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Building COE, One Wooden Block At a Time

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jun 10 2016

Butler University is represented twice in the Indiana State Museum’s new exhibition Indiana in 200 Objects, a celebration of the state’s 200th birthday, which will be on view through January 29, 2017.

The first is recognition of the Sigma Gamma Rho, a sorority emphasizing “sisterhood, scholarship, and service” that was founded at Butler in 1922. Sigma Gamma Rho is the only predominantly black sorority not founded at a historically black college, and the only sorority or fraternity founded at Butler University.

Eliza Blaker ArtifactsThe other Butler artifact foretells the founding of the College of Education. It’s Froebel Gift Blocks, wooden toy blocks used by kindergarten pioneer Eliza Blaker and loaned to the State Museum from the University archives. A description card with the blocks says:

Early education has a huge impact on small children. As head of the free kindergarten movement in Indianapolis, Eliza Blaker (1854-1926) was in the forefront of education reform. The groundbreaking theories Blaker promoted in her classroom and the Teachers College of Indianapolis—that children learn through play, should be encouraged to discover the world for themselves, and shouldn’t be beaten for making mistakes—are common knowledge today. 

In 1930, Butler University bought Blaker’s college and merged it with Butler’s then-new College of Education. Her portrait still hangs outside the College of Education offices.

“Eliza is one of the people most Hoosiers don’t know about but are impacted by every day,” said Ena Shelley, Dean of Butler’s College of Education. “Every day you take a child to kindergarten, you can thank Eliza Blaker for that.”

Blaker was brought to Indiana from Pennsylvania by a group of society women to start a kindergarten program for their children. Blaker agreed to come, but only if all children could attend her kindergartens. When she arrived, she discovered that she didn’t have the workforce she needed.

“So now she had to create kindergarten programs and train teachers,” Shelley said.

That spurred her to start her teacher-training school, which opened in 1892.Eliza Blaker

The idea was risky on multiple levels, Shelley said. Blaker had to raise money to fund her school and had to find the right students to train to be teachers.

“We owe her,” Shelley said. “She started the whole idea of parent education – teaching families the importance of nutrition, the importance of talking to your child, the importance of reading to your child. We take that for granted now, but that was saying to parents, ‘This is what you should be doing. That was leading edge at that time.’”

Blaker demanded that all students have access to kindergarten—highly unusual in the early 1900s—and had rigorous standards for who could become a teacher. She cared about her students, but she was strict with them.

She was far ahead of her time, and she wasn’t afraid to be far ahead, Shelley said. “She wrote a letter to the legislature more than 102 years ago telling them why they should invest in early childhood education. If she were alive today, she’d say, ‘You’re still talking about that?’”

Starting in 1922, Teachers College of Indianapolis and Butler began talking about a merger. Blaker died in 1926, and the merger took place in time for the 1930-1931 school year. Butler incurred some debt, but that was “part of our vision of who we were to be in the community,” Shelley said.

Being trained at the Teachers College of Indianapolis was considered extremely prestigious. “And I’m proud to say that today, when our students say that they graduated from Butler, people have the same reaction,” Shelley said. “I think Eliza would be proud of that.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Building COE, One Wooden Block At a Time

Butler University is represented twice in the Indiana State Museum’s new exhibition Indiana in 200 Objects, a celebration of the state’s 200th birthday, which will be on view through January 29, 2017.

Jun 10 2016 Read more
Campus

Aaron Hurt '08 Named 30 Under 30 Among Venue Managers

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jun 10 2016

Aaron Hurt ’08, the Director of Operations for the Butler Arts Center, has been selected as one of the International Association of Venue Managers Foundation (IAVM)’s 30 Under 30, which recognizes emerging leaders in the venue-management industry.

Aaron HurtHurt has been in event and venue management since 2009 with a variety of venues and ensembles and has worked with artists including Marvin Hamlisch, Sylvia McNair, Josh Radnor, and Allen Toussaint. In addition to working for the Arts Center, he teaches a seminar on Venue Management for Butler’s Arts Administration program.

“I’m humbled to be selected as one of IAVM’s 30 Under 30 recipients,” Hurt said. “Managing multiple venues, like we do at Butler Arts Center, is always presenting new, exciting challenges, and I’m truly privileged to have such a fun career where I’m able to solve those challenges every day. It’s quite an honor to have IAVM recognize my work in the field thus far, and I’m thankful for their support and recognition.”

