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Junior Emilie Turner Earns Spot In Fulbright Summer Institute

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PUBLISHED ON May 10 2016

Junior Political Science/International Studies major Emilie Turner likes to learn about different cultures, and this summer she’ll get a chance to do just that as a participant in the prestigious Fulbright Summer Institute in Wales.

Emilie TurnerTurner, who’s from Fishers, Indiana, will spend June 25 to August 6 at three internationally renowned Welsh universities, Cardiff University, Bangor University, and Aberystwyth University, focusing on the theme of contemporary Wales: industry, politics, culture, and change. She also will explore the geography, culture, heritage, and history of Wales by visiting museums, galleries, parks, castles, and islands.

“It’s an exciting program because not only will we be taking classes, but they’ll be incorporating historical sites and landmarks into the classes,” she said. “So we’ll be able to go explore the history and geography of Wales at the same time.”

The US-UK Fulbright Commission selects participants through a rigorous application and interview process. In making these awards the Commission looks not only for academic excellence but a focused application, a range of extracurricular and community activities, demonstrated ambassadorial skills, a desire to further the Fulbright Program and a plan to give back to the recipient’s home country upon returning.

The Commission is part of the Fulbright program conceived by Senator J William Fulbright in the aftermath of World War II to promote leadership, learning and empathy between nations through educational exchange. Award recipients and summer program participants will be the future leaders for tomorrow and support the ‘special relationship’ between the United States and United Kingdom.

Fulbright Summer Institutes cover all participant costs. In addition, Fulbright summer participants receive a distinctive support and cultural education program including visa processing, a comprehensive pre-departure orientation, enrichment opportunities in country, a re-entry session and opportunity to join its alumni networks.

Turner, who participants in service projects through the Intercollegiate YMCA and Blue Key Honor Society, plans to go to law school and possibly go into international law.

“I love to learn more about people and how to understand different cultures as it relates directly to international relationships,” Turner said. “I’m also excited to teach others about our culture, politics, economic viewpoints, and social environment.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Junior Emilie Turner Earns Spot In Fulbright Summer Institute

“It’s an exciting program because not only will we be taking classes, but they’ll be incorporating historical sites and landmarks into the classes.”

May 10 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler Graduates 996 at Commencement Ceremonies

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PUBLISHED ON May 07 2016

Your brain is an “amazing energy-processing machine” that lets you decide who you want to be in the world, Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor told Butler University’s Class of 2016 at commencement ceremonies on Saturday, May 7, in Hinkle Fieldhouse.

Taylor, a renowned brain researcher who suffered a stroke in 1996, said the brain’s hemispheres divide tasks. The left brain is where we get the ability to analyze, master details, judge critically, and think linearly. The right brain is the big picture side—the intuitive, gentle side.
Jill Bolte Taylor delivered the 2016 commencement address.

She said the graduates’ ability to be simultaneously happy about graduation and sad to be leaving Butler—two disparate thoughts—is “all about your brain.”

“Your left brain would rather be right than happy,” she said. “Your right brain would rather be happy than right. I wish for you the perfect balance.”

In the coming year, Taylor will collaborate with the University on One Butler: The Brain Project, a yearlong, campus-wide initiative that will focus on brain health and the impact neuroscience has on all areas of our lives. Taylor and other experts in subspecialized areas of neuroscience will speak throughout the year. A sculpture installation of Big Brains! will be on display in spring 2017.

Butler University graduated 996 students on Saturday, May 7, during commencement ceremonies at Hinkle Fieldhouse—262 from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 89 from the College of Education, 257 from the College of Business (now the Lacy School of Business), 173 from the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, 95 from the Jordan College of the Arts, and 120 from the College of Communication.

Taylor and former Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard received honorary degrees. In a short speech, Ballard pointed out that the graduates had help getting to this point in their lives, and he urged them to “give people the same helping hand.”

“This is a team game, always,” he said.

Associate Professor of Biology Jennifer Kowalski, who gave the faculty address, suggested that the graduates “be fearless and take lessons from each step.” She challenged them to engage in the social and political lives of their community, tackling issues such as climate change and economic injustice.

