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Sophomore Siena Amodeo Earns Spot In Fulbright Summer Institute

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PUBLISHED ON May 24 2016

International Business and Marketing major Siena Amodeo hopes one day to participate on the global stage, perhaps as a high-level employee of Google or Disney. She’s working toward that goal this summer as a participant in the prestigious and selective Fulbright Summer Institute.

Siena AmodeoFrom July 4-22, Amodeo will study at the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London, which specializes in the study of non-western civilizations.

Amodeo will take a course called Feminist Economics and Development, where she hopes to learn about the different economic policies in developing countries and how they affect men and women differently.

“It will be a very different experience than what I have in the United States,” the rising sophomore said. “Usually, we look at how the United States is related to other countries. In this program, I will be focusing on how non-western nations view the world.”

In addition, Amodeo and the other participants will get to see London, as well as take daytrips to Bath, Stonehenge, and Oxford.

Amodeo was chosen for the program by the US-UK Fulbright Commission. The commission selects participants through a rigorous application and interview process that looks for academic excellence, a focused application, a range of extracurricular and community activities, demonstrated ambassadorial skills, a desire to further the Fulbright Program, and a plan to give back to the recipient’s home country upon returning.

The commission is part of the Fulbright program conceived by U.S. Sen. J. William Fulbright in the aftermath of World War II to promote leadership, learning, and empathy between nations through educational exchange.

Fulbright Summer Institutes cover all participant costs. In addition, Fulbright summer participants receive a distinctive support and cultural education program, including visa processing, a comprehensive pre-departure orientation, enrichment opportunities in country, a re-entry session, and opportunity to join its alumni networks.

Amodeo, who is from suburban Columbus, Ohio, said she’s excited to learn about and see more of the world.

“I’m an international business and marketing major, and this is not something a lot of business majors get to do,” she said. “A lot of the students participating in this are not business majors, so I think I’ll bring a unique perspective to the classroom, and I hope to be influenced by the students who are with me as well.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allanmallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Sophomore Siena Amodeo Earns Spot In Fulbright Summer Institute

International Business and Marketing major Siena Amodeo hopes one day to participate on the global stage, perhaps as a high-level employee of Google or Disney.

May 24 2016 Read more
Campus

Sophomore Caitlyn Foye Crowned 500 Festival Queen

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PUBLISHED ON May 23 2016

Sophomore Biology major Caitlyn Foye of Newburgh, Indiana, has been crowned the 2016 Indianapolis 500 Festival queen.

Caitlyn Foye receives her crown. (Photo by Dawn Pearson)

See WTHR's interview with her here.

Foye was chosen from a final field of 33. The 2016 500 Festival Princesses represent 13 Indiana colleges and universities and 21 cities and towns across the state. With a cumulative GPA of 3.5, this year's 500 Festival Princesses were selected from hundreds of applicants based upon communication skills, commitment to service, leadership, scholarship, professionalism.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Evans Woollen, Who Designed Clowes Hall, Dies at 88

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PUBLISHED ON May 19 2016

Evans Woollen, the Indianapolis architect who designed Clowes Memorial Hall, died Tuesday, May 17. He was 88.
Evans Woollen

In 2013, the 50th anniversary of Butler's beloved theater, he gave an interview to Butler Magazine in which he talked about how he was hired, why he decided to use exposed concrete, and how the building has held up over the decades.

Read it here: Butler Magazine In His Own Words- Evans Woollen

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

AthleticsCampus

Butler Signs Coach Holtmann to Contract Extension

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PUBLISHED ON May 18 2016

Butler and men's basketball coach Chris Holtmann have agreed to a contract extension. The deal now runs through the 2021-22 season.

Chris HoltmannHoltmann's teams have posted a 45-22 record in his two seasons as head coach. He and former coach Brad Stevens are the only coaches in Butler history to lead the Bulldogs to the NCAA Tournament in each of their first two seasons, where both of Holtmann's teams have advanced to the Second Round of the NCAA Tournament. His teams are an impressive 22-14 in BIG EAST play. Holtmann will add Butler's highest-rated recruiting class in program history for the 2016-17 season, a class that was ranked as high as 20th on National Signing Day.

"This extension shows the commitment that both Chris and the University are making to the success of our men's basketball program on and off the court," said Butler Vice President and Director of Athletics Barry Collier. "Chris has led our team to significant accomplishments on the court these past two seasons, while also providing outstanding leadership as a key member of the Butler community."

