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Butler Magazine

Fall 2017

daniel meyers

The Answers to Big Questions

Monica Holb ’09

from Fall 2017

When Director for the Center for Faith and Vocation (CFV) Daniel Meyers took part in the Efroymson Diversity Center of Butler University’s “Discussions in the DC” in 2016, he felt the event vocalized the sentiments surrounding interfaith issues percolating on campus. 

As the forward-looking panels spoke to identity components such as race, gender, religion, and spirituality, Meyers said the conversation sparked the idea of making religious identity part of diversity work. 

Students, particularly Salman Qureshi, agreed. Qureshi’s interest soon led him to become the CFV’s interfaith intern and drive the genesis of the Interfaith Council. 

The CFV’s Interfaith Council is comprised of 12 students of a variety of different faith traditions who host conversations and build relationships among one another. The council shares its traditions and stories with students of all backgrounds. 

Meeting that goal played out through a social media effort that asked Butler students to answer on Instagram: “What is interfaith?” The prompt came the day after the 2016 presidential election, when students were likely asking many questions as they witnessed the first transfer of Presidential power in their young adult lives. 

“It’s been valuable to have a group of students who know each other so well, who don’t all agree or share the same beliefs, so that when something happens in the world, we can ask them, ‘What do you think needs to be addressed?’” Meyers said. 

According to Meyers, as the nation and the culture change, Butler’s students have a resource ready to provide assistance when they may feel they need to respond to current events. 

The CFV, established by a Lilly Endowment grant, co-written by Butler University Professor Paul Valliere more than a decade ago, now hosts the Interfaith Council, but has always served as the navigation point for students on their journey through college. 

“The CFV is home to 13 student groups, supports interns, and hosts meetings in the Blue House seven days per week—from study night to meditation space, yoga and a ‘Big Questions,’ lunch series,” explained CFV Assistant Director Marguerite Stanciu.  

Among these activities, CFV facilitates students thinking about the questions the world is challenging them to answer—relating to society and to one’s self—in a supported space.  

This is partly done through the CFV’s longstanding program: The Butler University Seminar on Religion and Global Affairs. “It has always been about going around the globe and looking through the lens of different religious and cultural perspectives at subjects such as religion and global health. It is a rigorous academic environment designed to be accessible for the general public,” Stanciu said. 

The CFV, and the issues its programing may address, are transforming, but it continues to fulfill its mission. 

“The CFV is within Academic Affairs, which is important. It means that the underpinning of our mission is that we are part of the learning experience at the heart of the institution,” Meyers said. 

The vocational reflection that the CFV hopes results from its programming is expected to be a part of the academic journey. The many big questions posed help students with the most important ones: “What are you studying, and how is it going to make the difference that you want to make in the world?” Meyers said. 

 

daniel meyers

The Answers to Big Questions

by Monica Holb ’09

from Fall 2017

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Anna Logan volleyball

Anna Logan ’18

Hayley Ross ’17

from Fall 2017

Looking back, Anna Logan said the past three years at Butler University and with Butler’s women’s volleyball were meant to happen. 

“Volleyball recruits so early,” she said. “They told me, ‘You need to start looking at college.’ I was like, ‘I’m only 15.’ I was told that the Butler Head Coach saw me at a tournament and would love to have me come to campus. I went for my unofficial visit during the spring of my sophomore year in high school.”

Other colleges were interested in Logan but she had grown up just down the street from campus and Butler was the only one Logan would call.

What she didn’t foresee was that she would experience such early success—American Volleyball Coaches Association (AVCA) All-Region, first team All-BIG EAST, and AVCA Honorable Mention All-American honors. She led Butler and the BIG EAST with 578 kills (ninth nationally) and 659.5 points (seventh nationally) during her sophomore season.

In her first two years, she compiled 944 kills, 666 digs, and 1092.5 points. She said her expectations for this season is to make it to the BIG EAST Tournament—only the top four teams in the conference make it—and also make it to the NCAA tournament. 

“Only 64 teams make it, but more than half of those teams are automatic bids from winning conference tournaments,” Logan said. “It’s very competitive, but it’s definitely something I am looking forward to accomplishing.”

Logan is an Accounting major. Her plan is to graduate in the summer of 2018, then stay for the following year (her senior year for volleyball) and graduate with her Master’s of Professional Accounting degree in spring 2019. She said that playing volleyball has not only helped her physically, but academically as well.

“Playing in college has definitely helped my time management,” she said. “I wake up at 5:45 AM and I still make enough time to
sleep. It is a skill I will take with me the rest of my life.”

Anna Logan volleyball

Anna Logan ’18

by Hayley Ross ’17

from Fall 2017

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afton

Feeding Our Future

Marc D. Allan

from Fall 2017

Four Butler alumni are doing their part to make sure that 7,500 children in Grand Rapids, Holland, and Muskegon, Michigan, have dinner tonight and every night.

What are you having for dinner tonight? For 7,500 kids in Grand Rapids, Michigan, today’s evening meal will be a hard-boiled egg, banana, and bags of snap peas and trail mix packed in a brown paper bag by some of the hundreds of volunteers who show up at Kids’ Food Basket (KFB) every day. 

Wearing T-shirts that say “Nourishing kids to be their best, in school and life,” they come to this 9,500-square-foot warehouse because they want to make sure that children in their community, who would otherwise go hungry, have something nutritious and tasty to eat when they go home from school. They come—lawyers, waitresses, and retirees alike, from all over the area—because they want to be part of the solution. 

“We all come to this organization in different doses,” said Renee Tabben ’94, “but I believe and feel the outcome we’re all working toward is very pure.” 

Tabben, a Director for Merrill Lynch, is one of the co-chairs of Kids’ Food Basket’s “Feeding Our Future” campaign to raise $6.4 million for the organization, and she’s one of four Butler graduates at KFB taking to heart the message that she learned as an undergraduate: We make a life by what we give. 

“I thought I was going to Butler to get an education, so all the focus was on how many credits I can take every semester,” Tabben said. “And I took a lot. I realize now that it wasn’t about the academics. The academics were great, and I’m very proud of that work, but it was more about the life experience and the expectations that were put out there that you contribute in a meaningful way.”

Tabben, an Arts Administration major at Butler, started as a Kids’ Food Basket volunteer after she moved to Grand Rapids in 2014. She ran into Matt Downey ’95, a fellow Arts Administration major who also lives in Grand Rapids and volunteers with KFB. He recommended that Tabben give time to the organization. 

Downey knows something about philanthropic organizations—he’s the Nonprofit Services Program Director for the Johnson Center for Philanthropy at Grand Valley State University. 

“Not only is the mission important, but this is one of the most innovative, impactful organizations I’ve come across,” he said of KFB. “My team, we’ve worked with about 150 organizations in 17 Michigan cities every year. KFB has a way of thinking about their operations and innovation that is head and shoulders above most nonprofit organizations.”

Downey grew up in Kalamazoo and moved to Grand Rapids to take the job at Grand Valley State. It was there—in a master’s program—that he was “shocked” to meet another Butler alum, Afton DeVos ’05, who would later become the Associate Director of Kids’ Food Basket. DeVos had grown up in Grand Rapids and moved back after meeting her future husband, who had a thriving business here, at a wedding in Indianapolis. 

DeVos, an Integrated Communications major at Butler, wanted to be in the nonprofit world—she had been active in Relay for Life and other philanthropic endeavors as an undergrad—but found that she didn’t have the connections or the experience. So she went to Grand Valley State and got her Master of Public Administration with a nonprofit leadership focus. That led to jobs with the Christian Reform Church, followed by Gilda’s Club Grand Rapids, a cancer support community. Then five years ago, Bridget Clark Whitney, the Executive Director of KFB, recruited her.

“The thought of a child going hungry was just unbelievable to me,” she said. “My husband and I had been regular volunteers at KFB, and my husband was on the finance committee. When the opportunity came to me, it felt like the right fit at the right time.”

DeVos has helped institute systems—like an ergonomically sound table, designed by Amway, which is headquartered here—to make the operation run more efficiently. In the last five years, KFB has grown to a mid-sized nonprofit with a staff of 36 and a reputation that Downey said is the envy of other organizations in the area for its ability to raise money and recruit volunteers. 

Kristen Guinn ’01, a Grand Rapids-area native, started volunteering at KFB when she moved back to west Michigan in 2008. Guinn, who came to Butler to study Pre-Law, ended up being a Math major—and then went to law school and became a trial attorney. Her firm volunteers regularly at KFB. Guinn had known DeVos for 20 years—their older sisters were good friends in high school—and when DeVos asked her to be part of the fundraising campaign committee, she said yes.

“There’s definitely a Butler bond,” Guinn said. “With Afton and I, just because we knew each other before, there’s a mutual respect and trust. Adding Butler to it is nice. I know a couple of other Butler folks in the area. You just kind of assume they’re good people.” 

And they are people doing good. If they have any doubts, they can look at the letters they get from children
who benefit. 

“Thank you for the sack suppers!” one child wrote. “I love the pink yogurt and sweet [sandwitch]. Food helps me think better. Your friend, Luis.”

afton

Feeding Our Future

by Marc D. Allan

from Fall 2017

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boots and flowers

From Firehouse to Aspire House

Marc D. Allan

from Fall 2017

Butler Volleyball Coach Sharon Clark is a magician of sorts. In her spare time, she turns old rubber rain boots into planters, converts a weightlifting bench to a patio seat, and salvages a barrel of discarded shoe soles to recycle into a sculpture.

“I don’t like putting things in the landfill,” she said.

And now for her greatest feat: Clark and her husband, Tim, are turning a long-vacant 1897 fire station, located in a downtrodden neighborhood about four miles southwest of Butler’s campus, into a community center complete with an art studio, kitchen, and residential units.

“When we found the building, we got inspired by that neighborhood and wanted to help revive it,” Clark said. “Our plan and our goal is to be that first beacon of light, the first renewed piece. Our goal is to help revive that neighborhood one block at a time.”

The Clarks bought the two-story brick firehouse in 2012 because Sharon wanted workshop space to reclaim and repurpose furniture. The building was boarded up, tagged with graffiti, and filled to the rafters with all kinds of junk—an inoperable forklift, boxes and boxes of shoe heels and shoe polish, church pews, engine blocks. It was such a mess that it actually scared children who passed by on their way to the neighborhood elementary school.

Two years ago, local community organizer LaShawnda Crowe Storm connected Clark with neighborhood residents and students from nearby Marian University to decorate the outside of the building with a mural. “Kind of like tagging it back,” Clark said. She put up an A-shaped fence to keep people from dumping in the back lot and gave the building a name: Aspire House. “For the community to aspire to something higher.”

The Clarks have since replaced the leaky roof, gutters, and most of the windows. One side of the building has been tuckpointed, an inner wall has been repaired, and decades of detritus has been discarded.

Sharon and Tim, Vice President of Programs for the Simon Youth Foundation, work on the building nights and weekends (“and weekends when you coach volleyball aren’t actually weekends”), during summer and spring break. Friends come to help, and Sharon’s dad has come in from California several times for a week at a time.

Sharon envisions the building with an art studio in front, where neighborhood kids can participate in creative enterprises and learn a skill, and some kind of commercial kitchen in the back. “This is a food desert over here,” she said. “There are no restaurants, no stores, no grocery store. So there’s a need.” Upstairs will be two residential units.

The ultimate goal is to make the building financially self-sustaining. She figures they’re about two years from finishing—if they get grants. If the project ends up being self-financed, it will take much longer.

“I will be proud when this is done,” she said. “Even with the stress that you go through—am I doing the right thing?—every time someone stops and says, ‘It looks great’ or ‘good job’ or ‘thank you,’ you get your energy going again. That makes it worthwhile.”

boots and flowers

From Firehouse to Aspire House

by Marc D. Allan

from Fall 2017

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pace temple

Pace Temple ’19

Kailey Eaton ’17

from Fall 2017

Pace Temple always wanted to play Division I football. He also wanted to get a great education that would support him in his postgraduate life. Butler was the perfect fit. 

