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Professor Davidson's Book Teaches Visual Basic for Applications

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PUBLISHED ON Jan 03 2017

Those who want to learn VBA—Visual Basic for Applications—are in luck: Jason Davidson ’01, an instructor in the Lacy School of Business, has written a new book on the popular programming language that is used to create and customize Microsoft Office programs.
Jason DavidsonVBA for Microsoft Office 2016, published by Pearson, is a 216-page, step-by-step guide that’s geared toward students, though professionals can use it too—and do.

“Think of it as an introduction to VBA for someone who’s never done anything with it,” Davidson said. “The book starts with what is it, what does it do, how does it work. By the end, it walks you through how to use it with database programs, so you can use it with Access. You can use it to automate databases, you can use it to automate spreadsheets in Excel, things like that.”

Davidson said VBA is a versatile program that’s frequently used for things like automating calculations for mortgages or car payments. It also can be used in business analytics jobs where the user is working in Excel, Word, or PowerPoint.

“VBA can be used with quite a bit,” he said.

Davidson teaches Advanced Web Design, Data Networks, Data Analysis and Business Modeling, and introductory Management Information Systems courses, and he’ll use the new book in his Data Analytics and Business Modeling course.

The 2016 edition is the second version of this book, Davidson said. He co-authored the first edition, and also co-wrote a new book on using Microsoft Excel that was published in late 2016. This is the first book he wrote on his own.

“I’m excited that this is the first one I’ve done by myself,” he said. “I have worked a lot as a coauthor, but this is my first solo publication.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Professor Davidson's Book Teaches Visual Basic for Applications

Think of it as an introduction to VBA for someone who’s never done anything with it.

Jan 03 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler Is One of His Favorite Things

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 02 2017

The last time Ben Davis sang onstage in Indianapolis, it was as a member of the Butler Chorale. The next time will be January 10-15 at the Murat Theatre, where he will portray Captain Georg von Trapp in the national touring company of The Sound of Music.

Ben DavisDavis grew up in Indianapolis, attended Butler in the mid-1990s as a voice major, and credits Jordan College of the Arts faculty such as Steven Stolen with preparing him for a career that has included Broadway roles in Les Miserables and A Little Night Music, and a 2003 Tony Honor for Excellence for his work in Baz Luhrmann’s production of the opera La Boheme.

“I was not a serious student,” he said. “I wasn’t one of those people who usually gravitates toward Butler. Butler is an incredibly well-respected university. But I had an incredible support team from Butler that helped me as much as they could and gave me a foundation upon which I could build this career. I can honestly say that if it weren’t for my two years at Butler, I wouldn’t be here.”

After leaving Butler, Davis went to work at a financial brokerage firm in Indianapolis. His mother bought him a Chicago trade paper where he saw an audition for The Phantom of the Opera. He tried out but didn’t hear anything. Six months later, he was invited to audition for Les Mis in New York. Again, the phone went silent for a time.

When the call finally came, the producers said they wanted him for the ensemble role Feuilly. But they hadn’t heard how high he could sing, and they needed him to be able to hit a high A. They asked him to get on the phone with the music director.

“I was so naïve and so green that I said, ‘Yeah, why not?’” he remembered. “The good part is that this was before Facetime, so I could make any face and contortion to get the note out.”

He hit the note and got the part.

He was 21 when he was cast, 22 when he started a 3½-year run in the national touring company. On September 10, 2001, he joined the Broadway production as Enjolras.

That led to La Boheme, an opera on Broadway in Italian, for which he and the other principals (who were double and triple cast) won the Tony. When that closed, he got cast immediately in Thoroughly Modern Millie opposite Sutton Foster, with whom he had done Les Mis.

