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Asia Is Luring Her Back, and She's Going

BY Hayley Ross '17

PUBLISHED ON Mar 20 2017

On May 6, Butler’s Class of 2017 will walk across Hinkle Fieldhouse, accept their diplomas, and step into the next chapter of their lives.

For Erin O’Neil ’17, that next step happens to be over 7,000 miles away. In June, she is heading back to China, where she spent her summer with the Butler in Asia program. (More about the program is below.)

Erin O'Neil“I thought about traveling China after college and my whole body filled with excitement,” said O’Neil, a Digital Media Production major from Columbus, Ohio. “It’s not a permanent job, but it’s a passion, and I would so much rather do that than anything.”

Her job is with the company Collective Responsibility, where she was a digital media intern this summer. The company helps businesses become more sustainable, and provides companies with research about the development of civil society, business sustainability, and social development in Asia.

“My primary role was to create graphics for the research projects and blogs they were working on,” O’Neil said. “I also worked a lot with the founder, Rich Brubaker. I’ve even been doing freelance work for him since I came home.”

O’Neil originally went on the summer program because she thought it would look good for the Fulbright-National Geographic Storytelling Fellowship. She had planned to apply for the fellowship this semester so she could focus on sustainability and urbanization.

After hearing a panel of fellows talk, she realized it wasn’t her path.

“It was a really hard decision not to apply, but I realized it wasn’t right for me at this moment,” she said. “I didn’t feel I had the story I wanted to tell. The decision was devastating, but I knew I would find something else”

That something else ended up coming from the founder of Collective Responsibility. Throughout the summer she worked with Brubaker, and he trusted her to help him with his vlog series on entrepreneurship in Asia.

“He emailed me this semester and says ‘I have an offer,’” she said. “’How do you feel about coming back to work for me?’ He made a comment about adding stamps to my passport and I immediately got excited.”

There was one line in particular that convinced her: “Expenses obviously paid. Equipment provided. Salary to be discussed. Awesome sh-- guaranteed.”

He wants to interview entrepreneurs and sustainability ambassadors all over Asia for a video series that hopes to inspire sustainable practices worldwide. She will be traveling Asia for 3-6 months.

“After I freaked out, I thought a lot about where I see myself six months after graduation, and that is a bit intimidating. But I'm helping someone create positive social change and that's my dream job."

Now, O’Neil can’t imagine not going to Shanghai this summer. She says between the GALA program (Global Adventures in the Liberal Arts) and Butler in Asia, she has gotten opportunities she would never have dreamed of.

“I owe my entire Butler experience to the Center for Global Education,” she said. “The personal experiences I have gained are entirely thanks to the opportunities they gave me.”

*

The Butler in Asia program is the product of a generous grant from the Freeman Foundation, whose aim is to provide U.S. college students “real work experiences in real work settings with direct interaction with local people in east and southeast Asia.”  This is an excellent experience offering students the long-term benefits of study abroad and resume-building opportunity of an internship.

Butler is one of only 23 universities in the United States that the Freeman Foundation is working with to create internship programs in East and Southeast Asia.

During the summer of 2015, the foundation awarded $99,500 for the initial summer internship program, which resulted in 19 students going to Shanghai. It followed up with a $339,000, two-year grant to expand the program both in students and in locations. The result: 19 students, including O’Neil, spent the summer of 2016 in Shanghai.

This summer, 45 students are slated to go—25 to Shanghai and 10 each in Beijing and Singapore.

The planning and implementing of the grant is done by Butler’s Center for Global Education, which works with nearly one-third of Butler students to have an overseas experience during their four years.

Campus

Asia Is Luring Her Back, and She's Going

Erin O'Neil '17 will spend the first six months after graduation in Asia, thanks to her experiences at Butler.

Mar 20 2017 Read more
Campus

Bolin Selected to International Band Directors' Hall of Fame

BY

PUBLISHED ON Mar 20 2017

Associate Professor of Music Education Daniel Bolin has been selected as the 2017 inductee to the Gamma Chapter, Phi Beta Mu Hall of Fame. Phi Beta Mu is the highest honorary fraternity for international band directors.

The award was presented at Purdue University on March 12 at the Indiana Bandmasters All State Band Concert.