The 30 Under 30 Class of 2016 will convene at VenueConnect, IAVM’s annual conference and trade show, July 23-26, in Minneapolis. They will also be provided opportunities for continued education for professional growth in the venue industry to help them become better, more productive employees.

Award recipients receive full complimentary registration to the conference, an $850 travel stipend, and a one-year complimentary Young Professional IAVM Membership. They also will be recognized at the Venue Industry Awards Luncheon at VenueConnect on Monday, July 25.

The Butler Arts Center includes Clowes Memorial Hall, the Schrott Center for the Arts, Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall, and the Black Box Theatre in Lilly Hall.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Aaron Hurt '08 Named 30 Under 30 Among Venue Managers

the International Association of Venue Managers Foundation (IAVM)’s 30 Under 30.

Jun 10 2016 Read more
Campus

Brandon Gaudin '06 to Be the Voice of Madden NFL 17

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jun 08 2016

Brandon Gaudin ’06, former voice of the Butler Bulldogs men’s basketball broadcasts, will be the new voice providing play-by-play for Madden NFL 17 video games.

Brandon GaudinGaudin will be joining the Big Ten Network as a play-by-play announcer this fall after being the voice of the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets since 2013. Additionally, he has been named the lead college football play-by-play voice for Westwood One Sports, and will also call occasional NFL games for the network.

Gaudin will continue to serve as one of the voices for Westwood One’s coverage of men’s basketball, including conference championship week and the NCAA Tournament.

Madden NFL 17 is developed in Orlando, Florida by EA Tiburon and will be available for Xbox One the all-in-one games and entertainment system from Microsoft, Xbox 360® games and entertainment system, PlayStation®4 computer entertainment system and PlayStation®3 entertainment system on August 23.

Matthew VanTryon '17 at the Indianapolis Star has more details here.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Brandon Gaudin '06 to Be the Voice of Madden NFL 17

Brandon Gaudin ’06, former voice of the Butler Bulldogs men’s basketball broadcasts, will be the new voice providing play-by-play for Madden NFL 17 video games.

Jun 08 2016 Read more
Campus

Micah Nelson '11 Named IPS Teacher of the Year

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jun 06 2016

Indianapolis Public Schools has named Micah Nelson MS ’11 its 2017 Teacher of the Year.

Nelson teaches sixth- through eight-grade social studies at Center for Inquiry (CFI) School 2. IPS said her commitment to global awareness, project-based learning and integrating literacy, and writing instruction into content area curriculum make her an example of excellence in education.
Micah Nelson (photo courtesy of IPS)

Nelson joined IPS in 2004. She is a member of the CFI building leadership team and serves as a District Lead Literacy Teacher, leading professional development trainings for her fellow educators. She has been published for her research on Progressive Education and student buy-in.

In IPS’s announcement, the district said that Nelson did not always know teaching was her calling. It wasn’t until she was a college student witnessing the reactions around her after the World Trade Center attacks on 9/11 when she realized her passion to promote global awareness.

“I had all kinds of minors, and kept taking classes to try to figure out what I really wanted to ‘be when I grew up,’” she said. “Finally, on September 11, 2001, it came to me. In the discussions that occurred after that event, I realized that many soon-to-be college graduates did not have the slightest understanding of world events. I felt like the education system had failed them. Here were students at a well-respected university who had never been pushed to think critically about world events, and had an overly-simplistic view of complicated issues and histories. At that point, I added an education degree to my history degree, and have been trying to inspire an interest in world events in my students ever since.”

Nelson graduated from Purdue University with degrees in history and education. She went on to complete a master’s in Teacher Leadership from Butler University, and is pursuing her master’s in Education Administration from Butler.

In addition to positively impacting the lives of students, Nelson is helping to train the next generation of educators. She is an instructor in Butler’s College of Education, leading prospective teachers through a course on secondary education. Nelson enjoys mentoring future teachers as well as educators in their first and second years of classroom instruction.

To select the district’s top teacher, each IPS principal was invited to nominate their building-level Teacher of the Year for consideration. The selection committee reviewed each nominee’s portfolio, including teaching philosophy, professional accomplishments, and instructional practices, to determine the finalists and the 2017 winner.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Micah Nelson '11 Named IPS Teacher of the Year

Indianapolis Public Schools has named Micah Nelson MS ’11 its 2017 Teacher of the Year.

