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She Couldn't Find The Book She Needed, So She Wrote Her Own

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 09 2017

Ann Bilodeau wanted a book to explain to her then-5-year-old daughter why she didn’t believe in God, but such a book didn’t exist.

So Bilodeau wrote her own.

What Do You Believe, Mama? (Mascot Books), an illustrated children’s book, features a mother teaching her daughter lessons such as “Look for things that are true. Be open to ideas. Listen to your heart” and “You don’t have to believe in God to be good.”

“My daughter started asking questions,” said Bilodeau, a Speech-Language Pathologist and Director of Butler University’s Speech and Language Clinic. “All the kids around her asked her why she did not believe in God, and she would come home crying because they said she was going to hell. We have always been respectful of others and I wanted a book to help me share that message with her.”

Bilodeau, a secular humanist, said that growing up, she attended a Methodist church—mainly on the holidays and special occasions. She never felt connected to a higher being, but she appreciated the moral lessons found in various religious ideologies, particularly the Golden Rule.

That is the advice she imparts in the book.

“I believe in caring for people with RESPECT, KINDNESS, ACCEPTANCE, FAIRNESS, and LOVE,” she writes. “I believe in knowing right from wrong and making good choices.”

“I wanted to find ways to teach her these important lessons—but from a secular perspective,” Bilodeau said.

The book is illustrated by Stanley Burford, Bilodeau’s aunt and a Herron School of Art professor emeritus.

“No children’s book is any good without wonderful illustrations, and this is where my aunt comes in,” Bilodeau said. “She completed these when she was 80 (she’s now 82).  She is an amazing woman and partnering with her on this project means the world to me.”

What Do You Believe, Mama? is available through amazon.com, Barnes & Noble, and Books-a-Million.

“If we sell some and get the book—and the message—out there, I will be over the moon,” Bilodeau said.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Board of Trustees Elects Seven New Members

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 04 2017

The Butler University Board of Trustees has elected seven new members—six of whom are Butler alumni.

The new trustees are Alex Anglin, Jana Fuelberth, Chris Gahl, Robin Lauth, Tom Mathers, Bill Soards, and Brian Stemme.

The trustees, who meet three times a year, are charged with fiscal and strategic oversight and governance of Butler University.

More about each new member follows.

Alex Anglin ’10Alexander A. “Alex” Anglin ’10 is a Consultant within Eli Lilly and Company’s API Manufacturing Finance division. He joined the company in 2014 and has served as a Senior Analyst and Associate Consultant in Lilly’s Corporate Audit Services and Corporate Financial Planning functions.

He earned a B.S. in Accounting and is a Certified Public Accountant. While at Butler, Anglin was a member of the men’s basketball team under Coach Brad Stevens as well as a member of the Spring Sports Spectacular Executive Board, an organization raising funds and awareness for Special Olympics Indiana.

He has formally served on the YMCA of Greater Indianapolis Avondale Meadows Advisory Board. Currently, he serves on the Indiana CPA Society’s Diversity Initiatives Council and is an MBA Prep Class of 2018 Fellow with Management Leadership for Tomorrow, an organization that equips high-potential minority professionals with the skills necessary to lead organizations and communities worldwide.

His sister Kymbrielle Anglin ’08 is a Butler alumna. His wife, Lindsey ’11, is a Deputy Prosecuting Attorney in the Marion County Prosecutor’s Office. She earned a B.A. in Electronic Media/Broadcast Journalism from Butler’s College of Communication in 2011 and obtained her JD from IU McKinney School of Law in 2014. While at Butler, she was a member of the women’s track and field team.

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Jana Fuelberth ’10Jana E. Fuelberth ’10 is President and Co-Founder of analytic.li, a human capital management analytics company that helps employers make data-driven people decisions by combining HR and business data. She is also the Co-Founder of HireCredit, an employer tax credit processor. Jana currently serves as Partner in Beyond Payroll.

She earned a B.S. in Marketing. She was a Butler Business Scholar, as well as a member of Kappa Alpha Theta and the Podium Expressions Program Board of the Student Government Association. She serves on the Young Alumni Board of Directors and is a current member of the Indianapolis Zoo Council.

Fuelberth has numerous family ties to Butler. Her brother, Ben Fuelberth, earned a B.S. in Marketing in 2008, and her sister-in-law Kate (Fuson) earned a B.S. in Elementary Education in 2008. Her late grandfather Robert “Bud” Laue (d. 1993) earned a B.S. in Business Administration from Butler in 1949.