Dan BolinThe Gamma Chapter of Phi Beta Mu was organized and the charter members initiated in 1953 at the state convention of the Indiana Music Educators Association.

Bolin joins a well-respected and dedicated group of lifelong music educators selected to the Hall of Fame. A complete list of former recipients is available at www.indianabandmasters.org under phi beta mu.

“It's a great honor to be the fourth director from Butler to receive this recognition,” Bolin said. “I was blessed with supportive parents, wonderful mentors, and outstanding students and colleagues throughout my 47-year career. This award is all about them.”

Bolin has taught at Butler since 1995. He served as Chair of the School of Music from 1995 to 2001 and again from 2009 to 2014. He received his Bachelor of Music and Master of Music degrees from Butler and his Ed.D. from Indiana University.  Prior to his appointment at Butler, he was an administrator in the Metropolitan School District of Perry Township serving as Assistant Principal at Southport High School, Director of Secondary Education, Assistant Superintendent and Interim Superintendent.

During his career in music education Dr. Bolin served as band director at Wood High School and Manual High School in the Indianapolis. He also developed outstanding bands at Lebanon and Southport High Schools.  His bands at Southport were selected to perform for the IMEA Conference, the ASBDA National Convention, and were twice honored by Butler by performances in Clowes Hall.  In 1977 he was elected into the ASBDA and selected as the Outstanding Young Band Director for Indiana. In 1981 he co-founded the Great Lake Music Camps which served middle school and high school musicians for 23 years.

His performing background includes the Philharmonic Orchestra of Indianapolis, the Carmel Symphony Orchestra, and principal tuba with the Indianapolis Symphonic Band. He has serves as an adjudicator, clinician and guest conductor throughout the United States and for Festivals at Sea.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Bolin Selected to International Band Directors' Hall of Fame

Associate Professor of Music Education Daniel Bolin has been selected as the 2017 inductee to the Gamma Chapter, Phi Beta Mu Hall of Fame.

Mar 20 2017 Read more
Campus

For These Students, the Sweet 16 Is That Much Sweeter

BY

PUBLISHED ON Mar 18 2017

Butler fans around the country have been rooting for the men’s basketball team this week, but three students had an extra incentive to cheer: Now that the Bulldogs have made it to the Sweet 16, juniors Alex Tison, Claire Cox, and Kaylynn Cline will be flown to Chicago to appear on a new ESPN quiz show called Bracket Genius.

The Butler team will play Kentucky, North Carolina, and UCLA on March 26 at 5:30 PM. Bonus round episodes will air Monday, March 27 at 6 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. ET. The final four teams will face off in the Bracket Genius championship episode scheduled to air on Tuesday, April 4 at 7 p.m.

The three students—and an alternate, sophomore Corrine Campbell—were chosen after winning a trivia contest and then going through a Skype audition. The producers used the audition to select students who projected personality as well as intelligence.

Bracket Genius“To stand out in the audition, I just tried to be as personable and talkative as possible,” said Tison, a junior Finance and Marketing major from Harrisburg, Illinois. “I just thought if I could leave an impression then they would be more likely to pick me. I also tried to interact a lot with the other people interviewing.”

Bracket Genius, hosted by Trey Wingo, will pit university academic teams, consisting of three undergraduate students, against one another in a bracket-style competition for the chance to have their team crowned the inaugural Bracket Genius Champion and share the prize of $100,000.
Alex Tison

The final 16 universities represented in the NCAA tournament will match up in the same head-to-head games on Bracket Genius, where the winning team advances by answering questions spanning history, geography, politics, literature, science, pop culture, the arts, and sports in a race to score as many points as possible against the clock and their opponent.

The opening round matchups are scheduled to air Wednesday, March 22, and Sunday, March 26, at 5:00 PM and 5:30 PM Eastern Time. Each half-hour episode will feature four teams vying for the chance to advance to the Bracket Genius championship episode.

Bonus round episodes will air Monday, March 27, at 6:00 PM and 6:30 PM. These half-hour episodes, Bracket Genius: Extra Credit, will give the four championship contenders a chance to win extra cash prizes of up to $25,000 per episode.

 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

For These Students, the Sweet 16 Is That Much Sweeter

Now that the Bulldogs have made it to the Sweet 16, juniors Alex Tison, Claire Cox, and Kaylynn Cline will be flown to Chicago to appear on a new ESPN quiz show called Bracket Genius.

