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Summer in Indy

I Love Indy Because...

Morgan

MORGAN SNYDER, ‘07

One might peg me as someone with a bit of bias towards Indy. After all, as Director of Public Relations for Visit Indy, I’m paid to pitch to journalists what it is that makes Indy so special and worthy of ink in Forbes or AFAR Magazine.

I love my job. But, I love my job because I love the product I get to promote. One doesn’t come without the other.

I was closing in on graduation from Butler in 2007 and wanted one more internship to round-out my skillset. I landed a gig with the city’s tourism office and it was in the span of those four internship months where I was forced to learn a new product: Indianapolis. I learned that there’s more than an iconic motor speedway and 500-mile race. There’s a glimmering canal walk, 250 acres of urban greenspace with seven museums and a top ten zoo. I learned that less than a mile from Butler’s campus there’s the original, iconic LOVE sculpture and one of the most progressive art museums in the country. The world’s largest children’s museum. A restaurant that’s pegged for having the world’s spiciest dish and another restaurant that is named on Condé Nast Traveler’s World’s Best Restaurants list. A city that checks the boxes on just about any sporting event one can imagine. Hip and funky neighborhoods. And so much more.

After that internship, I was sold on the city that was going to be my home. The city where I would make my core group of friends, find my husband, and raise our family together.

What I didn’t know or even really care that much about as a college student was that Indy was super accessible and affordable. Friends can flee to bigger cities after college – some of mine did – but ask them how much they paid for that tiny studio apartment or what their meal cost even at the most casual of restaurants. Indy is continuously ranked as one of the country’s most affordable cities. Even better, Indy is a city that is led by listeners, believers, and visionaries. Did you know this city built a football stadium when we didn’t even have a football team? And look where we are now. If you have an idea, you can actually make it happen here. The guy that built an 8-mile, $63 million bike trail in the heart of downtown wrote his idea on a napkin and without any taxpayers’ dollars, he made it happen. Project for Public Spaces called his trail, “the biggest and boldest step by any American city.”

Fortunately for us, Indy loves their Butler Bulldogs. We’re a community that has a unique bond in the principles we learned through The Butler Way. And I am continuously grateful that our city operates under a similar mantra.

 

NATALIE VAN DONGEN, ’18

I love Indianapolis because it rejects expectation. Upon seeing our humble skyline, one may believe that Indianapolis is nothing more than a run-of-the-mill, midwestern, industrial city – this assumption would be incorrect. Indianapolis is defined by its residents, and therefore cannot be adequately defined by any given industry, belief system, socioeconomic status, or even basketball team. We are artists, agriculturalists, environmentalists, athletes, activists, techies, entrepreneurs, doctors, spiritual leaders, and civil servants. We are mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, friends, and community members. We are hard workers, determined to do better and grow faster than any expectation would allow. We are our own city, made for each other, by each other.

Indianapolis is by no means a perfect city. In recent years, we have faced the same unrest many of our country’s cities have had to overcome. The issues we are facing currently will not subside in a day’s time. These challenges, be it an aging infrastructure or increased political tension, will require time, patience, and diligence. However, we do not claim to be perfect, nor do we claim to be complete. Indianapolis is a constant work in progress, wherein we must not only identify the adversity laid at our feet, but learn how to overcome as a community. We do not make excuses, we do not point fingers, we do not fall victim to hatred, and above all else, we watch out for all members of our community.

I love Indianapolis because it is limitless. In years past, Indianapolis has welcomed the victims of natural disasters, opened our hearts to refugees, and become a new home to disenfranchised populations. All who have come to Indianapolis, no matter if it was out of newfound opportunity or dire circumstance, have become an integral part of our city’s fabric. An engravement in the stone of the Old City Hall building in downtown Indianapolis reads, “I am a citizen of no mean city” – that is Indianapolis. A city proud of its people, the backgrounds of those people, and the accomplishments of those people.

 

JEFFREY STANICH III, ‘16

Indianapolis will sneak up on you - like how, during a random visit with a friend, it turned out to be a place I might actually like to call home.

Years ago, my high school buddy Elliot and I were down from Wisconsin for the day looking for some warmer golfing weather that we never found, so we had time to kill in a place we knew nothing about. Until he said: “Want to go check out that one small school that just made it to the Final Four?” So we did.