“Butler offered an opportunity for me to challenge and push myself to play Division I football while allowing me to have a life outside of the sport. It offered an incredible education for life after football,” Temple said. 

In 2016, he started all 11 games for the Bulldogs and was named Second Team All-PFL and Second Team All-Academic PFL. He led the team in receiving yards, receptions, and receiving touchdowns, and surpassed the 100-yard receiving mark in three separate games. 

“My coaches and teammates challenged and pushed me to grow as an athlete and gave me the opportunities needed to succeed,” Temple said. 

Temple, a Lacy School of Business Marketing and Finance double major, chose these majors because he enjoys collaborating with others to create projects and presentations and hopes to pursue a career in Marketing. He served as the Chief Marketing Officer of his Real Business Experience (RBE) group—BU Bands and Accessories—a student-run business that sold Butler wristbands and spirit wear to fans. “I love having the opportunity to work and grow as an athlete while being pushed equally to grow and work as a student.”

pace temple

Pace Temple ’19

by Kailey Eaton ’17

from Fall 2017

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adam bantz

Involvement Has its Own Rewards

Krisy Force

from Fall 2017

You only have to spend a few minutes with Butler student Adam Bantz ’17to know that he is a go-getter. He’s immersed himself in many extracurricular activities including Butler’s Ambassadors of Change program, Student Government Association (SGA), Butler University Students Foundation (BUSF), and still finds time to work as a tour guide showing prospective Butler students just how amazing campus life truly is. He’s getting the most out of the Butler student experience, and he’s planning a career to make sure future college students do as well. 

Bantz is on the path to what he deems as a fulfilling future career in Student Affairs—a talking point that seems to have created a permanent smile on his face. 

But Student Affairs wasn’t always the plan. 

When Bantz switched his major from Pharmacy to Strategic Communication two years ago, his parents were worried that he was “giving up an opportunity.” His response: “It’s not an opportunity if you don’t find the outcome personally rewarding.” 

Bantz has always been the type to quickly get involved. His immersion in student groups on campus is what sparked what Adam refers to as the “typical Student Affairs epiphany.” He explained no student enters college knowing they want to go into Student Affairs, but involvement in out-of-classroom experiences can lead some students to the realization that they, like their mentors, can help create life changing experiences for future college students. In this regard, Adam clearly feels he “fell into Student Affairs.” 

“People don’t realize all of the intricate details of Student Affairs and all the work that goes into making the University function the way it does,” Bantz explained. “I think being a part of that in general, and providing the same level of experience I’ve had at Butler for future college students is really cool.”

Since his epiphany, Bantz has been interning in both University Events and the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs to gain more experience in his future career field. Even with a busy internship schedule, Bantz has found time to serve as the President for the Interfraternity Council, a member of SGA’s Marketing and Communication Board, and as a mentor for GEAR—Greek Educators, Advocates, and Resources.

Meg Haggerty, Associate Director in the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, and Bantz’s internship advisor, commented that he has been one of the most insightful and inquisitive students she’s worked with. Furthermore, Haggerty explained that Bantz is using his hands-on student affairs internship to bridge his social involvement on campus with his academic education to maximize his future career and post-graduate work opportunities. 

“All of Adam’s involvement has been, in some way, a touchstone or area of engagement in Student Affairs,” Haggerty said. “It only makes sense with all of his participation as an undergraduate that he would find passion and love for a career mentoring future students in a similar way.” 

adam bantz

Involvement Has its Own Rewards

by Krisy Force

from Fall 2017

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marielle slagel

Marielle Slagel Keller '14

Megan Ward MS ’13

from Fall 2017

She had it all planned—her schedule, dorm, roommate. She was certain she was going to Purdue. I mean she grew up in Lafayette, Indiana—home of the Boilermakers.  

But, you know what they say about best-laid plans. 

Marielle Slagel Keller ’14 decided to take a campus tour at Butler a week before her final decision was due. Slagel Keller confided, “I had never seen anything like Butler. I knew it was where I needed to be.”  

While the campus tour may look a bit different now with all of the physical changes taking place, Keller said she thinks “Butler has been smart about the changes so that it doesn’t impact the overall community Butler inspires.” 

Keller did admit it was hard to watch Schwitzer get torn down. Understandable given the impact her first-year roommate had on her life—Keller says she taught her about the unique challenges minorities face. A lesson that served her well while getting her degree in Elementary Education, and now as a Kindergarten and First Grade Teacher at the IPS/Butler University Lab School in Indianapolis. 

Keller says something that defines her teaching is the project work she does with her students. From the creation of an insect hotel at the school for insects that are losing their habitats in the city to this year’s “Peace Project” that, among other things, included making wind chimes (renamed “kindness travelers”) that students placed randomly around the city. 

Her favorite student project, however, is a quilt of the city with silhouettes of the students flying over it. Keller shared, “[The students] painted and sewed it themselves ... and wrote their hopes and dreams for the city on it.” 

Working at the IPS/Butler Lab School, Keller remains tied to Butler in a way many alumni are not. As she put it, “I’m lucky to be at the Lab School where I get to see my professors on a regular basis.” 

A professor who has had a particular impact on Keller is Cathy Hartman. They even represented the United States together at a global conference in China—modeling teaching in front of hundreds of people. While Keller served as a Vice President of the Student Government Association, she says she gained perspective at Butler and met her husband, Mike Keller ’14.  

It’s clear that the relationships built at Butler matter. And it’s one thing Keller hopes will never change at Butler—students becoming family. 

“I would walk to class and say hello to 20 people on the way. I hope Butler doesn’t lose that.”

 

marielle slagel

Marielle Slagel Keller '14

by Megan Ward MS ’13

from Fall 2017

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jimbagnoli

The Game of Life

Krisy Force

from Fall 2017

Alumnus Jim Bagnoli ’75 remembers his entrance into the “real world” didn’t really hit him until his first day on the job. He had important responsibilities, and people and a company depending on him. Bagnoli says working a job is not like going to college.

“I was starting all over making new friends, establishing relationships, and building my reputation,” he said. “Along with a paycheck, there were bills and rent to pay. I had not been planning responsibly for my career and financial future.”

Looking back, Bagnoli wishes a college program or an event could have bestowed a little real life experience on him. This is why, as a member of the Butler Alumni Association Board, he was excited to partner with Butler’s Student Government Association’s Student Initiatives Board, the Young Alumni Board, and Butler’s Academic Affairs staff to offer Butler juniors and seniors a taste of the real world through an event called The Game of Life.

The event, which was loosely based off of the popular board game, Life, had students enter the room with a chosen profession after they graduated. They were then given a salary. Students moved from table to table where they dealt with a variety of circumstances, like the price of life insurance, eating out, student loan programs, and at Bagnoli’s table, the cost of renting a one-bedroom apartment in various parts of the country. 

“It was really interesting to watch their expression,” Bagnoli said, laughing. One student, Logan Schwering ’18, commented most students, including himself, were surprised to discover how the average cost of all the expenses students have after graduation slowly chip away at a salary. 

“Seeing how it all came together and started chipping away from your salary was eye-opening,” Schwering said.

Although the program, and the actual Life board game, don’t exactly mirror the real world, both incorporated a few hysterical similarities. 

“It was just a good, thought-provoking experience for students to realize they’ll have to put a budget together, and make lifestyle changes,” Bagnoli explained.

After going through the life tables, students attended a panel discussion with Bagnoli and four other alumni. Later on, students were able to ask questions and mingle with alumni, allowing them to “learn from one another,” Bagnoli said. 

“To have alumni who are so dedicated to giving back not only financially, but with their wealth of knowledge, is what sets  Butler apart from other institutions,” Schwering said. 

Schwering elaborated that he felt extremely fortunate to have the opportunity to interact with alumni with varying skillsets and life experiences. He urges future students to take advantage of programs about life after graduation, adding “graduation may seem far away, but the years go by quickly.”

jimbagnoli

The Game of Life

by Krisy Force

from Fall 2017

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past and present wall

Living Communities: Lifetime Connections

Patricia Snyder Pickett ’82 APR

from Fall 2017

While new and updated residence halls and greek housing abound on the Butler campus, life insude those buildings has evolved as well. 

While most of us headed off to college armed with a laundry basket full of good wishes, a couple of posters, and hope for the best, the Class of 2020 entered Butler University with a more solid approach to making lasting friendships and soaking in the post-secondary experience.

That solid approach—Themed Living Communities (TLC)—came as a natural extension of the University’s existing residence hall programming combined with the prospect of new residence halls (Fairview House) entering the picture. 

“We had previously used a ‘wellness model’ for residence hall programs,” said Karla Cunningham, Director of Residence Life. “We wanted to explore new and interesting concepts for Butler students.” A group representing Butler subsequently attended the Association of College and University Housing Officers–International (ACUHO-I) conference where the concept of Butler’s TLC began to gel. 

The process took about 18 months of study and development, according to Anne Flaherty, Dean of Student Life. “We made the decision to move in this direction with our new residence halls which are larger than our previous living communities. We were concerned about students really finding ‘community’ within these residence halls.”

A survey of high school junior and incoming students, Residence Assistants (RAs) and current students helped develop themes, said Flaherty, and guided them away from the “Living Learning Communities” model based on academic interests and majors. “Our students wanted a more holistic approach,” she explained, “and because of our research, the size of schools, and design of buildings,
we wanted it to be ‘all in’ and make it mandatory for all first-year students
to participate.”     

The Class of 2020—the largest first-year class ever to arrive at Butler at 1,255 strong—chose from 16 living communities, ranging from Faith and Spirituality to Creativity and Leadership based themes. Ideally, each theme would occupy a floor of a residence hall and activities were planned and facilitated by RAs with support of a Faculty-in-Residence (FIR), fulltime Butler faculty members who live in an apartment within the Residential College, Ross Hall, and Fairview House. Each theme was branded with its own shield, and students were encouraged to show their TLC pride around campus with stickers, t-shirts, etc.

“My overall take-away is that it was a success,” said Flaherty. “We’ve received positive feedback from both RAs and students. Not everything worked, we learned some lessons and are looking forward to next year.” Among those tweaks, the theme offerings have narrowed from 16 to the 12 most popular and the TLC must fill an entire floor. 

CJ Koch ’19 is a Chemistry and Mathematics major from Newburg, Oregon. His interest in being a RA intensified once he learned about the TLC concept. He interviewed for the New to Indy TLC and was awarded the position at the Residential College (ResCo). He arrived on campus two weeks prior to classes starting to train for his responsibilities and work on a plan of activities.

For Koch, the experience was nothing less than amazing and made him seem a bit wiser than one would associate with a 20-year old. “It gave me the opportunity to help people through issues, the logistics of  ‘where do I go’ that most of us go through when we first get to campus. Seeing them grow throughout the year has been really rewarding.”

His challenges with his New to Indy TLC had little to do with his charges and more to do with logistics of getting a group of college students around Indianapolis. He credits his Faculty-in-Residence, Erin Garriott, with getting bus passes, Blue Indy cars, etc., to move students around the Circle City from duck pin bowling in Fountain Square to team building at the Escape Room.

Colton Junod ’18 is a Pre-Med Biology major and a perfect RA for the Future Healthcare Professionals TLC. “My first-year experience was shaped by friendships and mentoring and I wanted to be able to provide that to others,” he said.
“I can empathize with them going through the Anatomy and Chemistry classes and help them if they ask.” Much of his group’s programming has focused on health, whether that be financial health, mental health, etc. 

“It’s been a unique position and increased my creativity,” said Junod. “Being able to identify what others like and work through those logistics is something I know I’ll use the rest of my life.”

Katie Keller ’20 was familiar with the Butler campus when she arrived last fall. Her grandparents had regularly brought her to attend The Nutcracker ballet during the holidays and she found the small campus close to her home in Greenfield a perfect fit. While she didn’t fully understand the concept of the TLC when she prioritized her choices, she has found it to be a positive experience. 

