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Education Professors to Receive a WFYI Award

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 27 2017

Education professors Susan Adams and Brooke Kandel-Cisco are part of a team that will be recognized with a B.E.S.T. Award from WFYI (Channel 20) for its “exemplary work ethic and performance” and its efforts to develop a curriculum guide for the station’s documentary Attucks: The School That Opened A City.
Susan Adams

Adams and Kandel-Cisco worked in partnership with educators from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS) to create the curriculum guide, which exists as an online resource and can be found here. IPS students have been viewing the documentary.

Adams, in collaboration with IPS Social Studies Instructional Coach Eric Heagy, has designed and delivered several workshops for K-12 educators and principals to support the use of the curriculum guide in concert with the documentary. Students at the Butler College of Education partnership school, IPS Shortridge IB High School, have been viewing the documentary in installments. They also hosted documentarian Ted Green at a Friday Connect session on February 17 to learn
Brooke Kandel-Cisco

about his process for making documentaries.

The story of Crispus Attucks High School is a difficult part of Indianapolis’ racial segregation history. The documentary showed that even though this school was “designed to fail,” it succeeded by most measures.

Green’s documentary debuted last year.

“School segregation is a painful, shameful part of Indianapolis history, but we have a lot of confidence in students’ ability to make meaning and to identify connections between past practices and current realities in our schools,” Adams said. “We must teach students approaches to confront this history with courage and with honesty or segregation’s destructive ripples will continue to do damage in our schools and communities.”

The WFYI B.E.S.T. Awards were established in 1995 to recognize individuals who form teams to accomplish tasks and projects in a timely and efficient manner. The award honors the memory of three extraordinary WFYI volunteers: Rowena Bush (the “B” in best), Bill Ehrich (the “E”), and Don Sandstrom (the “S”) for their outstanding service and teamwork (the “T”).

This year’s awards will be presented on April 20 at WFYI.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Education Professors to Receive a WFYI Award

The story of Crispus Attucks High School is a difficult part of Indianapolis’ racial segregation history. The documentary showed that even though this school was “designed to fail,” it succeeded by most measures.

Feb 27 2017 Read more
Campus

Spring Break in Krakow? Gerstein Winner Can't Wait.

BY Hayley Ross '17

PUBLISHED ON Feb 27 2017

For Pharmacy major Isaac Warshawsky ’20, exploring the historical accuracy of popular Holocaust movies like Schindler’s List is at the top of his to-do list. Fortunately for him, he is the second annual Bruce and Lucy Gerstein Holocaust Education Travel Fund recipient, and will get to do just that during spring break.

Isaac Warshawsky“I saw this grant as a way to expand my knowledge of the Holocaust,” Warshawsky said. “Going to a concentration camp and Auschwitz after learning about it my whole life would be an emotional experience and give what I have learned a deeper meaning.”

The fund supports travel and research related to Jewish learning. The guidelines this year were simple: We will grant you $1,600 if you tell us what you can accomplish with it.

“I wanted to go to Poland,” he said.

Warshawsky plans to use the education fund to travel with a friend to Krakow, Poland, where he will be able to explore Auschwitz and Oskar Schindler’s factory, which has been turned into a museum.

Warshawsky is currently taking an independent study honors class in which he is researching the Holocaust, specifically in Krakow. He will be analyzing books, movies, and other literature to see if there are any notable inaccuracies. Going to Poland and seeing first-hand what he will be watching and reading will directly help with his research.

“I am tied to the Holocaust through my ancestors and through its effect on the world, and as a result, I want to correct any misconceptions people have due to popular belief from movies and inform those who do not know much about the Holocaust,” he said.

Warshawsky will be presenting his research to the Butler and Indianapolis communities next fall. He plans to take videos and photographs while in Poland.

“I hope to make my presentation something people can relate to,” he said.

Warshawsky is counting down the days until spring break.

“I think it is going to be an amazing experience as a whole,” he said. “It’s something I will only be able to do once in my life, and I am going to be sure to make the most of it.”

Campus

Spring Break in Krakow? Gerstein Winner Can't Wait.

Isaac Warshawsky is the second recipient of the Bruce and Lucy Gerstein Holocaust Education Travel Fund.

