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Dr. Pangan's Class Gets Its Hands on Moon Rocks

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 01 2017

During six lunar missions, American astronauts brought back a total of 382 kilograms (about 842 pounds) of rocks from the moon. On Tuesday, January 31, some of them were on display in College of Education Professor Catherine Pangan’s Science and Social Studies Methods class.

The moon rock samples, with names like breccia, basalt, and anorthosite, came sealed in round, clear Plexiglas disks about six inches in diameter. They were brought to the class by NASA Education Specialist Susan Kohler, along with a message to the 26 future K-6 science and social studies teachers in the room: You too can borrow moon rocks to show to your students.
Carolyn Gassman with moon rocks.

“It’s not really well known that we do this,” said Kohler, who didn’t know NASA had a loaner program until she got her job seven years ago. “But I will say this: I have no open dates on my calendar for the rest of the year.”

NASA actually has been lending moon rocks for decades. Pangan said in the 1980s, her mom—a seventh-grade science teacher—borrowed some for her class.

“It left such an impression on me,” Pangan said. “We had a security guard outside our house, my mom had to put the lunar samples in a safe at the bank, and she had a band on her arm that was hooked to the briefcase that held the rocks. We got to see the samples up close and personal.”

Last year, when The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis opened an exhibit related to the International Space Station, Pangan recalled her experience and contacted NASA. (In a class two years ago, her students had the opportunity to speak with astronauts in real time who were in space aboard the International Space Station.) Her students will be working with the museum later this semester to provide some Space Station-related activities for school groups.

In Tuesday’s class, Kohler spent several hours presenting space-related lessons the students can replicate in their classrooms as well as training them in how to request to borrow sample disks containing moon rocks.
Libby Kauffman examines the moon rocks.

As Pangan’s class discovered, teachers go through a multi-step process to obtain what’s known as “Lunar Handling Certification—forms to fill out, security precautions that must be taken, and more.

As Kohler reminded the Butler students repeatedly: These rocks are irreplaceable.

But getting the rocks into classrooms is well worth the effort, said Matt Mackowiak, a senior from South Bend, Indiana. He was excited to see the rocks for himself—“Oh, my gosh, yes. You have no idea”—and to get them for the students at the Butler Lab School, where he student-teaches fifth and sixth grade.

“Our next unit is space, and any time you bring up space in the classroom, all the kids are engaged and they’re really looking forward to it,” he said. “What I got from here, I will take—all the information and the packets I got—and immediately use and probably present it similarly to the way we did it here.”

Pangan said this is the first time she’s done anything like this with her students in this class. It will happen again.

“This was really hands on and in-depth science, and that’s exactly what we hope to see in elementary classrooms from early learners pre-K through sixth grade,” she said. “This fits our philosophy of active engagement really well and asking the why. It’s not just the flash of having moon rocks but talking about how they got there, how they ended up on our planet, and talking about the people behind this.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Dr. Pangan's Class Gets Its Hands on Moon Rocks

"We had a security guard outside our house, my mom had to put the lunar samples in a safe at the bank, and she had a band on her arm that was hooked to the briefcase that held the rocks."

Feb 01 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler University Celebrates Founder's Week

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PUBLISHED ON Jan 31 2017

One hundred and sixty-two years ago, Butler University was founded on the principles of diversity, equality and inclusivity. We celebrate Founder’s Day (February 7) with a week of programming that seeks to celebrate and reclaim these values of Ovid Butler.
Ovid Butler

This year we are focusing on the theme of Justice and partnering with the student Diversity and Inclusion Board (DIB) to bring several events to the Butler community from February 4–11. Visit www.butler.edu/founders-day for more information.

FIVE ESSENTIAL FACTS ABOUT BUTLER UNIVERSITY:

  • Butler was chartered as North Western Christian University in 1850 by abolitionist Disciples of Christ members who wanted a university away from the "pernicious influences of slavery."
  • Founded on the values of diversity, inclusivity, and equality, NWCU opened in 1855 at 13th and College Avenue, admitting women and people of color on an equal basis with white males, a radical stance for the time.
  • The first woman to graduate from the full four-year program was Demia Butler, daughter of founder Ovid Butler. She graduated in 1862.
  • Ovid Butler founded the Demia Butler Chair of English Literature in 1869, the first endowed chair in the country for a female professor. Catharine Merrill was its first recipient, and the second full-time female professor in the country at any university.
  • Butler's first documented African-American graduate was Gertrude Amelia Mahorney, who graduated in 1887 on the school's second campus in Irvington. There may have been earlier graduates of color, but the school did not keep racial statistics for many years. Mahorney taught in the Indianapolis Public Schools, specializing in German.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler University Celebrates Founder's Week

One hundred and sixty-two years ago, Butler University was founded on the principles of diversity, equality and inclusivity.

