief Ethics and Compliance Officer at Eli Lilly and Company.

“It’s also times like these when creativity and partnerships take hold,” Buttrick says. “When we had the idea to record a podcast, the Butler Arts & Events Center team was available to help us record and produce the final products. It’s exciting to be part of a campus community that can pivot quickly to deliver timely content.”

This series is the first for the new Lacy School of Business Ethics Series Podcast. Episodes can be found on Spotify and BuzzSprout. The first episode, a conversation with Old National Bank Chairman and CEO Jim Ryan, is available now. More information about the series can be found at Lacy Business Ethics Series Podcast.

 

About Lacy School of Business Ethics Series, presented by Old National Bank: 
The series is part of our journey to become the Midwest's leader in Business Ethics Education and Ethical Leadership. Our goal is to continue to exemplify ethical practice and leadership development for our students, future leaders, and the community as a whole through a series of events and podcasts.

 

About Butler Arts & Events Center: 
The Butler Arts & Events Center (BAEC) is Central Indiana’s premiere home for diverse performing arts programming and education on the beautiful campus of Butler University. Its venues welcome more than 200,000 visitors annually, with 30,000 from the student matinee series.  The BAEC is comprised of five venues, including its flagship 2100-seat Clowes Memorial Hall; the Schrott Center for the Arts with 475 seats; Shelton Auditorium with nearly 400 seats; Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall with 135 seats, and Lilly Hall Studio Theatre. Programming includes the Butler Arts Presents series, BAEC’s Education Matinee Series, Jordan College of the Arts performances, Broadway In Indianapolis shows, various Butler lecture series, performances from local performing arts organizations, and a variety of national touring shows.

 

Media Contact:
Katie Grieze
News Content Manager
kgrieze@butler.edu
260-307-3403 (cell)

ethics series
Campus

Lacy School of Business Launches New Podcast as Part of Ethics Series

The three-part podcast series features business leaders discussing effects of COVID-19 pandemic

Apr 28 2020 Read more
Brooke Kandel-Cisco
Campus

Kandel-Cisco Named New College of Education Dean

BY Tim Brouk

PUBLISHED ON Mar 19 2020

Professor Brooke Kandel-Cisco has been appointed as Butler University’s new Dean of the College of Education. She had served as Interim Dean for the College since May 1.

While developing scholarship focusing on adult learning and professional development, Kandel-Cisco has excelled in leadership opportunities since joining the Butler Education program in 2009. Her roles have included Director of the Master of Science in Effective Teaching and Learning program, Chair of the College of Education graduate programs, and Program Coordinator for COE graduate programs. 

“I look forward to working with my colleagues to build on the COE’s legacy of high-quality educator preparation,” says Kandel-Cisco, whose research also explores educator collaboration with immigrant and refugee families. “We will continue to refine and enhance our existing preparation programs while also developing new pathways, pipelines, and partnerships to prepare equity-minded educators who have the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to serve schools and communities.”

Kandel-Cisco has taught courses in English as a Second Language (ESL) and works closely with teachers in Washington Township Schools’ ESL and Newcomer Programs. She recently completed a term as President of the Indiana Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages.

“I see my experiences as a teacher and as a university educator as key preparation for my role as Dean,” Kandel-Cisco says. “Academic leadership requires an ethic of care, a collaborative approach, and the ability to make decisions in the short term while creating conditions and building systems that help us move toward long-term goals—all things that strong teachers do every day.”

Provost Kathryn Morris says keeping Kandel-Cisco in the Dean’s office was a natural choice.

“Brooke has done a phenomenal job of leading the College during the interim period. I am confident she will continue to do so into the future,” Morris says. “Indeed, the current public health crisis demands effective leadership at all levels of the University. Brooke has been an integral part of our efforts to protect members of our community while also supporting our institutional mission.”

Butler President James M. Danko says Kandel-Cisco’s tenure at Butler has earned her the trust and support of her colleagues and students inside and outside of the classroom. 

“We know she will continue to provide outstanding service to the College of Education and the Butler community in the future,” he states.  