Butler finished the 2015-16 campaign with a 22-11 record and fourth-place finish in the BIG EAST. The Bulldogs' 79.9 points per game ranked in the Top 25 nationally. Kellen Dunham,Roosevelt Jones and Kelan Martin each earned All-BIG EAST honors.

"In his time at Butler, Chris has proven himself to be among the top tier of coaches nationally," said Butler President James Danko. "We have seen that translate to wins on the court. Chris continues to be an excellent ambassador for Butler University and our mission. On behalf of the Butler community, I'm excited for our future with Chris continuing to lead our men's basketball program and the tremendous coaching staff and student-athletes who represent us so well."

Holtmann was named Butler's 23rd men's basketball head coach in January of 2015, after serving for three months as interim head coach. He guided the 2014-15 Bulldogs to a 23-11 record, a tie for second place in the BIG EAST and an NCAA Tournament appearance. Butler tied the fourth-best single season turnaround (+8 wins) in BIG EAST history.

"I want to thank President Danko and Barry Collier for their continued support and confidence in our long-term ability to lead this outstanding program," said Holtmann. "I know I speak for our staff when I say how much we understand and appreciate the great responsibility that comes with this position. I am honored to serve Butler University in this capacity and I, along with Lori and Nora, are very excited about our future here.

"After graduating two outstanding senior classes, we are well aware of the challenges ahead. Clearly we are competing in one of the premier conferences in college basketball and we look forward to working very hard every day to make all those who have been a part of, and care about, Butler Basketball proud of our program."

The 2016-17 Bulldogs return three starters from last season's team, including Kelan Martin, who averaged 15.7 points and 6.8 rebounds per game while earning All-BIG EAST Second Team honors. The Bulldogs also add a recruiting class ranked in the Top 25 by several outlets, in addition to transfers Kethan Savage and Avery Woodson.

 

Media contact:
John Dedman
jdedman@butler.edu
317-940-9414

AthleticsCampus

Butler Signs Coach Holtmann to Contract Extension

Butler and men's basketball coach Chris Holtmann have agreed to a contract extension.

May 18 2016 Read more
Campus

Student-Driven Healthcare Journal Releases First Issue

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PUBLISHED ON May 13 2016

Butler University’s open access healthcare journal, BU Well, launched the first volume of the novel multimedia healthcare review journal on May 13, featuring nine articles on topics from the light in your environment affecting health to financial wellness to phone apps that help track daily well-being.
The staff of BU Well

The website for the open-access journal will be available on Butler University Digital Commons website: http://digitalcommons.butler.edu/buwell/.

BU Well publishes multimedia healthcare articles in three formats per article: print; an informational YouTube interview video vignette with the primary author of the print article; and an infographic of top-line information from each article. Items two and three are created by students working on the BU Well editorial team once an article is accepted for publication.

“BU Well is one of the nation’s only peer reviewed multimedia healthcare journals,” said Anne Leighty, Editor-in-Chief for the 2016-2017 school year. “This experience allows students to view and edit the work of their peers and then use their own ideas and thoughts on a topic to create an infographic and interview. This opportunity allows students to work on technical things like writing and editing, but then also on their creativity when designing an infographic and interview questions.”

This journal is run by about 30 students, representing four of the six colleges on Butler’s campus. There is also an external advisory board that includes professionals in healthcare and healthcare law, and founding executive editor Erin Albert, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice and faculty advisor for BU Well.

Functioning in teams, these Butler scholars have the chance to enhance their writing and editing abilities and promote more awareness on prominent healthcare information to the Butler community. Student duties include constructing, collaborating, and circulating various scholarly articles gathered from other faculty, alumni, and professionals in the healthcare field.

The project was created through a Butler Innovation Fund Grant written by Albert and Dean Mary Graham of COPHS.BU Well

For the next year, the second volume has a theme of the Future of Healthcare and will start accepting submissions starting August 18 on a rolling basis until December 16. BU Well invites submissions of original and scholarly healthcare articles for publishing consideration from any geographic location, and at any level of healthcare: students, residents, faculty, healthcare professionals, and others.

More is at BU Well’s Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/BUWellJournal, and Twitter (@BUWellJournal).

Nine articles are to be published in this first volume on Wellness. Some focus on improving the workplace of current healthcare to improve wellness in the community: “Improving collaboration between pharmacists and physicians”; “What’s app? Using evidence-based medicine smartphone applications in healthcare practice”; “Making an employee wellness program work for you”; and “Revolutionizing the patient package insert with infographics.”

