Back

Butler Magazine

Fall 2017

jimbagnoli

The Game of Life

Krisy Force

from Fall 2017

Alumnus Jim Bagnoli ’75 remembers his entrance into the “real world” didn’t really hit him until his first day on the job. He had important responsibilities, and people and a company depending on him. Bagnoli says working a job is not like going to college.

“I was starting all over making new friends, establishing relationships, and building my reputation,” he said. “Along with a paycheck, there were bills and rent to pay. I had not been planning responsibly for my career and financial future.”

Looking back, Bagnoli wishes a college program or an event could have bestowed a little real life experience on him. This is why, as a member of the Butler Alumni Association Board, he was excited to partner with Butler’s Student Government Association’s Student Initiatives Board, the Young Alumni Board, and Butler’s Academic Affairs staff to offer Butler juniors and seniors a taste of the real world through an event called The Game of Life.

The event, which was loosely based off of the popular board game, Life, had students enter the room with a chosen profession after they graduated. They were then given a salary. Students moved from table to table where they dealt with a variety of circumstances, like the price of life insurance, eating out, student loan programs, and at Bagnoli’s table, the cost of renting a one-bedroom apartment in various parts of the country. 

“It was really interesting to watch their expression,” Bagnoli said, laughing. One student, Logan Schwering ’18, commented most students, including himself, were surprised to discover how the average cost of all the expenses students have after graduation slowly chip away at a salary. 

“Seeing how it all came together and started chipping away from your salary was eye-opening,” Schwering said.

Although the program, and the actual Life board game, don’t exactly mirror the real world, both incorporated a few hysterical similarities. 

“It was just a good, thought-provoking experience for students to realize they’ll have to put a budget together, and make lifestyle changes,” Bagnoli explained.

After going through the life tables, students attended a panel discussion with Bagnoli and four other alumni. Later on, students were able to ask questions and mingle with alumni, allowing them to “learn from one another,” Bagnoli said. 

“To have alumni who are so dedicated to giving back not only financially, but with their wealth of knowledge, is what sets  Butler apart from other institutions,” Schwering said. 

Schwering elaborated that he felt extremely fortunate to have the opportunity to interact with alumni with varying skillsets and life experiences. He urges future students to take advantage of programs about life after graduation, adding “graduation may seem far away, but the years go by quickly.”

jimbagnoli
Student Life

The Game of Life

by Krisy Force

from Fall 2017

Read more
marielle slagel

Marielle Slagel Keller '14

Megan Ward MS ’13

from Fall 2017

She had it all planned—her schedule, dorm, roommate. She was certain she was going to Purdue. I mean she grew up in Lafayette, Indiana—home of the Boilermakers.  

But, you know what they say about best-laid plans. 

Marielle Slagel Keller ’14 decided to take a campus tour at Butler a week before her final decision was due. Slagel Keller confided, “I had never seen anything like Butler. I knew it was where I needed to be.”  

While the campus tour may look a bit different now with all of the physical changes taking place, Keller said she thinks “Butler has been smart about the changes so that it doesn’t impact the overall community Butler inspires.” 

Keller did admit it was hard to watch Schwitzer get torn down. Understandable given the impact her first-year roommate had on her life—Keller says she taught her about the unique challenges minorities face. A lesson that served her well while getting her degree in Elementary Education, and now as a Kindergarten and First Grade Teacher at the IPS/Butler University Lab School in Indianapolis. 

Keller says something that defines her teaching is the project work she does with her students. From the creation of an insect hotel at the school for insects that are losing their habitats in the city to this year’s “Peace Project” that, among other things, included making wind chimes (renamed “kindness travelers”) that students placed randomly around the city. 

Her favorite student project, however, is a quilt of the city with silhouettes of the students flying over it. Keller shared, “[The students] painted and sewed it themselves ... and wrote their hopes and dreams for the city on it.” 

Working at the IPS/Butler Lab School, Keller remains tied to Butler in a way many alumni are not. As she put it, “I’m lucky to be at the Lab School where I get to see my professors on a regular basis.” 