Jan 31 2017 Read more
Campus

President Danko's Statement on Immigration

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 30 2017

President Danko issued the following statement today (January 30, 2017):

Dear Members of the Butler Community,

In the wake of the executive order on immigration signed on January 27, I want to reaffirm Butler University’s role as an institution where all people are welcomed and valued—regardless of religion, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, or political beliefs.James Danko

I stated in my post-election message in November that many members of the Butler community were feeling anxiety, fear, anger, and vulnerability. Friday’s executive order has, understandably, only intensified these feelings. Several members of the campus community are directly affected, with family members living in countries from which immigration to the United States is now blocked.

The immigration ban, and the manner in which it has been implemented, is contrary to the principles of Butler University and detrimental to our educational mission. I join the many other leaders and citizens across Indiana, the United States, and the world in condemning this executive order and asking that it be revoked.

As we process the news of yesterday’s attack in Quebec City and we approach Butler’s annual Founder’s Week, let us remember and adhere to our founding principles. Butler University stands in support of all people of Muslim faith on our campus, including our Muslim Student Association (MSA). This group of extraordinary young leaders is integral to the fabric of the Butler community, and their contributions—in the classroom, on campus, and in Indianapolis—exemplify the very best of our University. We stand in support of Butler community members of any religion or no religion, any person who is marginalized or vulnerable, and anyone who is affected by our nation’s rapidly changing policies and discourse. Butler’s Community of Care is alive and well, and we remain committed to a community of inclusivity that is as old as the University itself.

Butler offers free and confidential Counseling and Consultation Services to all students. Students living in the residence halls may also seek the support of their Resident Assistant or Residence Life Coordinator. The Diversity Center is open to all students and will host an information session for international students on Wednesday, February 1, 2017, at 5:30 pm to discuss the executive order and related travel restrictions. The Center for Faith and Vocation (CFV) is open to all students, faculty, and staff looking for space to study, reflect, and find support. The CFV is available for one-on-one conversations of support and there are 13 student-led CFV groups that meet weekly to gather in community, including the MSA.

Thank you for all you do to cultivate a culture in which all members of the Butler community can learn, work, and thrive together in the spirit of compassion, fairness, and respect that has always defined our University.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

President Danko's Statement on Immigration

Thank you for all you do to cultivate a culture in which all members of the Butler community can learn, work, and thrive together in the spirit of compassion, fairness, and respect that has always defined our University.

Jan 30 2017 Read more
Campus

So This Is What An Appellate Court Hearing Looks Like

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 25 2017

For about an hour on Tuesday, the Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall became a courtroom as a three-judge panel from the Indiana Court of Appeals visited Butler—both to hear the case of Otis Sams Jr. v. State of Indiana and to demystify part of the legal process for students and the public.

“It gives us an opportunity to go out into the communities—normally, we don’t attract big audiences—and allow people to see what we do,” Judge Margret Robb told the audience of about 100 during a question-and-answer session after the hearing. “Television does a lot about trial courts and they don’t do much about appellate courts. This is really our opportunity to educate the public about what we do and how we do it.”
Appeals Court Judges Margret Robb, James Kirsch, and Paul Mathias, along with attorneys Lyubov Gore and Joel Wieneke, presented a case and answered questions afterward.

The panel of judges—Robb, Butler alumnus James Kirsch ’68, and Paul Mathias—heard 45 minutes of arguments in a case in which a motorist stopped for a broken taillight was eventually found, during an inventory of his truck, to have 25 grams of methamphetamine hidden inside a Big Mac box. The driver, Otis Sams, has sought to suppress the evidence, arguing that the police violated his Fourth Amendment rights against unreasonable search and seizure. The trial court denied his motion.