After that, he moved to Los Angeles for three years of theatre and TV work before heading to London to be in a film version of the opera The Magic Flute directed by Kenneth Branagh and recorded at Abbey Road Studios. Then it was back to New York for the first revival of Les Mis (he played Javert), two years on the road in Spamalot (directed by Mike Nichols), time in A Little Night Music (which starred Elaine Strich and Bernadette Peters) and concert performances of Kurt Weill’s Knickerbocker Holiday opposite Kelli O’Hara and Victor Garber.

Davis also performed in The Sound of Music in Nashville and at the Paper Mill Playhouse in New Jersey. In this production, he gives von Trapp a new spin.

“It’s more about just making him human,” he said. “I think over time the role has become so stoic and so one-note, and that’s not who we are as human beings. It’s understanding that there’s a reason for his sullenness and the gray cloud hanging over him, and there’s a reason he needs that discipline in his children and he’s gone back to his military days of discipline. So it’s about exploring those reasons and finding when that changes during the show, why it changes and how he reacts to that.”

And he’s excited to get to do this in front of family and friends.

“In 20 years of doing this, I’ve never played Indianapolis,” Davis said. “This is my first time. I’m so excited, I can’t begin to tell you.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Is One of His Favorite Things

"I can honestly say that if it weren’t for my two years at Butler, I wouldn’t be here.”

Jan 02 2017 Read more
Campus

Court of Appeals to Hear a Case at Butler

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 23 2016

A three-judge panel from the Indiana Court of Appeals will hear a case on the Butler campus January 24 at 11:00 AM in the Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall. The hearing is open to the public, and a reception with the judges will follow from noon to 1:00 PM downstairs in the Ford Salon.

Court of Appeals SealJudges James S. Kirsch, Paul D. Mathias, and Margret G. Robb will hear 40 minutes of arguments in a Greencastle case in which a motorist stopped for a broken taillight was eventually found, during an inventory of his truck, to have 25 grams of methamphetamine inside a hamburger box. The driver sought to suppress the evidence, arguing that the police violated his Fourth Amendment rights against unreasonable search and seizure. The trial court denied his motion. (More details about the case are below.)

“This will be a wonderful opportunity, especially for our pre-law students, to get to talk to professional judges in very high positions and get to learn about their careers and the paths they took to where they are now,” said Rusty Jones, Director of Butler’s Center for High Achievement and Scholarly Engagement.

These traveling oral arguments, sometimes called “Appeals on Wheels,” typically occur at high schools, colleges, law schools, and courtrooms, but they’ve also been held at conference centers, tourist sites, and even retirement communities, according to the Court of Appeals website.

The Court has conducted more than 430 Appeals on Wheels in 72 counties between its 2001 centennial and July 2015, although the program predates the centennial. The goal is to help Hoosiers learn more about the judiciary’s role in Indiana government and to provide opportunities for Court of Appeals judges to meet and talk with a range of citizens in relatively informal settings.

The case:

This case arises out of a traffic stop on the evening of February 20, 2015, in Greencastle, Indiana. Otis Sams was driving home from work in a truck without working taillights in a snowstorm. Sams had stopped at a fast-food restaurant and was eating his supper from the fast-food bag as he drove home. Two officers of the Greencastle Police Department on patrol that night noticed that Sams’s truck’s taillights were out and pulled him over. During the stop, the officers discovered that Sams was driving on a suspended license for the second time in 10 years, a misdemeanor. But rather than arrest him, the officers wrote Sams a summons for the misdemeanor.

The officers then had to decide what to do with Sams’s truck as it stood on the shoulder of a public road in a snowstorm without a licensed driver to drive it away. The officers decided the truck would need to be towed and impounded until it could be retrieved by a licensed driver. The officers informed Sams of their decision and released him from the scene. Sams walked to a nearby gas station to wait for a ride home.