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Chris Gahl ’00Chris Gahl ’00 earned a B.S. in Radio/TV. He has been Senior Vice President, Marketing and Communications for Visit Indy, the marketing organization for the city of Indianapolis, since 2005. He is a former member of Butler’s Young Alumni Board of Directors and Alumni Board of Directors. He also has spoken at the University Convocation for the past few years.

A member of the 2012 Super Bowl Host Committee, Gahl helped spearhead promotion and media relations for Super Bowl XLVI. Previously, he was co-owner of a marketing firm in Hawaii, helping various tourism clients in the islands.

In 2013, Gahl was named a “40 Under 40” business leader by the Indianapolis Business Journal. In 2014, he was a member of the Stanley K. Lacy Leadership Class. In 2015, he co-chaired the city’s Plan 2020 Love Indy committee. In 2016, he helped launch the city’s Film Indy initiative, helping attract TV and film-related production to Indy.

Gahl serves on the St. Vincent Foundation Board of Directors and the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library Board of Directors. He and his wife, Catherine (Dunaway) ’99, have two sons.

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Robin (Robertson) Lauth ’77, MS ’82Robin S. (Robertson) Lauth ’77, MS ’82 earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees in Education. As an undergraduate, she was a member of Kappa Alpha Theta, the cheerleading squad, and was voted Homecoming Queen.

Lauth is President of the Lauth Family Foundation, Inc. She previously owned and managed the first three free-standing Vera Bradley retail stores and was an elementary school teacher at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel. She is Vice President of the Lake Maxincuckee Association and a member of the Junior League.

Her husband, Bob, is Chairman of Lauth Group, Inc., a national real estate development construction company based in Carmel, Indiana.

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Tom MathersThomas “Tom” Mathers is the Founder and Chairman of Déclion Holdings, a biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery and development of innovative treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. Prior to Déclion, Tom was the President and CEO of CoLucid Pharmaceuticals, Inc., which focused on the development of lasmiditan for the acute treatment of migraine headaches. Eli Lilly and Company acquired CoLucid in March 2017 for $960 million.

Prior to joining CoLucid, Mathers was President and CEO of Peptimmune, Inc.; President and CEO of Cell Based Delivery, Inc.; Vice President and General Manager of Cardion AG; and Vice President of Strategic Development at Genzyme. For nine years, he has served on the Board of Directors for the Biotechnology Industry Organization where he is active in the policy areas of capital formation, bioethics, intellectual property, and regulatory policy.

Mathers earned a B.S. in Engineering from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1988. He went on to serve as a Captain in the United States Army and received several medals for his service as an AH-64 Apache helicopter pilot during the Gulf War.

Mathers and his wife, Michele, have two children, Savannah ‘20 (COPHS) and Tucker. Savannah is in Butler’s new Healthcare and Business degree program and is a member of Butler’s cheerleading squad and Delta Gamma sorority. Tucker graduated from Tufts with a degree in International Security and Arabic, and was the captain of the men’s lacrosse team, winning two NCAA National Championships.

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Bill Soards II ’96Bill Soards II ’96 has been President of AT&T Indiana since October 2013. In this role, he is responsible for external affairs for AT&T in the state, including state and local government relations, community affairs, regulatory and legislative activities, and initiatives before the Indiana General Assembly and the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission.

He earned a B.S. in Telecommunications from Butler’s Jordan College of the Arts. He was awarded the Hilton U. Brown Alumni Achievement Award in 2004 and was also named to Butler’s “50 Under 50” list that same year. As a student, he was a member of the Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He is also a past member of the Young Alumni Council and the Alumni Engagement Sub-Committee.

Soards’ family ties to Butler run deep. His mother, Mary Lu  Schroeder Pennington, earned both a B.S. and M.S. in Education from Butler’s College of Education in 1990 and 1994 respectively; she is associated with the class of 1967. His stepfather, Kenneth Pennington, also earned his B.S. and M.S. from Butler’s College of Education. Pennington played basketball for Butler under Coach Tony Hinkle and is a member of the BU Athletic Hall of Fame. His wife, Ann (Fulkerson) ’95, earned a B.A. in Journalism.

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Brian A. Stemme ’91Brian A. Stemme ’91 is the Project Director for BioCrossroads, , a non-profit organization which stimulates the continued growth of Indiana’s life sciences industry by investing in life sciences businesses and public-private partnerships, connecting   local companies with resources and building awareness of the industry.  As Project Director, Stemme works to identify and develop opportunities for growth within Indiana’s sector, evaluate early-stage companies for BioCrossroads’ venture capital fund and support the State’s efforts to attract and grow life sciences companies. He is a Board member of biotechnology companies Algaeon and Allinaire, and a co-founder of Indy Science Connect.  Prior to BioCrossroads, he worked for Eli Lilly and Company and Arthur Andersen.