Throughout the proceedings, the judges asked pointed questions of both the lawyer for Sams, Joel Wieneke, and Indiana Deputy Attorney General Lyubov Gore. The questions tended to revolve around two issues: first, whether Sams had the right to appeal since the truck did not belong to him, and then, whether the police had followed proper procedure when they opened what looked like a discarded McDonald’s bag yet did not inventory the tools found in the truck.

The judges did not specify when they would decide the case.

The January 24th hearing was one of about 2,100 cases the Court of Appeals will hear this year. The “Appeals on Wheels” program stops in locations as varied as independent living facilities, rotary clubs, and schools.

Judge Kirsch, a frequent visitor to Butler for basketball games and to walk the campus and along the canal, said he was pleased to bring the court to his alma mater. He recalled that when he was at Butler, the location of the January 24 trial was Christian Theological Seminary.

“I have great pride in this university,” he said.

Rusty Jones, Director of Butler’s Center for High Achievement and Scholarly Engagement, which arranged for the court’s visit to Butler, said he was “thrilled” with the event. Jones said that for Butler’s pre-law students, this “was most likely their first chance to ever witness something like that, so they have a better understanding of how the appellate system works.” For students in Kristin Swenson’s Rhetorical Theory class, “who were approaching the event from a totally different angle—the value and power of speech,” it gave them a chance to see the power of the spoken and written word.

“I thought the turnout was fantastic and, for the smaller meet-and-greet for the students who stuck around afterward, even better,” he said.

One of those who stuck around after was junior Sundeep Singh, a biology and political science double major. This was the third time he’d seen an appeals court hearing. The first was when he was a sophomore at Hamilton Southeastern High School in Fishers, Indiana.

Singh plans to go to law school after he graduates from Butler.

“That’s why I got involved in law,” he said about seeing “Appeals on Wheels” at his high school. “Because of that.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

So This Is What An Appellate Court Hearing Looks Like

It gives us an opportunity to go out into the communities—normally, we don’t attract big audiences—and allow people to see what we do.

Jan 25 2017 Read more
Campus

Lacy School of Business Students Get a Good Look at Retail

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 24 2017

Savannah Kleiner ’17 had no idea what was in store for her as she headed to New York for the National Retail Federation’s Big Show, the annual showcase for retail merchants. But not only did she come away excited about her future, she was honored as one of 20 semifinalists for the federation’s Next Generation Scholarship, which supports college students pursuing careers or majors relevant to retail.
Savannah Kleiner won a Next Generation Scholarship from the National Retail Federation.

“I think I was a little overwhelmed at first just at the magnitude and what a production it was,” said Kleiner, who has distinguished herself during her college career as Founder and President of Butler’s Fashion Club and as marketing intern with the Indiana Supreme Court. “But it was a great experience. I also didn’t realize how far-reaching the National Retail Federation (NRF) is. We had people from California to New York City. There were more than 600 students from all across this country. So this was huge.”

Kleiner was one of 10 Butler students to make the trip, along with Kim Goad, Director of Career Development in Butler’s Lacy School of Business, and Eloise Paul, one of the Lacy School of Business’s career mentors. Paul, who worked in retail before switching to teaching midway through her career, recommended that Butler join the National Retail Federation and attend the Big Show as a way to show students the enormous variety of career options available to them in retail.

The trip was funded by donors to the Lacy School of Business’s Experiential Fund and through NRF scholarships. In addition to Kleiner, Kelsey Kinniry ’19 (NRF Student Ambassador) and Macey O’Brien ’19 (NRF Rising Star) earned scholarships that paid for their expenses.

"I'm so grateful that Eloise encouraged us to join the NRF, and so proud of our students,” Goad said. “They represented Butler well and made the most of four very full days. This opens up incredible opportunities for all of our majors and I look forward to growing the program."