On the other side, one article evaluates the downside to a society focused on wellness: “The social implications of wellness industry as a commodity.”

Others looked at how your individual characteristics can affect your health: “What you ignore at work may harm you: the effects of light, design and nature”; “Mysteries of your blood”; and “Financial wellness in undergraduate students.”

One student even had a personal narrative: “An N of One: my review of management of type 1 diabetes, myself as the patient.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Student-Driven Healthcare Journal Releases First Issue

BU Well is one of the nation’s only peer reviewed multimedia healthcare journals.

May 13 2016 Read more
Campus

Robert Soltis '87 Named New Dean of COPHS

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PUBLISHED ON May 11 2016

Robert Soltis ’87, who has taught Pharmacology at Drake University since 1992 and is currently the Ellis and Nelle Levitt Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology, will return to Butler University as the new Dean of the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (COPHS) beginning June 27.

Dean Robert SoltisSoltis served as Chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Administrative Sciences in Drake’s College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences from 2003-2012 and has been a full Professor since 2007. In 2000-2001, he was a Visiting Scientist at Pioneer Hi-Bred International in Johnston, Iowa.

“When (Butler Dean) Mary Graham told me she was retiring, I thought this would be a great opportunity,” Soltis said. “I’m looking forward to getting back to Butler and working with the faculty and staff in the college.”

During his 24 years at Drake, Soltis was involved in a variety of innovative projects, including leading efforts to renovate lab spaces and developing and implementing a new undergraduate degree in health sciences. In addition, he has been engaged in strategic planning and earned a reputation for being an excellent teacher, scholar, and collaborative, transparent leader. He also served as Faculty Senate president.

Prior to joining Drake, he was a Pharmacology Research Associate (PRAT Fellow) at the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

At Butler, he will oversee the University’s second-largest college, with 937 students. COPHS’s three-year average pass rate for the North American Pharmacy Licensure Exam (NAPLEX) is 99.2 percent, and its three-year average pass rate for the PANCE (Physician Assistant National Certifying Exam) is 96 percent. The national pass rate average is 94 percent.

“Bob’s significant experience as a faculty member, department chair, and Faculty Senate president at Drake make him an ideal candidate to serve as the next Dean of COPHS,” Butler Provost Kathryn Morris said. “I believe Bob will elevate COPHS from its already strong standing, and he will contribute to the broader academic leadership team at Butler. I look forward to working with him.”

Soltis earned his Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (cum laude) from Butler and his doctorate in Pharmacology/Toxicology at the Indiana University School of Medicine in 1991. His wife, Denise, and their twin daughters, Abby and Sarah, are all Butler alumni. (Their daughter Emily graduated from Bradley University.)

Denise Soltis worked at Drake for several years. She is now pursuing a master’s in Global Health through Northwestern University.

Soltis said that over the years he has kept up with Butler’s College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences through the Dean’s newsletter and alumni events. When he visited to interview for the position, he was “struck by how complete everything seemed.”

“It was a testament to Mary and her administrative team of how well the college is positioned for the future,” he said. “I look forward to moving the college to the next level.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Robert Soltis '87 Named New Dean of COPHS

Robert Soltis ’87 will return to Butler University as the new Dean of the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (COPHS) beginning June 27.

May 11 2016 Read more
Campus

Junior Emilie Turner Earns Spot In Fulbright Summer Institute

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PUBLISHED ON May 10 2016

Junior Political Science/International Studies major Emilie Turner likes to learn about different cultures, and this summer she’ll get a chance to do just that as a participant in the prestigious Fulbright Summer Institute in Wales.

Emilie TurnerTurner, who’s from Fishers, Indiana, will spend June 25 to August 6 at three internationally renowned Welsh universities, Cardiff University, Bangor University, and Aberystwyth University, focusing on the theme of contemporary Wales: industry, politics, culture, and change. She also will explore the geography, culture, heritage, and history of Wales by visiting museums, galleries, parks, castles, and islands.

“It’s an exciting program because not only will we be taking classes, but they’ll be incorporating historical sites and landmarks into the classes,” she said. “So we’ll be able to go explore the history and geography of Wales at the same time.”

The US-UK Fulbright Commission selects participants through a rigorous application and interview process. In making these awards the Commission looks not only for academic excellence but a focused application, a range of extracurricular and community activities, demonstrated ambassadorial skills, a desire to further the Fulbright Program and a plan to give back to the recipient’s home country upon returning.