A professor who has had a particular impact on Keller is Cathy Hartman. They even represented the United States together at a global conference in China—modeling teaching in front of hundreds of people. While Keller served as a Vice President of the Student Government Association, she says she gained perspective at Butler and met her husband, Mike Keller ’14.  

It’s clear that the relationships built at Butler matter. And it’s one thing Keller hopes will never change at Butler—students becoming family. 

“I would walk to class and say hello to 20 people on the way. I hope Butler doesn’t lose that.”

 

marielle slagel
People

Marielle Slagel Keller '14

by Megan Ward MS ’13

from Fall 2017

Read more
mark dobson

Changing Communities for the Better

Cindy Conover Dashnaw

from Fall 2017

Mark Dobson ’84 credits his Butler University professors for turning him into “an ornery SOB” and his father for teaching him to “do the right thing.”

“They all fired me up,” he said, laughter and gratitude in his voice.

While his alma mater is sparking new community groups among student-residents, Dobson has been sparking community involvement in local government for two decades. He’s had one overarching mission: To get individuals directly involved in creating social change in their communities. 

Passion and bluster

Dobson willingly admits he entered public service “with bluster.” Prior to his current position as President/CEO of the Elkhart County Economic Development Corp., he was President/CEO of the Kosciusko County and St. Joseph County (now South Bend Regional) Chambers of Commerce in northern Indiana. Before then, he was President of the St. Joseph County Commissioners and once told the South Bend Tribune that the real burden on taxpayers was the many layers of local government.

“Coming in, I had all these grand ideas and probably made some statements that would’ve been offensive to folks that had actually served in government,” he said ruefully. “But I finally learned it’s typically not the people that are the problem. It’s the systems we give them [to operate within] that cause the problems. I changed my attitude tremendously.” 

Dobson quickly became known for his fiery advocacy of reducing government’s influence on people’s lives. In St. Joseph County, he established a Community Leader Forum and rebuilt the state’s Public Policy Division to ensure residents and businesses had a voice. He then led the Kosciusko Chamber through unprecedented growth and implemented the Chamber’s visionary strategic plan, earning him the Indiana Chamber Executive of the Year title in 2014. 

Calling himself “a fairly average student at Butler,” some of Dobson’s success surprises himself.

“I didn’t set the world on fire then, but a couple of things stayed with me,” he said. “The Butler Way was alive and well in the 1980s—we just didn’t have it branded that way. But the principles were the same. And professors in Butler’s business department really challenged us to think outside the textbook, to think for ourselves, to have a lifelong learning experience.”

He recalled one frighteningly motivational entrepreneurial class in particular.

“The professor told me I’d fail if I didn’t get McDonald’s to move into the new food court on campus, and I believed her,” Dobson said. “I learned so much by engaging with a McDonald’s Franchise Director. It was an invaluable learning experience.”

Dobson has infused his government work with his entrepreneurial spirit, education, and early work experience in the private sector. The one constant ingredient for success?

“For years in the corporate world, we valued and involved our people. Why wouldn’t we do the same in government?” he said.

mark dobson
People

Changing Communities for the Better

by Cindy Conover Dashnaw

from Fall 2017

Read more
bill dugan

Butler's Heart Remains the Same

Marc D. Allan

from Fall 2017

As a young man, Bill Dugan ’51 walked the Butler campus at a time when Hinkle Fieldhouse sat 15,000 and the Butler Bowl held 35,000, male students wore jackets and ties to basketball games, Robertson Hall was known as Sweeney Chapel, the Pharmacy Building and Atherton Center (now Union) were being built, and the campus had no dormitories.

Dugan, 87, who lives on the north side of Indianapolis, comes back to campus fairly often, and he says that while Butler’s exterior has changed, the heart is very much the same.  

“There were so many good people at Butler when I was in school—and there are still so many good, caring people
today,” he said.

Dugan spent most of his early years on a farm outside Huntingburg, in southern Indiana, the son of school teachers. He chose Butler after visiting campus with a high school friend. An academic scholarship paid a third of the $150 tuition bill, and he earned the rest by working as a campus janitor.