As reader has probably already picked up on, the institution in question was Butler University, and it turned out to be so much more than one small school. After leaving with more reasons to return than any other university visit had offered, Butler was choice number one when it came time to choose. And the following four years surpassed every expectation that I had built up in my head since first walking up the steps of Robertson Hall.

Beyond the ways that Butler integrated me into the surrounding city - such as statehouse visits with journalism courses, or learning that weekends begin on Thursday nights in Broad Ripple - it was on my peers and I to get to know Indianapolis beyond the bubble.

And for as much as we tried to get to know places, it wasn’t until the June following my ’16 commencement that I finally stumbled upon the downtown canal walk, and months more until I got to witness the leaves turn every September in Holliday and Garfield parks. Sure, nice places to spend some time are found in every city - but that autumn was when I learned how Butler University and Indianapolis are part of an entire community that has your back. 

I got my first real job out of college - writing speeches for Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett - because his chief of staff somehow found my name on Butler’s website. This job (beyond a consistent paycheck) offered a chance to see the true dynamic identity of Indianapolis, that major-metropolis-with-small-town-charm people often speak to.

On any given weekend, hundreds of thousands of visitors will flood the town late into the night for world-class events like the Indy 500 and GenCon, and then by Monday you’re bumping into old and new friendly faces to catch up with during your morning routine.

You can meet residents whose families have lived in a neighborhood for generations, and then spend time with whole communities of Burmese immigrants who are just starting their lives in America through Exodus Refugee Immigration.

There are all the jobs you could want in the 80,000-strong hospitality industry that is to credit for Indianapolis’ ranking as the number one convention city in the United States, or you can pursue just as many careers in one of the many tech companies like Salesforce and Infosys that contribute to our reputation as the Tech Capital of the Midwest. (We’re not letting Silicon Prairie catch on, sorry.)

So Indianapolis will sneak up on you - for me, it transformed from a day-trip destination, to a place where I spent four years learning and living, to the place where I still intend on growing. My little cousin is starting at Butler in August, and she’s echoing that same sentiment I did six years ago: “this is a whole lot better than I expected.”

Yeah, it is, I tell her. And you’re only at the beginning.

 

I Love Indianapolis Because...
Summer in IndyPeopleCommunity

I Love Indy Because...

We know Indy is a great city; we asked 3 young alumni to tell us why. 

What She Did On Her Summer Vacation: Shakespeare

By Marc Allan

For the past 10 years, Butler Theatre Chair Diane Timmerman has spent her summers bringing Shakespeare to the masses in White River State Park—first as an actor and, since 2013, as Producing Artistic Director of the Indianapolis Shakespeare Company, better known as Indy Shakes.

It's a huge commitment of time and energy, but Timmerman has a list of reasons that it's worth her time.

"There's a freewheeling joy to getting together and producing a Shakespeare play outdoors, where it was originally produced," she said as she prepared for this summer's production of the rarely produced tragedy Coriolanus, August 2-4.

Her list continues:

-Indy Shakes gives work to Butler alumni and interns. This summer's cast includes alumni Ryan Ruckman '06 and Joanna Bennett '08, and four current students are working as interns. "This project provides gainful, paying, artistically satisfying work for local artists. So that's a driver. I seem to have the ability to give a lot of other theater artists jobs, and I really like that."

-These free shows are an opportunity to expose more people to theater. Through surveys, Indy Shakes has found that as many as 12 percent of its audiences are seeing live theater for the first time.

-She gets the chance to work with so many talented people. "To have the professional quality of the actors, directors, designers, and everyone doing this work is incredible."

Coriolanus tells the story of a man who ends up seizing power and wielding that over the people. The story, Timmerman said, is easy to understand and dynamic.

"I think it's going to be our strongest production to date," she said.

Indy Shakes was founded as the Heartland Actors Repertory Theatre in 2006-07 by a group of equity actors. They began by doing mostly contemporary work, but Shakespeare in the Park took hold and became the company's primary activity. Timmerman was in the first Shakespeare production, The Merchant of Venice.

This year, the company launched a new traveling troupe that played a one-hour version of Macbeth in city parks, libraries, and community centers.

"What I love about this company is that none of us really have to do it," said Timmerman, who has been teaching at Butler for 25 years. "All of the artists are gainfully employed in other ways. But this project feeds everybody's artistic soul."

Coriolanus will be staged August 2-4 at 8:00 PM each night in White River State Park. Admission is free. Food trucks and beer and wine vendors will be on hand and pre-show entertainment begins at 5:00 PM.