And Senior Class President Alexandria Antonetti said the Class of 2016 should “be proud of what you accomplished, knowing that you’re just getting started.”

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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Butler Graduates 996 at Commencement Ceremonies

She said the graduates’ ability to be simultaneously happy about graduation and sad to be leaving Butler—two disparate thoughts—is “all about your brain.”

May 07 2016 Read more
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Student LifeCampus

Reducing Food Waste Is Their Goal. This Is Their Story.

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 29 2016

The Food Recovery Network is one of several sustainability efforts on campus.

By Hayley Ross '17

Making sure they don’t throw out the extra food on their plate is not enough for Bailey Armstrong ’16 and Olivia Carroll ’17. As executive members of Butler’s Food Recovery Network, their goal is bigger: eliminating food waste across campus.

“I look for opportunities to decrease waste wherever I go,” Armstrong said. “There are such easy ways to do it. If I am talking to a younger friend, I am always promoting the Food Recovery Network.”

Lauren Wathen, Olivia Carroll, and Bailey Armstrong are working to reduce food waste on campus
Lauren Wathen, Olivia Carroll, and Bailey Armstrong are working to reduce food waste on campus.

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Armstrong started the club in fall 2014 when her sister’s friend, who is one of the founders of the national program, told her to apply to create a chapter on Butler’s campus. After a couple of weekly calls with the program’s headquarters, she was able to make it official.

She said she went to Butler’s alternative block party ready to find others as passionate as she is.

“That’s where I met Olivia,” Armstrong said. “I also met Emily Guglielmo, who is now on our executive team as well.”

Guglielmo had transferred from the University of Michigan, which already had a Food Recovery Network chapter. Soon after, they met Lauren Wathen, current president, who joined them in making a four-person leadership team ready to conquer food sustainability and food waste prevention.

The Food Recovery Network’s efforts are just one part of the sustainability efforts on campus. Dining Services composts about 800 pounds of pre-consumer food waste—like the tops of peppers and apple cores—each week. This began in April 2015, thanks to an SGA grant.

In January 2015 they made their first recovery—taking all unused, untouched food that can’t be resold and donating it to the Julian Center, a center for women who have been domestically abused.

“We started at Hinkle after a basketball game,” Armstrong said. “We asked Dining Services, ‘If you think we are doing a good job at the games, can we do them in the dining halls?’ And now we have them twice a week at Atherton and at all home men’s basketball games.”

They have collected about 1,000 pounds of food in the past year.

“We view the amount of food we have recovered as an accomplishment, but also as a sign that there’s a lot more work to do to diminish food waste,” Armstrong said.

Each semester the network members meet with Dining Services’ head chef and the team that orders the food served at Atherton to discuss how much is being wasted.

“We just want to make them aware,” Carroll said. “They have been incredibly responsive.”

There are now 10 members of their executive team, although there are many more working these recoveries.

“The cool thing is that we have executive members that are really passionate, but also volunteers who can come for an hour or so,” Carroll said. “It’s great to have that balance that keeps the sustainability going.”

Other student organizations also pair with them weekly to do food recoveries. They said their goal is to make Butler students more aware.

“Awareness changes a society,” Carroll said. “Although we may not do this as a profession, Food Recovery has taught me a lot about the immense amount of food wasted in this country and the hunger in this country. We tend to focus abroad, but we have a huge problem in our own country.”

For more information on the organization and how to volunteer, visit the Butler Food Recovery Network Facebook page or contact Lauren Wathen at lwathen@butler.edu.

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CampusCommunity

Professor Rao's Artwork Is All Over Indy This Summer

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 28 2016

Summer break? What summer break?

Just as school is letting out, Art + Design Associate Professor Gautam Rao finds himself participating in three upcoming high-profile events.

IMG_9090The first is the Indianapolis Museum of Art’s miniature golf course, which opens to the public May 10. The course features 18 holes designed by local and regional artists, including Rao, who designed a hole called “Poplar Mechanics.” Rao’s design is inspired by Indiana’s woodlands and celebrates the state tree, tulip poplar, and the verdant forests of Brown County. It features abstract trees that recreate Indiana’s landscape in a subtle, artistic manner.

