Back

Latest In

Campus

Campus

Shepard to Winter Grads: You Have Reason to Be Optimistic

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 19 2016

Butler graduates should clutch their diploma with a sense of optimism because they are in America and they are educated, retired Indiana Supreme Court Justice Randall Shepard told the 138 graduates at the 2016 Winter Commencement on December 17 in Clowes Memorial Hall.

Supreme Court Justice Randall Shepard“The value of an education earned in 2016 at universities like Butler is more tangible than ever,” Shepard said. “Your decision and your family’s decision to persevere in education is the best possible launching pad for a successful career and a successful life.”

Shepard, the longest-serving chief justice in Indiana history, said that although the students are graduating at a moment of great national change, “In what other nation would you be positioned for a brighter future?”

“This nation has created more opportunity, more freedom, more economic security for more people from more walks of life than any society in the whole history of humankind,” he said, noting that investors and governments from Canada to Canton continue to support America.

President James M. Danko presented Shepard with an honorary doctorate. Trustee James P. White and his wife, Anna, also received honorary degrees.

The winter 2016 graduates are:

Ryan Akel, Business Administration
Emily Alaimo, Education Administration
Devon Bellamy, Risk Management and Insurance
Chelsea Boyce, Accounting
Kellie Brotherton, Education Administration
Emily Brumley, Psychology
Nathaniel Bubeck, Recording Industry Studies
Kelsey Burnett, International Business
Olivia Cabanban, Biology B.S.
Sarah Carney, English
Dennis Cho, Sociology
James Clark, Business Administration
Caitlyn Cole, Marketing
Allison Cotter, Chemistry B.S.
Daniel Cotter, Chemistry B.S.
Annette Coulombe, Business Administration
Olivia Cox, English
Andrew Cravens, Business Administration
Andrew Crecelius, Business Administration
Jared Curcio, Management Information Systems
Ryan Davis, Education Administration
Nicholas Decker, Business Administration
Michael Demos, Criminology
Anne-Marie DiBisceglie, Elementary Education
Carrie Dilley, Education Administration
Christopher Djonlich, Business Administration
Pamela Dobbin, Business Administration
Ian Dobek, Biology B.S.
Joshua Doty, Business Administration
Amanda Dusing, Elementary Education
Alan Eidelman, Accounting
Benjamin Ekhaus, Business Administration
Austin Engle, Chemistry B.S.
Eli Finkel, Physics B.S.
Craig Fisher, Professional Pharmacy
Victoria Fountain, Spanish
Holly Frantz, Marketing
Joshua Gallion, Business Administration
Matthew Gothard, Business Administration
Aaron Grady, Business Administration
Daniel Gryfinski, Finance
Kelsey Haas, Biology B.S.
Joseph Hackett, Biology B.S.
Jeremy Hawk, Business Administration
Samantha Haycox, Political Science
Luke Hodgin, Business Administration
Taylor Huntman, Risk Management and Insurance
Elizabeth Ingermann, Political Science
Allison Jaramillo, Business Administration
Patrick Jarrett, Business Administration
Flora Jones, Education Administration
Serina Kashimoto, Individualized Major
Stephen Kelley, Accounting
Christopher Kelsey, Actuarial Science
Ryan Kem, Management Information Systems
Nathaniel Kenny, Political Science
Elizabeth Knox, Music Conducting
Zachary LaRoche, Chemistry B.S.
Kyle Lang, Political Science
Kathryn Larimore, Psychology
Amber Lerman, Dance - Performance
Kelsey Livingston, Elementary Education
Kaley Lyons, Psychology
Johanna Mader, Creative Writing
Anthony Malito, Business Administration
Brooke Marshall, Management Information Systems
Jacey McCormick, Business Administration
Christopher McDonald, Computer Science B.S.
Claire McGuinness, Creative Writing
Rachel McKinzie, Finance
Philip McNealy, Creative Writing
Kailey Meadows, Professional Pharmacy
Cynthia Mellander, Mental Health Counselor
Megan Menapace, Chemistry B.S.
Amy Miller, Business Administration
Ethan Miller, Software Engineering
Patrick Miller, Business Administration
Vincent Mitchell, Sports Media
Kristin Mize, Creative Writing
Amber Moore, Education Administration
Brian Moore, Accounting
Benjamin Morrical, Political Science
Andrew Myers, Biology B.S.
Deanna Nibarger, Education Administration
Michael Nugent, Economics
Alessandra ORourke, Education Administration
Stephanie Oakland, Music Composition
Ryan Oliver, Education Administration
Mitchell Ostrowski, Finance
Alexis Pearcy, Finance
Kendall Perkins, Elementary Education
Emmaline Perrin, Education Administration
Trang Phung, Accounting
Makayla Pickett, Entrepreneurship & Innovation
Nestor Porres, Digital Media Production
Jordan Ransone, Strategic Communication
Gregory Rearden, Interactive Media
Sanika Rege, Pharmaceutical Science
William Roche, Business Administration
Tyler Roell, Education Administration
Matthew Roth, Marketing
Eric Rupenthal, Biology B.S.
Kyra Sanford, Accounting
Sonna Schafer, Education Administration
Taylor Schroeder, Communication Science & Disorders
Chancey Seger, Computer Science B.S.
Jennifer Seidel, Business Administration
Amy Selby, Education Administration
Kacey Shriner, Spanish
Andrew Shrum, Business Administration
Jeri Smith, Chemistry B.S.
Michael Smith, Education Administration
Robyn Stratford, Science, Technology, & Society
Elizabeth Subrin, Chemistry B.S.
John Syljebeck, Education Administration
Cameron Taylor, Finance
Hannah Todd, Education Administration
Matthew Troja, History
Benjamin Trube, Computer Science B.S.
Emily Trygstad, Marketing
Samantha Turley, Music
Alexandra Van Hoof, Biology B.S.
Madeline Verbica, Biology B.S.
Joshua Villafuerte, Middle/Secondary Education
Harlan Vondersaar, Business Administration
Kerstin Wade, Business Administration
Fallon Watton, Criminology
Malcolm Weaver, Strategic Communication
Kristen Webb, Psychology
Lindsay Wey, Education Administration
Terri Whitcomb, Education Administration
Victor Wierzba, Accounting
Tanner Witsken, Finance
Joseph Workinger, English Writing
Julian Wyllie, Entrepreneurship & Innovation
Kayla Yoder, Management Information Systems
Matthew Zider, Business Administration
Lucas Zimmerman, Finance