Mar 18 2017 Read more
Campus

On to the Sweet 16! Bulldogs Beat Middle Tennessee

BY

PUBLISHED ON Mar 18 2017

Butler advanced to its first Sweet 16 since 2011 with a 74-65 win over Middle Tennessee State Saturday night in Milwaukee. The Bulldogs advance to play Friday in Memphis against North Carolina, which defeated Arkansas, 72-65.

The Bulldogs are now 25-8 on the season. Middle Tennessee State, the 12th seed in the South Region, finishes the season at 31-5.

NCAA TournamentThe biggest shot of the night belonged to senior Andrew Chrabascz. Butler had built a 12-point lead with 7:18 remaining in the game. MTSU then scored the next nine points to pull within three at 59-56 with 3:40 to play. On the ensuing play, coach Chris Holtmann called Chrabascz's number, getting him involved in a two-man game that resulted in a wide-open look from the left wing. The senior knocked it down to push the lead back to six.

"Really proud of our guys. We beat a really good team in Middle Tennessee," said Holtmann. "We've got so much respect for how Kermit (Davis)'s team plays and how they compete. And we saw it in film for the last, you know, 36 hours and impressed. I loved our guys. I loved the fight they showed possession after possession. And players win games. We've got really good players and they had a heck of an effort."

Middle Tennessee State would not get any closer than five the rest of the way after Chrabascz's three-pointer as Butler went 10 of 12 from the free throw line down the stretch.

The Bulldogs shot 51 percent in the contest, jumping out to an early lead by hitting six of their first seven attempts from behind the arc. That catapulted the Bulldogs to a 35-22 lead with 4:28 to play in the first half. MTSU responded with six straight points and eventually pulled within 36-31 at the half.

Butler steadily built the lead in the second half, capped by a Kelan Martin three that game Butler the 59-47 lead with 7:18 remaining.

Martin led the Bulldogs with 19 points on 6-of-9 shooting. He and Kethan Savage each pulled down six rebounds. Chrabascz added 15 points with 13 of those coming in the second half. Freshman Kamar Baldwin had 13 points. He, Martin and Tyler Lewis each had four assists as the Bulldogs helped on 16 of their 24 made field goals.

Butler's defense, led by Baldwin, held MTSU's Giddy Potts scoreless on eight shots. He averaged 15.8 points per game entering Saturday's contest, most recently earning Conference USA Tournament MVP honors.

MTSU shot 44 percent, but only 4-of-19 from distance. JaCorey Williams led the Blue Raiders with 20 points and nine rebounds. Antwain Johnson added 19.

The Bulldogs advance to their sixth Sweet 16 (1962, 2003, 2007, 2010, and 2011) with the win. Butler is now 10-0 in the NCAA Tournament against teams seeded lower than the Bulldogs. Butler is the No. 4 seed in the South Region.

Butler never trailed in the game. Butler out-scored MTSU, 14-0, on points off turnovers.

Media contact:
John Dedman
jdedman@butler.edu
317-940-9414

Campus

On to the Sweet 16! Bulldogs Beat Middle Tennessee

Butler advanced to its first Sweet 16 since 2011 with a 74-65 win over Middle Tennessee State Saturday night in Milwaukee.

Mar 18 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler's New Fraternity Is ...

BY

PUBLISHED ON Mar 13 2017

Butler University has selected Beta Theta Pi as its new fraternity, with colonization of the Butler chapter to begin in fall 2017.

A location for a future chapter house will be determined, and the University will assist in selecting the site.

Beta Theta Pi“In selecting Beta Theta Pi, the Expansion Committee considered Beta's commitment to high standards and resources dedicated to chapter success,” said Becky Druetzler, Director of Greek Life. “As a fraternity, they prioritize partnerships, which was very evident during their presentation and echoed by other campuses. The addition of Beta Theta Pi will complement our existing chapters. We're excited to begin this relationship.”

Beta, which returns to Butler after more than a century away from campus, will be the University’s fifth fraternity.

“This invitation establishes a perfect partnership between two storied institutions with aligned values of intellectual growth, mutual assistance and integrity,” Beta Theta Pi Executive Director Jeff Rundle said. “With support from campus students and administrators, Fraternity staff and more than 1,800 Beta alumni living in the Indianapolis area, we are confident that Beta Theta Pi will become a valuable asset to Butler’s Greek community.”