Before the tow truck arrived, the officers searched Sams’s truck to inventory its contents. One of the officers noticed that Sams had moved the fast-food bag to the floorboard in the back of the cab from its earlier position on the front passenger seat next to him. The officers decided to open the bag. Inside the bag was a hamburger box, and inside the hamburger box were more than twenty-five grams of methamphetamine. Sams was arrested and charged with Level 4 felony possession of methamphetamine, an offense punishable by up to 12 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

Before his jury trial in Putnam Circuit Court, Sams moved to suppress the fruits of the inventory search of his truck. The trial court denied Sams’s motion. Sams sought certification for interlocutory appeal, which the trial court also denied. The evidence from the truck was admitted over Sams’s objection at trial.

Sams appeals the trial court’s decision to admit the evidence from the truck, arguing that the officers’ inventory search was not sufficiently regulated by standard procedures and thereby ran afoul of the Fourth Amendment to the federal constitution. Sams raises no separate argument under our state constitution. The State responds that the inventory search was properly conducted under the established procedures of the Greencastle Police Department and that the trial court did not abuse its discretion in deciding to admit the fruits of that search.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Court of Appeals to Hear a Case at Butler

The driver sought to suppress the evidence, arguing that the police violated his Fourth Amendment rights against unreasonable search and seizure. The trial court denied his motion.

Dec 23 2016 Read more
Campus

Superintendents to Learn the Business Side of Schools

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PUBLISHED ON Dec 23 2016

Thirteen Indiana public school superintendents from all over the state will participate in the first EPIC, a joint venture of Butler University and the Indiana Association of Public School Superintendents (IAPSS) designed to help great educators transform the business and constituent-services aspects of their work.

Butler UniversityEPIC (Educators Preparing Inspired Change), developed by Butler’s Executive Education program and College of Education in conjunction with the IAPSS, will feature a daylong session every other month throughout 2017, beginning January 12. Topics include strategy development, budgeting/finance, change management, community/stakeholder outreach, building a high-performance team, and board relations.

Wayne Township Superintendent Jeff Butts, one of the organizers, said the program came about because superintendents find themselves dealing with budget cuts, increased class sizes, and socioeconomic conditions that require them to operate in an environment of rapid change and uncertainty.

“Conversations across this country and throughout Indiana are focused on making sure school districts are providing a world-class education and preparing students to be college and career ready, all the while being great stewards of the taxpayer dollar,” Butts said. “Expectations of school superintendents are changing rapidly, and these leaders must be prepared to lead high functioning and complex organizations with great efficiency and success. EPIC will support superintendents’ transformative growth in leadership to thrive in this new reality.”

Participants registered for the first EPIC program are:

Robert Evans, Shelby Eastern Schools
Deborah Howell, Franklin County Community School Corp.
Jim White, Bremen Public Schools
Thomas Hunter, Greensburg Community Schools
Scott Deetz, Madison-Grant United School Corp.
Ginger Bolinger, Madison Consolidated Schools
Gregory Walker, Brownstown Central Community Schools
Steve Baule, Muncie Community Schools
Jana Vance, Rochester Community School Corp.
Matthew Prusiecki, Metropolitan School District of Decatur Township
Lisa Lantrip, Southern Hancock Schools
Scott Olinger, Plainfield Community School Corp.
Sam Watkins, Peru Community Schools

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Superintendents to Learn the Business Side of Schools

The program came about because superintendents find themselves dealing with budget cuts, increased class sizes, and socioeconomic conditions that require them to operate in an environment of rapid change and uncertainty.

Dec 23 2016 Read more
Campus

Professor Esteves Named Guyer Chair in Education

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 21 2016

Associate Professor Kelli Esteves, who has taught in the College of Education since 2010, has been named the Richard W. Guyer Chair in Education.

Kellie Esteves“It is a true honor to be awarded the Richard W. Guyer Chair, especially when considering how much admiration I have for previous recipients such as Arthur Hochman, Catherine Pangan, Shelly Furuness, Debbie Corpus, and Tom Keller,” she said. “Dean Ena Shelley and so many of my College of Education colleagues have been instrumental in helping me reach my professional goals. I am grateful to work with people across the University who are incredibly kind, intelligent, passionate, and hard working.”

