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Embrace Opportunity, Former First Lady Tells Graduates

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PUBLISHED ON Dec 19 2015

Former Indiana First Lady Judy O’Bannon Willsey urged the 93 graduates at Butler University’s winter commencement ceremonies to embrace the opportunities ahead of them.

“It’s a temptation to think on a day like today, when the news looks glum, that we are rushing to disaster as never before,” she said on Saturday, December 19, at Clowes Memorial Hall. “We’ve always had hazards, but … we have new, great, never-before-dreamed-of opportunities.”Judy O'Bannon Willsey

O’Bannon, whose husband Frank was governor of Indiana from 1997-2003, said the challenges can seem daunting and the world bleak. But from the cavemen on, human beings have always been able to deal with whatever came along.

“Today, think of what you’ve got, graduates,” she said. “A pretty stable society. You’ve got the rule of law. You’ve got the scientific method. You’ve got a lot of information that people have gathered through research and study and experiences of the past. And you have the microchip. And a Butler University degree. You are better equipped to deal with this changing, complex world than any generation that has ever come along.”

President James M. Danko presented O’Bannon with an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters—the same degree her husband received at Butler’s commencement in 1997.

Danko asked the graduates, who are part of a class that contributed more than 100,000 hours of community service, to “continue to allow the Butler Way to inspire you.”

“Continue to serve your families, your friends and your communities as you have done here at Butler University,” he said.

Academics

Embrace Opportunity, Former First Lady Tells Graduates

Former Indiana First Lady Judy O’Bannon Willsey urged the 93 graduates at Butler University’s winter commencement ceremonies to embrace the opportunities ahead of them.

Dec 19 2015 Read more
Academics

Butler Profs Earn a Starring Role Teaching the Teachers

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PUBLISHED ON Dec 16 2015

Six College of Liberal Arts and Sciences professors and their Dean, Jay Howard, are being recognized nationally for their teaching abilities.

They’ve been recorded in their classrooms for the Association of College and University Educators’ (ACUE) online Course in Effective Teaching Practices, demonstrating their skills in areas such as “Motivating Your Students” and “Delivering an Effective Lecture.” ACUE sent a video crew to Butler to videotape the professors during LAS classes this fall.
Professor Ali O'Malley is ready for her closeup. (Photo by Allie Deno) The ACUE course focuses on helping higher education faculty develop techniques, skills, and knowledge that increase student engagement, improve student motivation, and lead to better learning results. ACUE partners with colleges and universities to develop and certify faculty in effective teaching techniques.

“A couple of people associated with ACUE had picked up and read my recent book, Discussion in the College Classroom,” said Howard, who also teaches sociology. “They initially contacted me about serving as an ‘expert’ consultant on teaching practices. When I discovered they were looking for teaching exemplars as well, I offered to recommend some of the outstanding teachers in LAS.”

Assistant Professor of Psychology Alison O’Malley is featured in segments on “Developing Self-Directed Learners” and “Motivating Your Students.” Chris Wilson, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Actuarial Sciences, is shown in “Teaching Powerful Note-Taking Skills” and “Delivering an Effective Lecture.” Terri Jett, Associate Professor of Political Science, demonstrates “Motivating Your Students” and “Developing Self Directed Learners.”

Also part of the course are Psychology Professor Tara Lineweaver (“Planning Effective Class Discussions” and “Teaching Powerful Note-Taking Skills”), Associate Professor of Religion Chad Bauman (“Providing Useful Feedback” and “Aligning Assessments with Course Outcomes”), and Sociology Instructor Jess Butler (“Leading an Effective Discussion” and “Providing Clear Direction and Explanations”).

Howard introduced the videos for "Planning Effective Class Discussions," "Facilitating Engaging Class Discussions," "Teaching Powerful Note-Taking Skills," and "Leading the First Day of Class."

In all, ACUE showcased 30 experts from 15 different colleges and universities. Seven were from Butler.

“Butler University’s faculty members have made an invaluable contribution to ACUE’s Course in Effective Teaching Practices,” ACUE Chief Academic Officer Penny MacCormack said. “They opened up their classrooms to showcase the exemplary teaching that’s happening across the Butler campus. We are grateful for the partnership and excited to share Butler’s teaching methods with faculty from across the country.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

AcademicsPeople

Grant Helps Professor Samide Continue Art Preservation

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PUBLISHED ON Dec 16 2015

Chemistry Professor Michael Samide and Senior Conservation Scientist Gregory Smith will be the beneficiaries of a three-year, $75,000 grant that the Indianapolis Museum of Art has received to continue their work on preserving works of art.