The selection process began in January 2016 when the University contacted 25 national fraternities that had previously expressed interest in Butler's fraternity and sorority community. A committee of staff, students, alumni, and faculty reviewed eight extensive proposals and recommended three finalists.

The last time a chapter was established as a new initiative and not a recolonization was Phi Kappa Psi in 1971. Phi Delta Theta was recolonized in 2008–2009.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler's New Fraternity Is ...

Butler University has selected Beta Theta Pi as its new fraternity.

Mar 13 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler Elects 26 Students to Phi Beta Kappa

BY

PUBLISHED ON Mar 02 2017

Twenty-six Butler University students have been elected to Phi Beta Kappa, the honor society that recognizes the best and brightest liberal arts and sciences undergraduates from 286 top schools across the nation.

Phi Beta KappaThe primary criterion for selection to Phi Beta Kappa is academic excellence as measured by GPA in liberal subjects (not cumulative GPA). To be eligible, students must complete at least 90 hours of coursework in liberal-arts courses by the time they graduate.

Since the Society's founding in 1776, 17 U.S. presidents, 39 U.S. Supreme Court justices, and more than 130 Nobel Laureates have been inducted as members, along with countless authors, diplomats, athletes, researchers, actors, and business leaders.

The Phi Beta Kappa class of 2017 will be officially inducted during a ceremony April 8. The new members are:

-Cutter Koehler, a Biology and Chemistry double major from Westfield, Indiana.

-Elizabeth McGlone, a Strategic Communication and Psychology double major from West Terre Haute, Indiana.

-Kimbra Shaner, a Middle/Secondary Education and History double major from Robinson, Illinois.

-Michael Pajkos, an Astronomy/Astrophysics and Physics double major from Willow Springs, Illinois.

-Tiffany Kula, a Middle/Secondary Education and History double major from Dublin, Ohio.

-Lexa Muehlbauer, a Strategic Communication and Spanish double major from Grand Rapids, Michigan.

-Lindsey Gemmill, a Middle/Secondary Education and English double major from Noblesville, Indiana.

-Emily Farrer, a Music and Psychology double major from Lexington, Kentucky.

-Jacob Applegarth, a Chemistry major from La Porte, Indiana.

-Miren Mohrenweiser, a History, English, and French triple major from Brighton, Michigan.

-Brianna Bean, a German and Communication Sciences and Disorders double major from Manchester, Missouri.

-Lucas Morgan, a Psychology major from Elkhart, Indiana.

-Madeleine Rasor, an Individualized major from Columbus, Ohio.

-James Arthur, a Spanish major from Indianapolis.

-Taylor Smith, a Chemistry and Energy Engineering double major from Crown Point, Indiana.

-Andrew Alvarez, a History/Political Science and Spanish double major from Munster, Indiana.

-Lindsay Rich, a Communication Science and Disorders and Spanish double major from Grand Rapids, Michigan.

-Kacey Shriner, a Spanish and Political Science double major from Brownsburg, Indiana.

-Stephanie Kuhlman, a Psychology major from Evansville, Indiana.

-Clayton Taylor, a Biology and Chemistry double major from Greenwood, Indiana.

-Hayley Gearheart, an English and Classical Studies double major from Hartford City, Indiana.

-Alexandra Gabor, a Psychology major from Wilmette, Illinois.

-Brandi Kordes, a Communication Science and Disorders and Psychology double major from Saint Anthony, Indiana.

-Natalie Van Ochten, a Biology major from Excelsior, Minnesota.

-Cory Wuerch, a Chemistry major from Cicero, Indiana.

-Molly Smith, an International Studies and French double major from Mahomet, Illinois.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Elects 26 Students to Phi Beta Kappa

Twenty-six Butler University students have been elected to Phi Beta Kappa, the honor society that recognizes the best and brightest liberal arts and sciences undergraduates from 286 top schools across the nation.

Mar 02 2017 Read more
Campus

Students ‘Unpack’ Their Experiences at Lessons from Abroad Conference

BY Kailey Eaton ’17

PUBLISHED ON Feb 27 2017

Lexa Muehlbauer ’17 had a life-changing experience when she studied abroad in Spain in the fall of 2015.
Lexa Muehlbauer (far right) and friends in Spain.