During those four full days, Kleiner, Kinniry, O’Brien, and the other students—Anna Doran, Leanna Kerbs, Savannah Kitchel, Emily Leeson, Ariel Norris, Sabrina Pusatera, and Alex Ruemler:

-Had dinner with Mel Tucker and Michael Wolkoff, CFO and Chief Merchandising Officer, respectively of the iconic New York store Century 21. Paul said they had “an engaging conversation about the retail industry and careers in retail, and a tour at their flagship store.” Mel is the husband of Butler alumna Edwina Tucker ‘88.
At Century 21

-Heard from an array of speakers, including Neiman Marcus CEO Karen Katz; designer Rebecca Minkoff; a young professional panel with recent hires from Nike, the Home Depot, West Elm, Belk, and Kohls; College Relations executives from Macys, Kohls, Ross, Nordstrom, and Belk; and author/motivational speaker Simon Sinek, author of Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action.

“Karen Katz was really motivating,” said Kleiner, who liked the CEO’s story about getting turned down by Neiman Marcus when she applied to work there immediately after college. “It sounds cheesy, but if you’re passionate about something, do not let a little bump in the road take you off task. Stay focused on the goal and you’ll get there.”

-Learned that retail offers a broad range of career opportunities—not just fashion and not just sales. Paul said that the conference stressed the need for students in the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, and math) who can crunch and interpret data.

“Retail is dynamic,” Paul said. “It’s not for those who like a lot of structure and sameness. But if you like excitement and change and can juggle and do lots of different things, retail is a great career.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Lacy School of Business Students Get a Good Look at Retail

"We had people from California to New York City. There were more than 600 students from all across this country. So this was huge."

Jan 24 2017 Read more
Campus

Music Professor David Murray Wins Special Recognition Award

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 12 2017

Butler University Professor of Music David Murray has been awarded the International Society of Bassists’s 2017 Special Recognition Award for Solo Performance, which goes to a person “who has contributed special skills, knowledge, projects, and other such positive works in the furthering of ISB ideals.”

David MurrayThe award is given every two years by the organization, which represents nearly 3,000 members in more than 40 countries. Murray has been on the board for several years—he’s currently secretary—and is a Past President.

“I am totally shocked, humbled, and honored—and inspired to keep working harder and doing more,” he said.

Murray, who has an international reputation as a solo bassist and teacher, has taught at Butler since 1997. In addition, he is Principal Bassist of the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra. He also plays as Principal Bassist with Sinfonia da Camera in Urbana, Illinois, and at the Bear Valley Music Festival in northern California.

He has recorded three solo CDs (most recently in 2012) and a duo CD with bassist Diana Gannett, and is a founding member of the bass quartet Bad Boys of Bass, with whom he released a CD in 2006. He also released a DVD of theater music in spring 2003.

“David takes his place as part of an elite group of performers that have received this honor,” ISB General Manager Madeleine Crouch said. “We are very proud that he is being honored with the award in 2017.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Music Professor David Murray Wins Special Recognition Award

David takes his place as part of an elite group of performers that have received this honor.

Jan 12 2017 Read more
Campus

Professor Davidson's Book Teaches Visual Basic for Applications

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 03 2017

Those who want to learn VBA—Visual Basic for Applications—are in luck: Jason Davidson ’01, an instructor in the Lacy School of Business, has written a new book on the popular programming language that is used to create and customize Microsoft Office programs.
Jason DavidsonVBA for Microsoft Office 2016, published by Pearson, is a 216-page, step-by-step guide that’s geared toward students, though professionals can use it too—and do.

“Think of it as an introduction to VBA for someone who’s never done anything with it,” Davidson said. “The book starts with what is it, what does it do, how does it work. By the end, it walks you through how to use it with database programs, so you can use it with Access. You can use it to automate databases, you can use it to automate spreadsheets in Excel, things like that.”

Davidson said VBA is a versatile program that’s frequently used for things like automating calculations for mortgages or car payments. It also can be used in business analytics jobs where the user is working in Excel, Word, or PowerPoint.

“VBA can be used with quite a bit,” he said.

Davidson teaches Advanced Web Design, Data Networks, Data Analysis and Business Modeling, and introductory Management Information Systems courses, and he’ll use the new book in his Data Analytics and Business Modeling course.

The 2016 edition is the second version of this book, Davidson said. He co-authored the first edition, and also co-wrote a new book on using Microsoft Excel that was published in late 2016. This is the first book he wrote on his own.

“I’m excited that this is the first one I’ve done by myself,” he said. “I have worked a lot as a coauthor, but this is my first solo publication.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Professor Davidson's Book Teaches Visual Basic for Applications

Think of it as an introduction to VBA for someone who’s never done anything with it.