Michael SamideThe National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant will allow Samide to spend the next two summers at the museum as an NEH faculty fellow. In addition, two Butler undergraduates will have the opportunity to work at the museum during the next two summers.

The work is centered around the development of a new method for rapid analysis of volatile organic compounds released from materials used in museum construction. The hope is to find a better quantitative method for material testing so that museums can safely design and build museum spaces that will not damage the art.

The work began as part of a sabbatical leave in 2014 and continued with Samide serving as a Dreyfus MUSE scholar in the summer of 2015. Preliminary results have been published and the data was recently presented as part of symposium on conservation and exhibition planning at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

AcademicsPeople

Collegian Staff Selects Daniel Comiskey As New Adviser

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PUBLISHED ON Dec 14 2015

Daniel Comiskey, deputy editor of Indianapolis Monthly magazine, has been selected by The Butler Collegian’s staff to serve as its adviser. He will take on the role at the beginning of the spring semester.

As adviser, Comiskey serves as a consultant to problems, offers advice to the staff when it is solicited, and critiques the stories the Collegian publishes.

Daniel Comiskey“I know it's a transitional time for the newspaper—a new editor-in-chief, a new adviser, a digital-first format,” he said. “But all of those things are opportunities as much as they are challenges. I hope to bring stability while encouraging the ambitious reporting and lively writing that have been the paper's trademarks for so long.”

Comiskey joined Indianapolis Monthly in 2006, shortly after completing a Master of Arts in journalism at Indiana University. During graduate school, he served as arts and culture editor of the Indiana University Alumni Magazine and reported for the Bloomington Herald-Times. Comiskey’s long-form features have won a number of Society of Professional Journalists Awards, and have taken him across the country in a semi truck, to the sites of natural disasters, and inside New York City Hall.

Comiskey grew up around newspapers. His mother, Nancy, was Deputy Managing Editor at the Indianapolis Star and now teaches at Indiana University.

And, he lives a block from the University, “so I'm already part of the Butler community in a way,” he said. “It makes sense for me to have a relationship with the place.”

Katie Goodrich, who will take over as Collegian Editor in Chief for the spring semester, said Comiskey “will bring lots of knowledge about embracing the digital realm, since Indianapolis Monthly transitioned to a heavier web presence while he has been there. This will be very valuable as we build our online community. He seems very enthusiastic and optimistic about the Collegian's future, and I am excited to work with him as we both enter new roles.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allanmallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

AcademicsCommunity

Butler Students Head to Asia, Thanks to Freeman Grant

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PUBLISHED ON Dec 11 2015

Butler University has been awarded a $339,000 grant from the Freeman Foundation to support undergraduate student internships in East and Southeast Asia in 2016 and 2017.

The money will be used to send 20 students to Shanghai in 2016 and 20 to Shanghai, 10 to Beijing, and 10 to Singapore during summer 2017. The grant provides $5,000 per student to offset the cost of their travel and housing costs.
Grace Lewis interned at the pharmaceutical company Eisai China.

In addition, the grant provides financial support for students who are already in East Asia on a semester study-abroad program and can fit in an internship into that time.

The summer internships are six weeks long. A Butler faculty member will be on hand at the beginning of the semester to get the students settled.

“This grant is great news for our students,” said Jill McKinney, Butler’s Director of Study Abroad in the Center for Global Education. “There are many logistics that go into an exciting program like this. It hits much of what the Butler 2020 plan wants for students, which is high-impact programs. This is an innovative blend of two kinds of high-impact programs: study abroad and internships. As we strive to send off students to have a meaningful impact on the world, I think graduates who have broader worldview and have had internship in one of the leading economies in the world could have a distinct advantage personally and in the job market.”

McKinney said Butler is one of only 23 universities in the United States to earn this kind of support from the Freeman Foundation. During the summer of 2015, Butler sent 19 students to intern in Shanghai and Hong Kong, thanks to a $99,500 Freeman Foundation grant.

The Freeman Foundation, based in Stowe, Vermont, is dedicated to augmenting international understanding between the United States and the nations of East Asia. The foundation “provides real work experiences in real work settings with direct interaction with local people in East and Southeast Asia.”

Grace Lewis, a senior majoring in Pharmacy and minoring in Chinese, said her internship at the pharmaceutical company Eisai China Inc. taught her about the pharmaceutical industry and drug marketing, and also gave her insight into healthcare in China.