Jun 06 2016 Read more
Campus

Professor Forhan Discusses His Starkly Honest Memoir

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jun 06 2016

In many ways, from participating in Pinewood Derby to playing near construction sites, Associate Professor of English Chris Forhan’s suburban Seattle childhood had a Leave It to Beaver-like quality.

But then, Ward Cleaver wasn’t an undiagnosed manic depressive who took his own life when the Beaver was 14.

Chris ForhanThe happy and the horrible times of Forhan’s youth—and what happened after—are the subject of his starkly honest memoir, My Father Before Me (Scribner, $26), which comes out June 28.

Chris was the fifth of eight children born to Ed and Ange Forhan. His parents never talked about personal or emotionally difficult topics, and there was a lot of family history he didn’t know. So in 2010, he began researching—interviewing his mother and siblings, scouring Ancestry.com, the Seattle Times archives, and other Internet sites to glean what he could about his father.

“My reading of it was that his interior life drowned him,” said Forhan, who joined the English Department faculty in 2007 as a poetry professor. “He was in some ways a wonderful father. He didn’t beat us, didn’t yell at us. We had security. He paid the bills and made sure the car ran OK. But emotionally, he didn’t contribute much.”

What Forhan uncovered in his reporting and writing is in many ways an ordinary story about families and family dynamics. The specifics are unique to the Forhans, but the themes are universal.

“I generally do believe—and I feel this way as a writer and a writer of poetry—that the further inside yourself you go, the more you meet everybody else,” Forhan said. “Even with all the talk about diversity and putting yourself in somebody else’s skin, we do have basic human similarities. I hope the memoir touches on that.”

During an interview in his Jordan Hall office, Forhan talked more about the book and his family.

Q: Tolstoy wrote: “Happy families are all alike. Every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” What do you think made your family uniquely unhappy?

A: I don’t know that we were uniquely unhappy. And you know that Tolstoy quote is famously controversial—easily quotable but not necessarily true. To push against your question, I hope that we were representative. I think my parents are representative of certain values and habits of the culture they came from and the generation they were a part of: two Depression era babies. My father was Irish Catholic and my mother, while not particularly religious as she was growing up, came from a Scandinavian background. Those two cultures are just generally known as cultures that nurture repression and deflection. But I think my parents are representative of a time and a place and certain cultures.

My father, though, had a particularly horrific upbringing. His father abandoned him and his brothers and mother. His mother I don’t know a lot about because he didn’t say a word about her to us. I infer that she was not completely dependable as a mother. And his little brother drowned at 5, when my father was 7, and then his mother died when my dad was 11. All he knew, it seems to me, was loss and instability in his childhood. Then he was raised by grandparents who were caring but distant and put a lot of responsibility on him to be the good boy, the successful boy—whatever that might mean. And he came from a generation that was about not looking inward. So he had particular demons that I don’t think he confronted sufficiently. And then he got sick—he got diabetes. He seemed to be manic depressive, but probably not diagnosed as such.

My mother was exceedingly strong. She kept a stiff upper lip to the degree it was possible and always made sure the trains ran on time. She helped shelter us eight children from the worst of our father. We were happy in our own way. There was great joy. But the unhappiness had to do with that silence and mystery. We were just hunkered down in our rooms. My brother and I talk about how we kept our heads down. That’s how it felt.

Q: Your memoir is different from a lot of others in that the typical memoir is someone’s recollections. In your case, there was a lot you didn’t know, and you had to do reporting to find out. What was that process like?

A: That was fun. And I’m sure I would have not written the book if a lot of research had not been involved. That was what compelled me to write the book. I wanted to figure out my father. I came to a point in my life—I was turning 50—where I said, “What was that, anyway?” It seemed like history. There was this historical period that obviously affected me and was still in memory, but I had never figured it out and I was very curious. Who was this man? Who were the people who came before him and might have made him who he was? I really wanted to figure him out. And through that research, I came to know him in a way I never had before—as if he were still alive.

Q: In the chapter immediately after your father commits suicide, you have direct quotes from your mother and your siblings about their recollections. What was it like to gather that?

A: I felt that was important to do. I know it’s my memoir—I told my mother and all my siblings that I was doing this project—but I did understand that this was something that happened to my family. There were eight children and we were all different ages, so we had different experiences. My sister Theresa was 24 when my dad died and my little sister Erica was 5. Different experiences completely. So I thought it was important to open up the windows of the book and let the air come in. All these different voices, different perspectives. So I wasn’t pretending mine was the only experience. And secondarily, I wanted to give my siblings that gift. I knew he was their dad, too, and here was a chance for them to say what it was like for them.