Kandel-Cisco earned her PhD in Educational Psychology from Texas A&M University. She was a fellow of the Desmond Tutu Center for Peace, Reconciliation, and Global Justice.

“I am incredibly proud of my colleagues in higher education and in schools,” Kandel-Cisco says, “who continue to find creative and meaningful ways to support the growth of their students—even with the significant challenges and uncertainty of our current circumstances. Our current Butler student teachers and interns continue to support teaching and learning in local schools and community agencies as they work virtually alongside practicing educators.”

 

Media Contact:
Katie Grieze
News Content Manager
kgrieze@butler.edu
260-307-3403

Brooke Kandel-Cisco
Campus

Kandel-Cisco Named New College of Education Dean

Brooke Kandel-Cisco was Interim Dean since May 1, has held leadership roles in numerous Butler Education programs

Mar 19 2020 Read more
Trip last game
Campus

CBS Evening News Features Kaltenmark, Butler Blue III at Last Game in Hinkle Fieldhouse

BY Raquel Bahamonde

PUBLISHED ON Mar 11 2020

On March 4, 2020, history was made one more time at historic Hinkle Fieldhouse, and a CBS Evening News crew, with legendary network television reporter Dean Reynolds, was there to cover the story.

No, we’re not talking about the nationally ranked Butler men’s basketball team’s 77-55 dismantling of St. John’s. Although that was a fun one to watch. We’re talking about the last game at Hinkle Fieldhouse for Butler Blue III (Trip), and the celebration of Michael Kaltenmark’s 16-year run as the University’s live mascot handler—a run that spanned the careers of much-loved English Bulldog mascots Butler Blue II and Trip.

In the location some might call the cradle for Hoosier Hysteria, the roars from the Hinkle crowd that night were just as deafening for Kaltenmark and Trip as they were for the thrilling basketball action on the floor.

As Kaltenmark and Trip finished one more run for the bone, took their last lap around the Hinkle court, and made an emotional final stop at the Dawg Pound, the crowd chanted, “Michael! Michael! Michael!” The TV camera was there to capture the entire scene for a nationwide broadcast.

In the college basketball world, the Butler mascot carries a lot of celebrity, and Trip’s appearance is a favorite part of any event. Kaltenmark has dealt with health issues for years. In January, he underwent a kidney transplant and has overcome an enormous challenge to be able to return to duty so quickly.

The CBS crew visited with Kaltenmark, his wife Tiffany, their two sons Everett and Miles, and—of course—Trip, to catch their pre-game routine. They talked about what is involved in being part of Trip’s family, as well as the transition toward retirement at Butler’s May 9 Commencement.

And in case you thought Trip’s appeal is just an Indiana thing, after an exhaustive day of taping, the reporter, producer, videographer, and sound man reflected on the day. One member of the crew was overheard to say, “That was a fun one.” 

WATCH VIDEO

 

Media Contact:
Raquel Bahamonde
317-319-6875
raquel@bahamondecommunications.com

Trip last game
Campus

CBS Evening News Features Kaltenmark, Butler Blue III at Last Game in Hinkle Fieldhouse

Butler Blue III (Trip) and handler Michael Kaltenmark celebrated on national television

Mar 11 2020 Read more
Neil deGrasse Tyson on-stage
Campus

Famed Astrophysicist to Talk Science and Hollywood at Butler

BY Tim Brouk

PUBLISHED ON Mar 05 2020

*This event has been postponed from March 17 to October 6 due to the rapidly evolving Coronavirus (COVID-19) health crisis.*

Neil deGrasse Tyson is an expert in explaining mysteries of the universe to a general audience. Host of the rebooted Cosmos series, he is the 21st century’s Carl Sagan. Tyson’s passion for promoting celestial wonderment is only rivaled by his love for film.

Tyson will present An Astrophysicist Goes to the Movies at 7:30 PM October 6, at Clowes Memorial Hall. The event will center on science in movies, from science fiction to Disney classics. Tyson will screen short clips of more than 30 movies from the past 80 years before dissecting what is going on in each scene. It’s the melding of two passions on one stage.