Feb 27 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler’s Second Annual Day of Giving Is a Great Success

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 24 2017

Butler University’s second annual Day of Giving shattered expectations, with faculty, staff, students, alumni, parents, and friends making 887 gifts totaling more than $137,000. In addition, the University was able to “unlock” more than $103,000 in challenge funding.

Day of Giving“Butler students are achieving tremendous accomplishments in the classroom, and these results show that the community is behind them 100 percent,” said Mark Brouwer, Director of Annual Giving. “‘Bulldogs Always Give Back’ is more than a catchphrase. Butler is a family, and we support one another whenever we have the chance.”

Brouwer said the University met three challenges:

-The $30,000 College Challenge. The initial pledge was to double the first $30,000 in donations, collectively, made to any College’s unrestricted fund. “We met this challenge early and actually extended it to $45,000 thanks to a donor who wishes to remain anonymous,” he said. “We met the extended amount in full, $45,000 in total.”

-The $25,000 Scholarship Challenge. Trustee Rick Cummings ’73 and his wife, Martha, pledged to match the first $25,000 in donations made to the General Scholarship Fund. In addition, thanks to a pledge from Trustee Lynne Zydowsky ’81, the University was able to unlock another $3,500.

-The $20,000 Scholarship participation challenge. Butler received more than 800 gifts, which unlocked the $20,000 in scholarship support.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler’s Second Annual Day of Giving Is a Great Success

Butler University’s second annual Day of Giving shattered expectations, with 887 gifts totaling more than $137,000.

Feb 24 2017 Read more
ThanksCampus

Would You Give a Kidney to a Facebook Friend? She Did.

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 23 2017

Laura Coker Blandford ’97 posted an urgent message on Facebook on August 27, 2016: Unless a kidney donor stepped forward soon, she would die a slow death.
Kidney donor Tracy Pabst got a visit from Trip.

“I want to see my son graduate high school, college,” she wrote. “I want to be a grandmother and spoil his children rotten and I truly feel like I have so much life left in me that I want to live!”

Tracy Tyndall Pabst ’98 read the note, “and it just got me.”

Pabst knew Blandford as a Delta Gamma sorority sister and Facebook friend. While “we weren’t super-duper close,” Pabst looked at Blandford and saw a daughter, a wife, a mother of an 11-year-old boy, a woman whose kidneys were failing due to complications related to Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other ailments.

Letting her die was unthinkable.

Then Blandford posted again, this time mentioning that her blood type is O-positive. Pabst thought that might be her blood type too. She gave blood and yes, she and Blandford matched.

“So that was my first sign,” Pabst said.

A few weeks later, Pabst talked to her husband, Sean. “She sat me down on the couch one Sunday evening before dinner,” he recalled. “She said, ‘Hey, I need to talk to you about something.’ It’s never good when your spouse starts a sentence that way. But she told me and I said, ‘I know you well enough that you wouldn’t verbalize this if you hadn’t already made up your mind.’ So I was in full support.”
Ty, Brayden, and Laura Blandford

Pabst talked to her father and mother, a doctor and nurse, respectively, and “they were totally on board with it.”

In September, Pabst and Blandford began the process to make sure they were a match.

On December 6, they found out they were. “I just broke out in tears,” Blandford said.

And on January 19, Blandford received Pabst’s left kidney in an operation at a hospital in Lexington, Kentucky, about an hour from her home in Louisville.

The day after, Blandford posted a video on Facebook: “Everything went well. Just want to let you know you now have a friend who has three kidneys. So I’m extra awesome now.” She’s faced some complications since, but is back home now.

And Pabst, a pharmacist, was cleared to go back to work after three weeks.

Pabst said the response to her remarkably selfless act has been overwhelming. A table in the sunroom of her Indianapolis home is covered in cards and gifts—some from people she doesn’t know who heard about what she did.
Family, friends, and even people she doesn't know showered Tracy Pabst with gifts.

No one, of course, was more grateful than the Blandford family.

“I want to give the biggest hug, thanks, and love in the world to Tracy Tyndall Pabst for her amazing gift to our family,” Blandford’s husband, TJ, posted on Facebook. “I will never be able to express my gratitude to her.”

Laura said simply: “Tracy gave me life. She gave me life back.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

ThanksCampus

Would You Give a Kidney to a Facebook Friend? She Did.

Unless a kidney donor stepped forward soon, she would die a slow death.