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Shepard to Winter Grads: You Have Reason to Be Optimistic

"The value of an education earned in 2016 at universities like Butler is more tangible than ever."

Dec 19 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler Senior Wins Cell Biology Competition

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 15 2016

Victoria Kreyden ’17, a biology/Spanish double-major from Carmel, Indiana, has won first prize in the undergraduate poster session at the 2016 American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) meeting in San Francisco, California, for her poster presentation “Investigation of the neuronal functions of the SUMO conjugating enzyme UBC-9 at the C. elegans neuromuscular junction.”
Victoria Kreyden and her prize-winning poster.

Kreyden’s presentation on December 3 was judged best of more than 100 by undergraduates from around the country and abroad.

Kreyden is studying the C. elegans—microscopic roundworms—to learn more about the human nervous system. Associate Professor of Biology Jennifer Kowalski said Kreyden is investigating a particular set of enzymes, called SUMO enzymes, that control the activity of numerous proteins in neurons and other types of cells.

“Victoria is trying to determine the role of these enzymes in regulating neuronal signaling, which is critical for nervous system function,” Kowalski said. “Because of the similarities between the human and C. elegans nervous systems and the high number of genes they share, including the genes encoding SUMO enzymes, it is likely that what she learns in the worms will be relevant to understanding human nervous system function.”

Kowalski and Assistant Professor of Biology Lindsay Lewellyn accompanied Kreyden and three other Butler students who also presented their research at the 2016 ASCB meeting:

-Ashley Kline - “Characterizing a Role for the Misshapen Kinase in the Growth of the Germline Ring Canals in the Developing Egg Chamber.”

-Olivia Crowe - “Determination of the role of Dreadlocks (Dock) in the growth of the germline ring canals in the developing Drosophila melanogaster egg chamber.”

-Lauryn Campagnoli - “Investigation of SYD-2 as a potential substrate of the Anaphase Promoting Complex in promoting GABA release at the C. elegans neuromuscular junction.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Senior Wins Cell Biology Competition

Victoria Kreyden ’17 has won first prize in the undergraduate poster session at the 2016 American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) meeting in San Francisco, California.