He lived off campus at 39th Street and Kenwood Avenue his first year and would catch a city bus or walk to campus. Sometimes, he said, Butler basketball star Marvin Cave
(later an Indiana Basketball Hall of Famer) would stop and pick him up. In his later years at Butler, he lived in the Sigma Nu house.

Dugan was going to be a teacher—his father talked him out of that—but majored in accounting instead. “I was a good student,” he said. “I studied hard because it was my money I was spending.”

One of his favorite professors was Bill Shors—“We called him ‘Wild Bill’ because he always had tales”—who taught accounting. Dugan said Shors was a great example of how much Butler professors care for their students.

“If you went to school there, he got you a job,” Dugan said. “My brother graduated from Indiana State a year after I did, and I called Bill Shors and he got my brother a job, too.”

Dugan’s first job was in accounting with Kingan’s, a meat-packing company at Washington Street and the White River. Around that time, he also began dating Joanne Aiman ’53, a Butler Business major who became his wife. They were married for 56 years until she died in 2014 (Bill gave a gift to the Hinkle Campaign to name the Dawg Pound’s North End in her memory. He also gave a gift to name the Interview Suite in the Career Development area of the new Lacy School of Business building.)

After Kingan’s, Dugan spent four years in the Air Force as an auditor at a General Electric plant in Cincinnati. When he got out of the military, he went to work for Spickelmier Company, a building-materials company, then Bowes Seal Fast, which sold automotive parts, and, finally, as a consultant for Barth Electric. 

Dugan always wanted to own a business, and he ended up buying two, both of which he still owns: NCS, an embroidery and screen printing business in Indianapolis; and Sign Crafters, an Evansville company that designs, manufactures, and installs business signs. He still owns both businesses today.

In the 1990s, while raising their daughter Candy, Dugan was commuting between Indianapolis and Evansville and Joanne was running D’Arcy’s Children’s Wear, a clothing store they bought. Candy went on to graduate from Butler in 1990, as did her husband, Neal Stock ’91.

Dugan said he has had a wonderful life, and he appreciates all that Butler has done for him.

“I’ve been so blessed and so lucky,” Dugan said. “I never dreamed that I’d have even an ounce of the success I’ve had that’s come my way. I have nothing but high praise for Butler.”

bill dugan
People

Butler's Heart Remains the Same

by Marc D. Allan

from Fall 2017

Read more

Creativity in Motion

Marc D. Allan

from Fall 2017

 On the day that 18-year-old Michelle Jarvis moved into her third-floor Schwitzer Hall room, if you had told her that someday she would be named Butler University’s Associate Provost, she would have laughed. Jarvis had come here to dance, not to work in academic administration. 

“I don’t think that would have ever crossed my mind or I ever would have believed what you were telling me,” she said, sitting in her new Jordan Hall office after more than three decades in Lilly Hall. “Now, being a teacher, being an educator, working in a university program? Yes. I would have fallen into that pretty quickly and believed that. I liked what I was doing when I got here, and I saw what was happening and what was possible.” 

Jarvis, who grew up in suburban Detroit, started studying dance as a small child and chose Butler based on its “well-deserved” reputation for having both a great ballet program and demanding academics. After finishing her bachelor’s degree, she took a teaching position at another university. 

“Choreography was really calling me at the time,” she said, “and to be a good choreographer, you have to have good dancers. So you have to teach them.” 

And to teach them, she needed an advanced degree. So Jarvis returned to Butler—and never left. After earning her master’s degree, teaching for several years in the Special Instruction Division (which became the Jordan Academy of Dance), and performing with Dance Kaleidoscope and Indianapolis Ballet Theatre, she started as an Assistant Professor of Dance in 1986. Over the years, she moved up from Professor to Dance Department Chair, then Associate Dean of the Jordan College of the Arts, Interim Dean of the College (twice), and, now, Associate Provost. 

Her new role includes administrative oversight of the core curriculum, which she describes as “a living, breathing activity that is the foundation of all our academic work and should be ever-changing,
ever-developing, ever-growing, and leading our students down the right paths to become critical and creative thinkers and lifelong learners by addressing their academic curiosity.” She will provide administrative oversight for the Center for High Achievement and Scholarly Engagement (CHASE), and will be working on faculty policies and procedures, best practices for student advising, retention, and degree completion. 