Q: How comfortable were you in divulging personal details about yourself?

A: Pretty comfortable. When I decided to write this, I was all in. The most embarrassing thing I described was receiving a phone call at the high school radio station where I worked and swearing at the caller, thinking he was a prankster friend of mine. Just a stupid kid mistake. I still feel intensely guilty about that. But I felt OK otherwise. I wondered how my mother would feel about my telling the story of her life. And I was so honored and feel so lucky. She never said, “Don’t tell my story. Don’t tell the details.” She shared the details with me and she knew very well I would use them. She just asked me to change a couple of things that were factual errors or about which she had a different memory than I did. So I haven’t felt conflicted about sharing my experiences. This was a theme of the book. I was tired of the silence. So why not share it?

Q: I was surprised that after your dad’s suicide and the family’s memories, the book goes back to being your story. He’s part of the story, but he doesn’t become a distraction.

A: That’s a nice way of saying that the book is incoherent (laughs). His silence in some ways became my silence, and the last third of the book is about me dealing with that silence. Writing the book is a way of counteracting that silence, but it’s also about finding poetry—a way to use language to communicate what is real instead of to obscure it.

Q: What do you think your father would think of the book?

A: I’m not making this up—sometimes, when I was writing the book, and I was deep into it, and I was confronted with some riddle about him—I thought, well, I’m going to call him up and ask him. I really had this sense that he was so real to me and so alive on the page. But of course, if he were alive, I wouldn’t be writing the book.

I have no idea what he would think. One part of me thinks he would be embarrassed and find it presumptuous of me to do what I’ve done. On the other hand, would he be the 85-year-old guy who’s got some perspective on his life and actually would find it touching that I would devote attention to his life in this way? I wish I had a pithy answer, but I don’t.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Professor Forhan Discusses His Starkly Honest Memoir

The happy and the horrible times of Forhan’s youth—and what happened after—are the subject of his starkly honest memoir, My Father Before Me .

Jun 06 2016 Read more
Campus

Two New Members Elected to Board of Trustees

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jun 01 2016

Two Butler alumni, Aaron Schamp ’93 and Beth Morris ’78, have been elected to the Butler University Board of Trustees.
Aaron Schamp

Schamp, who will serve a three-year term, is a partner with PwC (PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLC) based in Indianapolis, where he currently serves as the Midwest Regional Leader for Cybersecurity, Privacy and Advanced Compliance and Risk Analytics. He joined the firm of Coopers & Lybrand as a manager in 1998, prior to its merger with Price Waterhouse. From 1998 to 2001, he was a principal at Whittman‐Hart, Inc. In 2001 he rejoined PwC and was admitted to the partnership in 2006.

Schamp earned a Bachelor of Science in Finance from Butler’s College of Business (now the Andre B. Lacy School of Business) in 1993. He has been a member of the COB Board of Visitors since 2007 and is also a member of the COB Emerging Alumni Group.  In addition to his involvement with Butler, Schamp is a member of the Stanley K. Lacy Executive Leadership Series Class of XXXI and has served on the parish council and finance commission at Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church.  He was a member of Phi Kappa Psi fraternity.

His wife, Meg, also a Butler alumna, earned a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in 1992. She was a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma. She has previously been employed with Roche Diagnostics and William M. Mercer Inc. The Schamps have a son and two daughters.

Morris, who was elected to a two-year term and will serve as Alumni Board representative, is President of WTG Associates. She has been an independent consultant for the pharmaceutical industry since her retirement from Eli Lilly & Company in 2008. She joined Eli Lilly & Co. in 1978 as a Pharmaceutical Chemist and held a variety of positions including Director, Dry Products Quality Assurance; Senior Director, Development Projects Management; Senior Director, Global Clinical Trial Materials; and Senior Director, CMC Project Management.
Beth Morris

She currently serves as a director for the Wawasee Property Owners Association and serves on the Wawasee Area Conservancy Foundation Ecology Committee.

She received her Bachelor of Science degree in Pharmacy from Butler’s College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences in 1978. She served as a member of the COPHS Board of Visitors from 2003 to 2016. She has been a member of the Alumni Board since 2013 and begins her tenure as President in 2016. As an undergraduate, she was a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma and was Most Outstanding Female Student in 1977. She was recognized as a COPHS Distinguished Alumnus and a “50 under 50” in 2004.