The Commission is part of the Fulbright program conceived by Senator J William Fulbright in the aftermath of World War II to promote leadership, learning and empathy between nations through educational exchange. Award recipients and summer program participants will be the future leaders for tomorrow and support the ‘special relationship’ between the United States and United Kingdom.

Fulbright Summer Institutes cover all participant costs. In addition, Fulbright summer participants receive a distinctive support and cultural education program including visa processing, a comprehensive pre-departure orientation, enrichment opportunities in country, a re-entry session and opportunity to join its alumni networks.

Turner, who participants in service projects through the Intercollegiate YMCA and Blue Key Honor Society, plans to go to law school and possibly go into international law.

“I love to learn more about people and how to understand different cultures as it relates directly to international relationships,” Turner said. “I’m also excited to teach others about our culture, politics, economic viewpoints, and social environment.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Junior Emilie Turner Earns Spot In Fulbright Summer Institute

“It’s an exciting program because not only will we be taking classes, but they’ll be incorporating historical sites and landmarks into the classes.”

May 10 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler Graduates 996 at Commencement Ceremonies

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PUBLISHED ON May 07 2016

Your brain is an “amazing energy-processing machine” that lets you decide who you want to be in the world, Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor told Butler University’s Class of 2016 at commencement ceremonies on Saturday, May 7, in Hinkle Fieldhouse.

Taylor, a renowned brain researcher who suffered a stroke in 1996, said the brain’s hemispheres divide tasks. The left brain is where we get the ability to analyze, master details, judge critically, and think linearly. The right brain is the big picture side—the intuitive, gentle side.
Jill Bolte Taylor delivered the 2016 commencement address.

She said the graduates’ ability to be simultaneously happy about graduation and sad to be leaving Butler—two disparate thoughts—is “all about your brain.”

“Your left brain would rather be right than happy,” she said. “Your right brain would rather be happy than right. I wish for you the perfect balance.”

In the coming year, Taylor will collaborate with the University on One Butler: The Brain Project, a yearlong, campus-wide initiative that will focus on brain health and the impact neuroscience has on all areas of our lives. Taylor and other experts in subspecialized areas of neuroscience will speak throughout the year. A sculpture installation of Big Brains! will be on display in spring 2017.

Butler University graduated 996 students on Saturday, May 7, during commencement ceremonies at Hinkle Fieldhouse—262 from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 89 from the College of Education, 257 from the College of Business (now the Lacy School of Business), 173 from the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, 95 from the Jordan College of the Arts, and 120 from the College of Communication.

Taylor and former Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard received honorary degrees. In a short speech, Ballard pointed out that the graduates had help getting to this point in their lives, and he urged them to “give people the same helping hand.”

“This is a team game, always,” he said.

Associate Professor of Biology Jennifer Kowalski, who gave the faculty address, suggested that the graduates “be fearless and take lessons from each step.” She challenged them to engage in the social and political lives of their community, tackling issues such as climate change and economic injustice.

And Senior Class President Alexandria Antonetti said the Class of 2016 should “be proud of what you accomplished, knowing that you’re just getting started.”

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Graduates 996 at Commencement Ceremonies

She said the graduates’ ability to be simultaneously happy about graduation and sad to be leaving Butler—two disparate thoughts—is “all about your brain.”

May 07 2016 Read more
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Student LifeCampus

Reducing Food Waste Is Their Goal. This Is Their Story.

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 29 2016

The Food Recovery Network is one of several sustainability efforts on campus.

By Hayley Ross '17

Making sure they don’t throw out the extra food on their plate is not enough for Bailey Armstrong ’16 and Olivia Carroll ’17. As executive members of Butler’s Food Recovery Network, their goal is bigger: eliminating food waste across campus.

“I look for opportunities to decrease waste wherever I go,” Armstrong said. “There are such easy ways to do it. If I am talking to a younger friend, I am always promoting the Food Recovery Network.”

Lauren Wathen, Olivia Carroll, and Bailey Armstrong are working to reduce food waste on campus
Lauren Wathen, Olivia Carroll, and Bailey Armstrong are working to reduce food waste on campus.

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Armstrong started the club in fall 2014 when her sister’s friend, who is one of the founders of the national program, told her to apply to create a chapter on Butler’s campus. After a couple of weekly calls with the program’s headquarters, she was able to make it official.

She said she went to Butler’s alternative block party ready to find others as passionate as she is.

“That’s where I met Olivia,” Armstrong said. “I also met Emily Guglielmo, who is now on our executive team as well.”