“I chose the Future Healthcare Professionals for my TLC because I’m a Health Sciences major,” she said. “It’s been great to have this group to work through adapting studying style from high school to college. It’s helped us get past that barrier that can be very difficult. Probably most important, it’s realizing that everyone you meet can contribute to you, and you can contribute to them.” 

After the First Year…What’s Next?

After completing their first year at Butler, students have other living options to consider, said Cunningham. “We offer special programming—Year Two at BU—that really targets their academic and post-college aspirations,” she explained. “Are they looking to study abroad? Changing majors? There’s lots of programming around those topics during the second year.”

Housing contracts are usually returned by early March. Those who will be sophomores will select or be assigned to Fairview House or select apartment options (unless they are living in their approved Greek house). Those who will be juniors, and any seniors who contract to stay on campus, will select or be assigned to apartments. Greek houses have their own contracts and assignment practices with each house handling their own contracts and assignments.

Since the early 1990s, Butler students interested in living in fraternities and sororities have participated in deferred recruitment (formerly known as rush). This process takes place the second semester of the student’s first year so that they may move into Greek housing their sophomore year. And that may be the only year they will live in the house, according to Becky Druetzler, Director of Greek Life.

“The biggest change we have seen is the increase in recruitment,” said Druetzler. “There is a substantial increase in chapter size while most of the houses have remained the same size. With the exception of those in leadership positions, the fraternity and sorority houses are mostly occupied by sophomores and some juniors.” There are currently seven sorority houses and 5 fraternity houses; around 35 percent of undergraduates participate in the Greek system.

That puts a little bit of a challenge on those trying to build bonds with their Greek brothers and sisters. “It’s a different dynamic when everyone isn’t under the same roof,” said Druetzler. “It starts with the chapter. They’re planning activities so those who aren’t in the house physically feel included. But it also calls on a lot of ‘adulting’ skills like negotiating and coordinating with a large group of people.” 

Like much of the population and a majority of their generation, Butler’s Greek population can stay in constant communication via social media. “Our students rely on social media and its ability to communicate well with everyone, regardless if members are across campus or across the world on an internship or study abroad opportunity.”

So, What's a TLC?

Butler University’s Themed Living Community (TLC) consists of students who share similar interests or hobbies. Incoming first-year students choose and rank six themes from a dozen offerings, including:

Eight Before You Graduate–Artistic and cultural opportunities while completing the Butler Cultural Requirement (BCR).

Balanced Bulldogs–Students take advantage of all that Butler and the Indianapolis community offer. 

BU Be Well–Students embrace the ability to develop and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

BU Leads–Students explore the many facets of leadership and meet movers and shakers within Butler and in the Indianapolis community. 

BU Scholars–Designed for first-year students interested in honors or those students eager to dig into their classes.

Butler Advance–Students connect with inspiring community partners in fun and serious settings on and off campus, developing a stronger sense of self and building a bridge from Butler to fulfilling careers and lives.

Creativity Reimagined–Students experience hands-on creativity by exploring local art museums and centers while learning new skills.

Exploratory Studies–Students navigate the
pathway of choosing a major with other students going through the same process.

Future Healthcare Professionals–Students discover opportunities to help them succeed at becoming a healthcare professional.

Go Global!–For students wanting to study abroad while at Butler, an opportunity to explore cultures around the world through food and arts.

New to Indy–Specifically designed for students not from Central Indiana, an opportunity to discover all Indianapolis offers through the eyes of those who live here and love it! 

The Bulldog Way–Students have the opportunity to show their school spirit by participating in Butler traditions and cultural and athletic events.

For those who can’t decide, a “No TLC Preference” is offered, though incoming students still need to rank a total of five TLCs to process their housing contract.

past and present wall

Living Communities: Lifetime Connections

by Patricia Snyder Pickett ’82 APR

from Fall 2017

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meg haggerty

Meg Haggerty moved around frequently as a kid.

Being the daughter of an Air Force officer meant Haggerty and the rest of her family didn’t stay in one place for too long. It also meant that, at a very young age, she learned how to quickly build relationships and fully immerse herself into a community—two traits that have allowed her to make lifelong friends in every place she’s lived. 

“Meg is a true inspiration,” Addie Barret ’17 said of Haggerty, who is the Staff Advisor for Barret’s sorority, Alpha Chi Omega—the same one Haggerty was a member of when she attended Butler as an undergraduate. 

From co-advising the Student Government Association’s (SGA) Marketing and Communications Board, and coordinating student events, like Winter and Spring Commencement and the Top 100 Most Outstanding Student Recognition Program, to working with interns, Haggerty makes it her mission to be a mentor to Butler students like her mentors were to her. She makes herself available 24/7 and she tells students, “Any aspect of your life you want to invite me into, I’ll invite you into mine as well.”

“She is there for students in every aspect: academic, personal, and professional,” Barret continued. “She is always asking questions about others and wanting to know how we are doing. Every memory I have of her consists of that same incredible attitude.” 

Levester Johnson, Vice President for Student Affairs for Illinois State University, worked with Haggerty closely as Butler’s former Vice President for Student Affairs. He also knew Haggerty during her undergraduate years and explained that she is Butler through and through—epitomizing Butler via its mission and values. 

“Meg has a youthful flair about herself when she advises,” he said. “She doesn’t see her job as a nine-to-five and she understands the importance of working with students hand-in-hand to achieve their dreams.” 

Johnson believes it’s Haggerty’s quality of going the extra mile that separates her from other administrative professionals. While interviewing Haggerty, this characteristic was revealed when she commented, “just say yes.” She added that if people are willing to say yes and step outside their comfort zones, they will have opportunities they never could have imagined. 

When she graduated from Butler in 2004, Haggerty’s next opportunity was at Florida State University (FSU) where she would earn a Master of Science in Higher Education Student Affairs. While attending FSU, and prior to coming back to Butler, she worked in the FSU College of Education coordinating programming and events for her master’s cohort. She remembers feeling the graduate assistantship was not what she pictured herself doing long term. 

“My passion, and my love, was still working with undergraduate students,” Haggerty explained. She looked for positions at various universities, but Haggerty says her “heart yearned for Butler.”

With a stroke of luck and good timing, Haggerty’s mentor and friend, Caroline Huck-Watson, reached out to her about a position in Butler’s Programs for Leadership and Service Education (PuLSE) Office. As an undergraduate, Haggerty had met Huck-Watson through the Ambassadors of Change (AOC) Program as a team builder and as a student staff member of the Volunteer Center. Huck-Watson had been an influence in her life at Butler and a significant inspiration to pursue Higher Education Student Affairs as a profession. By summer of 2006, Haggerty was back at Butler as an Assistant Director co-coordinating Welcome Week and Orientation programs as well as advising the Program Board of SGA with committees like films, the speaker’s bureau, Out and About in Indy, and events like Homecoming and Spring Sports Spectacular. 

Since then, Haggerty has been a key player in student event programming for Butler. She has an innate ability to connect with each student she meets, and because of that, over the past 10 years she’s been able to build some amazing relationships with students—meeting them during their first or second year, and staying in touch with them during life’s biggest milestones like marriage and children. To her, it’s amazing that she gets to create and be a part of those relationships. 

These relationships are shown through students like Emma Edick ’17, who remembers meeting Haggerty her first year on campus for a class project. 

“Meg has been such a large part of my Butler experience,” Edick said. “She pays attention to what students on campus are doing, what they are working on, and what they are excited about.”

Edick continued by explaining that even if the two of them pass by one another at Starbucks, Haggerty always puts her work aside to sincerely ask the question: “How are you?” 

“I never expected I would be here as a student and as a staff member for as long as I have, but it’s because of the people. People are the most important part of the work that I do—and I don’t think I could have done the work that I’ve done without the people in my life.” 

Creativity in Motion

Marc D. Allan

from Fall 2017

 On the day that 18-year-old Michelle Jarvis moved into her third-floor Schwitzer Hall room, if you had told her that someday she would be named Butler University’s Associate Provost, she would have laughed. Jarvis had come here to dance, not to work in academic administration. 

“I don’t think that would have ever crossed my mind or I ever would have believed what you were telling me,” she said, sitting in her new Jordan Hall office after more than three decades in Lilly Hall. “Now, being a teacher, being an educator, working in a university program? Yes. I would have fallen into that pretty quickly and believed that. I liked what I was doing when I got here, and I saw what was happening and what was possible.” 

Jarvis, who grew up in suburban Detroit, started studying dance as a small child and chose Butler based on its “well-deserved” reputation for having both a great ballet program and demanding academics. After finishing her bachelor’s degree, she took a teaching position at another university. 

“Choreography was really calling me at the time,” she said, “and to be a good choreographer, you have to have good dancers. So you have to teach them.” 

And to teach them, she needed an advanced degree. So Jarvis returned to Butler—and never left. After earning her master’s degree, teaching for several years in the Special Instruction Division (which became the Jordan Academy of Dance), and performing with Dance Kaleidoscope and Indianapolis Ballet Theatre, she started as an Assistant Professor of Dance in 1986. Over the years, she moved up from Professor to Dance Department Chair, then Associate Dean of the Jordan College of the Arts, Interim Dean of the College (twice), and, now, Associate Provost. 

Her new role includes administrative oversight of the core curriculum, which she describes as “a living, breathing activity that is the foundation of all our academic work and should be ever-changing,
ever-developing, ever-growing, and leading our students down the right paths to become critical and creative thinkers and lifelong learners by addressing their academic curiosity.” She will provide administrative oversight for the Center for High Achievement and Scholarly Engagement (CHASE), and will be working on faculty policies and procedures, best practices for student advising, retention, and degree completion. 

Although Jarvis has made the transformation from faculty to administrator, the arts are never far away. The walls of her new office are decorated with professional artwork as well as photos of dancers and art by students from the Art + Design program. She plans to use her creativity to advocate for students and faculty, and she also looks forward to teaching a course each semester. 

“I haven’t left the arts,” she said. “Dance is my identity. I haven’t moved on to something else. It’s the next step in a career that has advocated for higher education, students, and student growth and development. I’ve just stepped on to the next place in my career, which is an extraordinary opportunity.” 

Creativity in Motion

by Marc D. Allan

from Fall 2017

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It was out with the shovels and in with the Sharpies at the beam-signing ceremony in early May to dedicate the construction of a new 647-bed student residence hall to replace the old Schwitzer Hall at 750 W. Hampton Drive.

Instead of a traditional groundbreaking ceremony, students, faculty, staff, alumni, and friends of the University signed a beam that will be used in the construction of the four-story facility. 

The new housing, built in partnership with American Campus Communities (ACC) and open in fall 2018, will feature suite-style living units, with two double-occupancy rooms linked by a shared lavatory. Amenities will include gaming alcoves, study rooms, a fitness room, an interior bike room, and a large meeting room that supports the residents, student organizations, Greek chapters, and campus programming.

“The addition of this new facility is a critical step toward advancing Butler’s educational mission through superior campus amenities, and the ultimate realization of Butler’s 2020 Vision as an innovative national leader in undergraduate residential education,” Butler President James Danko said. “By the time this new housing opens, we will have added almost 1,300 new beds to campus in two years and given prospective students yet another reason to choose Butler.”

bill dugan

Butler's Heart Remains the Same

Marc D. Allan

from Fall 2017

As a young man, Bill Dugan ’51 walked the Butler campus at a time when Hinkle Fieldhouse sat 15,000 and the Butler Bowl held 35,000, male students wore jackets and ties to basketball games, Robertson Hall was known as Sweeney Chapel, the Pharmacy Building and Atherton Center (now Union) were being built, and the campus had no dormitories.

Dugan, 87, who lives on the north side of Indianapolis, comes back to campus fairly often, and he says that while Butler’s exterior has changed, the heart is very much the same.  