Stemme earned his B.S. in Accounting with Honors from Butler and was selected for the Top 100 Outstanding Students Program and a member of President Bannister’s inaugural Council on Presidential Affairs. He was a member of the Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity. He is a past Trustee and a former Alumni Board President.

Stemme’s wife, Britt, is a domestic relations mediator. Brian and Britt have four children: Kathryn, a junior at the University of Louisville; Mark and Rachel, twins who are seniors in high school; and Frances, an eighth-grader.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Board of Trustees Elects Seven New Members

The Butler University Board of Trustees has elected seven new members—six of whom are Butler alumni.

Oct 04 2017 Read more
hrc
Arts & CultureCampus

In The HRC, A Blank Wall Becomes a Canvas

BY Hannah Hartzell ’17

PUBLISHED ON Oct 02 2017

One wall gets a new look — a painting depicting the front of Hinkle Fieldhouse.

Butler Director of Recreation Scott Peden was running on the track in the Health and Recreation Center (HRC) when he noticed the number of blank walls.

“I saw this particular wall,” Peden said, referring to the north entrance, “and thought: ‘We need to put something there.’”

So he turned to Chris Blice and John Edwards, who painted the mural in the Robertson Hall Johnson Boardroom as well as the historical mural in the Wildman Room in Hinkle Fieldhouse.

Peden proposed a medium-sized painting.

But Blice and Edwards were thinking big picture.

“They came back to me with a vision that was 10 times what I’d thought of,” said Peden. “They wanted to make the entire wall a mural.”

Blice and Edwards proposed creating a massive rendering of Hinkle Fieldhouse from the outside looking in. A glimpse of the Hinkle magic.

“We didn’t want the colors to be overpowering or realistic, though,” Edwards said. “It needed to blend in with the room.”

The room, Peden said, is somewhere students often come to study or relax. He thinks the mural will enhance the soft space even further.

The new mural will hold special significance for the graduating class of 2010, which helped fund it. According to Peden, when the 2010 graduates couldn’t decide what to do with their class gift money, they gave it to the HRC.

“The HRC meant so much,” Peden said. “They were the first class to have use of it for four full years. They really valued it, and they also valued Hinkle.”

When he contacted the 2010 class president and shared the idea, she was “extremely excited.” The class gave its blessing and the Hinkle mural got the green light.

Blice and Edward began work on Monday, September 11, and they were still working on it as this story was being written.

In the meantime, they’re discussing where they want to paint their next Butler mural. “It’s very special,” Blice said of the experience. “This is our neighborhood college and we love Butler.”

“For me, it’s nostalgic,” Edwards said. “I grew up here. I’ve known Butler forever.”

hrc
Arts & CultureCampus

In The HRC, A Blank Wall Becomes a Canvas

One wall gets a new look — a painting depicting the front of Hinkle Fieldhouse

Oct 02 2017 Read more
Campus

How Butler Prepared Him for the Mayo Clinic

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 19 2017

As an undergraduate at Butler, Robert Jacobson ’80 participated in a dizzying array of activities—debate team, student government, dorm governance, writer, and cartoonist for The Butler Collegian—while majoring in pre-med.

All of that, he told students in the Pre-Med Society over lunch on September 21, shaped and prepared him for the rigors of medical school and a career in pediatrics at the Mayo Clinic.

Robert Jacobson“I would say Butler is a great place for professional preparation,” said Jacobson, who grew up in Indianapolis' Warren Township. “Butler offers you a lot of opportunities to challenge yourself, and medical schools are looking for how well you do on the standardized tests and how well you’ve challenged yourself. They want to see students who did hard work and did well with that. Butler offers you that. At the same time, Butler offers you a chance to explore who you are and what you’re capable of doing.”

The Center for High Achievement and Scholarly Engagement (CHASE) invited Dr. Jacobson to be the first speaker in its alumni speaker series, which is designed to connect graduates with current students in the Honors Program. Jacobson, who graduated with Highest Honors in Chemistry, shared his story with several science classes, groups of students interested in pursuing medicine, and, on Thursday night, nearly 100 people in the Reilly Room.

He shared fond memories of how he met Renee (Oehler) ’81, a Pharmacy major, on his first day at Butler. How, as a sophomore, he created a dorm-based fraternity event called the Ross Hall Rat Race that featured competitions such as the blindfolded maze and a mattress race and ended with a dance. How he helped Renee, who ran the campus movie series, promote a screening of The Exorcist by drawing a poster showing a girl vomiting and the caption “Guess What’s Coming Up This Friday.”