 

In the photo: Grant Goodman and Constance Macy star in 'Coriolanus.' (Julie Curry Photography)

Shakespeare
Summer in IndyPeopleCommunity

What She Did On Her Summer Vacation: Shakespeare

Theatre Chair Diane Timmerman is Producing Artistic Director for Indy Shakes

A Career That's Off to the Races

By Elizabeth Duis '20

Name: Zach Horrall
Hometown: Vincennes, IN
Major(s): Journalism, Spanish minor
Anticipated Grad Date: Spring 2019
Career Goals: Become a NASCAR reporter; travel and cover motor sports

 

Maybe it’s the sound. Maybe it’s the crowd. Maybe it’s the speed. Maybe it’s all of the above. Zach Horrall loves racing and hopes to make a career of it. But his route to victory in the sport isn’t exactly what you’d expect.

Growing up only two hours south of Indianapolis, Zach Horrall watched countless NASCAR, stock, and Indy car races. Frequent trips to the city fueled Zach’s desire to become a part of the racing community. This passion quickly merged with his talent for writing, and he began to aspire towards sports journalism. When the time came to make a college decision, Zach knew exactly where he wanted to be.

“There are two major racing hubs: Charlotte, North Carolina and Indianapolis,” Zach explained. “From there, I felt like Butler was the best school in Indy.”

Zach describes Butler’s caring community as plainly evident from his first visit. Small details like someone going out of their way to hold a door or an advisor’s genuine interest in him contributed to Zach’s overall view of Butler as a place where he could succeed.

During Zach’s first and second years, Butler’s sports media program owned and operated a website. After convincing the director to let him write for the website, Zach handled all the racing coverage. Covering one race in particular would change the course of his career.

While covering the Brickyard 400 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in 2016, Zach ran into his sports journalism idol Marty Smith. Smith was a general assignment reporter for ESPN who was also covering the race. Zach promptly introduced himself and explained his passion for sports journalism. It was then that Smith pointed to IndyStar’s table of employees and prompted Zach to reach out.

Believing he had plenty of time, Zach continued his coverage of the race in the hopes of approaching IndyStar later in the day. At the conclusion of the race, Zach looked back to see the table packed up and the employees about to leave. Practically running so as not to miss the chance, Zach approached the group, introduced himself, and inquired about a writing position.

Two years later, Zach Horrall is about to celebrate his second anniversary at The Indianapolis Star. This same interest in racing has transformed into a sports writing internship at one of the largest news sources in the state. His involvement with IndyStar began in a sports clerk role covering high school sports and has grown into the coverage of major motor sporting events such as the 2017 U.S. Nationals and this past spring’s Indy 500. A few of his stories have also been picked up by USA Today.

Zach attributes much of his academic and professional development to journalism classes and his time with the Butler Collegian. This experience provided real-world exposure that allowed Zach to learn in a hands-on setting. He will use these real-world lessons to serve as the Digital Managing Editor for the Collegian this upcoming academic year.

Moving forward, this successful senior aspires to continue working in racing, specifically as a NASCAR reporter. Zach maintains that as long as he can remain part of the racing community, he will be content and excited to go to work.

“I’m a very optimistic, happy-go-lucky person, and I want to maintain that attitude. I know the only way for me to do that is to do something I love,” Zach explained. “I want to be a person who says ‘I don’t have to go to work, I get to go to work.’”

This enthusiasm springs from a desire to share live sports with people. Not everyone has the ability to see a race, and Zach’s aim is to make these quick getaways accessible for everyone. He believes that everyone deserves the getaway from everyday stresses that sports can provide.

“Even if it’s only for a two or three hour race, everyone deserves that break from time to time,” Zach shared. “Racing isn’t the most popular thing in the world, but I want to show people why I love it and why it’s so interesting.”

To aspiring writers, Zach would like them to realize that it is possible to pursue a passion. Though covering a NASCAR race might not often be associated with journalism, it’s important to know yourself and explore the variety of positions available.

“The way that I’ve lived my life is to never take ‘no’ for an answer and never be afraid. If I was afraid to talk to my idol Marty Smith, I wouldn’t be where I am right now,” Zach explained. “You have to take chances because if you don’t, you will never meet your full potential.”

Summer in IndyStudent LifePeople

A Career That's Off to the Races

Zach Horrall's route to victory in racing isn’t exactly what you’d expect.