Jan 03 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler Is One of His Favorite Things

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 02 2017

The last time Ben Davis sang onstage in Indianapolis, it was as a member of the Butler Chorale. The next time will be January 10-15 at the Murat Theatre, where he will portray Captain Georg von Trapp in the national touring company of The Sound of Music.

Ben DavisDavis grew up in Indianapolis, attended Butler in the mid-1990s as a voice major, and credits Jordan College of the Arts faculty such as Steven Stolen with preparing him for a career that has included Broadway roles in Les Miserables and A Little Night Music, and a 2003 Tony Honor for Excellence for his work in Baz Luhrmann’s production of the opera La Boheme.

“I was not a serious student,” he said. “I wasn’t one of those people who usually gravitates toward Butler. Butler is an incredibly well-respected university. But I had an incredible support team from Butler that helped me as much as they could and gave me a foundation upon which I could build this career. I can honestly say that if it weren’t for my two years at Butler, I wouldn’t be here.”

After leaving Butler, Davis went to work at a financial brokerage firm in Indianapolis. His mother bought him a Chicago trade paper where he saw an audition for The Phantom of the Opera. He tried out but didn’t hear anything. Six months later, he was invited to audition for Les Mis in New York. Again, the phone went silent for a time.

When the call finally came, the producers said they wanted him for the ensemble role Feuilly. But they hadn’t heard how high he could sing, and they needed him to be able to hit a high A. They asked him to get on the phone with the music director.

“I was so naïve and so green that I said, ‘Yeah, why not?’” he remembered. “The good part is that this was before Facetime, so I could make any face and contortion to get the note out.”

He hit the note and got the part.

He was 21 when he was cast, 22 when he started a 3½-year run in the national touring company. On September 10, 2001, he joined the Broadway production as Enjolras.

That led to La Boheme, an opera on Broadway in Italian, for which he and the other principals (who were double and triple cast) won the Tony. When that closed, he got cast immediately in Thoroughly Modern Millie opposite Sutton Foster, with whom he had done Les Mis.

After that, he moved to Los Angeles for three years of theatre and TV work before heading to London to be in a film version of the opera The Magic Flute directed by Kenneth Branagh and recorded at Abbey Road Studios. Then it was back to New York for the first revival of Les Mis (he played Javert), two years on the road in Spamalot (directed by Mike Nichols), time in A Little Night Music (which starred Elaine Strich and Bernadette Peters) and concert performances of Kurt Weill’s Knickerbocker Holiday opposite Kelli O’Hara and Victor Garber.

Davis also performed in The Sound of Music in Nashville and at the Paper Mill Playhouse in New Jersey. In this production, he gives von Trapp a new spin.

“It’s more about just making him human,” he said. “I think over time the role has become so stoic and so one-note, and that’s not who we are as human beings. It’s understanding that there’s a reason for his sullenness and the gray cloud hanging over him, and there’s a reason he needs that discipline in his children and he’s gone back to his military days of discipline. So it’s about exploring those reasons and finding when that changes during the show, why it changes and how he reacts to that.”

And he’s excited to get to do this in front of family and friends.

“In 20 years of doing this, I’ve never played Indianapolis,” Davis said. “This is my first time. I’m so excited, I can’t begin to tell you.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Is One of His Favorite Things

"I can honestly say that if it weren’t for my two years at Butler, I wouldn’t be here.”

Jan 02 2017 Read more
Campus

Court of Appeals to Hear a Case at Butler

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 23 2016

A three-judge panel from the Indiana Court of Appeals will hear a case on the Butler campus January 24 at 11:00 AM in the Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall. The hearing is open to the public, and a reception with the judges will follow from noon to 1:00 PM downstairs in the Ford Salon.

Court of Appeals SealJudges James S. Kirsch, Paul D. Mathias, and Margret G. Robb will hear 40 minutes of arguments in a Greencastle case in which a motorist stopped for a broken taillight was eventually found, during an inventory of his truck, to have 25 grams of methamphetamine inside a hamburger box. The driver sought to suppress the evidence, arguing that the police violated his Fourth Amendment rights against unreasonable search and seizure. The trial court denied his motion. (More details about the case are below.)