“At the conclusion of my internship, I realized that the industry is a viable option for my future career,” she said. “Living and working in China greatly contributed to my personal growth. Particularly, my sense of independence grew much more than I had anticipated.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

AcademicsCampus

And Now, Some Parting Words From Your Professors

BY Evie Schultz ’16

PUBLISHED ON Dec 04 2015

If you were a college professor giving seniors their final 20-minute lecture, what would you say?
Chemistry Professor Stacy O'Reilly gives her parting advice.

National college senior honor society Mortar Board posed this question to four Butler professors, who then presented their “last lecture” on Thursday, December 3, to about 60 students.

Chemistry Professor Stacy O’Reilly took a scientific approach. She explained how Gore-Tex is made from petroleum for use in ski coats. She said students should be aware participants and consumers as they head out into the real world.

“Remember that everything you use comes from somewhere and from someone,” she said.

Philosophy and Religion Professor Brent Hege spoke about finding enlightenment, reminding students to continue to think critically.

Christine Smith, an Adjunct Professor in the Core/First-Year Seminar, wanted students to reflect on their life's purpose and to live unapologetically.

“For being yourself, you don't need to apologize,” she said. “If I never have, why should you?”

And Journalism Professor Scott Bridge just wanted his students to know how much they mean to him.

“I would want students to know how much they have meant to me and how I will continue to help them long after they've graduated,” he said.

All professors agreed that, although it was daunting to prepare for their theoretical last lecture, they were glad to participate.

Students felt the same way.

“It was an honor to hear their varied life perspectives in such an intimate setting,” Ashley Zegeistowsky ’16 said. “I've never had one of the professors for a class, but it was still really cool to listen to their lectures.”

AcademicsCampus

And Now, Some Parting Words From Your Professors

Four Butler professors were asked to give their “last lecture” to graduating seniors. Here’s what they said.

Dec 04 2015 Read more
AcademicsCommunity

At Lab School, 22 Chinese Principals Are Students for a Day

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PUBLISHED ON Dec 04 2015

When 22 principals from China’s Zhejiang Province wanted to see how American elementary schools operate, they chose to spend a day at the Butler Lab School, which the University operates in partnership with the Indianapolis Public Schools system.

The Chinese visitors devoted Friday, December 4, to observing how the elementary school at 34th and Meridian streets manages to educate the students without concentrating so much on standardized testing.
Ron Smith, Principal of the Butler Lab School, visits with counterparts from China.

“In China, they have one curriculum for the entire province,” said Grace Kontur, Program Director for the Indianapolis-based Chinese Education Connection, which coordinated the visit. “Every school teaches the same thing on the same day. So for them to differentiate (like the Lab School does) is a very hard topic for them to understand.”

Kontur left it to Ena Shelley, Dean of Butler’s College of Education and designer of the Lab School, to explain.

With Kontur translating, Shelley told the visitors that “all children are capable, competent, and powerful learners.” It’s up to schools, she said, to “instill a sense of wonder” in the students. “Focus on the strength of the child and build from there,” she said.

In explaining how Lab School learning works, Shelley shared the example of a teacher who showed her student Van Gogh’s painting “Sunflowers” and asked them to draw their own version. That was supplemented by a lesson on Van Gogh, which got the students interested in his painting “Starry Night,” which segued into a discussion of the constellations, which turned into a math lesson about how many stars are in specific constellations, which resulted in a visit to Butler’s Holcomb Observatory to see the stars, which caused one of the English as a Second Language students to start speaking more because he was so excited.

“It opened him up,” Shelley said.

All well and good, the visitors said. But how is student progress evaluated?

Lab School Principal Ron Smith ’88 MS ’96 said student evaluations combine quantitative data—gathered through testing—with qualitative data that measures whether the children have learned. Those qualitative measures include examining student work and recorded discussions with individual students to see what they have learned.

As for teachers, they are evaluated based on formal observations by the principal—that counts for 60 percent—and how the teacher did on goals established at the beginning of the year (40 percent).

This was difficult for the Chinese to understand because they’re accustomed to everything being measured, Kontur said.

But they’re trying.

“They really want to update,” she said. “They really want to keep improving their system, so they want to learn what’s over here that they can bring it back to China.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Academics

Many Pumpkins Were Harmed in the Making of This Event

BY Evie Schultz ’16

PUBLISHED ON Oct 30 2015


Going ...

If you give an engineering student a pumpkin … he’s probably going to design a protective structure and hurl it off the new Sunset Avenue Parking Garage. At least, that’s exactly what members of the Engineering Dual Degree Club (EDDC) did on Friday afternoon (October 30) during their annual Pumpkin Drop.