Feb 23 2017 Read more
Campus

MFA Students Promote the Healing Power of Writing

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 20 2017

Leona, a woman beyond a certain age, likes to break out in song. Doesn’t matter where she is or who’s in the room or that it’s well after Christmas and she’s still singing “Silent Night.” She’s going to sing.

At this moment, she’s sitting in a conference room at American Village retirement community, explaining herself between song bursts to Stephanie Anderson, a student in Butler’s Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program. Every Tuesday, Anderson and three other MFA students visit Leona and others at American Village to hear their stories and get them down on paper.

Leona talks, and Anderson captures her words.
Stephanie Anderson helped Leona kill sadness with joy.

“Leona feels happiest when she is among her 10 children,” she writes. “She loves to sing a lot too, and this is a gift she shares with her children, especially since it's a God-given talent. She loves singing in a choir and sharing the community, because God knows when she is happy and sad, and he projects his goodness through her. Leona knows we have to choose happiness. Words cannot describe the joy she feels being with her family, the one at home, and the one at church.

“Sometimes she is so glad to be alive that she bursts into song, being so glad for her life and her gift. She used to teach singing and sometimes she would sing those songs to her children when they felt lonely or sad, particularly ‘Amazing Grace.’ Leona believes firmly in love and laughter and compassion, and believes harder in the power of beautiful love. She doesn't want to be evil and frowning. She wants to kill sadness with joy. She sings when she is sad and when she is happy, because the voice is the soul coming to the light."

Sometime later, Anderson reflects on what happens in these sessions.

“We’re making a difference in these people’s lives,” she says. “We’re getting to know each other. We’re making friends. We’re showing ourselves and each other that it’s a big world we live in, but in this circle there’s joy, there’s happiness, there’s laughter. This is marvelous.”

This is Writing for Wellness, a program that MFA students began two years ago to use writing for therapy, for recollection, for relief, for fun. The first classes took place at Eskenazi Health in Indianapolis, where the MFA students worked with hospital staff who needed an opportunity to relax and unload.

Since then, Writing for Wellness has expanded—to Riley Hospital for Children, Indiana Women’s Prison, Hope Academy (a high school for students recovering from addiction), and Indiana Youth Group (an  organization for LGBT youth). The program is soon to add sessions for breast-cancer survivors.

The idea to bring Writing for Wellness to Butler started with Hilene Flanzbaum, the Director of the MFA program. Flanzbaum has taught creative writing on the undergraduate and graduate levels, and her husband, Geoffrey Sharpless, runs the summer creative writing camp at Butler and teaches creative writing at Park Tudor School. They often talk about the psychological benefits of that work, how the participants seem happier when they’re getting a chance to express themselves.

Flanzbaum thought that idea could be incorporated in the MFA program. And since one of the program’s missions is to provide service, Writing for Wellness seemed like a natural fit.

“It’s a discipline that’s fairly well established in other places but had no footprints at all in Indiana or Indianapolis,” Flanzbaum says. “So I saw a real opportunity for our students.”

Around the same time, Flanzbaum was recruiting a new MFA student, Bailey Merlin, who had taught in a Writing for Wellness program as an undergraduate at Berry College in Rome, Georgia.

“When we talked on the phone,” Merlin says, “I told her what I did: I bring everyone in, I have people write, they come to conclusions on their own, and it’s pretty fascinating. She’s like, ‘That’s exactly what we want.’”

That led Merlin to choose Butler for her MFA, and she led the MFA program’s first Writing for Wellness group that went to Eskenazi. There, she says, they saw staff members “writing about things they’d never expressed before and crying.” At Riley Hospital, she worked in a behavioral unit with kids suffering from eating disorders and depression.

“To see the spark of life go back into them is just amazing,” she says.

The spark works both ways.

“You would be amazed how much doing this changes you as a person,” Merlin says. “Just to see how you directly affect someone else. You don’t get that opportunity a lot.”

The MFA students who facilitate the program all seem to have that reaction. Tristan Durst has spent her Tuesday afternoons writing with a retiree named Robert, who was part of a 1950s Indianapolis-based doo-wop group called The Counts. The first week, she says, he told the same stories several times.

“Now, he’s remembering more, and more of his personality is coming out,” she says. “And this week, he was cracking jokes left, right and center. He was telling me about his brothers playing baseball and he said, ‘I won’t say that I was the best baseball player. I could, but I won’t.’ He started slipping in jokes, and I’m getting a real sense that he enjoys being there.”