Rao also was one of 33 Indiana artists selected to design an artwork as part of the Welcome Race Fans project for the 100th running of the Indianapolis 500. These works will be exhibited all over town. His piece has appeared at the Indianapolis ArtsGarden, the International Airport and the Harrison Center for the Arts.

“For me, being an artist is about making a career and a life,” Rao said. “Finding a balance between the two can be a challenge. My project features original lettering and a typographic sculpture. And who better to welcome race fans than my twins, born in Indianapolis, little Hoosiers who we will be one in May. This photograph represents my artistic life in its entirety– my twins, and my art. Welcome Race Fans!”

rao_welcome race fans_finalAnd Rao will be exhibiting an outdoor artwork in this year's Installation Nation at the Indianapolis Art Center. Installation Nation is a 23-day exhibition presented by Primary Colours featuring site-specific art installations to be located on the grounds of the Indianapolis Art Center’s 9.5 acre ArtsPark.

Rao joined the Butler faculty in 2004. He is originally from Washington, DC, and has also lived in Bangalore, India. He earned a BFA at Boston University in 1999 and an MFA from the University of Pennsylvania in 2002. His distinctions include a Susan Coslett Cromwell Traveling Fellowship, and awards from the Marie Walsh Sharpe Foundation and the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts.

He recently exhibited his work at the Art Director's Club in New York, the Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art, The South Bend Art Museum, The Swope Art Museum, and in Typeforce 5 in Chicago.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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GivingCampus

COB Renamed the Andre B. Lacy School of Business

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 26 2016

Butler University’s College of Business has been renamed the Andre B. Lacy School of Business, in recognition of a $25 million commitment from the Chairman of the Board of Indianapolis-based LDI, Ltd (Lacy Diversified Industries) and his wife, Julia, Butler President James M. Danko announced today. In addition, Lacy will serve as senior adviser to the School of Business.

The gift is Butler’s largest ever from an individual or family.

Andre B. Lacy

“The Butler community is deeply grateful to Andre and Julia Lacy for this transformational investment,” said Danko. “This partnership brings together recognized champions of business and education, and will further extend Butler’s national reputation as an innovative, world-class institution.”

“Butler has long been an excellent school and an anchor to the Indianapolis and Central Indiana community,” Lacy said. “But in the last five years, under President Danko’s leadership, I have seen Butler grow into a national player, especially when it comes to the University’s focus on innovation, experiential learning, and outcomes.”

In 2015, Butler was recognized by U.S. News and World Report as the Midwest’s most innovative school, and among the best in the nation for internships, study abroad, and undergraduate research. Just last week, Bloomberg BusinessWeek ranked Butler’s School of Business No. 1 in the nation for internships, and the School’s 2015 graduating class achieved a 99 percent placement rate.

“We hope this investment further establishes the Lacy School of Business—and Butler University overall—as the premier destination for students, faculty, employers, and community partners in Central Indiana and across the country,” Lacy said.

Lacy To Serve As Senior Adviser

Lacy has worked with Butler for more than a decade, serving on the Butler Business Consulting Group Advisory Panel and endowing a student scholarship within the School of Business. As part of this new partnership, Lacy will serve as a direct resource to the Lacy School of Business and Butler University community.

Stephen Standifird, Dean of the Lacy School of Business, said that Lacy will be an extraordinary asset to the School as senior adviser. “To do what we do well, we must have a strong group of people in the business community who are willing to advise us on what’s really happening—the dynamics of the marketplace, how we can increase connections with industry, and continue to be relevant,” Standifird said. “I can’t think of anybody better suited for that role than Andre Lacy. He is passionate about closely held business and developing the next generation of business leaders. We share these passions, which makes for a great partnership."

Lacy said he sees his new role at Butler as an opportunity to pass down what he’s learned and what he knows.

“The adviser role,” he said, “provides that opportunity to share, mentor, and help students see that prospering an entity is bigger than any one individual—and it gives back exponentially to the communities where they live. That’s a desire we see in this generation—to be part of something bigger than themselves, and to be on the ground floor of establishing something that has meaning and value.”

A Differentiated Experience

Two areas of particular focus for Lacy and Standifird will be helping the School build upon its signature experiential approach to teaching and learning, and expanding its focus on closely held businesses. In the School of Business, students create a business plan their first year, launch a company as sophomores, and complete at least two internships before graduation—a series of experiential requirements unmatched in the business school landscape.