Before joining the Butler faculty, Esteves taught as an Assistant Professor of Education at Aquinas College. She also has taught in the Rockford (Michigan) public schools as a special education teacher.

Esteves earned her bachelor’s degree from Hope College and her Master of Arts and Doctor of Education from Western Michigan University. Her areas of expertise are inclusive practices, response to intervention, children’s literature, and developmental theory.

The chair is named for Richard W. Guyer, a native of Indiana, who received his B.S. in education from Butler in 1948, an M.S. in 1950, and an Ed.S. in 1967 from the University. He received his Ed.D. from Ball State University in 1969. A World War II veteran, Guyer began his career in education as a teacher and head football coach at Crawfordsville, Indianapolis Howe, and Franklin Central high schools. He later served as athletic director, vice principal and principal at Franklin Central.

Guyer served as an adjunct faculty member at Butler for several years before becoming a full-time faculty member in 1968. He taught undergraduate and graduate courses in administration and also served as the director of student teaching and field experiences, director of educational placement and director of undergraduate studies for the College of Education. He retired from Butler in 1986 and enjoyed professor emeritus status until his death in 2000.

The Richard W. Guyer Professorship in Education was established in 1997 by D. Michael Hockett, a 1964 graduate of Butler University and an Indianapolis businessman who was deeply influenced by Guyer’s teaching and guidance.

Faculty members hold the Guyer Chair for three years.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Professor Esteves Named Guyer Chair in Education

The Richard W. Guyer Professorship in Education was established in 1997 by D. Michael Hockett, a 1964 graduate of Butler University and an Indianapolis businessman who was deeply influenced by Guyer’s teaching and guidance.

Dec 21 2016 Read more
Campus

John Conley Named Chief of Public Safety

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PUBLISHED ON Dec 20 2016

Veteran police officer John Conley has been named to succeed Ben Hunter as Butler University’s Chief of Public Safety.

John ConleyConley joined the Butler University Police Department two years ago, after working with the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department (IMPD) for 40 years in various positions in Operations, Investigations, and Administration. He served as Homeland Security Supervisor for IMPD, coordinating stadium security for Super Bowl XLVI, and also was District Commander and Deputy Chief of Operations.

Conley is a graduate of the FBI National Academy. He is a former Indianapolis Police Department Police Officer of the Year, a recipient of the American Legion Spartan Award for Valor, and a recipient of the Webber Seavey Award from the International Association of Chiefs of Police, presented by Attorney General Janet Reno, for Community Policing Excellence.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

John Conley Named Chief of Public Safety

Veteran police officer John Conley has been named to succeed Ben Hunter as Butler University’s Chief of Public Safety.

Dec 20 2016 Read more
Campus

Shepard to Winter Grads: You Have Reason to Be Optimistic

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 19 2016

Butler graduates should clutch their diploma with a sense of optimism because they are in America and they are educated, retired Indiana Supreme Court Justice Randall Shepard told the 138 graduates at the 2016 Winter Commencement on December 17 in Clowes Memorial Hall.

Supreme Court Justice Randall Shepard“The value of an education earned in 2016 at universities like Butler is more tangible than ever,” Shepard said. “Your decision and your family’s decision to persevere in education is the best possible launching pad for a successful career and a successful life.”

Shepard, the longest-serving chief justice in Indiana history, said that although the students are graduating at a moment of great national change, “In what other nation would you be positioned for a brighter future?”

“This nation has created more opportunity, more freedom, more economic security for more people from more walks of life than any society in the whole history of humankind,” he said, noting that investors and governments from Canada to Canton continue to support America.

President James M. Danko presented Shepard with an honorary doctorate. Trustee James P. White and his wife, Anna, also received honorary degrees.