“There were so many good people at Butler when I was in school—and there are still so many good, caring people
today,” he said.

Dugan spent most of his early years on a farm outside Huntingburg, in southern Indiana, the son of school teachers. He chose Butler after visiting campus with a high school friend. An academic scholarship paid a third of the $150 tuition bill, and he earned the rest by working as a campus janitor.

He lived off campus at 39th Street and Kenwood Avenue his first year and would catch a city bus or walk to campus. Sometimes, he said, Butler basketball star Marvin Cave
(later an Indiana Basketball Hall of Famer) would stop and pick him up. In his later years at Butler, he lived in the Sigma Nu house.

Dugan was going to be a teacher—his father talked him out of that—but majored in accounting instead. “I was a good student,” he said. “I studied hard because it was my money I was spending.”

One of his favorite professors was Bill Shors—“We called him ‘Wild Bill’ because he always had tales”—who taught accounting. Dugan said Shors was a great example of how much Butler professors care for their students.

“If you went to school there, he got you a job,” Dugan said. “My brother graduated from Indiana State a year after I did, and I called Bill Shors and he got my brother a job, too.”

Dugan’s first job was in accounting with Kingan’s, a meat-packing company at Washington Street and the White River. Around that time, he also began dating Joanne Aiman ’53, a Butler Business major who became his wife. They were married for 56 years until she died in 2014 (Bill gave a gift to the Hinkle Campaign to name the Dawg Pound’s North End in her memory. He also gave a gift to name the Interview Suite in the Career Development area of the new Lacy School of Business building.)

After Kingan’s, Dugan spent four years in the Air Force as an auditor at a General Electric plant in Cincinnati. When he got out of the military, he went to work for Spickelmier Company, a building-materials company, then Bowes Seal Fast, which sold automotive parts, and, finally, as a consultant for Barth Electric. 

Dugan always wanted to own a business, and he ended up buying two, both of which he still owns: NCS, an embroidery and screen printing business in Indianapolis; and Sign Crafters, an Evansville company that designs, manufactures, and installs business signs. He still owns both businesses today.

In the 1990s, while raising their daughter Candy, Dugan was commuting between Indianapolis and Evansville and Joanne was running D’Arcy’s Children’s Wear, a clothing store they bought. Candy went on to graduate from Butler in 1990, as did her husband, Neal Stock ’91.

Dugan said he has had a wonderful life, and he appreciates all that Butler has done for him.

“I’ve been so blessed and so lucky,” Dugan said. “I never dreamed that I’d have even an ounce of the success I’ve had that’s come my way. I have nothing but high praise for Butler.”

bill dugan

Butler's Heart Remains the Same

by Marc D. Allan

from Fall 2017

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kile family

Three Generations of Love

Cindy Conover Dashnaw

from Fall 2017

A three-generation love story began on the lawn of Pi Beta Phi when senior Nancy Bush ’60 strolled out to meet someone she “thought was pretty handsome”: Richard Stamm, just returned from military service. 

“My dad grew up with Butler in his backyard,” said his daughter, Kim (Stamm) Kile ’89 MS ’98. “He had come back from the military ready to enroll at Butler when he met my mom. So they got married on campus, and he went into business to support them.”

Twenty years later, history began to repeat itself. First, both of Nancy and Richard’s children attended Butler. Then, although son Kevin Stamm ’88 married outside the Butler family, he introduced his sister to fraternity brother Nick Kile ’87—and just like her mother, Kim married that handsome guy on campus.

“We used to ‘take a row,’ as everyone called it: walk along a row of fraternity houses and chat with people on their porches,” Kim said. “It was hanging out in a nice social way.”

Kim and Nick’s ceremony “wedded” three Butler families: the Stamms, the Kiles, and the Loves. Nick’s sister, Bulldog Christie Kile ’79, had married fellow Bulldog Jay Love ’76 a decade earlier. Even Kim’s mother-in-law had a Butler degree!

The Kiles had four children, who grew up surrounded by all things Butler and accompanied their mother to work in admissions. In 2010, Emily Kile ’14 became a third-generation Butler student—and part of yet another Butler couple when she married Peter Maxwell ’16. 

“We hadn’t planned on staying in Indianapolis after graduation,” Emily said. “But now we can’t imagine living anywhere else. Butler made us appreciate how diverse the city can be in experiences and opportunities.”

Emily’s siblings are keeping the family tree alive: one’s at Butler, one’s marrying a Bulldog, and wherever the youngest lands in 2018, Butler will always have a presence at a Kile house.

“We’ve had lots of amazing friendships and experiences with Butler,” Kim said. “I can’t image our world without it.”

kile family

Three Generations of Love

by Cindy Conover Dashnaw

from Fall 2017

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levinson

Butler University alumnus Frank Levinson ’75, a longtime Butler benefactor whose past gifts enabled Butler to upgrade its science programs and purchase its first supercomputer, generously provided the University with a new $5 million gift to support the sciences. 

Enrollment in the sciences at Butler has increased nearly 50 percent over the last decade. 

Levinson’s gift will be integral to the transformation of Butler’s science teaching and laboratory spaces, building on the University’s undergraduate research emphasis—recognized by U.S. News & World Report as among the best programs of its kind in the nation. The new facilities, designed to complement those of local and global science and health/life sciences companies, will enable Butler to collaborate more fully with and provide talent to these firms as well as prepare students for further study in the best graduate and post-professional programs.

“I have been so grateful for all the things that a Butler education has done for so many members of my family,” Levinson said. “Over many years, my family has seen how valuable and recognized this education has been. Looking forward, I know it takes a big commitment to stay on the cutting edge of the sciences. This gift aims to help keep this commitment high for many years to come.” 

Levinson grew up in Indianapolis and he and his family have a deep, multigenerational relationship with Butler University that goes back nearly 70 years. Levinson earned a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and Physics from Butler in 1975, and in 2006 he received an honorary doctorate. His father, Alan C. “Buzz” Levinson, received his Master of Science in Education from Butler in 1953, during which time he helped install and align the telescope at Holcomb Observatory. Buzz frequently brought young Frank along, helping kindle Frank’s interest in science and optics. 

Levinson’s mother, Winifred B. Levinson, received her Bachelor of Arts in French from Butler in 1951, and his brother Carl A. Levinson received his Bachelor of Science in Physics and Mathematics in 1978.

Levinson is an entrepreneur and investor who co-founded Finisar Corporation, a manufacturer of optical communication components and subsystems. He is currently the Managing Director of the early stage fund and incubator Small World Group, which engages in a mixture of venture capital, engineering, and philanthropy to help start companies or research efforts with a focus on “clean tech”—technology that helps improve the quality of life on earth.

He also is a partner in the San Mateo, California-based venture capital fund Phoenix Venture Partners, which invests in start-up teams developing advanced materials innovations for major industries such as photonics, health care, and sustainable products.

oncfchb announcement

Butler Unveils New Business Center

Marc D. Allan

from Fall 2017

In May, Butler announced a $5 million financial commitment from Old National Bank to create the Old National Bank Center for Closely Held Business, which will provide privately owned businesses with training, education, mentoring, and networking opportunities to help them succeed.

The Center, located in Butler’s Andre B. Lacy School of Business, will place special emphasis on serving the unique needs of this core segment of the economy. The Center will advance the Lacy School of Business’s commitment to experiential education by extending the definition of the Butler student to include the individuals at the businesses that they have the opportunity to work with.

“We are grateful not only for the tremendous financial contribution, but for the partnership with Old National Bank (ONB),” said Stephen Standifird, Dean of the Lacy School of Business. “ONB has been, and continues to be, a strong advocate for supporting closely held businesses.”

The Old National Bank Center for Closely Held Business will initially concentrate on two core areas: helping organizations understand how to manage transition strategies, a challenge that is unique to closely held businesses; and identifying stage-appropriate advisors who can help businesses grow in areas such as accounting, legal, risk, and insurance. 

The Center’s leadership team will design its initial programming. The team consists of Administrative Director Dennis Wimer; Academic Director and longtime Butler Business Professor Dick Fetter; and Dean Standifird. Much of the ongoing programming of the Center will be determined by client feedback and consultation with appropriate experts. If you want to learn more about how you or your business could be involved in this organization at Butler, connect with Wimer at dwimer@butler.edu.

Wimer and colleague Jennifer Dewitt spent the summer meeting with members of the Indiana Business community as well as attending The Alliance Conference, an organization consisting of leaders of family and closely held business centers across North America. “The first step is to understand our customers’ needs and this summer has helped us identify the critical topics that drive organizational growth and value,” Wimer said. “We have started to build relationships with key partners that we know our members will be able to count on.”

ONB Chief Credit Officer Steve McGlothlin ’87 will chair the Center’s Advisory Board. Lacy School of Business Senior Advisor Andre Lacy will serve on the board as well as Elaine Bedel MBA ’79, President of the Indiana Economic Development Corporation; Bill Neale, Senior Partner Krieg Devault LLP; and JP Engelbrecht, CEO South Central Inc. Additional board members who bring a diverse perspective on today’s critical business issues will be added.

“Old National is thrilled to partner with Butler University to help advance the success of privately owned businesses throughout our great state,” Old National Chairman and CEO Bob Jones said. “As the largest bank headquartered in Indiana, Old National is deeply committed to ensuring that Hoosier businesses get the training, education, and other resources they need to grow and thrive.”

oncfchb announcement
Campus

Butler Unveils New Business Center

In May, Butler announced a $5 million financial commitment from Old National Bank to create the Old National Bank Center for Closely Held Business, which will provide privately owned businesses with training, education, mentoring, and networking opportunities to help them succeed.

by Marc D. Allan

from Fall 2017

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mark dobson

Changing Communities for the Better

Cindy Conover Dashnaw

from Fall 2017

Mark Dobson ’84 credits his Butler University professors for turning him into “an ornery SOB” and his father for teaching him to “do the right thing.”

“They all fired me up,” he said, laughter and gratitude in his voice.

While his alma mater is sparking new community groups among student-residents, Dobson has been sparking community involvement in local government for two decades. He’s had one overarching mission: To get individuals directly involved in creating social change in their communities. 

Passion and bluster

Dobson willingly admits he entered public service “with bluster.” Prior to his current position as President/CEO of the Elkhart County Economic Development Corp., he was President/CEO of the Kosciusko County and St. Joseph County (now South Bend Regional) Chambers of Commerce in northern Indiana. Before then, he was President of the St. Joseph County Commissioners and once told the South Bend Tribune that the real burden on taxpayers was the many layers of local government.

“Coming in, I had all these grand ideas and probably made some statements that would’ve been offensive to folks that had actually served in government,” he said ruefully. “But I finally learned it’s typically not the people that are the problem. It’s the systems we give them [to operate within] that cause the problems. I changed my attitude tremendously.” 

Dobson quickly became known for his fiery advocacy of reducing government’s influence on people’s lives. In St. Joseph County, he established a Community Leader Forum and rebuilt the state’s Public Policy Division to ensure residents and businesses had a voice. He then led the Kosciusko Chamber through unprecedented growth and implemented the Chamber’s visionary strategic plan, earning him the Indiana Chamber Executive of the Year title in 2014. 

Calling himself “a fairly average student at Butler,” some of Dobson’s success surprises himself.

“I didn’t set the world on fire then, but a couple of things stayed with me,” he said. “The Butler Way was alive and well in the 1980s—we just didn’t have it branded that way. But the principles were the same. And professors in Butler’s business department really challenged us to think outside the textbook, to think for ourselves, to have a lifelong learning experience.”

He recalled one frighteningly motivational entrepreneurial class in particular.

“The professor told me I’d fail if I didn’t get McDonald’s to move into the new food court on campus, and I believed her,” Dobson said. “I learned so much by engaging with a McDonald’s Franchise Director. It was an invaluable learning experience.”

Dobson has infused his government work with his entrepreneurial spirit, education, and early work experience in the private sector. The one constant ingredient for success?