Although Jarvis has made the transformation from faculty to administrator, the arts are never far away. The walls of her new office are decorated with professional artwork as well as photos of dancers and art by students from the Art + Design program. She plans to use her creativity to advocate for students and faculty, and she also looks forward to teaching a course each semester. 

“I haven’t left the arts,” she said. “Dance is my identity. I haven’t moved on to something else. It’s the next step in a career that has advocated for higher education, students, and student growth and development. I’ve just stepped on to the next place in my career, which is an extraordinary opportunity.” 

Creativity in Motion

by Marc D. Allan

from Fall 2017

Read more
afton

Feeding Our Future

Marc D. Allan

from Fall 2017

Four Butler alumni are doing their part to make sure that 7,500 children in Grand Rapids, Holland, and Muskegon, Michigan, have dinner tonight and every night.

What are you having for dinner tonight? For 7,500 kids in Grand Rapids, Michigan, today’s evening meal will be a hard-boiled egg, banana, and bags of snap peas and trail mix packed in a brown paper bag by some of the hundreds of volunteers who show up at Kids’ Food Basket (KFB) every day. 

Wearing T-shirts that say “Nourishing kids to be their best, in school and life,” they come to this 9,500-square-foot warehouse because they want to make sure that children in their community, who would otherwise go hungry, have something nutritious and tasty to eat when they go home from school. They come—lawyers, waitresses, and retirees alike, from all over the area—because they want to be part of the solution. 

“We all come to this organization in different doses,” said Renee Tabben ’94, “but I believe and feel the outcome we’re all working toward is very pure.” 

Tabben, a Director for Merrill Lynch, is one of the co-chairs of Kids’ Food Basket’s “Feeding Our Future” campaign to raise $6.4 million for the organization, and she’s one of four Butler graduates at KFB taking to heart the message that she learned as an undergraduate: We make a life by what we give. 

“I thought I was going to Butler to get an education, so all the focus was on how many credits I can take every semester,” Tabben said. “And I took a lot. I realize now that it wasn’t about the academics. The academics were great, and I’m very proud of that work, but it was more about the life experience and the expectations that were put out there that you contribute in a meaningful way.”

Tabben, an Arts Administration major at Butler, started as a Kids’ Food Basket volunteer after she moved to Grand Rapids in 2014. She ran into Matt Downey ’95, a fellow Arts Administration major who also lives in Grand Rapids and volunteers with KFB. He recommended that Tabben give time to the organization. 

Downey knows something about philanthropic organizations—he’s the Nonprofit Services Program Director for the Johnson Center for Philanthropy at Grand Valley State University. 

“Not only is the mission important, but this is one of the most innovative, impactful organizations I’ve come across,” he said of KFB. “My team, we’ve worked with about 150 organizations in 17 Michigan cities every year. KFB has a way of thinking about their operations and innovation that is head and shoulders above most nonprofit organizations.”

Downey grew up in Kalamazoo and moved to Grand Rapids to take the job at Grand Valley State. It was there—in a master’s program—that he was “shocked” to meet another Butler alum, Afton DeVos ’05, who would later become the Associate Director of Kids’ Food Basket. DeVos had grown up in Grand Rapids and moved back after meeting her future husband, who had a thriving business here, at a wedding in Indianapolis. 

DeVos, an Integrated Communications major at Butler, wanted to be in the nonprofit world—she had been active in Relay for Life and other philanthropic endeavors as an undergrad—but found that she didn’t have the connections or the experience. So she went to Grand Valley State and got her Master of Public Administration with a nonprofit leadership focus. That led to jobs with the Christian Reform Church, followed by Gilda’s Club Grand Rapids, a cancer support community. Then five years ago, Bridget Clark Whitney, the Executive Director of KFB, recruited her.

“The thought of a child going hungry was just unbelievable to me,” she said. “My husband and I had been regular volunteers at KFB, and my husband was on the finance committee. When the opportunity came to me, it felt like the right fit at the right time.”