Dec 15 2016 Read more
Campus

Great-Great-Granddaughter of Ovid Butler Dies

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 07 2016

Patricia CochranPatricia Cochran, the great-great-granddaughter of Butler University founder Ovid Butler and great-niece of two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning author Booth Tarkington, died on December 5. She was 97.

Cochran, the daughter of Margaret and Donald Jameson, was a pillar of Indianapolis society, with memberships in the Indianapolis Women’s Club, The Dramatic Club of Indianapolis, Colonial Dames, Wildflower Society, the National World War II Museum, the American National Red Cross, the Society of Indiana Pioneers, and a life member of the Order of Merit.

A memorial service will be held on Saturday, December 10, at 11:00 AM at Crown Hill Cemetery in the Gothic Chapel for visitation and services, followed by a reception at the Woodstock Country Club at 2:30 PM.

Her grandson Richard Austin Cochran Acheson, her son, John Huyler Acheson, her husband of 32 years, Richard A. Cochran, and her siblings, Margaret Jameson Wildhack and Donald Fenton Booth Jameson, preceded her in death. She is survived by her son, Donald Jameson Acheson, and his wife, Clare Fox Acheson; her daughter-in-law Becky Acheson; six grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren, nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews, and many cousins.

Patty Cochran’s connection to Ovid Butler begins with Ovid Butler marrying Cordelia Cole. Their daughter Maria Butler married Patrick Henry Jameson in 1850. Maria and Patrick’s son Ovid Butler Jameson married Mary Booth “Haute” Tarkington in 1886. Their son Donald Ovid Butler Jameson married Margaret Booth in 1915. Patty is their daughter.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Great-Great-Granddaughter of Ovid Butler Dies

Patricia Cochran was a pillar of Indianapolis society.

Dec 07 2016 Read more
Campus

Sigma Gamma Rho Endows a Scholarship for a COE Student

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 07 2016

Sigma Gamma Rho, the sorority founded at Butler University on November 12, 1922, has given Butler a gift to establish the Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc. 7 Founders Endowed Scholarship to honor the seven education majors and public school teachers who started the organization.

Sigma Gamma Rho Alpha ChapterThe scholarship will be awarded annually beginning next fall to a student enrolled in the College of Education.

Bonita M. Herring, the Immediate Past Grand Basileus (International President of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc.), who implemented the project during her time in office, said the goal is “to uplift students in education and honor the legacy of seven visionary women on the campus of Butler University who shared a commitment to education and sisterhood.”

“We acknowledge these courageous women through this gift in preparation for the coming Centennial Celebration of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority,” she said.

Sigma Gamma Rho has more than 85,000 members in more than 500 chapters across the United States, the Bahamas, Bermuda, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Canada, Germany and Korea.

“We’re thrilled to have this scholarship to award, given the history of Sigma Gamma Rho at Butler,” said Jaci Thiede, Butler’s Vice President of Advancement.

Campus

Sigma Gamma Rho Endows a Scholarship for a COE Student

The scholarship will be awarded annually beginning next fall to a student enrolled in the College of Education.

Dec 07 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler Theatre Gets a New Scene Shop

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 07 2016

The curtain rose December 7 on the new Butler University Theatre Department Scene Shop, which has moved from cramped quarters in the basement of the Holcomb Building to much larger, well-ventilated space in the west side of the Sunset Avenue Parking Garage.

Butler Scene ShopHalf the space will be used to build scenery for Theatre productions; the other half will be used for costume storage for the Theatre and Dance departments.

At a brief ribbon-cutting ceremony, members of both departments said they couldn’t be happier.

“It’s like moving out of a house built in the ‘50s with no closet space into a house with walk-in closets,” Larry Attaway, Chair of the Dance Department, said.

“Such a significant upgrade,” said Michelle Jarvis, interim Dean of the Jordan College of the Arts.

“The scene shop was a small, crowded space in Holcomb, and this is way, way, way, way better,” Theatre Professor Wendy Meaden said.

The 40x80 scene shop and 40x40 storage spaces for both ballet and theatre costumes (which had been located in a pole barn behind Hinkle Fieldhouse) gives students and staff closer proximity to the Lilly Hall Studio Theatre, the Schrott Center for the Arts and Clowes Memorial Hall, where performances are held. It means that Glen Thoreson, the Scene Shop Supervisor and Technical Director, and crew have space with lots of natural light, a 25-foot-high ceiling, and improved air flow to build and paint sets, and they also have a garage door for easy access and exit to move sets.