“For years in the corporate world, we valued and involved our people. Why wouldn’t we do the same in government?” he said.

mark dobson

Changing Communities for the Better

by Cindy Conover Dashnaw

from Fall 2017

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frank ross headshot

Frank E. Ross III, a national leader in student affairs with 22 years of experience and degrees from both Ball State and Indiana universities, was named Butler University’s new Vice President for Student Affairs. He began the position in June.

Ross comes to Butler from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, where he has served as Vice President for Student Life. Prior to that, he was Vice President for Student Affairs at Northeastern Illinois University, Associate Provost for Student Success and Dean of Students at University of North Texas at Dallas, and Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Life at IUPUI.

He earned a B.S. in Psychology and an M.A. in Adult and Community Education from Ball State, an M.A.E. in Student Affairs from Western Kentucky University, and his doctorate in Higher Education and Student Affairs from Indiana University-Bloomington.

Butler President James M. Danko praised Ross as “a national leader in the student affairs profession with involvement in NASPA, the preeminent international association dedicated to the advancement, health, and sustainability of the student affairs profession.”

Ross served as a member of the NASPA: Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education Board of Directors, was the national director of Knowledge Communities, and served as chair for the 2016 NASPA Annual Conference. He also was a member of the James E. Scott Academy Board for senior student affairs officers.

Ross has received awards and recognition from NASPA, the National Resource Center on the First-Year Experience and Students in Transition, the National Academic Advising Association, the Association of American Colleges and Universities, and the American College Personnel Association for his work and research. In addition, he received the 2016 Robert H. Shaffer Distinguished Alumni Award from Indiana University.

Ross will be joined in Indianapolis by his husband, David, and their son, Mason, both of whom share in the excitement about coming to Indianapolis and joining the Butler community.

sellick bowl

The Butler Bowl became the Bud and Jackie Sellick Bowl on September 16, thanks to a gift from the estate of Winstan R. “Bud” Sellick ’47 and Jacqueline (Blomberg) ’44.

Also as part of the $9.6 million gift, the Champions Room in the Sellick Bowl was renamed the Bud and Jackie Sellick Room, and the Registrar’s Office is now the Jacqueline Blomberg Sellick Registrar’s Suite. 

The Sellicks had asked longtime friends Dan Yates and Bob Wildman to assist in the transfer of this gift to Butler. Wildman noted that the Sellicks “were special people with a special place in their hearts for Butler.”

“During their long history with the school, they saw it grow and prosper, and I know they were quite happy and proud to be a part of its success,” he said. “They would be extremely grateful to Butler for this recognition by the University of their generous gift.”

The Sellicks were married for 69 years. A Marine Corps veteran, Bud served on Okinawa and Korea. His association with Butler University was long and deep. When Bud was born, his father was the Treasurer of Butler University in Irvington, as well as a Professor of Economics at the school. In 1939, when he came to Butler as a student, an aunt was Assistant Registrar and a second aunt was a Librarian. 

Bud’s pursuit of a degree was interrupted by World War II. He returned to Butler following the war, earned his degree in Economics, and married his college sweetheart, Jacqueline Blomberg. As a student, he was involved in the band, Kappa Kappa Psi band honorary, and Delta Tau Delta fraternity. In 1947, he began his successful career as an insurance agent in the Indianapolis area.

After fighting in Korea, he returned to Indianapolis where he served as President and Owner of Bud Sellick Insurance Agency and the Blessing-Sellick Insurance Agency for several decades until his retirement. He was also involved in a successful real estate business in the Indianapolis area with his wife and brother-in-law.

Bud died March 30, 2015. He was 93.

Jackie was a lifelong resident of Indianapolis. She attended Shortridge High School, then went on to become a graduate of Butler University. During her Butler days, she was a member of Alpha Chi Omega sorority, a member of the Debate Team, and a recipient of the Ovid Butler Award.

Her career included over 20 years on the Industrial Board. She also owned and operated commercial real estate for 40 years.

Jackie died October 20, 2012. She was 89.

Consistent donors to Butler for more than a third of a century, the Sellicks endowed three scholarships: The Winstan R. Sellick, Jacqueline Sellick, and Herman W. Blomberg Scholarship; the Sellick, Deming, and Schuler Scholarship; and the Winstan R. Sellick and Jacqueline B. Sellick Business Scholarship. 

They also made gifts to the Butler Fund and several athletic funds, including the restoration of Hinkle Fieldhouse. In 2007, Bud and Jackie Sellick received the Ovid Butler Society Mortarboard Award. In 2014, Bud was honored when he received the Butler Medal. He also was a donor and strong supporter of Delta Tau Delta Fraternity.

hinkle exterior

The Secret is Out

Cindy Conover Dashnaw

from Fall 2017

The story of how Florie (Theofanis) Eaton ’88 and Joe Eaton ’88 got together sounds like the movie Animal House

“We weren’t in togas, but we were in Hawaiian garb,” she laughed.

They were dressed for the annual Sigma Nu Voo Doo Dance (fortunately, a thing of the past). 

“They built a pool over the entire front lawn with railroad ties and plastic sheeting, then filled it with a hose. It became something you didn’t want to swim in,” she said.

She and Joe avoided the water, but not the romance. After two years of noticing each other on outings with mutual friends, they finally became a couple.

“It’s just the way it was, and still is. Butler is such a community that everybody starts out as friends,” she said. 

‘Nothing but Butler’

Florie Theofanis was born into a true-blue Butler home: Her mother, Katie ’53 and her father, Chris ’52—an alumnus and retired Butler employee of 44 years—and her uncle, George Theofanis ’57, held that most revered of titles, “basketball coach.” 

In fact, inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000, George was known for “blazing the trail of unbiased and fair recruiting … during a time when social injustice ran rampant,” wrote The Butler Collegian.

“I knew nothing but Butler all my life,” Florie said. All three of the Theofanis children attended the University. “I didn’t give it a second thought.”

Florie and Joe’s children did, though. Daughter Kailey Eaton ’17 met the tennis coach, went for a recruiting weekend, came home with an offer and said, ‘That’s it! I’m going to Butler.’”

Son Zach Eaton ’20 played high school sports at what would be a Division III level if he continued, which would have ruled out Butler. 

“He gave up sports rather than give up Butler,” Florie said. “He’s never regretted it. He plays lots of club and intramural sports and absolutely loves Butler.”

Florie has seen what she calls “tremendous” growth at Butler. 

“It still has that family feeling, but the opportunity for our kids is tremendous,” she said. “We used to be a well-kept secret, and I think the secret is out. The more you’re there, the more reasons you find to love Butler University.”

hinkle exterior

The Secret is Out

by Cindy Conover Dashnaw

from Fall 2017

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stewart family bulldog

Family, Family Everywhere

Cindy Conover Dashnaw

from Fall 2017

Sarah Stewart ’21 can be forgiven for being unable to name every family member who has attended Butler.

After all, her father can name only 30, which is just about half of the 58 or so Stewarts, Athertons, and Browns who have graced the Butler campus—relatives that reach all the way back to legendary Butler President Hilton U. Brown.

“I remember knowing about Butler ever since I was little,” said Sarah, who entered the University this fall. “My uncle, dad, and grandparents all took me to Butler plays and games—football, basketball, soccer—and we would always see family there. We still do.”

Sarah’s father, Paul B. Stewart ’89 MD FACS, said he grew up the same way.

“Butler is almost synonymous with my dad’s side. Family, church, and Butler were the three things we have always talked about.” 

“Always” reaches as far back as the 1880s, when the Stewart family and Butler University began influencing each other. 

Planting The Family Tree

Hilton U. Brown was still a Butler student when he fell in love with coed Jennie Hannah. After they married, Brown went on to become Butler College Director in 1885 and Board President from 1903 to 1955. 

He’d also eventually be known as Sarah’s great-great-great-grandfather.

“Hilton Brown’s very strong commitment to Butler has extended throughout the family and has always been a big source of pride,” her dad said.

Sarah will encounter plenty of family members’ names throughout campus. 

Her uncle John W. Stewart ’96 DDS commissioned the bulldog sculpture in front of Atherton, a building named after Brown’s son-in-law John W. Atherton. Great-grandfather James Stewart ’34 received a Butler Alumni Achievement Award and is in the Butler Athletic Hall of Fame, along
with great-uncle Kent Stewart ’60 JD and great-great-uncle Robert Stewart ’35 PhD. Brown’s brother, Demarchus, was Butler’s President for only one year in 1906. Hilton U. Brown Jr. was honored with a painting still in Robertson Hall. Great-great-aunt Jean Brown Wagoner is a children’s author. 

Sarah finds comfort in such a legacy.

“I love Butler because it’s a smaller community that reminds me of family. When I see my family all over campus, it means a lot to me,” she said.

The line extending directly from Hilton U. Brown to Sarah Stewart goes like this:

Sarah’s great-great-great grandparents—Hilton U. Brown 1880 and fellow Butler student Jennie Hannah married and had 10 children, most of whom went to Butler.

Sarah’s great-great-grandparents—Mary Brown, one of Hilton’s daughters, married George Oliver Stewart. These two are the anomalies in the family tree; neither attended Butler, but they sent both of their sons, James J. Stewart ’34  JD and Robert Stewart ’35 PhD, there.

Sarah’s great-grandparents— James married Helen Gearen ’34; she and her sister, Marion, went to Butler, as did the latter’s husband, Victor Guio ’35. 

Sarah’s grandparents—James and Helen Stewart had two boys who each attended Butler: Peter ’63 and Kent ’60 (whose wife and son also went to Butler). Peter married Joan Juvinall ’65 and had Sarah’s father, Paul B. Stewart ’89 MD and her uncle, John W. Stewart ’96 DDS.

Sarah’s parents—Paul married Anne Schumaker, and they had Sarah and her older brother, Grant Brown Stewart.

Sarah and her brother—Grant was accepted at Butler, but is attending Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. Sarah is on track to become a Butler graduate in 2021.

stewart family bulldog

Family, Family Everywhere

by Cindy Conover Dashnaw

from Fall 2017

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paige haefer

The Evolution of a Bulldog

Paige Haefer ’17

from Fall 2017

During times of reflection, we can all identify moments that profoundly change who we are, what we believe, and who we strive to become. As children, it seems that we dream big and believe that the life changing moments we will experience will be grand, sweeping, and adventurous. However, as we grow up, I think more common than not, the moments that change our course of life and impact us the most happen in unexpected places and through the daily interactions we experience. The people we meet and communities we join are far more impactful than we ever imagine them to be.

I found this to be true through my experience at Butler University. Never did I imagine that a small, liberal-arts University, set in the quaint state of Indiana, would introduce such instrumental mentors and instill community values that have completely reframed my view of the world.

I graduated this past May from Butler’s College of Communications with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Human Communication and Organizational Leadership with minors in Strategic Communication and Sociology. Before making the move to Indianapolis, I grew up in Madison, Wisconsin. Growing up, I always had a bit of Hoosier influence from my mom, an Indiana native and IU grad. Yearly trips to Indy were common to visit my grandparents who still live here today. While looking for colleges, I was determined to get out of my Big Ten college town. A small classroom setting and high student involvement opportunities were my driving factors on the college search. I applied all over the Midwest and ultimately landed at Butler University in the city I had grown up visiting. I wasn’t too sure what I wanted to study but I knew I liked the options at Butler, was drawn to the beautiful campus, and had only had positive interactions with the current students, faculty, and staff. So, in August 2013, my family packed the mini van and helped me make the move to Indianapolis and my new residence in Schwitzer Hall.

Plenty has changed at Butler in my four years as a student. New buildings have appeared, new people have joined and exited the community, and student organizations have grown and expanded. Change is inevitable and often welcomed. I know personally, I have changed a lot in my four years at Butler. My first-year on campus I truly was a bit more soft-spoken and shy, especially my first few weeks. I wasn’t very sure of who I was or what I wanted, and I am genuinely grateful now that my experiences at Butler have helped me change

Part II of Blog

Involvement on Campus Evolves

Over my four-year Bulldog career, I was blessed to experience a wide variety of campus involvement and leadership opportunities.