The hardest part, she says, was not the difference in culture or the language barrier. It was returning to the U.S. at the end of her semester.

“I missed being around international students, planning spontaneous trips, and being immersed in a different culture,” she said.

Muehlbauer and 32 other students from surrounding colleges gathered on Butler’s campus on Saturday, February 18, to unpack, reflect, and act on their abroad experiences at Indiana’s first Lessons from Abroad Conference.

Lessons from Abroad, or LFA, is a non-profit organization that assists individuals with the re-entry process when coming back to the U.S., which can be one of the most difficult parts about studying abroad.

LFA offers regional conferences all over the country for abroad returnees. These conferences give students opportunities to continue to learn from their travel experiences.

Students at Indiana’s LFA conference on Saturday enjoyed a full schedule of activities. They watched a short film about returning to the United States and explored options to go abroad again. They also learned how to present their abroad experiences with digital storytelling and how to showcase their newly acquired skills in resumes, cover letters, and interviews.

The event also acted as a networking opportunity where students could connect with other study abroad returnees and professionals working in internationally focused jobs.

Muehlbauer said that even though she traveled abroad almost two years ago, the conference showed her how those experiences had an impact on her identity.Unpack Reflect Act

“It's always nice to be around people who have the same travel mindset as you do,” she said. “It's a very unique support system. These are new people who are excited to hear about your travel adventures and believe in your aspirations to make traveling a part of your life and career.”

Muehlbauer’s experience had such an influence on her that she decided to head back to Spain to volunteer teach for four months after graduation. The conference allowed her to reminisce about her trip and reinforced her desire to return to her host country.

Calie Florek is the Study Abroad Advisor at Butler. She serves as the primary contact for Butler students who are preparing to study abroad and was the co-chair for the LFA conference.

She said re-entry is something a lot of students don’t think about but is an important part of the study abroad process.

“Without unpacking what they learned abroad, students miss out on important lessons that study abroad teaches,” Florek said. “The Indiana LFA Conference is a wonderful opportunity for students to holistically evaluate their experiences abroad.”

Campus

Students ‘Unpack’ Their Experiences at Lessons from Abroad Conference

Butler University was the host of Indiana’s Lessons from Abroad Conference, an event that provides students with opportunities to reflect upon their study abroad experiences.

Feb 27 2017 Read more
Campus

Two Butler Students Selected to Be 500 Festival Princesses

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 27 2017

Hannah Kruger, a sophomore Psychology and Strategic Communications major from Hillsdale, Indiana, and Allie Watson, a graduate student from New Palestine, Indiana, studying to be a Physician’s Assistant, have been chosen as 500 Festival Princesses for 2017.
Hannah Kruger

The 500 Festival Princesses serve as ambassadors of the Indianapolis 500 Festival.

The 500 Festival Princess Program celebrates Indiana’s most civic-minded, academically driven college-aged women. Serving as a 500 Festival Princess provides young women with opportunities for leadership, networking, and professional development. The 500 Festival Princesses participate in the 500 Festival Leadership Development Program, which empowers participants to make an impact within their community and Indiana.

The 500 Festival Princess program provides each of the 33 princess a $1,000 scholarship, which was made possible by Marlyne Sexton, an Indiana philanthropist and president of The Sexton Companies, in conjunction with individual donors and the 500 Festival Foundation.
Allie Watson

The 2017 Festival Princesses represents 13 universities and 22 cities and towns across the state. Averaging a cumulative GPA of 3.7, the princesses were selected among hundreds of other applicants based on communication skills, leadership, scholarship, commitment to service, and professionalism.

Among the 33 2017 Festival Princesses, one princess will be selected as The 500 Festival Queen and will receive an additional $1,500 scholarship. The Queen will be crowned May 20 during the morning of the 500 Festival Breakfast at the Brickyard.

More about the 500 Festival’s Princess Program and 2017 Princesses is available at 500festival.com/princessprogram.

Campus

Two Butler Students Selected to Be 500 Festival Princesses

The 500 Festival Princesses serve as ambassadors of the Indianapolis 500 Festival.