In addition, costumes that once were often damp or damaged in storage are now kept in a climate-controlled facility. Both Theatre and Dance have more than 10,000 pieces in the new space.

“There’s so much more room to move and work,” Meaden said.

At the ribbon-cutting ceremony, Department of Theatre Chair Diane Timmerman said the scene shop had been in various locations over the years, including under the old Hilton U. Brown Theatre west of Hinkle Fieldhouse.

She thanked the administration and Board of Trustees for approving funds to make the new space possible, and she acknowledged the efforts of past faculty, staff, and administrators who worked to secure better space for the scene shop.

“We’re standing on the shoulders of the people who came before us,” Timmerman said.

“We’re so grateful for everything that was done to make this happen,” Attaway added.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Theatre Gets a New Scene Shop

Half the space will be used to build scenery for Theatre productions; the other half will be used for costume storage for the Theatre and Dance departments.

Dec 07 2016 Read more
Campus

In DC, Butler's College of Education Shows How to Lead

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 30 2016

When the federal Department of Education went looking for ideas on how to prepare teachers in early November, one of the places it sought out was Butler University’s College of Education.

After the nationwide call for teacher preparation programs to submit innovative practices that have the potential for growth, Butler became the first Indiana school to be invited to present at a Teach to Lead Preparation Summit. From nearly 100 submissions, 17 teams were invited to the early-November summit. Participants spent two days in sessions aimed at identifying obstacles and solutions for spreading innovative best practices in teacher preparation.
Amanda Huffman, Kaija Bole, Shelly Furuness, and Rick Mitchell shared a COE best practice in Washington.

Associate Professor of Education Shelly Furuness, along with Pike Master Practitioner and co-teacher Rick Mitchell, led the Butler contingent, which shared how ongoing University-School Partnership with Pike Township Schools supports a cycle of professional development benefiting both pre-service and in-service teachers.

The Butler message to DC was clear: When teacher-educators and school districts are able to work together, they can prepare the kinds of teachers that schools need.

Kaija Bole ’17, a math-education double major from suburban Chicago, also represented Butler at the summit, along with Amanda Huffman BS ‘12, MS ’16. In fall 2015, Huffman, as part of her master’s thesis research, was able to develop a curriculum based on gaps she knew existed from her own preparation at Butler. She used her prep period once a week to provide an hour-long workshop to the Math Education majors focused specifically on methods for teaching complex mathematics.

Huffman’s work represents a model of teacher leadership, Furuness said.

“She was an excellent pre-service teacher who was hired by Pike Township after completing her student teaching with the district,” Furuness said. “She immediately began participating in ongoing professional development opportunities made possible by the Butler-Pike Partnership. As a novice teacher, she continued to gain both content and pedagogical knowledge from Butler faculty members.”

The Butler students loved their experience, but Huffman’s prep period changed this academic year. She was unable to devote time to teaching future teachers like Bole.

Bole is lucky—Huffman is her practicum mentor, and Bole will be student-teaching in the Math Department at Pike High School under Huffman. But none of the other math education majors will have the opportunity to experience the math methods workshop because of scheduling logistics.

“I wish we could be doing what she did last year,” Bole said.

Furuness said this is the problem Butler is trying to solve: How to make sure teacher-leaders like Huffman have the time and resources to continue to work with future teachers.

Bole said after spending three days at the summit and comparing Butler’s teacher education to other programs, she’s convinced that Butler is serving as a model—through its partnerships with school districts such as Pike and Indianapolis Public Schools and the way it prepares students to teach.

The proof, she said, is in the College of Education’s 100 percent placement rate for its graduates.

“To hear about other programs, it made me realize how special we are here,” she said. “We’re doing great things.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

In DC, Butler's College of Education Shows How to Lead

When the federal Department of Education went looking for ideas on how to prepare teachers in early November, one of the places it sought out was Butler University’s College of Education.

Nov 30 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler Alumna Receives $3.9 Million to Expand Literacy Program

BY Hayley Ross ’17

PUBLISHED ON Nov 28 2016

In September, the United States Department of Education awarded more than $26 million in grants to develop and improve high-quality literacy programs in high-needs school. One of the largest awards went to a Butler alumna.