My first-year (Historically, a student’s first year on campus was referred to as their “freshman” year experience. Recently, most Universities have replaced that reference by the term “first-year.”) on campus I bounced around, joining various campus organizations, attending as many events as I could, and applying for everything and anything I could. This is probably a typical first-year experience. You want to do it all, meet everyone, and be everywhere. I think it took me about a year and a half to realize the areas I wanted to focus on for my college career. Ultimately, the areas I was truly passionate about and ended up investing time in were: on-campus employment at the Office of Admissions, social Greek Life, Butler’s Welcome Week leadership, and Student Government Association (SGA).

At the Office of Admissions, I served various roles over four years including tour guide, telecounseling supervisor, student assistant, and events and visits intern. In Greek Life, I found a home at Alpha Chi Omega sorority where I served my chapter as Vice President of Philanthropy and even got involved at the national level as a Student Trustee on the organizations non-profit Board of Trustees. Welcome Week and the first six weeks of college are instrumental to a successful four-year experience and because my experience with this was so positive I was determined to continue this for future Bulldogs serving as a Student Orientation Guide and Student Orientation Coordinator at the beginning of my sophomore through senior year fall semesters.

SGA has been my most involved opportunity. I applied for the Student Initiatives Board at the end of my first-year—excited to see what college student government was like. In high school I was a part of student government which mostly consisted of planning prom and designing a class t-shirt. Never did I expect to be a part of such incredible impact at the collegiate level. After sophomore year I ran to be Vice President of Student Initiatives, leading a 30-student board in addressing campus concerns. Heading into senior year I made the leap and ran for Student Body President and won! Serving my University and peers in this way was challenging, but I can’t picture any better way to experience senior year than through total investment in and service to the community in this way.

Although I had the opportunity to learn from, grow through, and be positively challenged by four unique areas of campus involvement in addition to my classroom experiences, I have found a common thread through it all. I enjoy facilitating conversation, problem-solving, building community, and advocating for change. Butler involvement has helped me discover my passion for people.

Organizations Grow and Improve

Change is a key part of the college experience. I think everyone changes at Butler, and hopefully always for the better. A key change that occurs within students can be seen in their student involvement. As students go through their four years, they change from organization participant to organization leader to, in some cases, organization founder, innovator, or revolutionizer. SGA is no exception to the way that student involvement evolves and grows over time. The summer after my sophomore year I had just been elected Vice President of Student Initiatives for SGA. I was nervous and excited about the opportunity. My role was a new one—previously this role had been known as the Vice President of Administration—and, while the duties of this role did not change much, this name change reflected just one of many changes that would occur to SGA over the course of the upcoming summer.

In summer 2015, SGA went through a rebranding process. Similar to the way that Butler University as a whole rebranded that year. SGA leadership felt as though the organization had gotten away from its core purpose: To represent every student at Butler University and truly be the voice for students on campus. That summer at SGA retreat, the newly renamed SGA Marketing and Communications Board worked tirelessly to craft a new SGA brand from scratch, one that would reflect the core mission of the organization, feel fresh, and remain recognizable. Across SGA, boards were renamed, roles were tightened up or reevaluated, and an overall vision of cohesion and unity was pushed. The most significant change to campus was the switch from a student organization assembly to a student elected, smaller senate. Looking back now on two years of this new SGA structure and refocused brand, its definitely different and its definitely not perfect. But, the overall impact seems incredible positive for campus.

Change can be scary and at the same time have incredible purpose. Student organizations come and go based on campus interest. SGA has changed and reformed but the core purpose of the organization remains and has stood the test of time. I view the changes as positive ones. These changes to our student government are a reflection of lessons learned at Butler. Personally, I feel that the changes in SGA have allowed more students to know about it as our brand is unified and easy to recognize. The board name changes have cleared up some confusion on what these actual boards do and the unification has allowed even more students to get involved by relying on single channels sharing applications, events, and opportunities. SGA is feeling less segmented and more unified and unification is always a positive change for our world. I am proud to have been a small part of some of these changes to SGA and hope that my leadership as President allowed some type of continued positive growth and change to take place.

People Change You

When I think about the changes I have seen at Butler, in myself, in SGA, and in other campus areas, I am not just struck by the outcomes of these changes but I can almost always associate with a specific person or people that were the core influencers, leaders, or mentors in that situation. Instead of thinking of specific events, I want to share a bit about a handful of the people who have been inspirations and mentors to me. The personal changes I have accomplished as well as organizational changes I have had the chance to be a part of are directly correlated to the incredible things I learned from the people on this campus.

SGA Leaders—As one would expect, student government brings together some of the most driven and inspiring student son a campus. While it has been great to be a part of some incredible change and evolution facilitated by this organization, looking back on my time in SGA, I am most thankful for the peer leaders I learned from. While everyone in SGA has impacted me in some way, Katelyn Sussli ’16, Cristina McNeily ’17, and Logan Schwering ’18 come to mind immediately. Katelyn was the SGA President before myself and I had the chance to serve as her Vice President. I learned a lot from her about humility and about always putting your best foot forward no matter the situation. Cristina helped me realize that asking questions and learning about things that are unfamiliar to you is the best way to build community, to celebrate differences instead of letting them divide us. Logan, has taught me to take advantage of your whole day and make sure every moment is spent engaged and following your passions.

Alpha Chi Omega—As tour guides we tend to describe Butler’s Greek life as “prominent but not dominant” and while the prominence of Greek Life is different for students across campus, I can personally say that my involvement in a Panhellenic sorority was always a positive one. To experience a group of women who’s genuine goal is to just love you and help you become a better person is a pretty jaw-dropping experience. Nobody is forced to be in Greek Life and women (or men) stay because they want to, not because they have to. From my experience, Greek Life at Butler has been about fostering community and personal connections. The women in my chapter have become my greatest role models and cheerleaders. From personal tragedy to personal victory, I have had at least one, if not many, more women of Alpha Chi Omega step in and show me nothing but love and support. To be part of an organization based on values is a pretty powerful thing.

Student Affairs Staff—How many people truly love their jobs enough to stay at work until well past 11:00 PM or even overnight? Through my high level of campus involvement, I have had the opportunity to experience first-hand how much our Student Affairs staff and program care about students. I have had countless meetings with Caroline Huck-Watson, Director of the PuLSE Office and an SGA Advisor, that go well past 10:00 PM. Anne Flaherty, Dean of Student Life , is seen at campus events no matter what day of the week it is and is quick to respond to campus concerns or student questions. Not only are these two women excellent at their jobs, they also are mothers and have families of their own. The Student Affairs staff truly cares about making the student experience as incredible as possible here at Butler even if that means sacrificing their own personal needs. That’s dedication and passion that I strive to emulate in my future career.

Communications Faculty—I definitely don’t want to forget to mention one of the most important aspects of the college experience. Our education. While every college and department has something special to offer, I want to brag on my College, the College of Communications. Scott Bridge, the College’s Internship irector will send you an email at 4:00 AM with not one but 10 paid internship opportunities. Professor Jessica Moore has  provided her students with her cell phone number to text or call her with questions from class. But, she also offers to skype with you on the weekends to help with major projects. Professor Janis Crawford is an advisor that puts up with my continuous “double checking” that I have accomplished all required courses and has continued to forgive me for my inability to understand Doodle polls. Professor Lindsay Ems introduced me to incredible books and thoughts and continues to engage with me in these ideas even a year after class is done. It makes it much easier to learn and get the most out of your curriculum when the folks charged with educating you want to be there and will go above and beyond to make sure you get the most out of your college experience in the classroom.

Community Stands Firm

Change will not stop at Butler University. Students will continue to grow over the course of their undergraduate careers. SGA and other student organizations will continue to transform with the ever-evolving needs and goals of student bodies, and the student experience not only at Butler, but across the country, will continue to revolutionize.

Despite ongoing transformation on Butler’s campus, the true brick and mortar of our 295 acres—the community itself—holds true. Through the continuous desire of the student body to be active and make the most out of their college experience, mentors and teachers such as the examples I listed previously, and an ever-engaged alumni presence—The Butler Way that most students cite as their favorite part of campus lives on. 

paige haefer

The Evolution of a Bulldog

by Paige Haefer ’17

from Fall 2017

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laura michel

Stars Aligned for Laura Michel ’08

Megan Ward MS ’13

from Fall 2017

From the beginning, Butler checked all of her boxes—small, liberal arts, major city with lots to offer, and not in Iowa. It was the “perfect fit” for Laura Michel ’08, the daughter of two public school educators and a middle child from—you guessed it—Iowa. 

Michel started out as a Chemistry major with pre-med plans. After taking a few classes and thinking about what she wanted post-grad, she switched to Communications Disorders—a major that incorporated her love of helping others and a medical field component. Michel went on to earn a master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln (UNL).

And, she found her way back to Iowa.

As she says, “the stars aligned” for Blank Children’s Hospital in Des Moines to have a pediatric speech-language pathologist opening when she graduated from UNL in 2010. The close proximity to her hometown of Clinton, Iowa, is perfect for Michel, a self-proclaimed family girl who recently got engaged and counts spending time with her niece and nephews among her favorite things to do.

What else does she like to do? Well, there is golf, yoga, and traveling. But, the two most noteworthy (in my opinion), are Michel spreading the word about Butler in Des Moines because of her “fandom during the NCAA tournaments” and staying involved with Alpha Chi Omega, a sisterhood that has followed her from her days at Butler to her time at UNL and now to Des Moines.

Michel also credits Alpha Chi with helping her stay connected to Butler, since she tries to visit campus once a year to reunite with her friends at Butler and her Alpha Chi sisters. On a recent visit, she was excited that there were places on campus to grab lunch, but admits it was a huge change to see the parking garage and new residence hall.

“Campus is still as beautiful as ever ... It’s evident Butler is invested in continuing the growth needed to attract and retain students,” she said.

It also was important for Michel to note that despite growth she hopes the feeling of belonging on campus never changes. As she put it, “The close-knit community and relationships I built with peers, professors, student organization advisors—even Dr. Fong and L.J.—are what made my years at Butler so impactful.”

In fact, she said if she had to sum up her Butler experience in one word she would choose “life-changing.”

Michel said her involvement in the Butler University Student Foundation (BUSF) and Student Government Association (SGA) helped shape her Butler experience and gave her the chance to learn and grow into who she is today. She also benefited from the relationships she built and leadership skills she honed while serving as SGA President.

As Michel spells it out, “I wish more people knew that you can really make the Butler experience your own. Whatever you invest or put in is directly correlated with what you will get [in return].”

laura michel

Stars Aligned for Laura Michel ’08

by Megan Ward MS ’13

from Fall 2017

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danko young

From the President

President James M. Danko

from Fall 2017

The more things change, the more they stay the same.

                                                      —Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr

Butler University’s forward momentum is palpable. You can see it in the construction of learning and living spaces and in the record-high national interest in a Butler education has reached a record high: the University received 15,000 applications in 2016, an increase of 50 percent over the previous two years. You can sense it when our student-athletes step onto the field or the court. You can feel it in the energy of newly formed learning communities. You can hear it in the laughter of the more than 35,000 Hoosier schoolchildren who come to Clowes Hall each year to see their first matinee. And above all, you can see it in the realization of our academic mission. Butler students are achieving the kind of intellectual and personal growth that prepares them for meaningful, successful lives after graduation. They are traveling the world, serving others, and collaborating with faculty on research and scholarship. They are rolling up their sleeves and gaining experience in the industries and disciplines that interest them. Our alumni are building outstanding careers, enriching their communities, and giving back to support a new generation of Butler students.