This year, the club opened up the event to all students on campus, and 11 teams showed up to see whose pumpkin could stand the fall from the roof of the five-story garage without shattering.

For engineering students like Dan Ellsworth ’20 and Joe Camacho ’20, the surprisingly intense competition was a major draw.

“We’ve got a couple of friends who are also engineering students, and they’ve been talking a lot of smack,” Ellsworth said. “They spent a bunch of money on this, and we’re kind of going with what we have.”
Going ...

For some, coming prepared meant using the expected materials to protect their pumpkins—packing peanuts, plastic bags, cardboard boxes. Others used items they found in their dorm rooms, like a fluffy down coat, to cushion the bottom of a box.

First-year students Spencer Spaulding and Taylor Hammond crafted some reusable shopping bags into a DIY parachute, but they didn’t look confident.

“It’s going to explode in the most extravagant fashion,” Spaulding said, looking down at his team’s homemade parachute.

His prediction was right, but his pumpkin wasn’t the only one that didn’t survive. In fact, no one’s did.

But Ryan Krueger ’18, president of the EDDC, said that doesn’t matter.
Gone... Ryan Krueger collects one of the pumpkins after its fall from the parking garage roof.

He says events like the pumpkin drop, though they’re fun, also raise awareness about engineering at Butler. If a student is interested in the engineering dual degree,

Krueger said, the club meetings are a great way to see if engineering is for him or her.

“I’m really excited to promote the engineering program and club,” he said.

Academics

Many Pumpkins Were Harmed in the Making of This Event

Can a pumpkin survive a five-story fall? The Engineering Dual Degree Club tries to find out.

Oct 30 2015 Read more
Academics

Butler's Part-Time MBA Program Ranked Best in Indiana

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PUBLISHED ON Oct 20 2015

Butler University’s part-time MBA program is the best in Indiana and 25th in the country, according to rankings Bloomberg Businessweek released on October 20.

Butler’s program, which moved up 32 spots from last year’s rankings, is Indiana’s only part-time MBA program in the Top 25. Bloomberg’s part-time MBA rankings are composed of 50 percent Student Survey score and 50 percent Alumni Survey score, which takes into account alumni compensation changes over time, job satisfaction, the impact the program has had on their career and if they would recommend the program to others.

Butler University's College of Business building June 26, 2013.Alumni of the program ranked Butler No. 8 overall.

"This year’s ranking is reflective of the tremendous impact our program is having on our alums and on the business community in general,” said Steve Standifird, Dean of Butler’s College of Business. “We are thrilled to be Indiana’s premier part-time MBA program."

Part-time MBA programs differ from the traditional two-year MBA because of their students, who often require flexibility and want to use the degree to advance within their company, Bloomberg said. The students tend to be a little older than full-timers, and more than half return to their pre-MBA job, compared with one in 10 full-time graduates.

Butler’s program is unique in the way courses are taught. Most are experiential and incorporate global issues and live cases and projects with local companies. Students complete real projects for actual businesses, which build their skills and expand their network. Concentrations are available in Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Finance, International Business, Leadership, and Marketing. Or students can pursue a general MBA.

Butler students are assigned a personal leadership coach who helps to hone leadership skills, provides career advice and coaching, and work as a sounding board. This relationship builds throughout their time in school and beyond, forming the cornerstone of a solid post-graduate network.

“We strive to give our students transformational experiences that develop them both personally and professionally,” said Marietta Stalcup, the MBA Program Director. “It is great to see that so many of our students and alums are happy with the outcomes that our program has helped produce for them.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Academics

Future Educators Get a Closer Look at Butler

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 01 2015

Hamilton Southeastern High School student Lauren Wallace had attended performances at Clowes Memorial Hall, but she’d never seen most of the Butler University campus. So when her school’s Cadet Teaching class came to Butler on October 1 for Future Educators Day, she was happy to make the trip.

“I want to be a child therapist,” she said. “So I figured that learning about the teaching program and being in Cadet Teaching could really aid me in that. But I also want to go to Butler, because I find that small classes and individualized instruction are really important to me.”
College of Education Assistant Dean Angela Lupton talked to students from six school districts about education and Butler.

Wallace was one of 96 students from six school districts who came to campus for a College of Education-sponsored day of learning about the teaching profession and Butler. They met an Admission representative, toured the campus, talked with professors and students, and heard a bit about both the teaching shortage in Indiana and the joys and meaningful nature of teaching.

They also had their questions answered about job placement rates (100 percent for the College of Education), class size (typically no more than 20, and usually less), and how much time Butler elementary-education students spend student-teaching before they graduate (1,500 hours).