Neil deGrasse Tyson
Neil deGrasse Tyson

When watching a movie about outer space, Tyson puts down the popcorn and starts taking notes. His Twitter account is full of criticisms for movies that include silly portrayals of space travel, exploration, or phenomena. But, if a film accurately captures these marvels, he gives credit where credit is due.

And sometimes, Tyson’s reviews have an impact on new stories in the works. One of his favorite compliments came from The Martian author, Andy Weir.

“While he was writing that novel, he said he imagined I was looking over his shoulder the whole time,” says Tyson with a laugh. “He didn't want to mess up a calculation and have me tweet about it. People think I’m nit-picking. ‘Well, I don’t want to take you to a movie,’ they say. Well, I assure you, I’m very silent during movies.”

Tyson knows his tweets carry weight. But he says he’s just pointing out the portrayal of science in movies, for better or for worse. It’s like a costume designer pointing out that the style of gown worn by a character in a Jane Austen movie didn’t come from that era, or a car enthusiast spotting a Ford from the 1960s in a movie that’s set in the ‘50s, Tyson says.

In recent years, some studios have hired on-set scientists to help make sure things are correct. Movies like Gravity have impressed Tyson in terms of their effort and execution.

“People assumed I didn’t like the movie because I pointed out some things it got wrong in about a dozen tweets,” Tyson says about the 2013 film starring George Clooney and Sandra Bullock, “but I only gave it that much attention because of how much science they got right. I loved the movie, so I had to go back and tweet that I did love the movie overall.”

The Martian fared even better in Tyson’s eyes—mostly.

“The one flaw was the windstorm scene,” he says. “The air pressure on Mars is 1/100th of that on Earth, so high-speed wind on Mars is like someone gently blowing on your cheek. But they needed some premise to create the drama of the storm.”

Stage and screen

Along with his many media appearances, Tyson’s résumé includes roles as an academic, a researcher, a planetarium director, a podcast host, and a member of the Commission on the Future of the United States Aerospace Industry. Yet, appearing on-stage to talk about the universe’s wonders will always be something he fits into his schedule. He calls it “a founding pillar” of his current career.

Tyson says An Astrophysicist Goes to the Movies is an example of how he reaches out to the public, which he finds has an “underserved appetite of science and science literacy. There’s an enlightenment that comes to you thinking critically about the world.”

Butler’s astrophysicists go to the movies, too

Prof. Gonzalo Ordonez holds a book.
Physics and Astronomy Chair Gonzalo Ordonez holds a book about Interstellar.

Tyson isn’t the only scientist who watches movies with a critical eye. Gonzalo Ordonez, Butler Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, says Interstellar is his favorite film.

“They do a good job respecting the physics,” Ordonez says of the 2014 movie starring Matthew McConaughey and Anne Hathaway. “The plot and visual effects are interesting. Their use of the theory of relativity, as well as the physics of how time slows down near a black hole, are well done.”

Physics Professor Xianming Han cited Star Trek as his favorite sci-fi series, but on the silver screen, he was most impressed with Contact starring Jodie Foster.

“Scientifically, it’s probably the most rigorous,” says Han, adding that he especially enjoyed the 1997 film’s take on space and time travel.

Han and Ordonez both look forward to Tyson’s visit to Butler.

“I think students will have a blast,” Ordonez says. “Tyson has made astrophysics more popular and more accessible to nonspecialists.”

Tyson’s take on cinema has proved popular—so much that An Astrophysicist Goes to the Movies: The Sequel is in the works. Yes, Tyson is reaching franchise status. Move over Marvel.

“My goal is to enhance people’s appreciation of what a movie is—or what it could have been if the science had been accurately reckoned,” he says.