A Career That's Off to the Races

By Elizabeth Duis '20

Indy Named Most Underrated City in America

by Elizabeth Duis ’20

This past May, Forbes named Indianapolis the Most Underrated City in America.

“It’s a city with an exploding culinary scene that is easy to get to, about as cheap as any urban destination in America, with lots of worthwhile attractions and a litany of special and Bucket List events, full of new hotels and outdoor activities, and every time I come back wondering, why don’t you hear more about Indy?” Larry Olmsted explained in his recent article. “Well, now that is all starting to change.”

Events like the Indy 500 have been on the public’s radar for years, but new developments such as the bid for Amazon’s second headquarters and Travel + Leisure’s 50 Best Places to Travel both included Indianapolis and have caused the media to take a closer look at Circle City. What they’ve found is a vibrant, growing metropolis that is ideal for young professionals.

“From a business perspective…Indy punches so far above its weight class,” Olmsted continued. “That and the low cost of living and high quality of life are all reasons why Indy recently made the cut to the short list for Amazon’s new second headquarters.”

As a future or current college student, you may be wondering what does this mean for me? Location is a huge factor to weigh when making a college decision. For those who are considering Butler University, the city of Indianapolis is closely tied to who we are and what we do. As the 15th largest city in America, it’s not too big and it’s not too small. It’s just right.

Indy is both an experience and a resource for Butler Bulldogs. It’s a metropolis that sustains, entertains, and connects us with the rest of the world. To show our love for Circle City, we’ve broken down some of our favorite ways that Indianapolis benefits Butler students during their time here and even after graduation.

While You’re a Student

No matter where you come from, Indianapolis is the perfect place for you. Indy has often been described as a “Goldilocks” type of city. For those coming from a bigger city, it’s a chance to receive personalized attention, take advantage of a lower cost of living without losing any benefits, and escape inconveniences like traffic, pollution, and crowded neighborhoods.

The opposite can be true as well. If you come from a small town, Indianapolis can be like a starter city to immerse yourself in a new and exciting environment. It’s a chance to try on big city life without any risk. Butler’s campus is its own community in the heart of a vibrant neighborhood just ten minutes from downtown Indianapolis. Within a short walk, bike ride, or drive, there is always something fun to do and wonderful places to eat. You can truly feel connected to the rest of the world.  

Not only does the environment fit just right, but the attitude of the environment fits as well. This is a place where you truly matter and you can make big things happen. Butler faculty and Indianapolis employers alike are concerned with and committed to your success. You’ll be a big fish in a big pond.

Another benefit to having Indy at your doorstep can be summarized in one word: internships. One of the aspects that sets Butler apart is that many degree tracks require an internship. The internships you complete during your time at Butler will connect you to this vibrant, growing city. This access to some of the nation’s top companies and organizations gives you a leg up on the competition.

After four years of making valuable networking connections and lifelong friends, graduates have a strong desire to put down roots here. It’s almost like if you love Butler, then you’re guaranteed to love Indy!

After Graduation

Even after you’ve walked across the stage at graduation, the Butler-Indy network is one that you will never lose. More than likely, the internship (or several!) that you completed during your time at Butler will help connect you to employment after graduation. That’s one of the many reasons that Butler University’s overall placement rate is 97%. That sense of security is critically important in today’s ever-shifting job market.

If you don’t have an “in” right away, don’t worry! Both Butler and Indy have several resources to help connect you to your next job. Butler’s Internship and Career Services will work closely with you even after graduation to ensure that your transition into the real world is a smooth one.

Another great Indianapolis resource goes by the name of Indy Hub. Established as a resource for 20 and 30-year olds to learn more about and become more connected with the city, Indy Hub coordinates signature programs and initiatives to provide young professionals with opportunities that cannot be found elsewhere. With your success in mind, Indy Hub helps bridge the gap between where you are and where you want to be.

The city of Indianapolis is an extremely collaborative place. It’s hard to find another place in the country that offers you access to thriving companies like Eli Lilly and Roche. Statistics like high quality of life and low cost of living speak for themselves, but when you read between those lines you uncover that Indianapolis is a place where you can easily find professional and personal success.

Not only can you pursue your career here, but you can also watch professional sports, dine at award-winning restaurants, explore miles of biking trails, or even go see a Broadway show! These are just a few reasons why young professionals are turning their heads towards Indy.

Here at Butler University, we are proud to call Indianapolis our home, and we hope that maybe one day you will too.