Lacy sees these strengths as key to Butler’s differentiation. “Butler’s business program presents two main points of value proposition for the student that differentiate it from Kelley, Krannert, Harvard, and the like,” he said. “The first is focusing on closely held businesses—meaning small businesses and family-owned businesses—which drive the nation’s economy and make up 90 percent of Indiana’s business sector. The second is giving students the real-world experience of working directly with local businesses, seeing first-hand the challenges they face, and learning the art and science of developing and selling solutions that have real value in the business market.”

An Everlasting Alignment

Butler President Danko said Lacy’s approach, which stresses leadership, character, and integrity, strongly aligns with The Butler Way.

"Andre Lacy has demonstrated through his business success, community leadership, and principled life a strong conviction to improving society and the well-being of others,” he said. “The financial commitment from Andre and Julia is extraordinary, but of equal or even greater value will be the everlasting alignment of the Lacy name and Butler University."

Media contact:
Marc Allan
317-940-9822
mallan@butler.edu

 

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Campus

Bloomberg Rates Butler's College of Business No. 1 for Internships

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 22 2016

Butler University’s College of Business is the top-ranked business school in the country for internships, according to Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2016 rankings.

Holcombexterior10“Studies have shown that college students with internships fare better in the labor market after they graduate, compared to students without internships,” Bloomberg said in the rankings released April 19. “Many undergraduate business programs push hard to place their students in high-value internships that may turn into full-time job offers, expose students to a particular industry or job function, or simply help students forge connections to the world of work.”

Bloomberg defines an internship as a work experience that accumulates a minimum of 120 hours of work within a six-month (consecutive) period, in which a student receives supervision and/or mentorship and in which the student applies his or her knowledge and skills learned in college. An internship may be paid or unpaid and may be for credit or not for credit. A student’s work on his or her own start-up business qualifies as an internship if it meets the other stated criteria.

In Butler’s experiential approach to teaching and learning, students in the College of Business create a business plan their first year, launch a company as sophomores, and complete at least two internships before graduation—a series of experiential requirements unmatched in the business school landscape.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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Campus

Butler's Literary Magazine Wins Three ICPA Awards

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 19 2016

Manuscripts, Butler University’s undergraduate literary magazine, won three awards at the Indiana Collegiate Press Association (ICPA) conference on April 9. The three awards all came from the Spring 2015 issue of the magazine.

final_Manuscripts wood logo-Theano fontManuscripts won first place in the category of Best Short Story, for a piece named “Grown-Ups” written by IUPUI student Olivia Emerich. The magazine also won first place in the category of Best Overall Design for designers Emily Yoo and Emily Farrer of Butler University. Manuscripts finished in third place in the category of Magazine of the Year.

Manuscripts has made a resurgence on Butler’s campus in the past two years, with the Spring 2015 issue being the biggest that Manuscripts has ever published.

"It was a challenging process to design a literary magazine from scratch--we spent so many hours choosing fonts alone,” Editor-in-Chief Emily Yoo said. “(Associate Editor) Emily Farrer and I both agree that it was an unforgettable learning experience, and that we wouldn't have won an award without the support of our wonderful staff and faculty."

Manuscripts has been at Butler since 1933, and was originally called The MSS. At the time, it was published quarterly, but is now published once a year during the spring semester. In the past, Manuscripts only published the work of Butler students, but in the past two years the magazine has started accepting prose, poetry, and art submissions from all Indiana undergraduate students.

The Spring 2016 edition of Manuscripts will be released on April 26. For more information, visit blogs.butler.edu/manuscriptsbu or facebook.com/manuscriptsbu.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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Campus

Butler Becomes Indiana's First Fair Trade Campus

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 14 2016

Butler University today became the first Fair Trade Designated campus in Indiana, agreeing to use and sell products such as coffee, chocolate, and clothing that were grown, harvested, crafted, and traded in ways that improve lives and protect the environment.