When an institution is moving forward so swiftly, it’s important to periodically step back to reaffirm and celebrate its foundational culture. Indeed, the more things change at Butler, the more our University’s traditions and core values remain the same. Butler began as our founders’ effort to champion inclusivity and equality among all people. Today, we continue to strive for these priorities. Outstanding undergraduate education has always been at the heart of our mission, and this focus continues today. Generations ago, Hinkle Fieldhouse came to life with cheering fans. Today, the electricity in Hinkle is only getting stronger. And Butler’s historical commitment to serving as a cultural and educational resource to Central Indiana is more robust than ever.

As you read this edition of Butler Magazine, I hope you enjoy this look at Butler’s past and present, and reflect upon your own role in shaping the Butler story. Whether your impact was large or small, your presence on this campus changed it. And for that we are grateful.

James M. Danko
President

president@butler.edu

danko young

From the President

by President James M. Danko

from Fall 2017

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Finding Balance

Megan Ward MS ’13

from Fall 2017

Balance. That elusive feeling we search for tirelessly. And when we don’t feel it, we long for it.

Truth is finding balance in your life can be complicated (read: messy, overwhelming, stressful ... you get the picture). Let’s be honest, the reason why it can be so complicated is because it involves our wellbeing. That’s what is at stake when we talk about balance.

The Health and Recreation Complex (HRC) at Butler understands the importance of balance and taking a holistic approach to wellbeing. As Director of Recreation Scott Peden said, “It’s not just your typical gym with a bunch of fitness equipment.”

Far from it, actually.

The HRC is home to Counseling and Consultation Services, Health Education and Outreach, Health Services, and Recreation. Services offered at the HRC range from personal training and nutritional counseling to massage therapy and physical therapy, and from swim lessons and certifications to a high-ropes course that is often used for team-building activities.

The impact the HRC has on the Butler community and beyond is obvious when you take a look at the numbers from last year:

  • Approximately 200 Butler student employees
  • Roughly 6,000 student-patient visits, and another 3,000 visits for external services (e.g., flu clinics)
  • Around 3,500 counseling sessions, for just over 500 students (about 10 percent of student body)
  • Almost 100 outreach and education programs, reaching around 3,000 students and employees

Nearly 90 percent of Butler students visit the HRC on a regular basis—about 1,200 students per day. Sure, current Butler students will always be the primary focus of the HRC, but there are numerous services and activities available to alumni, faculty and staff, and the community. In fact, there are over 400 non-student HRC members. Not to mention the hundreds of community members who purchase day passes or participate in programs/services offered at the HRC.

The interests and needs of students are always evolving when it comes to—well—everything. That includes wellbeing, which is becoming a more personal and individualized experience. These evolving needs mean the HRC staff has to be proactive not only in what they do, but how they do it. 

For example, as the demands for mental health services increase, Counseling and Consultation Services is continually adjusting the services provided in order to best meet the needs of Butler University students. Streamlining their intake process and expanding their group therapy program, which has been shown to be one of the most effective forms of therapy for college students, are two such adjustments recently made.

Another example is exploring how to engage students and the community in different ways. In particular, providing programming and services outside the walls of the HRC.

“Beyond the aspects of how we engage our community, we will take a serious look at what programs or services might be feasible to add to our expanding portfolio,” shared Peden.

“I would love to see the HRC become the embodiment of what a university can do when resources, strategies, and personnel align to create a living, learning lab for holistic wellbeing.”

In an effort to truly maximize the potential of the HRC, staff continue to identify opportunities for collaboration with campus partners and others. If they could add a couple more basketball courts, an indoor climbing wall, solar panel roof, and a wing reserved solely for reflection and meditation, that’d be good, too.

It’s all about balance, right?

Campus

Finding Balance

by Megan Ward MS ’13

from Fall 2017

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madison sauerteig

A Bulldog with a Soft Heart

Patricia Pickett ’82 APR

from Fall 2017

Children who are dealing with serious illnesses can experience a range of emotions, from scared to bored…Scared by unfamiliar surroundings and symptoms, bored by hours that drag by without their normal routine.

So, imagine how awesome it would be to have a smiling face peek into your room with the offer to play a game, create an art project, or just hang out and chat.

Meet Madison Sauerteig. The senior Psychology major from Cicero, Indiana, spends a dozen or so hours a month doing just that with patients at Riley Hospital for Children, ranging in age from infant to 18 years old. Her love of kids and thoughts of being a child life specialist prompted her to volunteer. While her career goals have shifted a bit—maybe the title “guidance counselor” is in her future—she has put in more than 150 hours to date.

The experience, which began as a volunteer opportunity that would translate well on her resume, blossomed into a passion that has spawned some valuable lessons, said Sauerteig.

“At first, I was a little scared to go into a patient’s room, but I’ve learned that it’s good to be that smiling face,” she said. “And I’ve also learned that not all kids have their parents—they have work, other children…things that take them away from Riley. Which makes what volunteers do even more important.”

Madison is a second-generation Bulldog, with parents Jeff ’87 and Wendy (Pfanstiel) ’89, also graduating from Butler University. The family attended numerous basketball games at Hinkle and other campus events when she was growing up. Madison says that familiarity—as well as its proximity to home and family—were major factors in her decision to attend. 

madison sauerteig

A Bulldog with a Soft Heart

by Patricia Pickett ’82 APR

from Fall 2017

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Q&A with Coach Jordan

Kelan Martin ’18

from Fall 2017

My first memory of basketball was probably from an elementary school league. I couldn’t dribble—I was terrible. But basketball must have been in my blood. My great uncle put up a goal on the side of our garage and took up the grass. Some of my fondest memories are of my neighborhood buddies and me playing basketball for hours on a dirt court in our backyard. I was filthy dirty at the end of every day. But, I loved every minute of it.

              —Butler Men’s Basketball Head Coach LaVall Jordan ’01 

 

College of Communication Sports Media Major Kelan Martin spends some one-on-one time with new Head Men’s Butler Basketball Coach LaVall Jordan.

KM: Talk about your younger playing career.

CJ: I wasn’t the best player on my high school team. I played basketball my freshman year, but I didn’t play varsity until my sophomore year. I didn’t start as a sophomore either, but I did play. I come from Albion, Michigan, which is a pretty small town. But, the whole community would come out to watch high school basketball for entertainment and they would really get behind their team. It was a great support system and atmosphere.

And, something about that community feeling that I grew up with was exactly what I felt when I came to visit Butler. Everyone was behind the basketball program at Butler and the program itself had a big vision to do something special. Personally, that was a big connection when I came as a recruit. I just knew I wanted to come and be a part of it as a player. Now, it truly is a dream come true to be back at my alma mater as a coach.

When I was in the 8th grade, our basketball team made a good state tournament run but we lost in the state championship title game to Detroit Country Day and a guy named Chris Webber.

Fast forward a few years to when I was a high school player and we were once again in the state championship game against Detroit Country Day, this time playing against another guy people might know, Shane Battier. And we lost again. But the whole community was behind us rooting for the team. That was a great moment.

KM: The Butler family, students, and the community are pretty loyal Butler fans. What do you think you can expect from them?

CJ: That is and was a big part of the attraction for me to come here even as a player. At that time Butler wasn’t as much of a national name as it is now. People would stop and ask us, “Where is Butler?” But, I had already had that experience playing for a small school that ended up competing with some pretty big name schools.

But something about that small Butler community attracted me to the campus and the program. It seemed like everyone was behind the basketball program and the program had a big vision to do something special. Listening to Coach [Barry] Collier and hearing what his vision was and what he saw Butler Basketball becoming was where I wanted to play.

KM: By the way, how was the coach you played for at Butler?

CJ: Well, he was just great. You know what, one of the things that my father appreciated about Coach Collier was that he was fair. You knew where you stood and you either got it done or you didn’t and there was heavy accountability. I responded to that. If you were getting the job done at practice—you earned playing time.

And, so that allowed the team and everyone in the program to know what was expected and have guys step up and do the job that needed to be done for the team to be successful. There were never any excuses on what year you were or how big you were…it was just the job description and “do it” for the good of the team. If you worked consistently to get better, then you got the chance to play. But the team was always bigger than any individual member. And, that is what everyone knows Butler is all about now.

KM: Talk about your ups and downs as a player.

CJ: That is a great question. As a freshman I didn’t play a lot. There were five seniors on the team then. So I had a lot to learn. I thought that I was going to come in and take somebody’s spot. That is what every freshman thinks—that you are going to conquer the world and you are going to come in and play right away. And so I learned a lot pretty quickly. And, by the end of my freshman year, I had earned some playing time.

Coach Collier would always ask me the question: Do you want to look good or be good? Because I had some “look good” in me on my way in the Butler door. I learned a lot about the substance of the game and about what it actually takes to be a good player and to be a good teammate, and to be part of a good program. Once I understood these things and committed myself to them, I was able to earn some playing time as a sophomore.

Now, funny side story—in the past I have been the coach working with the guards and point guards. As a player, Coach Collier started me at point guard. Butler had brought in Thomas Jackson, who is a Butler Hall of Fame point guard, and one of the best to ever play here.

The first four games of the season, I am starting at the point and averaging over 25 turnovers a game. We are 0 and 4. Coach Collier flips Jackson and me and he runs the point and all of the sudden we got better. So, Coach knew better. Thankfully, we did get better and were able to experience three tournament runs over four years and then the last year to finally win a NCAA tournament game. That was a big deal back then because Butler hadn’t won a tournament game yet and we were just getting over the hump.

KM: Do you maintain relationships with past teammates?

CJ: I’m probably more in touch with my Butler college teammates than my high school teammates. A few of them were even in my wedding. But I do still see and talk to a few from high school and not necessarily were they players. You’ve always got those couple of guys that are just your close buddies—your friends. It is ironic that you spend about 18 years at your community school and only four years at college but the connections that I made at college with players like Mike Marshall and Jason Meyers and the seniors on my first team—those are special guys. And, they laugh and remind me what I was when I walked through those gym doors and support the transformation to what I am now.

It is special to hear from them and they are all rooting for me, the other coaches, and the whole team—and I feel a responsibility to succeed for all of them because you know they all have your best interest in mind—the best interest of Butler. At Butler everyone really does become your family.

KM: What made you want to become a basketball coach?

CJ: I didn’t always know that I wanted to coach. I wanted to play. My dream was that I was going to be the first Butler player to play in the NBA. That wasn’t reality. I played a year overseas in Norway after I graduated from Butler and played a year in the D League in Hunstvillle, Alabama. Then, after that, I decided that I didn’t want to go overseas to play and was trying to decide next steps to stay closer to home.

At Butler, I studied Journalism and Public Relations with an emphasis on the PR side of things. I was out interviewing for a few jobs in Marketing and Sales and PR. And, then, Coach Lickliter, who was here at the time, offered me a spot.

At that time, Mike Marshall was the Director of Men’s Basketball Operations (DOBO) but he really wanted to be an Athletic Director. And as he moved into administration, Coach Lickliter gave me the opportunity to try out a basketball staff position. So I quickly jumped into the DOBO seat and fell in love with the mentorship piece of the job. In the DOBO role you are not coaching, you are doing all of the operations and administrative things for the team that need to happen, but you do get to be a mentor and big brother to the players, especially the first-year players who don’t know anything. Sharing the Butler philosophy, the basketball stuff, was probably easier because this was a system that I knew and that I could talk about and communicate to the players.

I always say that coaching is a calling. I didn’t know that I wanted to be a coach. But then you get called to do it…and you can’t ignore that feeling that this is what you are supposed to do.

KM: Tell us about the new coaching job here at Butler and what does it mean to you and your family?

CJ: It means a lot. It is obviously unique to be able to come back and coach at your alma mater. For my family, my wife is from Indianapolis and attended North Central High School, so she is coming home. And my three daughters get to see where Daddy went to school and be around what I had been around during my college years. They have heard me talk about Butler as they have grown up and now they get to live it with us and that is special.

And, obviously, I feel a great responsibility to make sure that the guys that are playing here understand, and for them to continue to understand, how special it is to play at this high level of basketball and how special it is to play that basketball here at Butler.