Taylor Lewandowski, the MFA student who’s leading the group at the senior center, says he and the other Butler students are needed there. He tells the story of a woman he’s worked with named Martha.

“Her roommate passed away, and she saw her last breath,” Lewandowski says. “That obviously affected her. She came in three days after that and I worked with her. Afterward, she said, ‘That was really good for me. It was good for me to get out and talk to someone.’ Writing for Wellness creates this community that’s really nice. It’s really a service. We’re there to be there for them and once you realize that, it’s really nice. We’re actually doing something good.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

MFA Students Promote the Healing Power of Writing

Leona, a woman beyond a certain age, likes to break out in song.

Feb 20 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler's Second Annual 'Day of Giving' Is Coming Up

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 16 2017

Butler University will hold its second annual Day of Giving on Thursday, February 23, to increase support for student scholarships and the Butler Fund.

Gifts can be made at butler.edu/dayofgiving through the “Give Now” Button on Thursday, February 23. Indiana residents can earn a 50 percent state tax credit on a gift to Butler University. Gifts up to $200 for single filers and $400 for joint filers are eligible for the tax credit.Day of Giving

Gifts can be designated for a specific fund or as a general gift.

“Whether you can afford a $500 gift or a $5 gift, every gift counts,” said Mark Brouwer, Director of Annual Giving. “All gifts will help current and future Bulldogs have the same amazing learning and living opportunities that alumni before them had.”

The University has set a goal of 800 gifts. There also are three opportunities to have contributions doubled:

-The $30,000 College Challenge. The first $30,000 in donations, collectively, made to any College’s unrestricted fund will be doubled. Support the College of Communication, College of Education, Jordan College of the Arts, Lacy School of Business, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and/or the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences and your gift will be matched up to a total of $30,000.

-The $25,000 Scholarship Challenge. Trustee Rick Cummings ’73 will match the first $25,000 in donations made to the General Scholarship Fund. Gifts to the General Scholarship Fund help make a Butler education more affordable for future Bulldogs.

-The $10,000 Parent Fund Challenge. All gifts to the Parent Fund will be matched up to $10,000. Gifts to the Parent Fund provide financial resources that support our nationally recognized degree programs, experiential learning opportunities like internship placement and undergraduate research, service-oriented leadership development programs, health and wellness programming that promotes healthy lifestyle choices, and on-campus student employment opportunities.

The hashtag #BUDayofGiving will be used in University, Alumni, and college social-media accounts.

More information about the Day of Giving is available at butler.edu/dayofgiving, by email at gifts@butler.edu, or by calling the Office of Annual Giving at 317-940-9469.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler's Second Annual 'Day of Giving' Is Coming Up

Whether you can afford a $500 gift or a $5 gift, every gift counts.

Feb 16 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler to Select a New Fraternity

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 13 2017

Three Greek organizations interested in opening a chapter at Butler will present their proposals to the University community February 16–23, with a decision due by early March.

Butler CampusBeta Theta Pi will present on February 16 from 4:15–5:15 PM in Jordan Hall, Room 141.

Pi Kappa Alpha will follow on February 20 from 5:30–6:30 PM in Jordan Hall, Room 141.

Theta Chi will follow on February 23 from 4:00–5:00 PM in Jordan Hall, Room 141.

Beta Theta Pi was founded in 1839 at Miami (Ohio) University and has 137 chapters and 26 colonies in the United States and Canada.

Pi Kappa Alpha was founded in 1868 at the University of Virginia and has a total of more than 220 chapters and colonies across the United States and Canada.

Theta Chi was founded in 1856 at Norwich University in Norwich, Vermont. It has 235 chapters.

Anne Flaherty, Interim Vice President for Student Affairs, and Becky Druetzler, Director of Greek Life, said the University is committed to working with the organization selected to obtain housing. Butler requires that any organization invited to establish a chapter provides housing within 2–4 years.

The selection process began in January 2016 when the University contacted 25 national fraternities that had previously expressed interest in Butler's fraternity and sorority community.

A committee of staff, students, alumni, and faculty reviewed eight extensive proposals and recommended the three finalists. A University trustee will be joining the committee for consideration of the three finalists. The committee will makes its recommendation to the President.