Morris is the daughter of the late H. Raymond “Ray” Swenson, former Dean of Butler’s College of Business and Professor Emeritus.  She lives in Fishers, Indiana, with her husband, Doug, who earned a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue and an MBA from IU-Bloomington and works at Eli Lilly and Co. in forecasting. They have two children.

The board also re-elected seven trustees to new three-year terms: Dennis Bassett ’79; Scott Bening; John Cooke ’62; Tom Fischer ’75; Ron Langston; Jane Magnus-Stinson ’79; and Josh Smiley.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Two New Members Elected to Board of Trustees

Two Butler alumni, Aaron Schamp ’93 and Beth Morris ’78, have been elected to the Butler University Board of Trustees.​

Jun 01 2016 Read more
Campus

Sophomore Siena Amodeo Earns Spot In Fulbright Summer Institute

BY

PUBLISHED ON May 24 2016

International Business and Marketing major Siena Amodeo hopes one day to participate on the global stage, perhaps as a high-level employee of Google or Disney. She’s working toward that goal this summer as a participant in the prestigious and selective Fulbright Summer Institute.

Siena AmodeoFrom July 4-22, Amodeo will study at the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London, which specializes in the study of non-western civilizations.

Amodeo will take a course called Feminist Economics and Development, where she hopes to learn about the different economic policies in developing countries and how they affect men and women differently.

“It will be a very different experience than what I have in the United States,” the rising sophomore said. “Usually, we look at how the United States is related to other countries. In this program, I will be focusing on how non-western nations view the world.”

In addition, Amodeo and the other participants will get to see London, as well as take daytrips to Bath, Stonehenge, and Oxford.

Amodeo was chosen for the program by the US-UK Fulbright Commission. The commission selects participants through a rigorous application and interview process that looks for academic excellence, a focused application, a range of extracurricular and community activities, demonstrated ambassadorial skills, a desire to further the Fulbright Program, and a plan to give back to the recipient’s home country upon returning.

The commission is part of the Fulbright program conceived by U.S. Sen. J. William Fulbright in the aftermath of World War II to promote leadership, learning, and empathy between nations through educational exchange.

Fulbright Summer Institutes cover all participant costs. In addition, Fulbright summer participants receive a distinctive support and cultural education program, including visa processing, a comprehensive pre-departure orientation, enrichment opportunities in country, a re-entry session, and opportunity to join its alumni networks.

Amodeo, who is from suburban Columbus, Ohio, said she’s excited to learn about and see more of the world.

“I’m an international business and marketing major, and this is not something a lot of business majors get to do,” she said. “A lot of the students participating in this are not business majors, so I think I’ll bring a unique perspective to the classroom, and I hope to be influenced by the students who are with me as well.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allanmallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Sophomore Siena Amodeo Earns Spot In Fulbright Summer Institute

International Business and Marketing major Siena Amodeo hopes one day to participate on the global stage, perhaps as a high-level employee of Google or Disney.

May 24 2016 Read more
Campus

Sophomore Caitlyn Foye Crowned 500 Festival Queen

BY

PUBLISHED ON May 23 2016

Sophomore Biology major Caitlyn Foye of Newburgh, Indiana, has been crowned the 2016 Indianapolis 500 Festival queen.

Caitlyn Foye receives her crown. (Photo by Dawn Pearson)

See WTHR's interview with her here.

Foye was chosen from a final field of 33. The 2016 500 Festival Princesses represent 13 Indiana colleges and universities and 21 cities and towns across the state. With a cumulative GPA of 3.5, this year's 500 Festival Princesses were selected from hundreds of applicants based upon communication skills, commitment to service, leadership, scholarship, professionalism.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Evans Woollen, Who Designed Clowes Hall, Dies at 88

BY

PUBLISHED ON May 19 2016

Evans Woollen, the Indianapolis architect who designed Clowes Memorial Hall, died Tuesday, May 17. He was 88.
Evans Woollen

In 2013, the 50th anniversary of Butler's beloved theater, he gave an interview to Butler Magazine in which he talked about how he was hired, why he decided to use exposed concrete, and how the building has held up over the decades.