DeVos has helped institute systems—like an ergonomically sound table, designed by Amway, which is headquartered here—to make the operation run more efficiently. In the last five years, KFB has grown to a mid-sized nonprofit with a staff of 36 and a reputation that Downey said is the envy of other organizations in the area for its ability to raise money and recruit volunteers. 

Kristen Guinn ’01, a Grand Rapids-area native, started volunteering at KFB when she moved back to west Michigan in 2008. Guinn, who came to Butler to study Pre-Law, ended up being a Math major—and then went to law school and became a trial attorney. Her firm volunteers regularly at KFB. Guinn had known DeVos for 20 years—their older sisters were good friends in high school—and when DeVos asked her to be part of the fundraising campaign committee, she said yes.

“There’s definitely a Butler bond,” Guinn said. “With Afton and I, just because we knew each other before, there’s a mutual respect and trust. Adding Butler to it is nice. I know a couple of other Butler folks in the area. You just kind of assume they’re good people.” 

And they are people doing good. If they have any doubts, they can look at the letters they get from children
who benefit. 

“Thank you for the sack suppers!” one child wrote. “I love the pink yogurt and sweet [sandwitch]. Food helps me think better. Your friend, Luis.”

afton
People

Feeding Our Future

by Marc D. Allan

from Fall 2017

Read more
daniel meyers

The Answers to Big Questions

Monica Holb ’09

from Fall 2017

When Director for the Center for Faith and Vocation (CFV) Daniel Meyers took part in the Efroymson Diversity Center of Butler University’s “Discussions in the DC” in 2016, he felt the event vocalized the sentiments surrounding interfaith issues percolating on campus. 

As the forward-looking panels spoke to identity components such as race, gender, religion, and spirituality, Meyers said the conversation sparked the idea of making religious identity part of diversity work. 

Students, particularly Salman Qureshi, agreed. Qureshi’s interest soon led him to become the CFV’s interfaith intern and drive the genesis of the Interfaith Council. 

The CFV’s Interfaith Council is comprised of 12 students of a variety of different faith traditions who host conversations and build relationships among one another. The council shares its traditions and stories with students of all backgrounds. 

Meeting that goal played out through a social media effort that asked Butler students to answer on Instagram: “What is interfaith?” The prompt came the day after the 2016 presidential election, when students were likely asking many questions as they witnessed the first transfer of Presidential power in their young adult lives. 

“It’s been valuable to have a group of students who know each other so well, who don’t all agree or share the same beliefs, so that when something happens in the world, we can ask them, ‘What do you think needs to be addressed?’” Meyers said. 

According to Meyers, as the nation and the culture change, Butler’s students have a resource ready to provide assistance when they may feel they need to respond to current events. 

The CFV, established by a Lilly Endowment grant, co-written by Butler University Professor Paul Valliere more than a decade ago, now hosts the Interfaith Council, but has always served as the navigation point for students on their journey through college. 

“The CFV is home to 13 student groups, supports interns, and hosts meetings in the Blue House seven days per week—from study night to meditation space, yoga and a ‘Big Questions,’ lunch series,” explained CFV Assistant Director Marguerite Stanciu.  

Among these activities, CFV facilitates students thinking about the questions the world is challenging them to answer—relating to society and to one’s self—in a supported space.  

This is partly done through the CFV’s longstanding program: The Butler University Seminar on Religion and Global Affairs. “It has always been about going around the globe and looking through the lens of different religious and cultural perspectives at subjects such as religion and global health. It is a rigorous academic environment designed to be accessible for the general public,” Stanciu said. 

The CFV, and the issues its programing may address, are transforming, but it continues to fulfill its mission. 

“The CFV is within Academic Affairs, which is important. It means that the underpinning of our mission is that we are part of the learning experience at the heart of the institution,” Meyers said. 

The vocational reflection that the CFV hopes results from its programming is expected to be a part of the academic journey. The many big questions posed help students with the most important ones: “What are you studying, and how is it going to make the difference that you want to make in the world?” Meyers said. 