The last time a chapter was established as a new initiative and not a recolonization was Phi Kappa Psi in 1971. Phi Delta Theta was recolonized in 2008–2009.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler to Select a New Fraternity

Three Greek organizations interested in opening a chapter at Butler will present their proposals to the University community.

Feb 13 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler Students, Staff Aim to End Dating Violence

BY Kailey Eaton ’17

PUBLISHED ON Feb 08 2017

One in three women and one in four men will experience an abusive relationship in their lifetime.

Butler University students and staff are committed to eliminating this statistic by ending dating violence and sexual assault on campus.

And they’re doing a pretty good job at honoring this commitment.
Butler students involved in the Escalation Workshops through the One Love Foundation.

Butler has been recognized as “Top Campus” in the One Love Foundation’s Escalation Workshop Challenge for putting on 11 peer-facilitated workshops about dating violence during the month of October.

The Office of Health Education and Outreach Programs partnered with the One Love Foundation to offer these workshops to students in Greek life and residential life, with plans of expanding to more student groups on campus.

The One Love Foundation was created in honor of a young woman at the University of Virginia, Yeardley Love, who lost her life to domestic violence.

The workshops consist of a video called “Escalation,” which shows the subtle warning signs of an abusive relationship and how it can escalate into a dangerous situation. Following the video, students participate in a discussion led by one of their peers who is trained to guide the conversation.
Joe Martinelli

Joe Martinelli ’20 facilitated an Escalation Workshop for his fraternity. He says the workshop spurred a tough conversation that doesn’t happen enough because of how difficult it can be.

“I think what sets the Escalation Workshop apart is that it is peer-led,” Martinelli said. “Members of the group participating in the workshop were more comfortable with the discussion leaders and the more conversational tone of the discussion.”

Martinelli also shows his commitment to the cause by serving on the executive board for the Stand Tall Project.

He got involved with the Stand Tall Project after he heard a few of his friends talking about it. This organization was founded with the goal of ending sexual assault and domestic violence on college campuses. Through the work of the Stand Tall Project, Martinelli hopes to see positive change in his peers.

“I want to be a good peer,” Martinelli said. “I want to learn more about how to challenge rape culture and how to notice signs of relationship abuse, and help others do the same.”

Martinelli believes that Butler has been so successful in its efforts to prevent dating violence and sexual assault because of the small, tight-knit community developed by the student body.

“Beyond simply watching out for each other, we want to educate each other on what exactly consent is, or what the warning signs of a potentially abusive relationship are so we can erase any trace of ignorance over the issue,” he said. “It’s through education and full understanding of the issues that we can hopefully be a generation that changes the culture for the better, and I have faith in my peers to do just that.”

Along with the Stand Tall Project, the Office of Health Education and Outreach Programs oversees PAWS (Peers Advocating Wellness for Students), GEAR (Greek Educators, Advocators, and Resources) and Red Cup Culture, which are all peer-driven organizations and resources with similar missions.
Sara Minor

The office is also home to Butler’s Prevention Educator and Victim Resource Specialist, Sara Minor. She deals with all sexual assault prevention strategies on campus and serves as the Victim Advocate for anyone who has experienced sexual assault.

“As a Butler alumna myself, it’s exciting to see the sexual assault prevention and response efforts that have been added and refined since my time as a student,” Minor said. “It’s clear that Butler University aims to be a progressive leader in providing students the knowledge, resources, and skills it takes to develop and maintain healthy dating and sexual relationships. I am so thankful to the One Love Foundation for creating an engaging workshop that gets students comfortable talking about this topic. As Butler’s Victim Advocate, I am beyond proud to be a part of these efforts. Our work has only begun.”

Campus

Butler Students, Staff Aim to End Dating Violence

Butler University offers multiple resources and peer-facilitated organizations to help students educate themselves on issues surrounding dating violence and sexual assault.  

Feb 08 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler Students Embrace the Cold for the Polar Plunge

BY Kailey Eaton ’17

PUBLISHED ON Feb 06 2017

“It was colder than I thought it would be” was a phrase thrown around quite often outside the HRC on Saturday morning, February 4, where hundreds of Butler students plunged into ice-cold water.

Despite the 30-degree temperatures, students and supporters from around Indianapolis came together to participate in the Polar Plunge.
Ali Thompson '20 takes the plunge.