The winter 2016 graduates are:

Ryan Akel, Business Administration
Emily Alaimo, Education Administration
Devon Bellamy, Risk Management and Insurance
Chelsea Boyce, Accounting
Kellie Brotherton, Education Administration
Emily Brumley, Psychology
Nathaniel Bubeck, Recording Industry Studies
Kelsey Burnett, International Business
Olivia Cabanban, Biology B.S.
Sarah Carney, English
Dennis Cho, Sociology
James Clark, Business Administration
Caitlyn Cole, Marketing
Allison Cotter, Chemistry B.S.
Daniel Cotter, Chemistry B.S.
Annette Coulombe, Business Administration
Olivia Cox, English
Andrew Cravens, Business Administration
Andrew Crecelius, Business Administration
Jared Curcio, Management Information Systems
Ryan Davis, Education Administration
Nicholas Decker, Business Administration
Michael Demos, Criminology
Anne-Marie DiBisceglie, Elementary Education
Carrie Dilley, Education Administration
Christopher Djonlich, Business Administration
Pamela Dobbin, Business Administration
Ian Dobek, Biology B.S.
Joshua Doty, Business Administration
Amanda Dusing, Elementary Education
Alan Eidelman, Accounting
Benjamin Ekhaus, Business Administration
Austin Engle, Chemistry B.S.
Eli Finkel, Physics B.S.
Craig Fisher, Professional Pharmacy
Victoria Fountain, Spanish
Holly Frantz, Marketing
Joshua Gallion, Business Administration
Matthew Gothard, Business Administration
Aaron Grady, Business Administration
Daniel Gryfinski, Finance
Kelsey Haas, Biology B.S.
Joseph Hackett, Biology B.S.
Jeremy Hawk, Business Administration
Samantha Haycox, Political Science
Luke Hodgin, Business Administration
Taylor Huntman, Risk Management and Insurance
Elizabeth Ingermann, Political Science
Allison Jaramillo, Business Administration
Patrick Jarrett, Business Administration
Flora Jones, Education Administration
Serina Kashimoto, Individualized Major
Stephen Kelley, Accounting
Christopher Kelsey, Actuarial Science
Ryan Kem, Management Information Systems
Nathaniel Kenny, Political Science
Elizabeth Knox, Music Conducting
Zachary LaRoche, Chemistry B.S.
Kyle Lang, Political Science
Kathryn Larimore, Psychology
Amber Lerman, Dance - Performance
Kelsey Livingston, Elementary Education
Kaley Lyons, Psychology
Johanna Mader, Creative Writing
Anthony Malito, Business Administration
Brooke Marshall, Management Information Systems
Jacey McCormick, Business Administration
Christopher McDonald, Computer Science B.S.
Claire McGuinness, Creative Writing
Rachel McKinzie, Finance
Philip McNealy, Creative Writing
Kailey Meadows, Professional Pharmacy
Cynthia Mellander, Mental Health Counselor
Megan Menapace, Chemistry B.S.
Amy Miller, Business Administration
Ethan Miller, Software Engineering
Patrick Miller, Business Administration
Vincent Mitchell, Sports Media
Kristin Mize, Creative Writing
Amber Moore, Education Administration
Brian Moore, Accounting
Benjamin Morrical, Political Science
Andrew Myers, Biology B.S.
Deanna Nibarger, Education Administration
Michael Nugent, Economics
Alessandra ORourke, Education Administration
Stephanie Oakland, Music Composition
Ryan Oliver, Education Administration
Mitchell Ostrowski, Finance
Alexis Pearcy, Finance
Kendall Perkins, Elementary Education
Emmaline Perrin, Education Administration
Trang Phung, Accounting
Makayla Pickett, Entrepreneurship & Innovation
Nestor Porres, Digital Media Production
Jordan Ransone, Strategic Communication
Gregory Rearden, Interactive Media
Sanika Rege, Pharmaceutical Science
William Roche, Business Administration
Tyler Roell, Education Administration
Matthew Roth, Marketing
Eric Rupenthal, Biology B.S.
Kyra Sanford, Accounting
Sonna Schafer, Education Administration
Taylor Schroeder, Communication Science & Disorders
Chancey Seger, Computer Science B.S.
Jennifer Seidel, Business Administration
Amy Selby, Education Administration
Kacey Shriner, Spanish
Andrew Shrum, Business Administration
Jeri Smith, Chemistry B.S.
Michael Smith, Education Administration
Robyn Stratford, Science, Technology, & Society
Elizabeth Subrin, Chemistry B.S.
John Syljebeck, Education Administration
Cameron Taylor, Finance
Hannah Todd, Education Administration
Matthew Troja, History
Benjamin Trube, Computer Science B.S.
Emily Trygstad, Marketing
Samantha Turley, Music
Alexandra Van Hoof, Biology B.S.
Madeline Verbica, Biology B.S.
Joshua Villafuerte, Middle/Secondary Education
Harlan Vondersaar, Business Administration
Kerstin Wade, Business Administration
Fallon Watton, Criminology
Malcolm Weaver, Strategic Communication
Kristen Webb, Psychology
Lindsay Wey, Education Administration
Terri Whitcomb, Education Administration
Victor Wierzba, Accounting
Tanner Witsken, Finance
Joseph Workinger, English Writing
Julian Wyllie, Entrepreneurship & Innovation
Kayla Yoder, Management Information Systems
Matthew Zider, Business Administration
Lucas Zimmerman, Finance