 

daniel meyers
Student Life

The Answers to Big Questions

by Monica Holb ’09

from Fall 2017

Read more
adam bantz

Involvement Has its Own Rewards

Krisy Force

from Fall 2017

You only have to spend a few minutes with Butler student Adam Bantz ’17to know that he is a go-getter. He’s immersed himself in many extracurricular activities including Butler’s Ambassadors of Change program, Student Government Association (SGA), Butler University Students Foundation (BUSF), and still finds time to work as a tour guide showing prospective Butler students just how amazing campus life truly is. He’s getting the most out of the Butler student experience, and he’s planning a career to make sure future college students do as well. 

Bantz is on the path to what he deems as a fulfilling future career in Student Affairs—a talking point that seems to have created a permanent smile on his face. 

But Student Affairs wasn’t always the plan. 

When Bantz switched his major from Pharmacy to Strategic Communication two years ago, his parents were worried that he was “giving up an opportunity.” His response: “It’s not an opportunity if you don’t find the outcome personally rewarding.” 

Bantz has always been the type to quickly get involved. His immersion in student groups on campus is what sparked what Adam refers to as the “typical Student Affairs epiphany.” He explained no student enters college knowing they want to go into Student Affairs, but involvement in out-of-classroom experiences can lead some students to the realization that they, like their mentors, can help create life changing experiences for future college students. In this regard, Adam clearly feels he “fell into Student Affairs.” 

“People don’t realize all of the intricate details of Student Affairs and all the work that goes into making the University function the way it does,” Bantz explained. “I think being a part of that in general, and providing the same level of experience I’ve had at Butler for future college students is really cool.”

Since his epiphany, Bantz has been interning in both University Events and the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs to gain more experience in his future career field. Even with a busy internship schedule, Bantz has found time to serve as the President for the Interfraternity Council, a member of SGA’s Marketing and Communication Board, and as a mentor for GEAR—Greek Educators, Advocates, and Resources.

Meg Haggerty, Associate Director in the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, and Bantz’s internship advisor, commented that he has been one of the most insightful and inquisitive students she’s worked with. Furthermore, Haggerty explained that Bantz is using his hands-on student affairs internship to bridge his social involvement on campus with his academic education to maximize his future career and post-graduate work opportunities. 

“All of Adam’s involvement has been, in some way, a touchstone or area of engagement in Student Affairs,” Haggerty said. “It only makes sense with all of his participation as an undergraduate that he would find passion and love for a career mentoring future students in a similar way.” 

meg haggerty

Meg Haggerty moved around frequently as a kid.

Being the daughter of an Air Force officer meant Haggerty and the rest of her family didn’t stay in one place for too long. It also meant that, at a very young age, she learned how to quickly build relationships and fully immerse herself into a community—two traits that have allowed her to make lifelong friends in every place she’s lived. 

“Meg is a true inspiration,” Addie Barret ’17 said of Haggerty, who is the Staff Advisor for Barret’s sorority, Alpha Chi Omega—the same one Haggerty was a member of when she attended Butler as an undergraduate. 

From co-advising the Student Government Association’s (SGA) Marketing and Communications Board, and coordinating student events, like Winter and Spring Commencement and the Top 100 Most Outstanding Student Recognition Program, to working with interns, Haggerty makes it her mission to be a mentor to Butler students like her mentors were to her. She makes herself available 24/7 and she tells students, “Any aspect of your life you want to invite me into, I’ll invite you into mine as well.”

“She is there for students in every aspect: academic, personal, and professional,” Barret continued. “She is always asking questions about others and wanting to know how we are doing. Every memory I have of her consists of that same incredible attitude.” 

Levester Johnson, Vice President for Student Affairs for Illinois State University, worked with Haggerty closely as Butler’s former Vice President for Student Affairs. He also knew Haggerty during her undergraduate years and explained that she is Butler through and through—epitomizing Butler via its mission and values. 

“Meg has a youthful flair about herself when she advises,” he said. “She doesn’t see her job as a nine-to-five and she understands the importance of working with students hand-in-hand to achieve their dreams.” 

Johnson believes it’s Haggerty’s quality of going the extra mile that separates her from other administrative professionals. While interviewing Haggerty, this characteristic was revealed when she commented, “just say yes.” She added that if people are willing to say yes and step outside their comfort zones, they will have opportunities they never could have imagined. 