Read it here: Butler Magazine In His Own Words- Evans Woollen

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

AthleticsCampus

Butler Signs Coach Holtmann to Contract Extension

BY

PUBLISHED ON May 18 2016

Butler and men's basketball coach Chris Holtmann have agreed to a contract extension. The deal now runs through the 2021-22 season.

Chris HoltmannHoltmann's teams have posted a 45-22 record in his two seasons as head coach. He and former coach Brad Stevens are the only coaches in Butler history to lead the Bulldogs to the NCAA Tournament in each of their first two seasons, where both of Holtmann's teams have advanced to the Second Round of the NCAA Tournament. His teams are an impressive 22-14 in BIG EAST play. Holtmann will add Butler's highest-rated recruiting class in program history for the 2016-17 season, a class that was ranked as high as 20th on National Signing Day.

"This extension shows the commitment that both Chris and the University are making to the success of our men's basketball program on and off the court," said Butler Vice President and Director of Athletics Barry Collier. "Chris has led our team to significant accomplishments on the court these past two seasons, while also providing outstanding leadership as a key member of the Butler community."

Butler finished the 2015-16 campaign with a 22-11 record and fourth-place finish in the BIG EAST. The Bulldogs' 79.9 points per game ranked in the Top 25 nationally. Kellen Dunham,Roosevelt Jones and Kelan Martin each earned All-BIG EAST honors.

"In his time at Butler, Chris has proven himself to be among the top tier of coaches nationally," said Butler President James Danko. "We have seen that translate to wins on the court. Chris continues to be an excellent ambassador for Butler University and our mission. On behalf of the Butler community, I'm excited for our future with Chris continuing to lead our men's basketball program and the tremendous coaching staff and student-athletes who represent us so well."

Holtmann was named Butler's 23rd men's basketball head coach in January of 2015, after serving for three months as interim head coach. He guided the 2014-15 Bulldogs to a 23-11 record, a tie for second place in the BIG EAST and an NCAA Tournament appearance. Butler tied the fourth-best single season turnaround (+8 wins) in BIG EAST history.

"I want to thank President Danko and Barry Collier for their continued support and confidence in our long-term ability to lead this outstanding program," said Holtmann. "I know I speak for our staff when I say how much we understand and appreciate the great responsibility that comes with this position. I am honored to serve Butler University in this capacity and I, along with Lori and Nora, are very excited about our future here.

"After graduating two outstanding senior classes, we are well aware of the challenges ahead. Clearly we are competing in one of the premier conferences in college basketball and we look forward to working very hard every day to make all those who have been a part of, and care about, Butler Basketball proud of our program."

The 2016-17 Bulldogs return three starters from last season's team, including Kelan Martin, who averaged 15.7 points and 6.8 rebounds per game while earning All-BIG EAST Second Team honors. The Bulldogs also add a recruiting class ranked in the Top 25 by several outlets, in addition to transfers Kethan Savage and Avery Woodson.

 

Media contact:
John Dedman
jdedman@butler.edu
317-940-9414

AthleticsCampus

Butler Signs Coach Holtmann to Contract Extension

Butler and men's basketball coach Chris Holtmann have agreed to a contract extension.

May 18 2016 Read more
Campus

Student-Driven Healthcare Journal Releases First Issue

BY

PUBLISHED ON May 13 2016

Butler University’s open access healthcare journal, BU Well, launched the first volume of the novel multimedia healthcare review journal on May 13, featuring nine articles on topics from the light in your environment affecting health to financial wellness to phone apps that help track daily well-being.
The staff of BU Well

The website for the open-access journal will be available on Butler University Digital Commons website: http://digitalcommons.butler.edu/buwell/.

BU Well publishes multimedia healthcare articles in three formats per article: print; an informational YouTube interview video vignette with the primary author of the print article; and an infographic of top-line information from each article. Items two and three are created by students working on the BU Well editorial team once an article is accepted for publication.

“BU Well is one of the nation’s only peer reviewed multimedia healthcare journals,” said Anne Leighty, Editor-in-Chief for the 2016-2017 school year. “This experience allows students to view and edit the work of their peers and then use their own ideas and thoughts on a topic to create an infographic and interview. This opportunity allows students to work on technical things like writing and editing, but then also on their creativity when designing an infographic and interview questions.”

This journal is run by about 30 students, representing four of the six colleges on Butler’s campus. There is also an external advisory board that includes professionals in healthcare and healthcare law, and founding executive editor Erin Albert, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice and faculty advisor for BU Well.