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Shepard to Winter Grads: You Have Reason to Be Optimistic

"The value of an education earned in 2016 at universities like Butler is more tangible than ever."

Dec 19 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler Senior Wins Cell Biology Competition

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 15 2016

Victoria Kreyden ’17, a biology/Spanish double-major from Carmel, Indiana, has won first prize in the undergraduate poster session at the 2016 American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) meeting in San Francisco, California, for her poster presentation “Investigation of the neuronal functions of the SUMO conjugating enzyme UBC-9 at the C. elegans neuromuscular junction.”
Victoria Kreyden and her prize-winning poster.

Kreyden’s presentation on December 3 was judged best of more than 100 by undergraduates from around the country and abroad.

Kreyden is studying the C. elegans—microscopic roundworms—to learn more about the human nervous system. Associate Professor of Biology Jennifer Kowalski said Kreyden is investigating a particular set of enzymes, called SUMO enzymes, that control the activity of numerous proteins in neurons and other types of cells.

“Victoria is trying to determine the role of these enzymes in regulating neuronal signaling, which is critical for nervous system function,” Kowalski said. “Because of the similarities between the human and C. elegans nervous systems and the high number of genes they share, including the genes encoding SUMO enzymes, it is likely that what she learns in the worms will be relevant to understanding human nervous system function.”

Kowalski and Assistant Professor of Biology Lindsay Lewellyn accompanied Kreyden and three other Butler students who also presented their research at the 2016 ASCB meeting:

-Ashley Kline - “Characterizing a Role for the Misshapen Kinase in the Growth of the Germline Ring Canals in the Developing Egg Chamber.”

-Olivia Crowe - “Determination of the role of Dreadlocks (Dock) in the growth of the germline ring canals in the developing Drosophila melanogaster egg chamber.”

-Lauryn Campagnoli - “Investigation of SYD-2 as a potential substrate of the Anaphase Promoting Complex in promoting GABA release at the C. elegans neuromuscular junction.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Senior Wins Cell Biology Competition

Victoria Kreyden ’17 has won first prize in the undergraduate poster session at the 2016 American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) meeting in San Francisco, California.

Dec 15 2016 Read more
Campus

Sigma Gamma Rho Endows a Scholarship for a COE Student

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 07 2016

Sigma Gamma Rho, the sorority founded at Butler University on November 12, 1922, has given Butler a gift to establish the Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc. 7 Founders Endowed Scholarship to honor the seven education majors and public school teachers who started the organization.