“This will be a wonderful opportunity, especially for our pre-law students, to get to talk to professional judges in very high positions and get to learn about their careers and the paths they took to where they are now,” said Rusty Jones, Director of Butler’s Center for High Achievement and Scholarly Engagement.

These traveling oral arguments, sometimes called “Appeals on Wheels,” typically occur at high schools, colleges, law schools, and courtrooms, but they’ve also been held at conference centers, tourist sites, and even retirement communities, according to the Court of Appeals website.

The Court has conducted more than 430 Appeals on Wheels in 72 counties between its 2001 centennial and July 2015, although the program predates the centennial. The goal is to help Hoosiers learn more about the judiciary’s role in Indiana government and to provide opportunities for Court of Appeals judges to meet and talk with a range of citizens in relatively informal settings.

The case:

This case arises out of a traffic stop on the evening of February 20, 2015, in Greencastle, Indiana. Otis Sams was driving home from work in a truck without working taillights in a snowstorm. Sams had stopped at a fast-food restaurant and was eating his supper from the fast-food bag as he drove home. Two officers of the Greencastle Police Department on patrol that night noticed that Sams’s truck’s taillights were out and pulled him over. During the stop, the officers discovered that Sams was driving on a suspended license for the second time in 10 years, a misdemeanor. But rather than arrest him, the officers wrote Sams a summons for the misdemeanor.

The officers then had to decide what to do with Sams’s truck as it stood on the shoulder of a public road in a snowstorm without a licensed driver to drive it away. The officers decided the truck would need to be towed and impounded until it could be retrieved by a licensed driver. The officers informed Sams of their decision and released him from the scene. Sams walked to a nearby gas station to wait for a ride home.

Before the tow truck arrived, the officers searched Sams’s truck to inventory its contents. One of the officers noticed that Sams had moved the fast-food bag to the floorboard in the back of the cab from its earlier position on the front passenger seat next to him. The officers decided to open the bag. Inside the bag was a hamburger box, and inside the hamburger box were more than twenty-five grams of methamphetamine. Sams was arrested and charged with Level 4 felony possession of methamphetamine, an offense punishable by up to 12 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

Before his jury trial in Putnam Circuit Court, Sams moved to suppress the fruits of the inventory search of his truck. The trial court denied Sams’s motion. Sams sought certification for interlocutory appeal, which the trial court also denied. The evidence from the truck was admitted over Sams’s objection at trial.

Sams appeals the trial court’s decision to admit the evidence from the truck, arguing that the officers’ inventory search was not sufficiently regulated by standard procedures and thereby ran afoul of the Fourth Amendment to the federal constitution. Sams raises no separate argument under our state constitution. The State responds that the inventory search was properly conducted under the established procedures of the Greencastle Police Department and that the trial court did not abuse its discretion in deciding to admit the fruits of that search.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Court of Appeals to Hear a Case at Butler

The driver sought to suppress the evidence, arguing that the police violated his Fourth Amendment rights against unreasonable search and seizure. The trial court denied his motion.

Dec 23 2016 Read more
Campus

Superintendents to Learn the Business Side of Schools

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 23 2016

Thirteen Indiana public school superintendents from all over the state will participate in the first EPIC, a joint venture of Butler University and the Indiana Association of Public School Superintendents (IAPSS) designed to help great educators transform the business and constituent-services aspects of their work.

Butler UniversityEPIC (Educators Preparing Inspired Change), developed by Butler’s Executive Education program and College of Education in conjunction with the IAPSS, will feature a daylong session every other month throughout 2017, beginning January 12. Topics include strategy development, budgeting/finance, change management, community/stakeholder outreach, building a high-performance team, and board relations.

Wayne Township Superintendent Jeff Butts, one of the organizers, said the program came about because superintendents find themselves dealing with budget cuts, increased class sizes, and socioeconomic conditions that require them to operate in an environment of rapid change and uncertainty.

“Conversations across this country and throughout Indiana are focused on making sure school districts are providing a world-class education and preparing students to be college and career ready, all the while being great stewards of the taxpayer dollar,” Butts said. “Expectations of school superintendents are changing rapidly, and these leaders must be prepared to lead high functioning and complex organizations with great efficiency and success. EPIC will support superintendents’ transformative growth in leadership to thrive in this new reality.”