Fair trade items such as Barkthins dark chocolate and Alta Gracia apparel are available in the Butler Bookstore, Starbucks, C-Club and C-Store. Each of these retail locations will sell at least two food items that are Fair Trade-designated. Additionally, Fair Trade items such as sugar and coffee are being used in both campus dining halls.

fair trade logo“This is an exciting opportunity for Butler University because Butler is the first certified Fair Trade Designated university in Indiana,” said Kylie Nealis, the national organizer for Fair Trade Colleges and Universities.

The process to become Fair Trade certified has occurred over the past year, led by the Student Government Association in partnership with University Dining Services, Butler Sustainability, the Butler Bookstore, and the Office of the President. This certification aligns with the Butler University Sustainability and Climate Action Plan.

“This is especially exciting because after this major milestone Butler will be able to continue adding more Fair Trade items to its menus," said Matt Proctor, Marketing Manager for Butler Dining Services.

Fair trade is a social movement whose goal is to help producers in developing countries achieve better trading standards and working conditions globally. This is done to promote higher environmental and social standards. The program Butler is involved in is called A University Fair Trade Campaign.

The Fair Trade certification model is designed and audited to ensure equitable trade practices at every level of the supply chain. To earn a license from Fair Trade USA to use the Fair Trade Certified™ label on their products, companies must buy from certified farms and organizations, pay Fair Trade prices and premiums and submit to a rigorous supply chain audits. This process entails a high level of transparency and traceability in their global supply chains.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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AcademicsCampus

URC Let Students Show Their Work

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 08 2016

More than 900 individuals representing 58 colleges and universities in 11 states participated in Butler University's 28th annual Undergraduate Research Conference on April 8. The students presented in 26 subject areas, from music and English to biology and chemistry.

Indiana University-Bloomington student Reyan Coskun presents her poster on "Toward Efficient Chemoenzymatic Syntheses of Sialyl-a-2,3-Lactose/Lactosamine Assisted by a Fluorous-Tag Purification."
Indiana University-Bloomington student Reyan Coskun presents her poster on "Toward Efficient Chemoenzymatic Syntheses of Sialyl-a-2,3-Lactose/Lactosamine Assisted by a Fluorous-Tag Purification.

 

Emily Wilkerson, a sophomore Elementary Education major from Columbus, Indiana, Moriah Riggs, a sophomore Marketing/Communications major from Hernando, Mississippi, and Allissa Quick, a sophomore Pharmacy major from Terre Haute, Indiana, were among the volunteers helping out at the URC.
Emily Wilkerson, a sophomore Elementary Education major from Columbus, Indiana, Moriah Riggs, a sophomore Marketing/Communications major from Hernando, Mississippi, and Allissa Quick, a sophomore Pharmacy major from Terre Haute, Indiana, were among the volunteers helping out at the URC.

 

 

Butler student Jesse Allen presents "A Blaschke-Factor Bifurcation Locus"
Butler student Jesse Allen presents "A Blaschke-Factor Bifurcation Locus

 

Butler's Brittany Garrett was among the artists who artwork was on display.
Butler's Brittany Garrett was among the artists who artwork was on display.

 

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AcademicsPeopleCampus

51 Years and Counting: Mulholland Still Makes Sweet Music

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 07 2016

You might think that having just turned 81, Professor of Music James Mulholland would be in the winter of his career. If so, it’s a mighty busy winter.

During March and early April, Mulholland:


James Mulholland, rehearsing choirs in Carnegie Hall.

-Served a week in residency at University of Wisconsin Eau Claire, which culminated with a concert of Mulholland compositions by the various ensembles of the School of Music. While there, he coached the all-male choral ensemble The Singing Statesmen on his latest commission for them, in honor of the group’s 50th anniversary.

-Visited the University of Illinois for the 2016 Intercollegiate Men’s Choral National Seminar. Ten choirs came from all over the country, and Mulholland’s music was featured.

-Attended the Gotham SINGS! Collegiate Choral Showcase at Carnegie Hall, where choirs from four universities performed selections by composers such as Mozart, Mendelssohn, Rachmaninoff, and, yes, Mulholland. He rehearsed the university choirs prior to their performance.

-Hosted students from Iola/Scandinavian High School of Wisconsin, who made a two-day trip to Indianapolis to attend a choral clinic with Mulholland and tour the Butler campus.