 

Photos by Tim Brouk and provided by Delvinhair Productions and Roderick Mickens

 

Media Contact:
Katie Grieze
News Content Manager
kgrieze@butler.edu
260-307-3403

Neil deGrasse Tyson on-stage
Campus

Famed Astrophysicist to Talk Science and Hollywood at Butler

Neil deGrasse Tyson explores science in movies at ‘An Astrophysicist Goes to the Movies,’ October 6 at Clowes

Mar 05 2020 Read more
Butler Blue IV receives ceremonial collar
Campus

Collar Handoff: Butler Blue IV Takes Next Step Toward Being Big Dog on Campus

BY Raquel Bahamonde

PUBLISHED ON Mar 01 2020

In a February 29, 2020 “changing of the collar” ceremony, Butler Blue III, also known as Trip, relinquished his collar signifying Butler Blue IV (Blue) as successor to the official live mascot of Butler University.

Prior to the Butler, DePaul University men’s basketball game at Hinkle Fieldhouse, Trip’s handler Michael Kaltenmark and his wife Tiffany along with their two sons, Everett and Miles, watched as Butler President James M. Danko removed the collar from around Trip’s neck and placed it around the neck of Blue.

Brian Kenny representing Reis-Nichols Jewelers, creators of the custom-made mascot collar, looked on.

After donning the collar, Blue’s handler and owner Evan Krauss lifted him into the air to cheers from the crowd—before he and his wife Kennedy escorted the mascot-to-be from the floor.   

Trip and Kaltenmark accepted more cheers from the crowd before Trip did his traditional running of the bone as the team entered the court.

“This event ushers in the next chapter for the Butler mascot program,” said Krauss. “I just want to thank Michael (Kaltenmark). He has taught me so much over the past seven years I’ve worked with him.”

Trip will remain in his current role as official live mascot until the end of the 2019–2020 academic year. In the meantime, Blue IV and his handler are training side-by-side learning their new responsibilities, which recently included a graduation for Blue from the Bark Tutor School for Dogs.

When asked how the puppy is adjusting to his new role, Krauss smiled.

“Blue has been a dream dog and is taking to his training like a champ,” he said.  “But speaking for both of us, the support from the Butler Community has been overwhelming and has meant the world to us.”

“Do the job, do it well and don’t forget to have fun doing it. That would be Trip’s advice to Blue,” said Kaltenmark. “Trip loves the job—loves to work—but he never takes things too seriously.”

After eight proud years on the job, Trip has earned his retirement. Plus, his energetic heir to the throne is ready for the very physical demands of leading the Butler faithful.

An American Kennel Club-Registered English Bulldog like his predecessors (Blue I, II, and III), the equally adorable Blue IV is described by those involved in finding the new mascot as “super cool”—an important quality to have when representing the “Butler Way” to the world.

The changing of the guard (dog) means the younger Blue will soon be leader of the pack.

While welcoming the next Blue and saying goodbye to number III could be a bittersweet time, fans of the much beloved Trip can rest assured, following his farewell tour, he moves on to an even more essential role in life—providing love and affection to his fur dad Kaltenmark who underwent a kidney transplant earlier this year.

“Thanks to Evan we’ve been able to manage and keep him (Trip) working,” said Kaltenmark. “However, I will say that because of my kidney transplant, our return to action together is just going to make Trip’s last months on the job that much more poignant and special.”

With the official change in May, Kaltenmark will step aside from his live mascot handling duties but will continue as the University’s Director of External Relations and plans to stay involved in the live mascot program. Don’t be surprised if you see mascot emeritus Trip around campus from time to time.

If Trip could talk, Kaltenmark believes he would let the entire Butler family know; “You’ve made me the luckiest dog on the planet. In return, I hope I have brought you joy during my years as your mascot. It’s truly been my honor and pleasure. Thank you for making me feel loved as I wind things down this year.”

 

Media contact:
Raquel Bahamonde
317-319-6875
raquel@bahamondecommunications.com

Butler Blue IV receives ceremonial collar
Campus

Collar Handoff: Butler Blue IV Takes Next Step Toward Being Big Dog on Campus

Butler Blue III relinquished his collar signifying Butler Blue IV as successor

Mar 01 2020 Read more
Midwinter Dances
Campus

Butler Commissions New Music From Composer Behind 'Get Out' and 'Us'

BY Katie Grieze

PUBLISHED ON Feb 18 2020

When Michael Colburn first saw the movie Get Out, a 2017 film directed by Jordan Peele that captures themes of racism through lenses of horror and comedy, he thought it was all-around fantastic. But what stood out most to the Butler University Director of Bands was the music behind the dialogue.