Sigma Gamma Rho Alpha ChapterThe scholarship will be awarded annually beginning next fall to a student enrolled in the College of Education.

Bonita M. Herring, the Immediate Past Grand Basileus (International President of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc.), who implemented the project during her time in office, said the goal is “to uplift students in education and honor the legacy of seven visionary women on the campus of Butler University who shared a commitment to education and sisterhood.”

“We acknowledge these courageous women through this gift in preparation for the coming Centennial Celebration of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority,” she said.

Sigma Gamma Rho has more than 85,000 members in more than 500 chapters across the United States, the Bahamas, Bermuda, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Canada, Germany and Korea.

“We’re thrilled to have this scholarship to award, given the history of Sigma Gamma Rho at Butler,” said Jaci Thiede, Butler’s Vice President of Advancement.

Campus

Sigma Gamma Rho Endows a Scholarship for a COE Student

The scholarship will be awarded annually beginning next fall to a student enrolled in the College of Education.

Dec 07 2016 Read more
Campus

Great-Great-Granddaughter of Ovid Butler Dies

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 07 2016

Patricia CochranPatricia Cochran, the great-great-granddaughter of Butler University founder Ovid Butler and great-niece of two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning author Booth Tarkington, died on December 5. She was 97.

Cochran, the daughter of Margaret and Donald Jameson, was a pillar of Indianapolis society, with memberships in the Indianapolis Women’s Club, The Dramatic Club of Indianapolis, Colonial Dames, Wildflower Society, the National World War II Museum, the American National Red Cross, the Society of Indiana Pioneers, and a life member of the Order of Merit.

A memorial service will be held on Saturday, December 10, at 11:00 AM at Crown Hill Cemetery in the Gothic Chapel for visitation and services, followed by a reception at the Woodstock Country Club at 2:30 PM.

Her grandson Richard Austin Cochran Acheson, her son, John Huyler Acheson, her husband of 32 years, Richard A. Cochran, and her siblings, Margaret Jameson Wildhack and Donald Fenton Booth Jameson, preceded her in death. She is survived by her son, Donald Jameson Acheson, and his wife, Clare Fox Acheson; her daughter-in-law Becky Acheson; six grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren, nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews, and many cousins.

Patty Cochran’s connection to Ovid Butler begins with Ovid Butler marrying Cordelia Cole. Their daughter Maria Butler married Patrick Henry Jameson in 1850. Maria and Patrick’s son Ovid Butler Jameson married Mary Booth “Haute” Tarkington in 1886. Their son Donald Ovid Butler Jameson married Margaret Booth in 1915. Patty is their daughter.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Great-Great-Granddaughter of Ovid Butler Dies

Patricia Cochran was a pillar of Indianapolis society.

Dec 07 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler Theatre Gets a New Scene Shop

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 07 2016

The curtain rose December 7 on the new Butler University Theatre Department Scene Shop, which has moved from cramped quarters in the basement of the Holcomb Building to much larger, well-ventilated space in the west side of the Sunset Avenue Parking Garage.

Butler Scene ShopHalf the space will be used to build scenery for Theatre productions; the other half will be used for costume storage for the Theatre and Dance departments.

At a brief ribbon-cutting ceremony, members of both departments said they couldn’t be happier.

“It’s like moving out of a house built in the ‘50s with no closet space into a house with walk-in closets,” Larry Attaway, Chair of the Dance Department, said.

“Such a significant upgrade,” said Michelle Jarvis, interim Dean of the Jordan College of the Arts.

“The scene shop was a small, crowded space in Holcomb, and this is way, way, way, way better,” Theatre Professor Wendy Meaden said.

The 40x80 scene shop and 40x40 storage spaces for both ballet and theatre costumes (which had been located in a pole barn behind Hinkle Fieldhouse) gives students and staff closer proximity to the Lilly Hall Studio Theatre, the Schrott Center for the Arts and Clowes Memorial Hall, where performances are held. It means that Glen Thoreson, the Scene Shop Supervisor and Technical Director, and crew have space with lots of natural light, a 25-foot-high ceiling, and improved air flow to build and paint sets, and they also have a garage door for easy access and exit to move sets.