Guglielmo had transferred from the University of Michigan, which already had a Food Recovery Network chapter. Soon after, they met Lauren Wathen, current president, who joined them in making a four-person leadership team ready to conquer food sustainability and food waste prevention.

The Food Recovery Network’s efforts are just one part of the sustainability efforts on campus. Dining Services composts about 800 pounds of pre-consumer food waste—like the tops of peppers and apple cores—each week. This began in April 2015, thanks to an SGA grant.

In January 2015 they made their first recovery—taking all unused, untouched food that can’t be resold and donating it to the Julian Center, a center for women who have been domestically abused.

“We started at Hinkle after a basketball game,” Armstrong said. “We asked Dining Services, ‘If you think we are doing a good job at the games, can we do them in the dining halls?’ And now we have them twice a week at Atherton and at all home men’s basketball games.”

They have collected about 1,000 pounds of food in the past year.

“We view the amount of food we have recovered as an accomplishment, but also as a sign that there’s a lot more work to do to diminish food waste,” Armstrong said.

Each semester the network members meet with Dining Services’ head chef and the team that orders the food served at Atherton to discuss how much is being wasted.

“We just want to make them aware,” Carroll said. “They have been incredibly responsive.”

There are now 10 members of their executive team, although there are many more working these recoveries.

“The cool thing is that we have executive members that are really passionate, but also volunteers who can come for an hour or so,” Carroll said. “It’s great to have that balance that keeps the sustainability going.”

Other student organizations also pair with them weekly to do food recoveries. They said their goal is to make Butler students more aware.

“Awareness changes a society,” Carroll said. “Although we may not do this as a profession, Food Recovery has taught me a lot about the immense amount of food wasted in this country and the hunger in this country. We tend to focus abroad, but we have a huge problem in our own country.”

For more information on the organization and how to volunteer, visit the Butler Food Recovery Network Facebook page or contact Lauren Wathen at lwathen@butler.edu.

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CampusCommunity

Professor Rao's Artwork Is All Over Indy This Summer

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 28 2016

Summer break? What summer break?

Just as school is letting out, Art + Design Associate Professor Gautam Rao finds himself participating in three upcoming high-profile events.

IMG_9090The first is the Indianapolis Museum of Art’s miniature golf course, which opens to the public May 10. The course features 18 holes designed by local and regional artists, including Rao, who designed a hole called “Poplar Mechanics.” Rao’s design is inspired by Indiana’s woodlands and celebrates the state tree, tulip poplar, and the verdant forests of Brown County. It features abstract trees that recreate Indiana’s landscape in a subtle, artistic manner.

Rao also was one of 33 Indiana artists selected to design an artwork as part of the Welcome Race Fans project for the 100th running of the Indianapolis 500. These works will be exhibited all over town. His piece has appeared at the Indianapolis ArtsGarden, the International Airport and the Harrison Center for the Arts.

“For me, being an artist is about making a career and a life,” Rao said. “Finding a balance between the two can be a challenge. My project features original lettering and a typographic sculpture. And who better to welcome race fans than my twins, born in Indianapolis, little Hoosiers who we will be one in May. This photograph represents my artistic life in its entirety– my twins, and my art. Welcome Race Fans!”

rao_welcome race fans_finalAnd Rao will be exhibiting an outdoor artwork in this year's Installation Nation at the Indianapolis Art Center. Installation Nation is a 23-day exhibition presented by Primary Colours featuring site-specific art installations to be located on the grounds of the Indianapolis Art Center’s 9.5 acre ArtsPark.

Rao joined the Butler faculty in 2004. He is originally from Washington, DC, and has also lived in Bangalore, India. He earned a BFA at Boston University in 1999 and an MFA from the University of Pennsylvania in 2002. His distinctions include a Susan Coslett Cromwell Traveling Fellowship, and awards from the Marie Walsh Sharpe Foundation and the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts.

He recently exhibited his work at the Art Director's Club in New York, the Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art, The South Bend Art Museum, The Swope Art Museum, and in Typeforce 5 in Chicago.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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GivingCampus

COB Renamed the Andre B. Lacy School of Business

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 26 2016

Butler University’s College of Business has been renamed the Andre B. Lacy School of Business, in recognition of a $25 million commitment from the Chairman of the Board of Indianapolis-based LDI, Ltd (Lacy Diversified Industries) and his wife, Julia, Butler President James M. Danko announced today. In addition, Lacy will serve as senior adviser to the School of Business.

The gift is Butler’s largest ever from an individual or family.