Participants registered for the first EPIC program are:

Robert Evans, Shelby Eastern Schools
Deborah Howell, Franklin County Community School Corp.
Jim White, Bremen Public Schools
Thomas Hunter, Greensburg Community Schools
Scott Deetz, Madison-Grant United School Corp.
Ginger Bolinger, Madison Consolidated Schools
Gregory Walker, Brownstown Central Community Schools
Steve Baule, Muncie Community Schools
Jana Vance, Rochester Community School Corp.
Matthew Prusiecki, Metropolitan School District of Decatur Township
Lisa Lantrip, Southern Hancock Schools
Scott Olinger, Plainfield Community School Corp.
Sam Watkins, Peru Community Schools

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Superintendents to Learn the Business Side of Schools

The program came about because superintendents find themselves dealing with budget cuts, increased class sizes, and socioeconomic conditions that require them to operate in an environment of rapid change and uncertainty.

Dec 23 2016 Read more
Campus

Professor Esteves Named Guyer Chair in Education

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 21 2016

Associate Professor Kelli Esteves, who has taught in the College of Education since 2010, has been named the Richard W. Guyer Chair in Education.

Kellie Esteves“It is a true honor to be awarded the Richard W. Guyer Chair, especially when considering how much admiration I have for previous recipients such as Arthur Hochman, Catherine Pangan, Shelly Furuness, Debbie Corpus, and Tom Keller,” she said. “Dean Ena Shelley and so many of my College of Education colleagues have been instrumental in helping me reach my professional goals. I am grateful to work with people across the University who are incredibly kind, intelligent, passionate, and hard working.”

Before joining the Butler faculty, Esteves taught as an Assistant Professor of Education at Aquinas College. She also has taught in the Rockford (Michigan) public schools as a special education teacher.

Esteves earned her bachelor’s degree from Hope College and her Master of Arts and Doctor of Education from Western Michigan University. Her areas of expertise are inclusive practices, response to intervention, children’s literature, and developmental theory.

The chair is named for Richard W. Guyer, a native of Indiana, who received his B.S. in education from Butler in 1948, an M.S. in 1950, and an Ed.S. in 1967 from the University. He received his Ed.D. from Ball State University in 1969. A World War II veteran, Guyer began his career in education as a teacher and head football coach at Crawfordsville, Indianapolis Howe, and Franklin Central high schools. He later served as athletic director, vice principal and principal at Franklin Central.

Guyer served as an adjunct faculty member at Butler for several years before becoming a full-time faculty member in 1968. He taught undergraduate and graduate courses in administration and also served as the director of student teaching and field experiences, director of educational placement and director of undergraduate studies for the College of Education. He retired from Butler in 1986 and enjoyed professor emeritus status until his death in 2000.

The Richard W. Guyer Professorship in Education was established in 1997 by D. Michael Hockett, a 1964 graduate of Butler University and an Indianapolis businessman who was deeply influenced by Guyer’s teaching and guidance.

Faculty members hold the Guyer Chair for three years.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Professor Esteves Named Guyer Chair in Education

The Richard W. Guyer Professorship in Education was established in 1997 by D. Michael Hockett, a 1964 graduate of Butler University and an Indianapolis businessman who was deeply influenced by Guyer’s teaching and guidance.

Dec 21 2016 Read more
Campus

John Conley Named Chief of Public Safety

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 20 2016

Veteran police officer John Conley has been named to succeed Ben Hunter as Butler University’s Chief of Public Safety.

John ConleyConley joined the Butler University Police Department two years ago, after working with the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department (IMPD) for 40 years in various positions in Operations, Investigations, and Administration. He served as Homeland Security Supervisor for IMPD, coordinating stadium security for Super Bowl XLVI, and also was District Commander and Deputy Chief of Operations.

Conley is a graduate of the FBI National Academy. He is a former Indianapolis Police Department Police Officer of the Year, a recipient of the American Legion Spartan Award for Valor, and a recipient of the Webber Seavey Award from the International Association of Chiefs of Police, presented by Attorney General Janet Reno, for Community Policing Excellence.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

John Conley Named Chief of Public Safety

Veteran police officer John Conley has been named to succeed Ben Hunter as Butler University’s Chief of Public Safety.

Dec 20 2016 Read more

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