Michelle (Skinner) BrownMichelle (Skinner) Brown ’09 will receive $3.9 million over two years to help fund and expand her company, CommonLit Inc., a completely free, online compilation of literary and teaching resources that was created to try to close the “secondary literacy gap.”

“Teachers, parents, anyone can go on the site and make measurable improvements,” Brown said. “That is the overall goal.”

Brown came to Butler from New Braunfels, Texas, to study classical ballet. She said she never stopped loving ballet. “I just decided that I didn't want it to be my profession.”

“The late Dr. Marshall Gregory was the person in the Butler English Department who inspired me to change my major to English,” she said. “His classes made me believe in the power of literature to change people's minds. In fact, Dr. G ended up writing my letter of recommendation for Teach for America, which is what brought me to the education sector.”

After graduating Butler, she joined Teach for America and taught at a school in the Mississippi Delta for two years. It was a highly impoverished and extremely rural, and it was there that she got the “teaching bug.”

“Ultimately, what I am doing now directly correlates to teaching there,” she said. “CommonLit was born out of my experience in the classroom.”

She left and began to teach in a charter school in Boston. She noticed the vast differences in teaching tools between the two schools, and it pushed her to go to Harvard for her Master’s in Education Policy and Management.

“It kind of made me angry that the resources that I had in Boston weren’t available to me in Mississippi,” Brown said.

The idea for CommonLit formed when she told her Harvard academic advisor, Ronald Ferguson, that her plan was to write a book on literary instruction.

“He told me that wasn't enough,” she said. “He pushed me to have a bigger vision of what I could do.”Michelle (Skinner) Brown

She started with the curriculum itself around three years ago, never dreaming of what it could accomplish. Today, CommonLit is reaching over 12,000 schools nationwide and gains more than 3,000 new users every day.

“By the end of the year I want to reach around 1 million students,” Brown said. “And we are definitely on track to exceed that number.”

CommonLit has professional high-performing teachers who create all of the lessons on the site, which include new articles, poems, short stories, and historical documents. The works themselves are donated by authors and publishers that support CommonLit’s mission of improving literacy for vulnerable populations.

“We have contact partners, non-profit, that give us permission to integrate their writing into our collection,” she said.

With the money from the federal grant, Brown said she wants to focus on hiring new people and making the website more visible—not only to places that don’t usually have access to these resources, but to people who may have a disability that makes the website hard to understand.

“We are going to focus on high poverty and rural schools,” she said. “We are also focusing on reading instruction. We are learning to make the site more accessible to those with reading issues, visual impairment, and those with English not as their first language.”

Campus

Butler Alumna Receives $3.9 Million to Expand Literacy Program

CommonLit, run by Michelle (Skinner) Brown '09, aims to close the "literacy gap."

Nov 28 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler's Winner of the Realizing the Dream Scholarship Is ...

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 15 2016

Jacklyn Gries, a second-year Pharmacy major from Evansville, Indiana, has been selected as Butler University’s 2016 winner of the Independent Colleges of Indiana’s Realizing the Dream scholarship.
Jacklyn Gries and Carl Voegel.

This scholarship goes to students who are first in their families to go to college, have been selected by their colleges for outstanding achievement in their first year, and are successfully advancing towards completing their bachelor’s degrees.

Gries and 30 other students from Indiana’s independent colleges and universities, and their most influential elementary or secondary teachers, were honored on November 5 at the 27th annual “Realizing the Dream” banquet. The event, made possible by a grant from Lilly Endowment Inc. to the Independent Colleges of Indiana, recognizes first-generation students attending ICI campuses, along with their inspirational teachers and families.

Gries will receive a $2,500 check to help with college costs. Additionally, each student’s selected most influential teacher/mentor will receive a $1,000 professional development grant. Gries chose her high school science teacher Carl Voegel from Mater Dei High School.

 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler's Winner of the Realizing the Dream Scholarship Is ...