When she graduated from Butler in 2004, Haggerty’s next opportunity was at Florida State University (FSU) where she would earn a Master of Science in Higher Education Student Affairs. While attending FSU, and prior to coming back to Butler, she worked in the FSU College of Education coordinating programming and events for her master’s cohort. She remembers feeling the graduate assistantship was not what she pictured herself doing long term. 

“My passion, and my love, was still working with undergraduate students,” Haggerty explained. She looked for positions at various universities, but Haggerty says her “heart yearned for Butler.”

With a stroke of luck and good timing, Haggerty’s mentor and friend, Caroline Huck-Watson, reached out to her about a position in Butler’s Programs for Leadership and Service Education (PuLSE) Office. As an undergraduate, Haggerty had met Huck-Watson through the Ambassadors of Change (AOC) Program as a team builder and as a student staff member of the Volunteer Center. Huck-Watson had been an influence in her life at Butler and a significant inspiration to pursue Higher Education Student Affairs as a profession. By summer of 2006, Haggerty was back at Butler as an Assistant Director co-coordinating Welcome Week and Orientation programs as well as advising the Program Board of SGA with committees like films, the speaker’s bureau, Out and About in Indy, and events like Homecoming and Spring Sports Spectacular. 

Since then, Haggerty has been a key player in student event programming for Butler. She has an innate ability to connect with each student she meets, and because of that, over the past 10 years she’s been able to build some amazing relationships with students—meeting them during their first or second year, and staying in touch with them during life’s biggest milestones like marriage and children. To her, it’s amazing that she gets to create and be a part of those relationships. 

These relationships are shown through students like Emma Edick ’17, who remembers meeting Haggerty her first year on campus for a class project. 

“Meg has been such a large part of my Butler experience,” Edick said. “She pays attention to what students on campus are doing, what they are working on, and what they are excited about.”

Edick continued by explaining that even if the two of them pass by one another at Starbucks, Haggerty always puts her work aside to sincerely ask the question: “How are you?” 

“I never expected I would be here as a student and as a staff member for as long as I have, but it’s because of the people. People are the most important part of the work that I do—and I don’t think I could have done the work that I’ve done without the people in my life.” 

Anna Logan volleyball

Anna Logan ’18

Hayley Ross ’17

from Fall 2017

Looking back, Anna Logan said the past three years at Butler University and with Butler’s women’s volleyball were meant to happen. 

“Volleyball recruits so early,” she said. “They told me, ‘You need to start looking at college.’ I was like, ‘I’m only 15.’ I was told that the Butler Head Coach saw me at a tournament and would love to have me come to campus. I went for my unofficial visit during the spring of my sophomore year in high school.”

Other colleges were interested in Logan but she had grown up just down the street from campus and Butler was the only one Logan would call.

What she didn’t foresee was that she would experience such early success—American Volleyball Coaches Association (AVCA) All-Region, first team All-BIG EAST, and AVCA Honorable Mention All-American honors. She led Butler and the BIG EAST with 578 kills (ninth nationally) and 659.5 points (seventh nationally) during her sophomore season.

In her first two years, she compiled 944 kills, 666 digs, and 1092.5 points. She said her expectations for this season is to make it to the BIG EAST Tournament—only the top four teams in the conference make it—and also make it to the NCAA tournament. 

“Only 64 teams make it, but more than half of those teams are automatic bids from winning conference tournaments,” Logan said. “It’s very competitive, but it’s definitely something I am looking forward to accomplishing.”

Logan is an Accounting major. Her plan is to graduate in the summer of 2018, then stay for the following year (her senior year for volleyball) and graduate with her Master’s of Professional Accounting degree in spring 2019. She said that playing volleyball has not only helped her physically, but academically as well.

“Playing in college has definitely helped my time management,” she said. “I wake up at 5:45 AM and I still make enough time to
sleep. It is a skill I will take with me the rest of my life.”

Anna Logan volleyball
Athletics

Anna Logan ’18

by Hayley Ross ’17

from Fall 2017

Read more
pace temple

Pace Temple ’19

Kailey Eaton ’17

from Fall 2017

Pace Temple always wanted to play Division I football. He also wanted to get a great education that would support him in his postgraduate life. Butler was the perfect fit. 