Summer in IndyCommunity

Indy Named Most Underrated City in America

Indy is both an experience and a resource for Butler Bulldogs.

10 Restaurants in 10 Minutes

There are so many great restaurants in Indy! In fact, Conde Nast Traveler called it “the most underrated food city in the U.S.” Here are just a few choices within a short drive, bike ride, or even walk from campus.
 

BREAKFAST  Metro Diner

You can practically stumble out of bed and into campus’s Metro Diner. With traditional offerings like omelets and Belgian waffles, and some new favorites like avocado toast and chicken and waffles, the portion sizes are huge.

Pro Tip: You can order breakfast all day long so don’t worry about waking up early.
 

 

 

PREGAME MEAL  Scotty’s Dawghouse

The Butler themed décor and large TVs broadcasting sports makes Scotty’s the perfect place to head to before you continue down the path to Hinkle Fieldhouse or The Sellick Bowl. With lots of burgers, wraps, and appetizers to choose from, you’ll be able to cheer on the Dawgs with a full heart and belly.

Pro Tip: On game day, get there early! The place fills up quickly.
 

 

 

BURGER  Twenty Tap

A local favorite, Twenty Tap takes its name from its emphasis on micro and local brews. This family-friendly gastropub also has excellent burgers, tasty cheese curds, and some yummy vegetarian options.

Pro Tip: Grab a spot outside and enjoy some of the best people watching in Midtown.
 

 

 

BBQ  Fat Dan’s Deli

With an emphasis on food that pairs well with a cold drink, Fat Dan’s has some of the best brisket, smoked ribs, and wings around. If you are from the Chicago area and want a taste of home, the Chicago dogs and Italian beef sandwiches are as authentic as they get.

Pro Tip: They have tater tots. TATER TOTS!
 

 

 

PIZZA  Byrne’s Grilled Pizza

This is definitely an upgrade from your average pizza. Byrne’s has wood fired pizzas and stromboli that are a massive step up from the delivery you get at the residence halls. Perched within walking distance from campus, it is super conveniently located.

Pro Tip: Make it a big night out and grab ice cream, coffee, or cupcakes on the same block.
 

 

 

SANDWICH  Ripple Bagel and Deli

This place is an institution. Ask any Butler grad from the last decade where to get a sandwich and without hesitation, they’ll point you to this spot on the strip in Broad Ripple. They steam the sandwiches, which sounds a bit weird, but believe us, it’s tasty!

Pro Tip: The menu is massive, and everyone has a favorite. Ask a friend for their pick before you go.
 

 

 

MEXICAN  La Piedad

Super casual and super good, this beloved restaurant is named for the owner’s hometown in Mexico. When the weather is nice, you can sit out on the deck and enjoy your chips and salsa under twinkling lights.

Pro Tip: BRICS ice cream is just a block away. Grab a cone and walk the Monon Trail after dinner.

 

 

 

THAI  Chiang Mai Noodle

With large portions, a good atmosphere, and a menu with just about any Thai dish you can think of, Chiang Mai specializes in more than just their noodle dishes. There’s an outdoor patio that is great for a date or night out with friends.

Pro Tip: Want to enjoy it from your couch? You can also order delivery or carry out.

 

 

 

SUSHI  Sushi Bar

A simple name and an even simpler façade, you might be inclined to discount what’s inside this restaurant on the Broad Ripple strip. But if you like sushi, this is a can’t miss destination. Everything is reasonably priced and tasty.

Pro Tip: The patio is pet friendly, so all Dawgs—even the four-legged kind—­­­­­are welcome.

 

 

 

VEGETARIAN/VEGAN  SoBro Café

This farm-to-table restaurant is open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner seven days­ a week. With locally sourced meat, vegan, and vegetarian options on the menu, you’ll leave feeling full and happy.

Pro Tip: Get a Bhota Chai, a specialty blended tea custom-made by the owner.

 

 

 

For a look at our tour of food in Indianapolis, visit our campus map.

Metro Diner
Summer in IndyStudent Life

10 Restaurants in 10 Minutes

Conde Nast Traveler called Indy “the most underrated food city in the U.S.”

Top 15 Things To Do in Indy

by Elizabeth Duis ’20

Indianapolis is a bustling city with unforgettable experiences around every corner. As home to the world’s largest children’s museum, 11 professional sports teams, and one of only two racing hubs in the country, Indy has established a name for itself as a vibrant, growing metropolis. We’ve rounded up a list of our Top 15 things to do in Indy this summer and all year ‘round! Whether you’re a sports fanatic, art enthusiast, animal lover, or family-oriented person, the Circle City has got a spot for you!