-Finished a composition for the combined Indianapolis Children’s Choir and full orchestra to perform at the retirement extravaganza for Choir Founder and longtime Butler Professor Henry Leck.

While doing all this, he only missed one class.

“I’m booked through 2018,” said Mulholland, who is finishing his 51st year of teaching at Butler. “As far as my career artistically and academically, I’m still in demand. And I’m not cheap.”

Mulholland travels frequently to work with choral groups around the country, and he is among the world’s most-performed composers. In his doctoral dissertation examining music selected by high school honor choirs, James Spillane, now Director of Choral Studies at the University of Connecticut, found that the five most-programmed composers are, in order, Handel, Brahms, Mendelssohn, Mulholland, and Mozart.

In 2015, the Southern Chorale at the University of Southern Mississippi, Mulholland’s undergraduate alma mater, released a CD of his compositions called Back Home in Southern Mississippi: The Music of James Quitman Mulholland. The discs features 11 selections in which Mulholland married his music to texts by William Butler Yeats, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Lord Byron, and others.

Reviewing the CD in The Choral Scholar, the online journal of the National Collegiate Choral Organization, C. Michael Porter, Director of Choral Organizations at Boise State University, wrote: “James Quitman Mulholland’s compositions have garnered a respected position within today’s choral canon. Because of their rich sonorities and expansive melodic lines, Mulholland’s compositions appeal to musicians and audiences of all levels…. Through their moving and impeccable performance, the Southern Chorale demonstrates why Mulholland’s works are synonymous with choral excellence.”mul2

Gregory Fuller, the Director of Choral Activities at Southern Mississippi, said he’s known of Mulholland’s work since he was a high school student in the late 1970s. What makes Mulholland’s music distinctive, Fuller said, is its “lush, romantic sound—lush harmonies and beautiful melody.”

“There are a couple of things that make him a standard-bearer,” he said. “Number one, he’s been at it a long time. He’s written a lot of music that is not only beautiful, but it’s accessible for a lot of different types of groups—school groups, community groups, professional groups, collegiate groups. And one of the reasons I think his music is profound is that you will struggle to find any piece by James Mulholland that does not include substantive text. He chooses great poetry, and he does not waste his time on things that are not profound or have not stood the test of time.”

Mulholland said he’s written the lion’s share of his more than 600 compositions on the piano in his second-floor office in Lilly Hall. He remains enormously proud of his service at Butler, including his 41 years on the Athletic Committee, and notes that next year, one of his students will be the third generation of his family to take one of his classes.

“I’m going to make music until I die,” he said. “And the only thing I enjoy more than making music is sharing it. Where better than you share your knowledge and love of music, the passion of it, than at a university? It’s also nice to have a captive audience. It gives me a fuel for my creativity.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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AcademicsCampus

Butler Joins Lincoln Park Zoo in Wildlife Study

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PUBLISHED ON Feb 25 2016

Butler University’s Center for Urban Ecology will place 48 motion-sensitive cameras at locations in Indianapolis, Westfield, Zionsville, and Carmel for four weeks every quarter beginning in April to study urban wildlife.

The Indy Wildlife Watch project is being done in conjunction with the Lincoln Park Zoo Urban Wildlife Institute in Chicago and the University of Wisconsin-Madison to see how central Indiana wildlife compares with theirs. Researchers also will be looking to see how the habitat compares in different neighborhoods.

12687783_601770739970468_6472042605984240961_nFor the past five years, the Urban Wildlife Institute has been undertaking a groundbreaking study of Chicago’s urban ecosystem, using camera traps and acoustic monitors to track the behavior of bats, birds, coyotes and even humans. The pictures can be seen at http://www.chicagowildlifewatch.org/.

“The Urban Wildlife Information Network and these new camera-trap sites will provide a wealth of knowledge about not only wildlife but the ecosystem as a whole,” Lincoln Park Zoo Urban Wildlife Institute Director Seth Magle said. “We’re grateful to the University of Wisconsin and Butler University for this vital support, which will help everyone better understand wildlife and, subsequently, mitigate conflict between humans and animals.”