“I knew nothing about Michael Abels as a composer until I saw that movie,” he says. “The freshness of the score caught my attention. It was very unusual, and it got me wondering if Michael had ever written anything for band.”

So Colburn tracked down the critically acclaimed composer on Facebook, asking if he would be interested in writing a piece for Butler’s Wind Ensemble.

Abels replied almost instantly. The composer has become known for his work in orchestral music and film score (especially for the Jordan Peele movies Get Out and Us), but he had never written for concert band. He was intrigued.

As the conversation went on, Colburn mentioned Butler’s nationally known ballet program. Abels had already considered trying his hand at writing for dance, and a collaboration with Butler’s annual Midwinter Dances event meant he could create music that would be performed by student-musicians, alongside choreography by student-dancers. The piece, Falling Sky, made its world debut during the performances in Clowes Hall earlier this month.

Leaders from Butler’s Dance department recommended world-renowned Patrick de Bana to lead the choreography, and the two men joined on campus last year to start talking about what they wanted to create.

Colburn asked that the piece focus on some kind of social issue because “one of the more intriguing places we approach these topics is through the arts.” Together, Abels and de Bana realized they both cared deeply about the current humanitarian crisis at the United States’ southern border.

“What really impressed me was how open-minded they were,” Colburn says. “They were making very strong points—and making them adamantly—but they were both receptive to what the other person had to offer. It was truly collaborative.”

The artists also discussed how dance differs from film: Movies have strong narratives—with music that supports certain scenes and actions—while dance is more representational.

“Patrick encouraged Abels to not think about a specific plot or narrative,” Colburn says, “but to think more in terms of representational images that convey emotions, or that capture the general experiences of people who are caught up in this crisis.”

 

 

Working together, the artists created a 20-minute performance packed with themes of innocence, terror, diversity, and hope.

Falling Sky is really a unique score,” Colburn says about the work. “I don’t think I’m going out on a limb to say there’s nothing like it in the band world. Some parts are very traditional, but the second movement is based entirely on hip hop. One of Abels’ overall goals is finding ways to fuse classical music with more popular, contemporary reference points.”

A few basic themes pop up throughout the piece, Colburn says. A youthful exuberance toward the beginning reflects the spirit of the children involved in the border situation. Darker, more sinister elements come in during the second movement, representing the forces working against families.

“Then the third movement is the most angst-ridden,” Colburn says. “It seeks to capture what these families are going through when they are incarcerated and the kids are separated from their parents—and the incredible difficulties that presents.”

The piece concludes in a final movement, hinting at the optimism that comes with moving toward a better place.

 

Butler's Wind Ensemble will perform music from Falling Sky in concert on March 1 as part of the Music at Butler Series. This event is free and open to the public. 

 

Photos by Brent Smith

 

Media Contact:
Katie Grieze
News Content Manager
kgrieze@butler.edu
(260) 307-3403

 

Student Access and Success
At the heart of Butler Beyond is a desire to increase student access and success, putting a Butler education within reach of all who desire to pursue it. With a focus on enhancing the overall student experience that is foundational to a Butler education, gifts to this pillar will grow student scholarships, elevate student support services, expand experiential learning opportunities, and more. Learn more, make a gift, and read other stories like this one at beyond.butler.edu.

Midwinter Dances
Campus

Butler Commissions New Music From Composer Behind 'Get Out' and 'Us'

Butler Ballet and Wind Ensemble teamed up to perform the world premiere of Michael Abels' 'Falling Sky'

Feb 18 2020 Read more
Butler men's basketball action
Campus

Butler University Announces New Sports Wagering Policy

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 31 2020

Butler University announced the adoption of a new Sports Wagering Policy, effective immediately, in response to the legalization of betting on National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I sports in Indiana.