Feb 27 2017 Read more
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Education Professors to Receive a WFYI Award

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 27 2017

Education professors Susan Adams and Brooke Kandel-Cisco are part of a team that will be recognized with a B.E.S.T. Award from WFYI (Channel 20) for its “exemplary work ethic and performance” and its efforts to develop a curriculum guide for the station’s documentary Attucks: The School That Opened A City.
Susan Adams

Adams and Kandel-Cisco worked in partnership with educators from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS) to create the curriculum guide, which exists as an online resource and can be found here. IPS students have been viewing the documentary.

Adams, in collaboration with IPS Social Studies Instructional Coach Eric Heagy, has designed and delivered several workshops for K-12 educators and principals to support the use of the curriculum guide in concert with the documentary. Students at the Butler College of Education partnership school, IPS Shortridge IB High School, have been viewing the documentary in installments. They also hosted documentarian Ted Green at a Friday Connect session on February 17 to learn
Brooke Kandel-Cisco

about his process for making documentaries.

The story of Crispus Attucks High School is a difficult part of Indianapolis’ racial segregation history. The documentary showed that even though this school was “designed to fail,” it succeeded by most measures.

Green’s documentary debuted last year.

“School segregation is a painful, shameful part of Indianapolis history, but we have a lot of confidence in students’ ability to make meaning and to identify connections between past practices and current realities in our schools,” Adams said. “We must teach students approaches to confront this history with courage and with honesty or segregation’s destructive ripples will continue to do damage in our schools and communities.”

The WFYI B.E.S.T. Awards were established in 1995 to recognize individuals who form teams to accomplish tasks and projects in a timely and efficient manner. The award honors the memory of three extraordinary WFYI volunteers: Rowena Bush (the “B” in best), Bill Ehrich (the “E”), and Don Sandstrom (the “S”) for their outstanding service and teamwork (the “T”).

This year’s awards will be presented on April 20 at WFYI.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Education Professors to Receive a WFYI Award

The story of Crispus Attucks High School is a difficult part of Indianapolis’ racial segregation history. The documentary showed that even though this school was “designed to fail,” it succeeded by most measures.

Feb 27 2017 Read more
Campus

Spring Break in Krakow? Gerstein Winner Can't Wait.

BY Hayley Ross '17

PUBLISHED ON Feb 27 2017

For Pharmacy major Isaac Warshawsky ’20, exploring the historical accuracy of popular Holocaust movies like Schindler’s List is at the top of his to-do list. Fortunately for him, he is the second annual Bruce and Lucy Gerstein Holocaust Education Travel Fund recipient, and will get to do just that during spring break.

Isaac Warshawsky“I saw this grant as a way to expand my knowledge of the Holocaust,” Warshawsky said. “Going to a concentration camp and Auschwitz after learning about it my whole life would be an emotional experience and give what I have learned a deeper meaning.”

The fund supports travel and research related to Jewish learning. The guidelines this year were simple: We will grant you $1,600 if you tell us what you can accomplish with it.

“I wanted to go to Poland,” he said.

Warshawsky plans to use the education fund to travel with a friend to Krakow, Poland, where he will be able to explore Auschwitz and Oskar Schindler’s factory, which has been turned into a museum.

Warshawsky is currently taking an independent study honors class in which he is researching the Holocaust, specifically in Krakow. He will be analyzing books, movies, and other literature to see if there are any notable inaccuracies. Going to Poland and seeing first-hand what he will be watching and reading will directly help with his research.

“I am tied to the Holocaust through my ancestors and through its effect on the world, and as a result, I want to correct any misconceptions people have due to popular belief from movies and inform those who do not know much about the Holocaust,” he said.

Warshawsky will be presenting his research to the Butler and Indianapolis communities next fall. He plans to take videos and photographs while in Poland.

“I hope to make my presentation something people can relate to,” he said.

Warshawsky is counting down the days until spring break.

“I think it is going to be an amazing experience as a whole,” he said. “It’s something I will only be able to do once in my life, and I am going to be sure to make the most of it.”

Campus

Spring Break in Krakow? Gerstein Winner Can't Wait.

Isaac Warshawsky is the second recipient of the Bruce and Lucy Gerstein Holocaust Education Travel Fund.