Jacklyn Gries has been selected as Butler University’s 2016 winner of the Independent Colleges of Indiana’s Realizing the Dream scholarship.​

Nov 15 2016 Read more
Campus

Jacob Reeves ’18 Named Inaugural Hendricks Fellow

BY Kailey Eaton ’17

PUBLISHED ON Nov 10 2016

The inaugural 2016-17 Hendricks Fellowship has been awarded to junior Jacob Reeves for his project studying how wildlife use Butler University’s campus as their home.
Jacob Reeves

The Fellowship was established in 2016 through a donation from Dr. Frederick Hendricks, a urologist with a lifelong passion for conservation and the study of Indiana ecosystems. The Hendricks Fellowship is given to undergraduate students to support their scientific research, preferably in the area of conservation or Indiana ecosystems.

Reeves, a Biology major with minors in Chemistry and Mathematics, used his passion and interest in the outdoors as the fuel behind his winning research project, the Butler Wildlife Watch. Reeves’s research will allow him to identify the regions and habitats on campus that are most valuable to wildlife through the use of motion triggered wildlife cameras.

The goal of the study is to increase knowledge of what areas on campus need to be conserved the most while also keeping in mind campus’s future development plans.

“This [project] becomes increasingly important with our current push for expansion, so that we can design facilities with the conservation of wildlife in mind,” he said.

Reeves said he got his inspiration for the project from Indy Wildlife Watch, where he is an intern. Indy Wildlife Watch’s program was created to measure wildlife conservation through the greater Indianapolis area. Reeves has been working on his project for just under a year with professors Carmen Salsbury and Travis Ryan, and Julia Angstmann, the Director of Butler’s Center for Urban Ecology, who serves as his faculty mentor.

Reeves said the Fellowship will provide him with the funds for all the equipment necessary to complete his research as well as to attend research conferences. He plans to present his results at the Butler Undergraduate Research Conference as well as the Indiana Academy of Sciences Conference in 2018.

Reeves is more than grateful for the opportunity he was given through the generosity of Dr. Hendricks. The fund is administered by the Center for High Achievement and Scholalry Engagement (CHASE). According to the CHASE website, applications for the next Hendricks Fellow will open in September 2017.

“Too few are the people willing to give toward the furthering of our knowledge of the world we live in—especially directly to conservation efforts,” Reeves said. “It truly restores my faith in our world to know that there are generous people who believe in this cause as wholeheartedly as I do, and who are willing to fund projects like mine.”

Campus

Jacob Reeves ’18 Named Inaugural Hendricks Fellow

The Center for High Achievement and Scholarly Engagement (CHASE) announced the winner of the 2016-17 Hendricks Fellowship, which is awarded to a student who completes a scientific research project in the area of conservation or Indiana ecosystems.

Nov 10 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler Business Students Are Bullish on New York City

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 08 2016

Will Willoughby ’19 went to New York City in October with the Lacy School of Business, confident about pursuing a career in finance and banking. He came home convinced that he’s on the right career track.

“The trip had quite a significant impact on me,” the sophomore from Kalamazoo, Michigan, said. “After seeing all of the different financial positions, and their significance to every company we went to, I knew when I left New York that finance and banking was what I wanted to do.”
Front row: Marissa Terando, Romie Reno, Emily Guglielmo, Taylor Viti. Back row: Griffin Karpeck, Ryan Cultice, Will Willoughby, Parker Chalmers.

And then there’s Marissa Terando ’18, an accounting and finance double-major. She “learned so much at JPMorgan Chase about the investment banking industry and all the different sectors that make up the company” that she came away interested in working on the Foreign Exchange and Commodities desk. “Something I had never even heard of before this trip,” the junior from Carmel, Indiana, said.

Willoughby and Terando were among eight students who took the Wall Street Trek trip to get a good look at Wall Street—JPMorgan Chase, the Stock Exchange, Blue Mountain Capital—and Johnson & Johnson headquarters in New Brunswick, New Jersey.

At JPMorgan Chase, they met with Mike Bennett ’09, Vice President, Investment Specialist, and Eric Wiedelman, Managing Director, Global Securitized Products. Amy Wierenga ’01, Head of Risk Management, was their host at Blue Mountain Capital, and Francisco Miyares ’10, Senior Financial Analyst, met with the group at Johnson & Johnson.

The idea of the Wall Street Trek, said Kim Goad, Director of Career Development in Butler’s Lacy School of Business, is to provide students with a deeper awareness of different roles in finance and a bit of a taste of what it might be like to work in New York City.