The Polar Plunge is a signature event that raises money for Special Olympics Indiana, a non-profit organization that provides sports training and competition for people with intellectual disabilities.

Ali Thompson ’20 is an experienced Polar Plunge participant whose heart is close to the cause- her brother has Down Syndrome and is a Special Olympics athlete.

Before coming to college, she participated in three Polar Plunges and she knew she wanted to keep up her involvement with Special Olympics. She is now an executive board member for Butler Ambassadors for Special Olympics, the organization that runs the Polar Plunge.

Thompson says the event is an easy and fun way to get people to donate to such an important cause.

“My favorite part about the Plunge is seeing how many other people are crazy enough to do it with me,” Thompson said.

This year’s event saw impressive numbers, with 298 participants and 1,300 individual donations.

Each individual was required to raise at least $75 in pledges to participate, and together the pledges totaled over $53,000.

Mike Lesak ’20 took the plunge for the first time this year. He had his doubts about the icy temperatures, but was able to see the bigger picture in the end.

“I was definitely scared to jump in the water because I knew how could it would be,” Lesak said, “but then I looked around saw how excited some of the members from the Special Olympics organization were and I knew that this was so much bigger than myself, and an opportunity I had to take full advantage of.”

Campus

Butler Students Embrace the Cold for the Polar Plunge

Students and supporters raised over $53,000 for Special Olympics Indiana.

Feb 06 2017 Read more
Campus

Dr. Pangan's Class Gets Its Hands on Moon Rocks

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 01 2017

During six lunar missions, American astronauts brought back a total of 382 kilograms (about 842 pounds) of rocks from the moon. On Tuesday, January 31, some of them were on display in College of Education Professor Catherine Pangan’s Science and Social Studies Methods class.

The moon rock samples, with names like breccia, basalt, and anorthosite, came sealed in round, clear Plexiglas disks about six inches in diameter. They were brought to the class by NASA Education Specialist Susan Kohler, along with a message to the 26 future K-6 science and social studies teachers in the room: You too can borrow moon rocks to show to your students.
Carolyn Gassman with moon rocks.

“It’s not really well known that we do this,” said Kohler, who didn’t know NASA had a loaner program until she got her job seven years ago. “But I will say this: I have no open dates on my calendar for the rest of the year.”

NASA actually has been lending moon rocks for decades. Pangan said in the 1980s, her mom—a seventh-grade science teacher—borrowed some for her class.

“It left such an impression on me,” Pangan said. “We had a security guard outside our house, my mom had to put the lunar samples in a safe at the bank, and she had a band on her arm that was hooked to the briefcase that held the rocks. We got to see the samples up close and personal.”

Last year, when The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis opened an exhibit related to the International Space Station, Pangan recalled her experience and contacted NASA. (In a class two years ago, her students had the opportunity to speak with astronauts in real time who were in space aboard the International Space Station.) Her students will be working with the museum later this semester to provide some Space Station-related activities for school groups.

In Tuesday’s class, Kohler spent several hours presenting space-related lessons the students can replicate in their classrooms as well as training them in how to request to borrow sample disks containing moon rocks.
Libby Kauffman examines the moon rocks.

As Pangan’s class discovered, teachers go through a multi-step process to obtain what’s known as “Lunar Handling Certification—forms to fill out, security precautions that must be taken, and more.

As Kohler reminded the Butler students repeatedly: These rocks are irreplaceable.

But getting the rocks into classrooms is well worth the effort, said Matt Mackowiak, a senior from South Bend, Indiana. He was excited to see the rocks for himself—“Oh, my gosh, yes. You have no idea”—and to get them for the students at the Butler Lab School, where he student-teaches fifth and sixth grade.

“Our next unit is space, and any time you bring up space in the classroom, all the kids are engaged and they’re really looking forward to it,” he said. “What I got from here, I will take—all the information and the packets I got—and immediately use and probably present it similarly to the way we did it here.”

Pangan said this is the first time she’s done anything like this with her students in this class. It will happen again.

“This was really hands on and in-depth science, and that’s exactly what we hope to see in elementary classrooms from early learners pre-K through sixth grade,” she said. “This fits our philosophy of active engagement really well and asking the why. It’s not just the flash of having moon rocks but talking about how they got there, how they ended up on our planet, and talking about the people behind this.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Dr. Pangan's Class Gets Its Hands on Moon Rocks

"We had a security guard outside our house, my mom had to put the lunar samples in a safe at the bank, and she had a band on her arm that was hooked to the briefcase that held the rocks."