The cameras are held in metal boxes to shield them from the elements and camouflaged so they’re not an eyesore on the landscape. They are strapped around the trunk of a tree and secure with a cable and a lock. The cameras are pointed at another tree 10-20 feet away where a scented lure is attached. When animals stop to investigate the lure, they trip the motion sensor in the camera.

The cameras are capable of taking a picture every 30 seconds. The pictures are stored on memory cards that will be collected and replaced every two weeks.

In January, Butler’s Center for Urban Ecology tested about 18 cameras. Biology Professor Travis Ryan said the best pictures so far have come from the area around the Monon Center in Carmel, where deer, foxes, coyotes, squirrels, and rabbits triggered the camera.

A sampling of those pictures is now available on Twitter (@indywildwatch) and Facebook (Indy Wildlife Watch). Beginning in 2017, all the pictures from central Indiana sites will be posted on a website for the public to view and help identify the contents of the photos.

Butler students will be actively involved in managing the images and the cameras, and some area elementary and high schools also may participate, Ryan said. Butler students will be introduced to the project as part of an Introduction to Ecology and Evolutionary Biology class.

“We envision students playing an important role in the field and when we get back with the data,” Ryan said.

Zoo officials approached Butler Biology Professor Carmen Salsbury about participating.

“The reason we reached out to Carmen and Travis and others is because to us, the next step is to say how many of the patterns that we see are specific to individual cities and how many are universal,” Magle said. “If we can identify universal patterns in urban wildlife, then that’s incredibly powerful for policy, for planning, for green infrastructure, for all sorts of things.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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Campus

Dean Shelley Honored for Contributions to Teacher Education

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PUBLISHED ON Feb 22 2016

Ena Shelley, Dean of Butler University’s College of Education (COE) since 2005 and a professor in the College since 1982, has been selected to receive the Edward C. Pomeroy Award for Outstanding Contributions to Teacher Education from the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education (AACTE).

ena closeThe award will be presented to the Dean on February 23 in Las Vegas.

The Pomeroy Award is given to a person or persons who have made exceptional contributions to AACTE, to a national or state organization involved in teacher education, or to persons responsible for the development of exemplary teacher education initiatives.

Shelley provided the leadership to create the first Butler University memo of understanding between the University and the Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS) to establish Shortridge Magnet High School for Law and Public Policy (now Shortridge International Baccalaureate High School). In addition, she led creation of the IPS/Butler University Laboratory School, focused on early childhood and elementary education.

She also was instrumental in bringing Reggio-inspired educational practices to Indiana through the Indianapolis Reggio Collaborative. She was able to bring an international exhibit from Reggio Emilia, Italy, to the Indiana Statehouse for a six-month stay that provided many professional development experiences for hundreds of educators from around and beyond the state.

“Each success in the College of Education is not from a solo experience in my role as a Dean, but rather it is a beautiful symphony created by colleagues in the College and in the schools,” Shelley said. “There is a saying that ‘a leader is only as good as the team that surrounds them,’ and I have found that to be very true. I truly have the dream team in my College.”

Shelley’s approach to education is well known around the COE and Butler: “The College of Education believes we must prepare our students for schools as they should be, not simply perpetuating schools as they currently exist. We must be willing to explore with our students the difficult issues of inequities that exist in our schools and society and to help them to become agents of change.”

Shelley’s COE colleagues said her efforts on behalf of the College, its faculty, staff, and students have been outstanding.

“She has always been charismatic, clear in her vision and integrity, but at her core profoundly decent and kind,” said Professor of Education Arthur Hochman. “This is the reason that she makes so many connections, achieves what might appear impossible, and the reason that so many want to walk in her wake.”

“If you are looking for a positive educator and advocate who challenges the status quo and works tirelessly at lifting up the greatest profession in the world, then look no further,” Associate Dean Debra Lecklider wrote on Shelley’s behalf.

Shelley earned her Bachelor of Science, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy from Indiana State University.

“Each day I see the future of education in the talented young people who have chosen it as their vocation,” she said. “These young people could do anything, and they want to teach. I see great teachers doing extremely difficult work as I spend time in the schools. It will be up to our society to invest in educators by valuing the teaching profession and remembering that our democracy was founded on providing a free public education to all citizens.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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