“This is one of the best parts of my job—to be able to match students up and show them what a day in the life really looks like and to expose them to different opportunities,” said Goad, who chaperoned the trip along with Assistant Professor of Finance Bryan Foltice.

Goad said the students chosen to participate in the two-day trip were required to submit a resume and cover letter. They had to have attained a certain grade-point average and make a compelling argument why this trip aligned with their career goals.

Lacy School of Business donors have now paid for the trip for two consecutive years and have committed to continue funding an experiential fund. Goad said the Butler students made their benefactors proud.

“A comment I often get about Butler students is that they are very polished but not robotic,” Goad said. “They kept the conversation alive in every meeting that we had, yet they were still students and fun and relatable.”

And in January, the Lacy School of Business will be going back to New York—this time with students interested in the retail world. From January 12-15, 10 students and two faculty members will attend Retail’s The Big Show, which features thousands of retailers—big box stores, fashion, technology, online, and others. They’ll have an opportunity to network with people, to have their resumes reviewed, and hear some great keynote speakers.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Business Students Are Bullish on New York City

Will Willoughby ’19 went to New York City in October with the Lacy School of Business, confident about pursuing a career in finance and banking. He came home convinced that he’s on the right career track.

Nov 08 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler Team Wins Library Research Competition

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 07 2016

A team of five Butler University students won the Purdue University Parrish Library Case Competition held on Saturday, November 5, an annual contest that challenges students to use their business research skills to solve a problem for a company.
The team, from left: Karly Krebs, senior, Marketing and Management Information Systems major; Taylor Gillenwater, senior, Marketing and Finance major; Allison Wolff, sophomore, Entrepreneurship & Innovation and Marketing major; Samantha Chalmers, junior, International Business major; Nicole Henrich, sophomore, International Business, French, and German major

Sammie Chalmers, Taylor Gillenwater, Nicole Henrich, Karly Krebs, and Allison Wolff beat more than 20 teams from Indiana University and Purdue University in a competition that took place at the Burton Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship on the main campus of Purdue University in West Lafayette.

Business Librarian Teresa Williams organized Butler's entry into the competition. Williams and Library Associate Andrew Welp, who also is an adjunct librarian supporting Butler’s Lacy School of Business, helped the team to prepare.

As Information Commons students—student employees of the Information Commons, a collaborative program of the Butler Libraries and Center for Academic Technology—the Butler team members receive training in how to find, evaluate, use, and present information. Information Commons and eLearning Librarian Amanda Starkel and Academic Technology Specialist Megan Grady-Rutledge co-manage the Information Commons program and have developed a training program that provides a foundation for 21st century research skills.

Participants in this year’s competition were asked to focus on a real startup, Alexandria Brewing Company of Alexandria, Kentucky. The students were asked to conduct research and provide a market analysis for the company. They were assigned to analyze the craft beer market nationally as well as locally in Ohio/Kentucky/Indiana to provide insights on the target customers, trend analysis, and action plan.

The teams put together PowerPoint presentations and executive summaries. The judges complimented the Butler team for its information and presentation of data, its implementation plan and the way it connected its research to the company’s backstory.

“We are proud of the students and how they applied their Information Commons training and business information literacy skills to succeed in the competition,” Williams said. “When considering the multitude of research resources that are available to IU and Purdue business students, this was a significant achievement, especially given it was Butler’s first year in the competition.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Team Wins Library Research Competition

“We are proud of the students and how they applied their Information Commons training and business information literacy skills to succeed in the competition.”

Nov 07 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler's Center for Citizenship and Community Turns 20

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 07 2016

Butler’s Center for Citizenship and Community (CCC) celebrates its 20th anniversary on November 30 at 4:00 PM in Jordan Hall 109, and among the achievements the CCC will be reflecting on is the widespread impact it’s had on the city of Indianapolis, the University, and, especially, Butler students.

The CCC is responsible for creating the Indianapolis Community Requirement (ICR), which requires students to take one course in any part of the University that involves active engagement with the Indianapolis community. In 2015-2016, Butler students gave more than 25,000 hours of time, which translates to about $600,000 in value.

Students Digging“I'm not sure money captures the reciprocal learning value of the ICR, though,” said Donald Braid, who has been the CCC Director since 2007. “The work students do in ICR classes has helped address needs in Indianapolis communities, and it helps the students understand their own role in the community.”