The policy prohibits all Butler trustees, faculty, staff, students, and independent contractors from placing wagers on Butler sporting events since they may be afforded greater access to information that could impact the outcome of competitions. The goal of the policy is to foster a culture of honesty, integrity, and fair play in keeping with The Butler Way and to help protect Butler teams, student-athletes, and coaches from undue influence and improper conduct. Butler’s student-athletes and those providing support to the athletic program are already prohibited from engaging in sports wagering by NCAA rules.   

“We pride ourselves on providing our student-athletes an exceptional educational and athletic experience,” says Butler President James Danko. “Our Sports Wagering Policy, which is supported by our Board of Trustees, is a proactive measure rooted in our commitment to and support of our student-athletes and our athletic programs.”

Vice President and Director of Athletics Barry Collier commented, “I am pleased that our University’s leadership has taken this important step to live our shared values and protect the integrity of our campus community.”

For more information, please visit http://www.butler.edu/sportswagering to access Butler’s Sports Wagering policy.

 

Media Contact:
Katie Grieze
News Content Manager
kgrieze@butler.edu
260-307-3403

Butler men's basketball action
Campus

Butler University Announces New Sports Wagering Policy

The policy prohibits all Butler faculty, staff, and students from placing wagers on Butler sporting events

Jan 31 2020 Read more
Founder's Week
Campus

Butler’s 2020 Founder’s Week Recognizes Centennial of Women’s Suffrage

BY Katie Grieze

PUBLISHED ON Jan 30 2020

In efforts to focus on diversity and inclusion on campus, Butler University can look back to its roots. From February 2–8, the University will celebrate those ideals during Founder’s Week.

Every year, Butler observes the birthday of its founder, abolitionist Ovid Butler, with a slate of events that remind the campus community of his spirit and founding vision. Since opening in 1855, Butler has invited women and people of color to attend the University—an innovative position for the time.

“When people find out that Butler was founded by an abolitionist in 1855, open from the very beginning for African-Americans and women—and that we have the first endowed chair named after a woman in this country—they are kind of surprised,” says Terri Jett, Associate Professor of Political Science and Special Assistant to the Provost for Diversity and Inclusivity. “People don’t look to Indiana as being on the forefront of progressive ideas. But it actually was—at least at Butler.”

This year, in honor of the centennial of women winning the right to vote, the week will embrace the theme of “BU | Be Demia”—as in Demia Butler, Ovid’s daughter and the first woman to graduate from Butler’s four-year program. The University also established the first endowed chair in the country for a female professor in Demia’s name. After the Demia Butler Chair of English Literature was created in 1869, Catharine Merrill—the second full-time female professor in the nation at any university—became its first recipient.

Through the image of Demia, this year’s event will honor women through a series of events including a suffragist exhibit in Irwin Library, screenings of the movies On the Basis of Sex and Hidden Figures, a panel discussion about reproductive rights, and a Visiting Writers Series event with award-winning author Carmen Maria Machado. On Thursday, the week’s keynote presentation will feature Butler Speaker’s Lab Director Sally Perkins in a performance of her one-woman play about the suffragist movement, Digging in Their Heels. To wrap up the celebration on Friday, all staff, faculty, and students can receive two free tickets to the February 7 Women’s Basketball game at Hinkle Fieldhouse.

“We need to keep recognizing our own history and tradition,” Jett says. “But the values that history was founded on are still in line with the things we focus on today: diversity, equity, and inclusion.”

To help emphasize those ideals throughout the year, the Founder’s Week Committee awards several $1,000 grants to help faculty develop course projects, assignments, or independent studies in ways that incorporate the themes of Founder’s Day. More than 40 faculty members have received these grants, and this year’s celebration showcases three recipients: Ryan Rogers, Peter Wang, and Erin Garriott.

 

  • Rogers, Assistant Professor of Creative Media and Entertainment, and Academic Coordinator of Esports Programs, used the grant to develop a class focusing on themes of diversity and inclusion in esports. Students learned about the relationship between harassment and competition, and that the mediated environment inherent to esports—not seeing your competitor face-to-face—can lead to more dismissal of the other person’s feelings. The class found that female participants were common targets of this harassment. Students then conducted original studies to search for solutions for making the esports industry more welcoming for everyone.