Feb 01 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler University Celebrates Founder's Week

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 31 2017

One hundred and sixty-two years ago, Butler University was founded on the principles of diversity, equality and inclusivity. We celebrate Founder’s Day (February 7) with a week of programming that seeks to celebrate and reclaim these values of Ovid Butler.
Ovid Butler

This year we are focusing on the theme of Justice and partnering with the student Diversity and Inclusion Board (DIB) to bring several events to the Butler community from February 4–11. Visit www.butler.edu/founders-day for more information.

FIVE ESSENTIAL FACTS ABOUT BUTLER UNIVERSITY:

  • Butler was chartered as North Western Christian University in 1850 by abolitionist Disciples of Christ members who wanted a university away from the "pernicious influences of slavery."
  • Founded on the values of diversity, inclusivity, and equality, NWCU opened in 1855 at 13th and College Avenue, admitting women and people of color on an equal basis with white males, a radical stance for the time.
  • The first woman to graduate from the full four-year program was Demia Butler, daughter of founder Ovid Butler. She graduated in 1862.
  • Ovid Butler founded the Demia Butler Chair of English Literature in 1869, the first endowed chair in the country for a female professor. Catharine Merrill was its first recipient, and the second full-time female professor in the country at any university.
  • Butler's first documented African-American graduate was Gertrude Amelia Mahorney, who graduated in 1887 on the school's second campus in Irvington. There may have been earlier graduates of color, but the school did not keep racial statistics for many years. Mahorney taught in the Indianapolis Public Schools, specializing in German.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler University Celebrates Founder's Week

One hundred and sixty-two years ago, Butler University was founded on the principles of diversity, equality and inclusivity.

Jan 31 2017 Read more
Campus

President Danko's Statement on Immigration

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 30 2017

President Danko issued the following statement today (January 30, 2017):

Dear Members of the Butler Community,

In the wake of the executive order on immigration signed on January 27, I want to reaffirm Butler University’s role as an institution where all people are welcomed and valued—regardless of religion, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, or political beliefs.James Danko

I stated in my post-election message in November that many members of the Butler community were feeling anxiety, fear, anger, and vulnerability. Friday’s executive order has, understandably, only intensified these feelings. Several members of the campus community are directly affected, with family members living in countries from which immigration to the United States is now blocked.

The immigration ban, and the manner in which it has been implemented, is contrary to the principles of Butler University and detrimental to our educational mission. I join the many other leaders and citizens across Indiana, the United States, and the world in condemning this executive order and asking that it be revoked.

As we process the news of yesterday’s attack in Quebec City and we approach Butler’s annual Founder’s Week, let us remember and adhere to our founding principles. Butler University stands in support of all people of Muslim faith on our campus, including our Muslim Student Association (MSA). This group of extraordinary young leaders is integral to the fabric of the Butler community, and their contributions—in the classroom, on campus, and in Indianapolis—exemplify the very best of our University. We stand in support of Butler community members of any religion or no religion, any person who is marginalized or vulnerable, and anyone who is affected by our nation’s rapidly changing policies and discourse. Butler’s Community of Care is alive and well, and we remain committed to a community of inclusivity that is as old as the University itself.

Butler offers free and confidential Counseling and Consultation Services to all students. Students living in the residence halls may also seek the support of their Resident Assistant or Residence Life Coordinator. The Diversity Center is open to all students and will host an information session for international students on Wednesday, February 1, 2017, at 5:30 pm to discuss the executive order and related travel restrictions. The Center for Faith and Vocation (CFV) is open to all students, faculty, and staff looking for space to study, reflect, and find support. The CFV is available for one-on-one conversations of support and there are 13 student-led CFV groups that meet weekly to gather in community, including the MSA.

Thank you for all you do to cultivate a culture in which all members of the Butler community can learn, work, and thrive together in the spirit of compassion, fairness, and respect that has always defined our University.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

President Danko's Statement on Immigration

Thank you for all you do to cultivate a culture in which all members of the Butler community can learn, work, and thrive together in the spirit of compassion, fairness, and respect that has always defined our University.

Jan 30 2017 Read more

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