Feb 27 2017 Read more
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Butler’s Second Annual Day of Giving Is a Great Success

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 24 2017

Butler University’s second annual Day of Giving shattered expectations, with faculty, staff, students, alumni, parents, and friends making 887 gifts totaling more than $137,000. In addition, the University was able to “unlock” more than $103,000 in challenge funding.

Day of Giving“Butler students are achieving tremendous accomplishments in the classroom, and these results show that the community is behind them 100 percent,” said Mark Brouwer, Director of Annual Giving. “‘Bulldogs Always Give Back’ is more than a catchphrase. Butler is a family, and we support one another whenever we have the chance.”

Brouwer said the University met three challenges:

-The $30,000 College Challenge. The initial pledge was to double the first $30,000 in donations, collectively, made to any College’s unrestricted fund. “We met this challenge early and actually extended it to $45,000 thanks to a donor who wishes to remain anonymous,” he said. “We met the extended amount in full, $45,000 in total.”

-The $25,000 Scholarship Challenge. Trustee Rick Cummings ’73 and his wife, Martha, pledged to match the first $25,000 in donations made to the General Scholarship Fund. In addition, thanks to a pledge from Trustee Lynne Zydowsky ’81, the University was able to unlock another $3,500.

-The $20,000 Scholarship participation challenge. Butler received more than 800 gifts, which unlocked the $20,000 in scholarship support.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler’s Second Annual Day of Giving Is a Great Success

Butler University’s second annual Day of Giving shattered expectations, with 887 gifts totaling more than $137,000.

Feb 24 2017 Read more
Campus

Would You Give a Kidney to a Facebook Friend? She Did.

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 23 2017

Laura Coker Blandford ’97 posted an urgent message on Facebook on August 27, 2016: Unless a kidney donor stepped forward soon, she would die a slow death.
Kidney donor Tracy Pabst got a visit from Trip.

“I want to see my son graduate high school, college,” she wrote. “I want to be a grandmother and spoil his children rotten and I truly feel like I have so much life left in me that I want to live!”

Tracy Tyndall Pabst ’98 read the note, “and it just got me.”

Pabst knew Blandford as a Delta Gamma sorority sister and Facebook friend. While “we weren’t super-duper close,” Pabst looked at Blandford and saw a daughter, a wife, a mother of an 11-year-old boy, a woman whose kidneys were failing due to complications related to Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other ailments.

Letting her die was unthinkable.

Then Blandford posted again, this time mentioning that her blood type is O-positive. Pabst thought that might be her blood type too. She gave blood and yes, she and Blandford matched.

“So that was my first sign,” Pabst said.

A few weeks later, Pabst talked to her husband, Sean. “She sat me down on the couch one Sunday evening before dinner,” he recalled. “She said, ‘Hey, I need to talk to you about something.’ It’s never good when your spouse starts a sentence that way. But she told me and I said, ‘I know you well enough that you wouldn’t verbalize this if you hadn’t already made up your mind.’ So I was in full support.”
Ty, Brayden, and Laura Blandford

Pabst talked to her father and mother, a doctor and nurse, respectively, and “they were totally on board with it.”

In September, Pabst and Blandford began the process to make sure they were a match.

On December 6, they found out they were. “I just broke out in tears,” Blandford said.

And on January 19, Blandford received Pabst’s left kidney in an operation at a hospital in Lexington, Kentucky, about an hour from her home in Louisville.

The day after, Blandford posted a video on Facebook: “Everything went well. Just want to let you know you now have a friend who has three kidneys. So I’m extra awesome now.” She’s faced some complications since, but is back home now.

And Pabst, a pharmacist, was cleared to go back to work after three weeks.

Pabst said the response to her remarkably selfless act has been overwhelming. A table in the sunroom of her Indianapolis home is covered in cards and gifts—some from people she doesn’t know who heard about what she did.
Family, friends, and even people she doesn't know showered Tracy Pabst with gifts.

No one, of course, was more grateful than the Blandford family.

“I want to give the biggest hug, thanks, and love in the world to Tracy Tyndall Pabst for her amazing gift to our family,” Blandford’s husband, TJ, posted on Facebook. “I will never be able to express my gratitude to her.”

Laura said simply: “Tracy gave me life. She gave me life back.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Would You Give a Kidney to a Facebook Friend? She Did.

Unless a kidney donor stepped forward soon, she would die a slow death.

Feb 23 2017 Read more

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