 

  • Wang, Lecturer of Art History, has added a section related to Founder’s Day to his class about American art and visual culture. The assignment asks students to research a female or African-American artist from the Colonial period through the 19th century. “The idea is to re-contextualize the barriers and challenges for these artists around the time when Butler University was established,” Wang says. “If students were in the second half of 19th-century America and were to collect a piece of art made by a woman or an African-American, what would they be looking at?”

 

  • Garriott, a Lecturer in the College of Education, used her Founder’s Day grant to support disability inclusion efforts around campus. She started with the café on Butler’s South Campus, working with staff there to help transform the space into “a place to celebrate people of all abilities.” Now, the café is decorated with artwork from Kelley Schreiner, an artist who has Down Syndrome, and it will soon host a larger exhibition. Garriott also led efforts to raise awareness for the Special Olympics members who take classes in Butler’s Health and Recreation Complex. “Kelley Schreiner now has a poster of her strong self getting ready to lift some weights, which is hanging outside The Kennel,” Garriott explains. “We will have another poster made this semester with Katherine Custer, who is taking the Wagging, Walking, and Wellness Physical Well Being class. Plus, we have created a documentation panel that will hang at South Campus to celebrate our collaboration with Special Olympics Indiana.”

 

Media Contact:
Katie Grieze
News Content Manager
kgrieze@butler.edu
(260) 307-3403

 

Innovations in Teaching and Learning

One of the distinguishing features of a Butler education has always been the meaningful and enduring relationships between our faculty and students. Gifts to this pillar during Butler Beyond will accelerate our commitment to investing in faculty excellence by adding endowed positions, supporting faculty scholarship and research, renovating and expanding state-of-the-art teaching facilities, and more. Learn more, make a gift, and read other stories like this one at beyond.butler.edu.

Founder's Week
Campus

Butler’s 2020 Founder’s Week Recognizes Centennial of Women’s Suffrage

The annual event celebrates the University’s founding values of diversity, equity, and inclusion

Jan 30 2020 Read more

Hi, I’m Blue!

Well, I guess I am Butler Blue IV, but you can call me Blue. I am Butler’s new mascot-in-training!

I was born the lone male in a litter of three on October 30, 2019, at Fall Creek Place Animal Clinic. My vet, Dr. Kurt Phillips ’92, delivered my two sisters and me. Then I went home with my breeders, Jodi and Cameron Madaj, and I have been living with them for the last 12 weeks while growing into this bundle of brown and white rolls you see today.

Oh, and don’t worry, I already bleed Butler Blue. I stuck my head out of the incubator at two weeks old to watch the Men’s Basketball team play on television. I even started barking when the announcer said the rival team’s name.

I was born for this.

I’d love to meet you! My on-campus debut for students, faculty, and staff will be on Friday, January 24. And later that evening, I’ll make my public debut at Hinkle Fieldhouse just before the Butler Men’s Basketball game against Marquette. Be sure you get to your seats early.

For the next few months, I’ll be training, interning, and following around Uncle Trip (Butler Blue III) to learn what it takes to represent Butler. Then, I’ll take over full-time mascot duties after Trip retires at the end of the 2019-2020 academic year.

Other than all of that, I’m looking forward to getting settled at my new home, too. I moved in with my parents, Evan ’16 and Kennedy Krauss, about a week ago, but it feels like I’ve known them forever. They even got to be there when I was born, and they have visited me every week over the last couple of months.

I hope to see you all on Friday. I’ve been waiting my whole life to meet you! I’m so honored to be your next Butler Bulldog.

 

Go Dawgs!

 

 

 

 

 

Butler Blue IV
Butler University’s Mascot-in-Training

P.S.: Please follow me on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @TheButlerBlue. Two words: Puppy Pics.

P.P.S.: I love you.

Blue IV
Campus

Hi, I’m Blue!

I am your new mascot-in-training. I can’t wait to meet you. 

Pages