In addition, they got a taste of the College of Education’s teaching philosophy: “The College of Education believes we must prepare our students for schools as they should be, not simply perpetuating schools as they currently exist.”

Toward that end, they participated in a class taught by Professors Arthur Hochman and Cathy Hartman. Using the book 50 Myths and Lies That Threaten America's Public Schools: The Real Crisis in Education, Butler students, the visiting high school students, and the professors discussed issues such as merit pay for teachers and whether American education has been dumbed down.

“It’s been a great experience for the kids,” said Hamilton Southeastern teacher Liz Trinkle, who brought 29 students to Butler. “I’ve always had Angela (Lupton, Assistant Dean of the College of Education) come to my cadet class, but this has been a great opportunity for the kids to see the school, hear about how critical the teacher shortage is, and see that there are people who are so totally passionate about the field.”

The high school students—who came from the Crawfordsville, Hamilton Southeastern, Rossville, Charlestown, Twin Lakes, and Western Boone school districts—said they liked touring the campus, participating in the class, and meeting Butler professors, students, and the live mascot, Trip.

College of Education representatives said they were happy with this first Future Educators Day. They expect next year’s event to double in size.

“Nothing makes me happier than to be in a roomful of people interested in teaching or working with young people in some capacity,” Lupton told the group. “You are our future.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Academics

Pharmacists Alliance Names Daniel Peterson '16 Outstanding Student

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 22 2015

The Indiana Pharmacists Alliance has awarded Butler PharmD candidate Daniel Peterson '16 its Outstanding Student of the Year Award. The award recognizes students who have been actively involved in association activities and have helped to promote the advancement of pharmacy.
Daniel Peterson and Indiana Pharmacists Alliance Past President Amy Hyduk '04

Peterson is scheduled to graduate with a Doctor of Pharmacy degree and an MBA. Daniel is an intern at CVS pharmacy.

Peterson has also held many leadership positions. He is the President of his pharmacy class at Butler University. He is the Director of Resources and Records for the Butler University Community Outreach Pharmacy (BUCOP). Last summer, he was chosen out of many applicants as the VALOR pharmacy intern at the Richard L. Roudebush VA Medical Center.

He was also awarded a McSoley scholarship by the Indiana Pharmacists Alliance in spring 2015.

Peterson is an avid volunteer. He has participated in the Phi Delta Chi cleanup of inter-city neighborhoods and has worked at BUCOP, a student-run clinic that provides free medical care to an underserved community.

The Outstanding Student of the Year award was presented to Daniel during the Indiana Pharmacists Alliance’s Annual Convention at the French Lick Convention Center on September 17.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Academics

COPHS Graduates Ace the NAPLEX Exam. Again.

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 03 2015

For the fourth time in five years, every Butler College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (COPHS) graduate who took the North American Pharmacist Licensure Exam, the NAPLEX, passed on the first try.

That first-time pass rate for the national exam ties for third best result among the country’s 130 pharmacy schools. Of the 557 Butler graduates who have taken the test over the past five years, only one didn’t pass the first time. Last year, all 111 passed.

“It’s pretty nice to being that close to having everybody pass,” COPHS Dean Mary Graham said. “Imagine that you’re in the job of hiring new pharmacy grads. You’re going to have a lot more confidence hiring someone from Butler, realizing that consistently our graduates do so well.”

The NAPLEX measures a candidate’s knowledge of the practice of pharmacy and is used by the boards of pharmacy as part of their assessment of a candidate’s competence to practice as a pharmacist, according to the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy.

The NAPLEX assesses whether a prospective pharmacist:

  • Can identify practice standards for safe and effective pharmacotherapy and optimize therapeutic outcomes in patients.
  • Can identify and determine safe and accurate methods to prepare and dispense medications.
  • Can provide and apply health care information to promote optimal health care.

Students can take the NAPLEX any time after graduation. It’s one of two tests they must take—along with a state exam to test their knowledge of the laws governing pharmacy in the state where they work—before they can practice pharmacy.

Graham said the first-time pass rate among COPHS graduates is a great source of pride in the College. It shows not only that the College is providing the knowledge students need, but that COPHS students are learning, integrating, and applying the information.

“I talk to a lot of employers of pharmacists, especially the chain pharmacies that hire pharmacists all over the country, and many of them say, ‘When we have an opportunity, even outside of the Indianapolis area or Indiana, we want to hire Butler grad,’ ” Graham said. “Not just because of the pass rate, but because they have a good work ethic, they understand what practice is all about, and can become integrated into an established practice pretty easily.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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