  1. The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis

Let your imagination run wild down the halls of the largest children’s museum in the world. Located just minutes from downtown, The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis features five floors of fun and interactive learning that are thrilling for all ages. The new Sports Legends Experience combines indoor and outdoor exhibits so guests can run, dive, jump, put, and play year round!

  1. Butler Arts Center

Comprising several venues on Butler University’s campus, the Butler Arts Center features both collegiate and professional performances. BAC’s largest venue, Clowes Memorial Hall, hosts Broadway in Indianapolis that brings Broadway-level productions to the Midwest. Also, don’t miss showstopping collegiate performances like Butler Ballet’s The Nutcracker as the next generation of professionals grace the stage.

  1. Indianapolis Zoo

Located downtown in White River State Park, the Indianapolis Zoo is a 64-acre accredited zoo, aquarium, and botanical garden that’s sure to make animal lovers giddy! The zoo is divided by ecological systems, so visitors can take in the sights, sounds, smells, and, of course, animals in every environment. Approximately 250 species can be seen in these numerous biomes, so go pay them a visit!

  1. Indianapolis Public Library

College students and business travelers alike will love the serenity and architectural beauty of the Indianapolis Public Library. Originally constructed in 1917, the library has undergone a recent expansion to create a breathtaking glass and steel atrium, which serves as an impressive event space. The city skyline views offered by the sixth floor spaces are a must-see for any Indy explorer.

  1. Old National Centre

At the heart of downtown sits a nationally-renowned venue that hosts some of the best entertainment in the city. Old National Centre, formerly the Murat Centre, boasts a lineup of Broadway shows, concerts, and more each year. Check out a show and grab dinner or a drink closeby on Mass Ave.

  1. Newfields

The Indianapolis Museum of Art, located on the Newfields campus, is one of the nation’s largest art museums. Art enthusiasts will love the 152 acres of gardens and grounds featuring the museum's permanent collection of many cultures and eras, numbering more than 50,000 works. Even is art isn’t really your thing, Newfields also offers 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park, one of the United States' foremost museum contemporary sculpture parks, with installations integrated into woodlands, wetlands, lakes, and meadows that are breathtaking no matter your level of interest.

  1. NCAA Hall of Champions

For those who love to follow their legends, the NCAA Hall of Champions boasts two floors of interactive exhibits to engage visitors and create a true-to-life understanding of what it takes to make the grade. The first floor, “Arena,” represents all 24 NCAA sports represented and contains fun features such as a trivia challenge, current team rankings, and video highlights. The second floor, “Play,” is even more interactive as guests can compete virtually and hands-on through sports simulators, a 1930’s retro gymnasium, ski simulator, and more!

  1. Indiana State Museum

Much more than your average museum, the Indiana State Museum is blazing the trail of interactive museums across the country. Exhibits come to life through costumed actors and intriguing presentations. Spanning three floors of permanent and changing galleries, the museum tells the story of the Hoosier state. The museum also houses unique amenities such as an IMAX movie theater, the Indiana Store, The Farmers Market Café, and the L.S. Ayres Tea Room.

  1. Eiteljorg Museum

Prepare to immerse yourself in the beauty of another culture. Named one of the world's finest Native American and Western Art collections by True West, the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art is one of only two such museums east of the Mississippi. Works of sculpture decorate the lawn and invite guests in to view the traditional and contemporary works of artists such as Georgia O’Keefe and Andy Warhol.

  1. Victory Field

Home to the Indianapolis Indians, Victory Field is a 14,200-set ballpark located on the west side of Indianapolis. Recognized as one of the best ballparks in the United States by publications such as Baseball AmericaSports Illustrated, and Midwest Living, Victory Field is the perfect spot for a day trip in Indy. The Tribe play a 70-game home schedule running from April all the way through September. Pro Tip: its panoramic views of the downtown skyline are some of the best in the city!

  1. Lucas Oil Stadium

Next on the list of incredible sports venues is Lucas Oil Stadium, home of the Indianapolis Colts. This retractable roof multi-purpose venue can seat over 63,000 for footballs games and concerts. Perks of the stadium include public tours given every week that give participants an up-close and personal look at the playing field, an NFL locker room, Lucas Oil Plaza, the press box, and numerous other areas that are generally inaccessible to the public. For diehard football fans, this is an opportunity don’t want to pass up!