In addition, costumes that once were often damp or damaged in storage are now kept in a climate-controlled facility. Both Theatre and Dance have more than 10,000 pieces in the new space.

“There’s so much more room to move and work,” Meaden said.

At the ribbon-cutting ceremony, Department of Theatre Chair Diane Timmerman said the scene shop had been in various locations over the years, including under the old Hilton U. Brown Theatre west of Hinkle Fieldhouse.

She thanked the administration and Board of Trustees for approving funds to make the new space possible, and she acknowledged the efforts of past faculty, staff, and administrators who worked to secure better space for the scene shop.

“We’re standing on the shoulders of the people who came before us,” Timmerman said.

“We’re so grateful for everything that was done to make this happen,” Attaway added.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Theatre Gets a New Scene Shop

Half the space will be used to build scenery for Theatre productions; the other half will be used for costume storage for the Theatre and Dance departments.

Dec 07 2016 Read more
Campus

In DC, Butler's College of Education Shows How to Lead

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 30 2016

When the federal Department of Education went looking for ideas on how to prepare teachers in early November, one of the places it sought out was Butler University’s College of Education.

After the nationwide call for teacher preparation programs to submit innovative practices that have the potential for growth, Butler became the first Indiana school to be invited to present at a Teach to Lead Preparation Summit. From nearly 100 submissions, 17 teams were invited to the early-November summit. Participants spent two days in sessions aimed at identifying obstacles and solutions for spreading innovative best practices in teacher preparation.
Amanda Huffman, Kaija Bole, Shelly Furuness, and Rick Mitchell shared a COE best practice in Washington.

Associate Professor of Education Shelly Furuness, along with Pike Master Practitioner and co-teacher Rick Mitchell, led the Butler contingent, which shared how ongoing University-School Partnership with Pike Township Schools supports a cycle of professional development benefiting both pre-service and in-service teachers.

The Butler message to DC was clear: When teacher-educators and school districts are able to work together, they can prepare the kinds of teachers that schools need.

Kaija Bole ’17, a math-education double major from suburban Chicago, also represented Butler at the summit, along with Amanda Huffman BS ‘12, MS ’16. In fall 2015, Huffman, as part of her master’s thesis research, was able to develop a curriculum based on gaps she knew existed from her own preparation at Butler. She used her prep period once a week to provide an hour-long workshop to the Math Education majors focused specifically on methods for teaching complex mathematics.

Huffman’s work represents a model of teacher leadership, Furuness said.

“She was an excellent pre-service teacher who was hired by Pike Township after completing her student teaching with the district,” Furuness said. “She immediately began participating in ongoing professional development opportunities made possible by the Butler-Pike Partnership. As a novice teacher, she continued to gain both content and pedagogical knowledge from Butler faculty members.”

The Butler students loved their experience, but Huffman’s prep period changed this academic year. She was unable to devote time to teaching future teachers like Bole.

Bole is lucky—Huffman is her practicum mentor, and Bole will be student-teaching in the Math Department at Pike High School under Huffman. But none of the other math education majors will have the opportunity to experience the math methods workshop because of scheduling logistics.

“I wish we could be doing what she did last year,” Bole said.

Furuness said this is the problem Butler is trying to solve: How to make sure teacher-leaders like Huffman have the time and resources to continue to work with future teachers.

Bole said after spending three days at the summit and comparing Butler’s teacher education to other programs, she’s convinced that Butler is serving as a model—through its partnerships with school districts such as Pike and Indianapolis Public Schools and the way it prepares students to teach.

The proof, she said, is in the College of Education’s 100 percent placement rate for its graduates.

“To hear about other programs, it made me realize how special we are here,” she said. “We’re doing great things.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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