Functioning in teams, these Butler scholars have the chance to enhance their writing and editing abilities and promote more awareness on prominent healthcare information to the Butler community. Student duties include constructing, collaborating, and circulating various scholarly articles gathered from other faculty, alumni, and professionals in the healthcare field.

The project was created through a Butler Innovation Fund Grant written by Albert and Dean Mary Graham of COPHS.BU Well

For the next year, the second volume has a theme of the Future of Healthcare and will start accepting submissions starting August 18 on a rolling basis until December 16. BU Well invites submissions of original and scholarly healthcare articles for publishing consideration from any geographic location, and at any level of healthcare: students, residents, faculty, healthcare professionals, and others.

More is at BU Well’s Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/BUWellJournal, and Twitter (@BUWellJournal).

Nine articles are to be published in this first volume on Wellness. Some focus on improving the workplace of current healthcare to improve wellness in the community: “Improving collaboration between pharmacists and physicians”; “What’s app? Using evidence-based medicine smartphone applications in healthcare practice”; “Making an employee wellness program work for you”; and “Revolutionizing the patient package insert with infographics.”

On the other side, one article evaluates the downside to a society focused on wellness: “The social implications of wellness industry as a commodity.”

Others looked at how your individual characteristics can affect your health: “What you ignore at work may harm you: the effects of light, design and nature”; “Mysteries of your blood”; and “Financial wellness in undergraduate students.”

One student even had a personal narrative: “An N of One: my review of management of type 1 diabetes, myself as the patient.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Student-Driven Healthcare Journal Releases First Issue

BU Well is one of the nation’s only peer reviewed multimedia healthcare journals.

May 13 2016 Read more
Campus

Robert Soltis '87 Named New Dean of COPHS

BY

PUBLISHED ON May 11 2016

Robert Soltis ’87, who has taught Pharmacology at Drake University since 1992 and is currently the Ellis and Nelle Levitt Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology, will return to Butler University as the new Dean of the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (COPHS) beginning June 27.

Dean Robert SoltisSoltis served as Chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Administrative Sciences in Drake’s College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences from 2003-2012 and has been a full Professor since 2007. In 2000-2001, he was a Visiting Scientist at Pioneer Hi-Bred International in Johnston, Iowa.

“When (Butler Dean) Mary Graham told me she was retiring, I thought this would be a great opportunity,” Soltis said. “I’m looking forward to getting back to Butler and working with the faculty and staff in the college.”

During his 24 years at Drake, Soltis was involved in a variety of innovative projects, including leading efforts to renovate lab spaces and developing and implementing a new undergraduate degree in health sciences. In addition, he has been engaged in strategic planning and earned a reputation for being an excellent teacher, scholar, and collaborative, transparent leader. He also served as Faculty Senate president.

Prior to joining Drake, he was a Pharmacology Research Associate (PRAT Fellow) at the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

At Butler, he will oversee the University’s second-largest college, with 937 students. COPHS’s three-year average pass rate for the North American Pharmacy Licensure Exam (NAPLEX) is 99.2 percent, and its three-year average pass rate for the PANCE (Physician Assistant National Certifying Exam) is 96 percent. The national pass rate average is 94 percent.

“Bob’s significant experience as a faculty member, department chair, and Faculty Senate president at Drake make him an ideal candidate to serve as the next Dean of COPHS,” Butler Provost Kathryn Morris said. “I believe Bob will elevate COPHS from its already strong standing, and he will contribute to the broader academic leadership team at Butler. I look forward to working with him.”

Soltis earned his Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (cum laude) from Butler and his doctorate in Pharmacology/Toxicology at the Indiana University School of Medicine in 1991. His wife, Denise, and their twin daughters, Abby and Sarah, are all Butler alumni. (Their daughter Emily graduated from Bradley University.)

Denise Soltis worked at Drake for several years. She is now pursuing a master’s in Global Health through Northwestern University.

Soltis said that over the years he has kept up with Butler’s College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences through the Dean’s newsletter and alumni events. When he visited to interview for the position, he was “struck by how complete everything seemed.”

“It was a testament to Mary and her administrative team of how well the college is positioned for the future,” he said. “I look forward to moving the college to the next level.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Robert Soltis '87 Named New Dean of COPHS

Robert Soltis ’87 will return to Butler University as the new Dean of the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (COPHS) beginning June 27.

May 11 2016 Read more

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