  1. Banker’s Life Fieldhouse

Sports Business Journal has named Banker’s Life Fieldhouse the finest NBA basketball arena in the country, and for good reason! This retro-style fieldhouse in the heart of downtown offers the classic basketball feel that you love paired with the special effects and technology to get fans on their feet. The NBA Pacers and World Champion WNBA Fever find their home here, as well as various concerts and special events.

  1. Indianapolis Motor Speedway

Ladies and gentlemen, start your engines! Indianapolis Motor Speedway is known as “The Greatest Race Course in the World” by fanatics and casual siteseers alike. Nestled in the town of Speedway, Indiana, within the city of Indianapolis, IMS is most known globally for hosting the largest single-day sporting event in the world, the Indianapolis 500. Fans from every continent make the trip to visit this electric and historic venue. As host to the Verizon IndyCar Series, NASCAR, Red Bull Air Race, LPGA and many other forms of racing and events throughout the year, it’s no wonder that Indy has been named The Racing Capital of the World. If you haven’t been to a race yet, you certainly need to!

  1. Eagle Creek Park

Eagle Creek Park covers more than 3,900 acres across the northside of Indianapolis, rendering it one of the nation’s largest city parks. Hiking and picnicking enthusiasts will enjoy the park’s breathtaking trails and campgrounds. The park also features a unique, 1,400-acre lake that frequently hosts the U.S. Rowing National Championship. Residents of Indy and surrounding areas love this spot for its ropes course, swimming, canoeing, kayaking, and boating.

  1. The Canal & White River State Park District

Whether it's a relaxing stroll, vigorous run, day at the ballpark, interacting with dolphins, discovering Indiana history, exploring Native American art, learning about Lincoln or enjoying an outdoor concert, the Canal and White River State Park Cultural District has something for everyone, including authentic gondola rides! This is not your typical waterway, as the this cultural destination boasts public art, unique cafes, and more!

For a look at our tour of Things To Do in Indianapolis, visit our campus map.

Summer in IndyCampus

Top 15 Things To Do in Indy

  Indianapolis is a bustling city with unforgettable experiences around every corner.

Top 15 Things To Do in Indy

by Elizabeth Duis ’20

10 Things Every Bulldog Should Do Before They Graduate

By Shannon Rostin '18

Four years of being a Bulldog will go by quicker than you can imagine.  Your years will be full of unique experiences in Indy, here is a list of bucket list items every bulldog should cross off before leaving Butler to conquer the world. 

  1. Cheer on the Indiana Pacers or Fever 
    Butler Basketball will always have your heart, but spend a night with the professionals cheering on the Pacers or Fever at Bankers Life Fieldhouse
     
  2. Live concerts
    Indy has access to some of the coolest live music venues, such as Ruoff Home Mortgage Music Center (formerly known as  Klipsch), The Old National Centre, and the HiFi. See your favorite artists come through Indy in intimate and unique venues. Seeing Rihanna live wasn’t on my bucket list when I came to college, but after experiencing it, it should have been.
     
  3. Walk to Newfields (formerly the IMA)
    Free membership for Butler students includes access to a world of art, almost in your backyard. Take a relaxing walk down the canal, and you’ve arrived at 152 acres of gardens, grounds, and galleries. Be sure to explore The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park: 100 Acres while
    Funky Bones
    Image courtesy of Newfields. 
    the weather is nice, including Funky Bones - a great spot for an afternoon picnic with friends.
     
  4. Intern in Indy
    Indy has access to cool, exciting intern opportunities. Indianapolis professionals have connections near and far that could help launch your career. Being an intern in Indianapolis lets you connect even more to the community and see why many young professionals call Indy home. Butler Students have had opportunities to work with The Indiana Pacers, Do317, Eli Lilly, Roche and more, bettering themselves and their city.
     
  5. Represent at a Colt’s Game
    Nothing makes you feel more a part of the Indy community more than being at a packed Colt’s game at Lucas Oil Stadium with fans clad in blue and white. Fun fact: you can also get a group together and tour the stadium.
     
  6. Festivals
    Fill up on the best Indy has to offer. Take a break from the grind of studying to check out popular festivals such as Heartland Film Fest, First Friday Food Trucks, The Taste of Broad Ripple, and the many art shows happening around Broad Ripple and Rocky Ripple areas.
     