In addition, Braid said, thanks to the ICR, “community engagement is woven into the fabric of the institution. All students participate, so that embeds in our core curriculum the civic goals that are part of a liberal education and Butler’s founding principles.”

Beyond the ICR, the CCC also has helped facilitate projects that involve campus-community partnerships. This year, for example, the center is helping lead a major research project, “Music First,” which will use music to attempt to ease the suffering of Alzheimer’s patients. It also has supported Education Professor Katie Brooks, who secured a $2 million grant to alleviate the shortage of English as a New Language teachers. And the center has sponsored educational programs like leading a campus-wide discussion on civil discourse.

But Braid said the most significant impact the CCC has had may be on individual students who have gone into the community thinking they were simply doing volunteer work and instead found that they were learning about themselves and getting back even more than they were giving.

When Kate Richards ’18 came to Butler from Effingham, Illinois, she knew a little about the ICR and Butler’s focus on service learning. But the idea of communicating with the Indianapolis community was something that appealed to her.

During her first American Sign Language class, she did her service learning at Miller’s Merry Manor, a nursing home and rehabilitation center, where she and another student played cards and talked with three or four deaf residents using sign language. In her third ASL class, she was assigned to the Indiana School for the Deaf, where she tutored middle-school students in math.

Richards, a Communication Sciences and Disorders major, has now completed four ICR courses and works for the CCC as a liaison between the Deaf School and students at Butler. In that role, she places students where they’ll have the best experience.

“Students know about the ICR,” she said. “But they don’t realize how much of an experience it is. I think that’s what the CCC is trying to get at—it’s much more than everyone thinks it’s going to be.”

*

The CCC began through a grant from Eli Lilly & Co. in 1996 with Political Science Professor Margaret Brabant as its first director. The center’s creation was an outgrowth of Butler’s role as a founding member of Indiana Campus Compact, an organization of Indiana universities that got together to recognize the value of civic engagement and the responsibility of universities to make connections with their communities.

Early on, Brabant pursued Community Outreach Partnerships Centers grants from the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development. The grants help colleges and universities apply their human, intellectual, and institutional resources to the challenge of revitalizing distressed communities.

Those grants, along with funding from the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust and other local foundations, launched the CCC, which initially focused on service learning, community revitalization, fair-housing, and crime and safety issues.Hearing Test

“A lot of that work was valuable, and some portions didn’t fit Butler’s mission,” Braid said. “Over the years, we’ve learned which pieces really fit the university’s educational mission, which partnerships really are valuable reciprocally in supporting the education of our students and in supporting community issues, and we’ve focused on those things.”

The Indianapolis Community Requirement is one of those pieces that stayed. The CCC set up partnerships with community organizations, many of which continue to this day. The relationship with the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ISBVI) is one.

Luke Schaible ’17, an Accounting major from Findlay, Ohio, began his service learning experience at ISBVI when he was a first-year student in Braid’s Making a Difference in the World course.

“I was pretty new to the whole concept of service and I had no idea what to expect,” he said. “I thought it was something you did for a requirement in college because you had to, and I didn’t know what I was going to gain. But talking to the students there really changed my view.”

When he first got there, he sat in a corner—“just being my shy self”—when a student came up and asked him to play basketball.

“It’s nice to go into their world for a few hours and see how ISBVI students are with their peers,” said Schaible, who now works for the CCC, guiding students to ISBVI to make sure they have the kind of experience he had. “You see that ISBVI students are just like you and me. That’s what’s so intriguing.”

Braid said the experiences Richards and Schaible have had are exactly what makes the CCC important to Butler.

“We’re interested in empathy, community, and service, which are what we think are an essential part of an education, and with students coming through a liberal arts university, we hope to generate an understanding and a practice of those kinds of values and virtues,” he said.

“The kind of educational process we promote is experiential on one hand, which is more than just doing in the community; it’s learning to value the community, it’s learning to understand others, to understand and appreciate diversity. In a way, this could be seen as an experiential education for the liberal arts. Anything that falls within that domain are things the center is interested in supporting.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler's Center for Citizenship and Community Turns 20

Among the achievements the CCC will be reflecting on is the widespread impact it’s had on the city of Indianapolis, the University, and, especially, Butler students.

Nov 07 2016 Read more

Pages