“Butler offered an opportunity for me to challenge and push myself to play Division I football while allowing me to have a life outside of the sport. It offered an incredible education for life after football,” Temple said. 

In 2016, he started all 11 games for the Bulldogs and was named Second Team All-PFL and Second Team All-Academic PFL. He led the team in receiving yards, receptions, and receiving touchdowns, and surpassed the 100-yard receiving mark in three separate games. 

“My coaches and teammates challenged and pushed me to grow as an athlete and gave me the opportunities needed to succeed,” Temple said. 

Temple, a Lacy School of Business Marketing and Finance double major, chose these majors because he enjoys collaborating with others to create projects and presentations and hopes to pursue a career in Marketing. He served as the Chief Marketing Officer of his Real Business Experience (RBE) group—BU Bands and Accessories—a student-run business that sold Butler wristbands and spirit wear to fans. “I love having the opportunity to work and grow as an athlete while being pushed equally to grow and work as a student.”

pace temple
Athletics

Pace Temple ’19

by Kailey Eaton ’17

from Fall 2017

Read more
sellick bowl

The Butler Bowl became the Bud and Jackie Sellick Bowl on September 16, thanks to a gift from the estate of Winstan R. “Bud” Sellick ’47 and Jacqueline (Blomberg) ’44.

Also as part of the $9.6 million gift, the Champions Room in the Sellick Bowl was renamed the Bud and Jackie Sellick Room, and the Registrar’s Office is now the Jacqueline Blomberg Sellick Registrar’s Suite. 

The Sellicks had asked longtime friends Dan Yates and Bob Wildman to assist in the transfer of this gift to Butler. Wildman noted that the Sellicks “were special people with a special place in their hearts for Butler.”

“During their long history with the school, they saw it grow and prosper, and I know they were quite happy and proud to be a part of its success,” he said. “They would be extremely grateful to Butler for this recognition by the University of their generous gift.”

The Sellicks were married for 69 years. A Marine Corps veteran, Bud served on Okinawa and Korea. His association with Butler University was long and deep. When Bud was born, his father was the Treasurer of Butler University in Irvington, as well as a Professor of Economics at the school. In 1939, when he came to Butler as a student, an aunt was Assistant Registrar and a second aunt was a Librarian. 

Bud’s pursuit of a degree was interrupted by World War II. He returned to Butler following the war, earned his degree in Economics, and married his college sweetheart, Jacqueline Blomberg. As a student, he was involved in the band, Kappa Kappa Psi band honorary, and Delta Tau Delta fraternity. In 1947, he began his successful career as an insurance agent in the Indianapolis area.

After fighting in Korea, he returned to Indianapolis where he served as President and Owner of Bud Sellick Insurance Agency and the Blessing-Sellick Insurance Agency for several decades until his retirement. He was also involved in a successful real estate business in the Indianapolis area with his wife and brother-in-law.

Bud died March 30, 2015. He was 93.

Jackie was a lifelong resident of Indianapolis. She attended Shortridge High School, then went on to become a graduate of Butler University. During her Butler days, she was a member of Alpha Chi Omega sorority, a member of the Debate Team, and a recipient of the Ovid Butler Award.

Her career included over 20 years on the Industrial Board. She also owned and operated commercial real estate for 40 years.

Jackie died October 20, 2012. She was 89.

Consistent donors to Butler for more than a third of a century, the Sellicks endowed three scholarships: The Winstan R. Sellick, Jacqueline Sellick, and Herman W. Blomberg Scholarship; the Sellick, Deming, and Schuler Scholarship; and the Winstan R. Sellick and Jacqueline B. Sellick Business Scholarship. 

They also made gifts to the Butler Fund and several athletic funds, including the restoration of Hinkle Fieldhouse. In 2007, Bud and Jackie Sellick received the Ovid Butler Society Mortarboard Award. In 2014, Bud was honored when he received the Butler Medal. He also was a donor and strong supporter of Delta Tau Delta Fraternity.

Pages