  7. Volunteer with our non profits
    Working with Indianapolis nonprofits is fulfilling and there are many causes to get connected with. Bulldogs have had the chance to be inspired by organizations such as Girls Rock, Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, People For Urban Progress, and The Damien Center, among many other local nonprofits. Butler encourages its students to be active leaders on campus and within their communities, demonstrated by sending ‘Dawgs out to better Indy.
     
    Fountain Square
    Image dourtesy of Visit Indy.
  8. Fountain Square
    An artistic and lively section of Downtown, Fountain Square offers some of the best in entertainment, food, and nightlife. Fountain Square is known for its lively art culture and entertainment, with highlights such as the Fountain Square Music Festival, the iconic  Duckpin Bowling, RadioRadio venue, and the artist studios in the Murphy Building.
     
  9. Shop local (Mass Ave)
    Indy has no shortage of small and local businesses to support. Mass Ave is home to many locally owned shops and restaurants to explore on a fun weekend. Mass Ave is located a short 15-minute drive from campus, and you will never be bored roaming downtown’s shops and restaurants. Some Bulldogs favorite memories have been made by going to Mass Ave without a plan and finding their new favorite local restaurant or shop.
     
  10. Take cliche “I love my city & I never want to leave” pictures by Soldier and Sailors Monument / Monument Circle
    A popular tourist attraction, anyone new to Indy should go see Monument Circle. It’s especially fun when it is lit up during the holiday season. As one of the most photogenic spots in Indy, it may be the quintessential Indianapolis selfie sight. It’s almost like being a tourist in a city you’ve lived in for four years.
Downtown Indy
Summer in IndyStudent Life

10 Things Every Bulldog Should Do Before They Graduate

A bucket list of items every bulldog should cross off before leaving Butler to conquer the world. 

#LoveIndy: 6 Questions for Chris Gahl

By Shannon Rostin '18

Butler students find a home in Indianapolis as soon as they arrive on campus. Exploring Indy and all it has to offer helps to shape a student's experience from weekend adventures to finding their favorite hidden gems in the city. Butler Grad and Trustee Chris Gahl ’00 serves as Senior VP of Marketing and Communications for Visit Indy and shared some of the perks of living and studying in Indianapolis.

For more information on Indianapolis and everything happening throughout the city, check out Visit Indy

 

How do you think being located in Indianapolis affects Butler students or shapes their college experience?

The ability to score meaningful internships is one of many ways Indy helps shape—and benefits from—Butler students. This aligns with Butler’s “Indianapolis Community Requirement,” a core-curriculum ensuring students get out of the classroom and into the community to learn.  For instance, collegiate sports are governed in Indy at the NCAA, an organization that is constantly looking for talented marketing interns.  Pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly’s international headquarters are here, regularly employing Butler business interns.  

 

What are some highlights that Butler students have access to?

Each year, Indy host more than 1,000 major music concerts, sporting events, festivals, and cultural events, allowing Butler students the ability to soak in the sights and sounds, all within minutes of campus. 

 

What is something (or a few things) you would recommend students do in Indianapolis before they graduate?

You can kayak the White River, a hidden jewel running more than 300 miles, with portions adjacent to Butler’s campus.  During the summer, it’s fun to watch a concert at The Lawn, an amphitheater in downtown Indy.  I’ve seen The Avett Brothers, Arcade Fire, and The Black Keys.  

 

What attracts students and young professionals to Indy?

Students and young professionals continue to gravitate to Indy’s big city amenities with the affordability of a smaller city. Indy has arrived, much like Butler, onto the national stage as a vibrant world class city. Travel & Leisure named Indy one of only “50 Best Places in the World to Travel" in 2017, right next to Honolulu, Hawaii and Cape Town, South Africa. 

 

What are some ways students can feel at home in or apart of the Indianapolis community?

Part of our DNA in Indy is hosting major sporting events. As part of this, we are in constant need for volunteers to help roll out the red carpet and welcome international visitors to Indy. We are always seeking ambassadors to give city tours, greet professional athletes, and donate time to staff information desks.  Volunteering for major sporting events—like an NCAA Men’s Final Four—helps the community all while providing an incredible networking opportunity.  

 

What makes Indy home to you?

Indy’s residents genuinely care about each other.  We are quick to smile and eager in our desire to help.  Servant leadership can be seen and felt daily, there’s even a name for it, “Hoosier Hospitality.”