I think that it is a once in a lifetime opportunity for us…we are going to do everything we can to make the Butler family and community proud and we are going to need the players that have been in the program the last couple of years to really step up and mentor the new young players.

CJ: You know, coaching here at Butler is a dream come true. We can all feel the energy building toward that first tip and excited about what is next for the program, the team, and the fans.

We are just going to work every day to make everyone proud to be a Bulldog.

Q&A with Coach Jordan

by Kelan Martin ’18

from Fall 2017

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Transformation and Transition—From Butler to China

Erin O’Neil ’17

from Fall 2017

Blog Posted: July 2017

The day I received my acceptance letter to attend Butler University was one of the best days of my life, but I didn’t realize that Butler was my dream school until the last few days of my undergraduate career. It wasn’t until then that I was able to truly see the impact this institution has had on my life. When I walked across the stage and received my diploma, I was handed so much more than a degree—I was given the skills necessary to begin a new path, the support to carry me through, and the determination to use my education to create positive change. As I sit here reflecting on how in the world I ended up halfway around the globe just a month after graduation, I know it’s because of Butler.

Transitions are never easy, but mine was particularly difficult as I took on the challenge of settling into post-grad life in Shanghai, China. I’ve returned to work as a videographer for Collective Responsibility, the company with whom I interned last summer and continued working for remotely throughout my senior year. I’ll admit in the months leading up to the move I was terrified, and I continuously doubted my ability to move this far from home for six months. And it certainly hasn’t been easy; I don’t speak Chinese, so every mundane task is that much more difficult. I’ve never rented an apartment before—let alone in a foreign country—and the 12-hour time difference has strained communications with family and friends back home. Moving to Asia alone is perhaps one of the most intimidating experiences of my life. But I can easily say, after having lived here for just two months, it will certainly be one of the most rewarding.

During one of my first meetings with the founder of the company and my direct supervisor, Rich, he explained that the only way to make the most of my time here is to always have a camera in hand. He encouraged me to be courageous and confident in capturing Shanghai culture. He made a point of noting that the thing people seem to regret most is not having taken full advantage of this incredible city by the time they leave. Yet I felt very intimidated to capture a world I don’t understand and scared in particular of doing so alone.  Rich reminded me that people would either be okay with it or wave at me to stop; both results I wouldn’t know to be reality until I first got out there and tried.  I quickly realized that this opportunity has not only allowed me to explore Asia for six months and continue practicing my art, but that it will also help me become a more dauntless storyteller.

The world will not wait for me; it will continue flying by and either I have captured it, or I haven’t. During my undergraduate studies I spent my fair share of time walking around campus interviewing students, capturing footage of the beautiful Holcomb Gardens, and sitting in Fairbanks editing the night away. But walking out into the “real world” with a camera in hand and minimal knowledge of my surroundings is a whole lot scarier than trekking the woods behind Butler’s I-lot or setting up camp in the TV studio. I don’t know these streets like the back of my hand; I don’t know the inner workings of this city as I did the “Butler bubble.” But these breaches of our comfort zones are what make us stronger individuals and more developed and talented artists.

Shanghai is an amazing city: the diverse culture, the scenery, the constant bustle, and the international community that is steadily expanding. The people I run into from all over the world continuously surprise me. The diversity and personal testaments to the question, “Why China?” is always fascinating. Shanghai is particularly appealing to entrepreneurs, researchers, and small businesses owners, which means my network is rapidly expanding and I’m learning from professional in all different industries.

Two of the projects I’m most excited for are video series called “Entrepreneurs4Good,” and “Sustainability Ambassadors.” The former is a series of interviews in which entrepreneurs from differing industries in Asia share their stories of how they create positive change and inspire others by developing socially responsible enterprises. Sitting behind the camera, I learn about what motivates people, how they find their inspiration, and how they’ve overcome personal challenges. “Sustainability Ambassadors” is a similar concept that focuses on leaders specifically working in environmental sustainability. Both video series are an opportunity to learn from professionals and young entrepreneurs alike about how they strive for and determine success. As a recent graduate, these stories encourage me and facilitate personal growth as I reflect on my own goals and achievements.

Travel has been a passion since my first trip to Chile in high school. It was on that trip that I discovered how incredible it is to be able to connect with and learn from international communities despite language and cultural differences. Since then I’ve made another visit to Chile, traveled to France, studied abroad with the GALA program in Western Europe, and trekked to China on two separate occasions. Each adventure inspires me in different ways, and I continue to learn about myself in ways I couldn’t do within my comfort zone of the United States. But this trip in particular has already expanded my global and personal perspectives far beyond previous excursions. The silence in traveling alone is where I find the moments to reflect and to learn about myself and what motivates me as a storyteller.

Moving to another country certainly has its unique adversities and moments of frustration.  But so does starting a new job, taking on a challenging role at work, or even getting your first apartment. To anyone faced with the opportunity to travel the world and get paid to do what you love, the only advice I can give is to do it. Yes, it’s scary to uproot yourself from a familiar and comfortable lifestyle to start over in a very foreign place. Yes, it will force you to question yourself and adapt in a world you may not entirely understand. But if there’s anything I know for certain, it’s that it’s worth every strain and moment of adversity. It is in these moments that we become the strongest versions of ourselves and begin to recognize how our work can influence and contribute to positive change. To my fellow Bulldogs, never take your education nor your university for granted; it will help shape who you become and provide opportunities that will change your life. It sounds cheesy, but I promise, I would not be the person I am today without Butler, and I certainly wouldn’t be in China.

Follow my adventures at outcollectingstamps.wordpress.com

After 37 Years of Service, Owen Schaub Retires

Marc D. Allan

from Fall 2017

“Having been at Butler has been a very warm, rewarding and humane experience,” he says.

Owen Schaub accumulated a raft of memories during his 37 years as a Butler professor, but this one, from around 1990, stands out: After speaking at a luncheon for new students and their parents, a father plunked himself down next to Schaub and said, “You said you like being at Butler. What do you like about it?”

“I said,” Schaub recalled, “and I still think this is true, that at Butler, you’re allowed to try new things, to explore things for yourself, and people won’t make judgments about you because you’re going to do something that seems different from your discipline or your orientation. And that’s welcome.”

Owen Schaub has taught at Butler for half his life. Schaub, 75, said that’s one of the many things he’ll miss about Butler when he retires at the end of this academic year.

He will also miss the students (“We’ve always attracted very nice young people who come from good family backgrounds and are sensible 18- to 22-year-olds”), his colleagues (“Everyone is very talented and qualified in the areas they work in, so we have a coherent and, I think, successful approach to theatre”), and the classes he’s taught in both theatre and the core curriculum.

He’s seen a lot of changes in personnel—five presidents, five deans in the College of Fine Arts, and five department chairs in the Theatre Department—and to the campus, and he’s especially thankful for the addition of the Schrott Center for the Arts. “We have needed a middle-sized, well-equipped theatre for a very long time. It is a joy that that’s here.”

In the Theatre Department, the soft-spoken Schaub is known for his encyclopedic knowledge of theatre history.

“One of us on faculty or a visiting guest artist will hear about some intricate detail from theatre history and share it with the group,” Theatre Chair Diane Timmerman said. “Invariably, Owen will launch into a richly nuanced description of the topic because he knows all about this time in theatre history. Whenever a guest lecturer says, ‘You probably will not have heard of this…,’ I always respond, ‘Well, one of us has.’ And I am always right about that.”

*Schaub grew up in Massapequa, New York, son of a construction-equipment operator and licensed practical nurse, in a house where he could hear the Atlantic Ocean and was in proximity to New York City. He “stumbled” into theatre almost literally, when he saw a high school friend moving a lighting rig through the halls. Schaub helped him carry the lights and soon was involved in a production.

He went to Hofstra College (now Hofstra University) for his bachelor’s degree in theatre, graduating in 1963, and spent 2½ years in active duty in the Army, mostly in Germany. There, he met Heidi, the woman who would become his first wife. They had their first daughter there, then moved to Bloomington, Indiana, where Schaub earned his M.A. in Theatre.

He started his teaching career at the University of Hawaii (and Heidi gave birth to their second daughter in Honolulu), then moved on to Dalhousie University, Kent State—where he earned his doctorate in theatre—and Newberry College in South Carolina.

kids jumping

Learning Self, Skills, and Strengths

Monica Holb ’09

from Fall 2017

“One might be surprised to learn the tennis bubble is not the only bubble on Butler University’s campus. Bubbles pop up in dorms, clubs, and classrooms. Students may have remarkable experiences, but if contained to their own bubbles, they may not recognize their learning in one area can impact others,” Caroline Huck-Watson, Director of Programs for Leadership and Service Education (PuLSE), said.

But a powerful force is bursting these bubbles by intentionally connecting students and introducing reciprocal learning: the PuLSE Office. 

The office is the campus hub for co-curricular activities, including Ambassadors of Change (AOC) and the Emerging Leaders Program. Using the term co-curricular is an indication of PuLSE’s intentionality. Students arrive on campus with a high school resume filled with extra-curricular activities, but quickly learn how that term differs from co-curricular. During Welcome Week, Huck-Watson relieves brand-new Bulldogs of the need to feel their work outside of the classroom is additive. 

“It is not extra. These service and leadership activities are woven into your overall experience,” Huck-Watson said, explaining the importance of reciprocity between co-curricular programming and academics. Huck-Watson also sees the value in Butler’s new Themed Living Communities (TLCs). “Students are living in an environment where they are exploring things in an intentional way,” she said. (See related article on page 6.)

Intention and reciprocity are top bubble-bursting strategies. Reciprocity means that students bring the ideas they are studying in the classroom and breathe life into them through co-curricular activities, and vice-versa. “It is about making meaning of one’s experiences. Students come to the University to learn and develop. That is happening in the classroom, but we certainly see it happening outside the classroom as well,” Huck-Watson said. “One might say of PuLSE programming, ‘that was fun.’ But behind that was a myriad of opportunities to learn about one’s skills, self, and strengths. That is what staff in the PuLSE Office, and all of Student Affairs, looks to do: connect ‘fun’ to opportunities for growth.” 

Indeed, learning is not confined to the classroom: service-based education allows students to engage in a service opportunity and learn about the theories behind it, such as the active citizen continuum. “Service education is the cornerstone of everything we do,” said Jen Agnew, Associate Director of PuLSE. “Students learn how they operate in their community and how they can contribute in a meaningful way.”

One of the flagship PuLSE programs is AOC, a pre-orientation program that focuses on service to society and leadership skills development. The program challenges students to understand themselves and see how they fit into the larger Indianapolis community—and what they can do to change it. During AOC, in the days leading up to Welcome Week, students begin understanding “their head, their heart, their hustle,” in the context of service and discover social justice issues in Indianapolis, Agnew said. 

AOC facilitates asking “why” questions and using the community voice to analyze the root causes of issues like food insecurity. Done during the first few days of the transition to college student, these exercises prime young minds to continue that line of questioning into the classroom. “Hopefully that becomes a process they carry with them in their other campus experiences, too,” Huck-Watson said.

Such holistic development gives Butler students license to understand themselves and the power to change their communities, while building a foundation for their own well-being. The 2016 Gallup-Purdue Index, a national survey of graduates, found that those with experiential learning and involvement in activities and organizations had double the odds of being engaged at work and thriving as an adult. 

Interest in this type of engagement is popular among students, but Huck-Watson urges them to be intentional, just like the programming designed by the PuLSE Office. PuLSE encourages students to invest in the programs that are of interest to them and allow time for meaningful contributions. 

“A message we emphasize is that your involvement should bring joy. There are a million and one things to do. Look at the opportunities. But at the end of the day, to grow and develop you need to be intentional,” Huck-Watson said. 

The bubbles have met their match. 

kids jumping

Learning Self, Skills, and Strengths

by Monica Holb ’09

from Fall 2017

Read more