Andre B. Lacy

“The Butler community is deeply grateful to Andre and Julia Lacy for this transformational investment,” said Danko. “This partnership brings together recognized champions of business and education, and will further extend Butler’s national reputation as an innovative, world-class institution.”

“Butler has long been an excellent school and an anchor to the Indianapolis and Central Indiana community,” Lacy said. “But in the last five years, under President Danko’s leadership, I have seen Butler grow into a national player, especially when it comes to the University’s focus on innovation, experiential learning, and outcomes.”

In 2015, Butler was recognized by U.S. News and World Report as the Midwest’s most innovative school, and among the best in the nation for internships, study abroad, and undergraduate research. Just last week, Bloomberg BusinessWeek ranked Butler’s School of Business No. 1 in the nation for internships, and the School’s 2015 graduating class achieved a 99 percent placement rate.

“We hope this investment further establishes the Lacy School of Business—and Butler University overall—as the premier destination for students, faculty, employers, and community partners in Central Indiana and across the country,” Lacy said.

Lacy To Serve As Senior Adviser

Lacy has worked with Butler for more than a decade, serving on the Butler Business Consulting Group Advisory Panel and endowing a student scholarship within the School of Business. As part of this new partnership, Lacy will serve as a direct resource to the Lacy School of Business and Butler University community.

Stephen Standifird, Dean of the Lacy School of Business, said that Lacy will be an extraordinary asset to the School as senior adviser. “To do what we do well, we must have a strong group of people in the business community who are willing to advise us on what’s really happening—the dynamics of the marketplace, how we can increase connections with industry, and continue to be relevant,” Standifird said. “I can’t think of anybody better suited for that role than Andre Lacy. He is passionate about closely held business and developing the next generation of business leaders. We share these passions, which makes for a great partnership."

Lacy said he sees his new role at Butler as an opportunity to pass down what he’s learned and what he knows.

“The adviser role,” he said, “provides that opportunity to share, mentor, and help students see that prospering an entity is bigger than any one individual—and it gives back exponentially to the communities where they live. That’s a desire we see in this generation—to be part of something bigger than themselves, and to be on the ground floor of establishing something that has meaning and value.”

A Differentiated Experience

Two areas of particular focus for Lacy and Standifird will be helping the School build upon its signature experiential approach to teaching and learning, and expanding its focus on closely held businesses. In the School of Business, students create a business plan their first year, launch a company as sophomores, and complete at least two internships before graduation—a series of experiential requirements unmatched in the business school landscape.

Lacy sees these strengths as key to Butler’s differentiation. “Butler’s business program presents two main points of value proposition for the student that differentiate it from Kelley, Krannert, Harvard, and the like,” he said. “The first is focusing on closely held businesses—meaning small businesses and family-owned businesses—which drive the nation’s economy and make up 90 percent of Indiana’s business sector. The second is giving students the real-world experience of working directly with local businesses, seeing first-hand the challenges they face, and learning the art and science of developing and selling solutions that have real value in the business market.”

An Everlasting Alignment

Butler President Danko said Lacy’s approach, which stresses leadership, character, and integrity, strongly aligns with The Butler Way.

"Andre Lacy has demonstrated through his business success, community leadership, and principled life a strong conviction to improving society and the well-being of others,” he said. “The financial commitment from Andre and Julia is extraordinary, but of equal or even greater value will be the everlasting alignment of the Lacy name and Butler University."

Media contact:
Marc Allan
317-940-9822
mallan@butler.edu

 

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Campus

Bloomberg Rates Butler's College of Business No. 1 for Internships

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 22 2016

Butler University’s College of Business is the top-ranked business school in the country for internships, according to Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2016 rankings.

Holcombexterior10“Studies have shown that college students with internships fare better in the labor market after they graduate, compared to students without internships,” Bloomberg said in the rankings released April 19. “Many undergraduate business programs push hard to place their students in high-value internships that may turn into full-time job offers, expose students to a particular industry or job function, or simply help students forge connections to the world of work.”

Bloomberg defines an internship as a work experience that accumulates a minimum of 120 hours of work within a six-month (consecutive) period, in which a student receives supervision and/or mentorship and in which the student applies his or her knowledge and skills learned in college. An internship may be paid or unpaid and may be for credit or not for credit. A student’s work on his or her own start-up business qualifies as an internship if it meets the other stated criteria.

In Butler’s experiential approach to teaching and learning, students in the College of Business create a business plan their first year, launch a company as sophomores, and complete at least two internships before graduation—a series of experiential requirements unmatched in the business school landscape.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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