And he told how lessons he learned gathering evidence as part of debate preparation inspired him as he advanced from medical school at the University of Chicago to residency at Yale University. At Yale, one of his mentors told him that no one should take a job in clinical medicine without touring the Mayo Clinic.

Jacobson was already a fan of the world-renowned clinic—he had signed up for the free monthly magazine Mayo Clinic Proceedings while at Butler. On the tour, Jacobson noted the clinic’s practice of evidence-based medicine that depended on research.

“I fell in love with Mayo Clinic,” he said. “It was everything a former debater from Butler would love about medicine because there was real evidence for what we did and I could be part of gathering the evidence just the way I started in September of 1976 for the debate team at Butler—collecting evidence.”

Jacobson said he originally intended to be an internist, and found pediatrics mortifying. “The first child I ever drew blood from was dying of measles in a hospital bed.” But the first rotation he had as a four-year resident was ambulatory pediatrics, and he found it intriguing that every child, depending on their age and their development, offered a different aspect of “the differential diagnosis”—the list of diseases you would consider in making a diagnosis.

He had found his calling.

Jacobson advised students to “realize what you can deliver and are good at.” He said he had been active in student government at a university-wide level, but he found dorm activities to be a better fit. “While I got a kick at times from butting heads with our President, Alexander Jones, and Herb Schwomeyer, the Dean of Men, it wasn’t the thing I really enjoyed. So ask yourself: What am I good at and what do I enjoy doing? And how can I do that better?”

He also offered advice about:

-The importance of the Honors Program. Good students often hear that they’re doing well, he said. “The Honors Program gave me the opportunity to hear, ‘That’s not good enough. You’ve got to do that over.’ The program pushes you and prepares you for medical school, where everyone is an exceptional student.

-Writing a thesis. “Even if you don’t think of yourself as a great writer, you are writing it down and trying to make the sentences match and click with the evidence. In making your arguments, you will learn so much more.”

-Starting on projects immediately. “I think there’s a real danger in procrastinating because something’s difficult. I think that if you have work assigned, spending a little time on it every day is better than saving it up. Get working now rather than putting off the big things.”

“Butler will do a great job preparing you for how to study, how to think, how to present yourself, and how to be efficient with time,” he said. “There will be doubts in your mind whether the degree of work is worth it. But boy, I swear I meet people in all walks of life who will tell you that about their career—there were certain points where they were questioning it. But the great thing about health is the problem you’re trying to solve won’t go away. There will always be ill people who need your help. To have a career where you’re helping a person, you can keep coming back to: That’s worth it.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

How Butler Prepared Him for the Mayo Clinic

Jacobson advised students to “realize what you can deliver and are good at.”

Sep 19 2017 Read more
Hurricane Irma Destruction
CampusCommunity

Hurricane Irma, Up Close and Personal

BY Hannah Hartzell ’17

PUBLISHED ON Sep 18 2017

September 6 was supposed to be the first day of school in the U.S Virgin Islands. Teachers like Vanessa Mackenzie were supposed to start lessons.

Then Hurricane Irma struck. You can’t hold class when a Category 5 hurricane is barreling through the Caribbean.

Mackenzie, who graduated from Butler in 2015, had recently moved to the Caribbean and was slated to begin her first year of teaching on the island of St. Thomas. When we spoke the week after the hurricane, she was just hoping her students were safe and had a place to sleep.

“Half of my students live on St. John and the other half live in the part of the island that was completely devastated,” Mackenzie said. “I don’t know what kind of devastation they are going home to, or not going home to.”

It’s not only homes that are destroyed. Mackenzie said power lines are strewn across the streets. Cars have no windows. Trees are stripped bare.

With the island in disarray, citizens are on a curfew. They are only allowed outside between noon and 6:00 PM. During those hours, Mackenzie said everyone wants three things: gas, ice, and water.

“It’s unbelievable how important those things have become,” said Mackenzie, who stayed in a hotel on the south portion of the island during the hurricane—and returned to find her house still standing. “You need gas for your car and your generator, and water is essential on a Caribbean island.”

Citizens are unsure when the next shipment of supplies will come, so they are relying on the generators for power. “We need electricians, contractors, and construction workers,” Mackenzie said. “We need national help.”

For now, Mackenzie is running her generator for a few hours a day, just enough to keep food cold.

She’s also utilizing a Facebook group where people are sharing information about where they’ve found provisions. “That’s how I’m finding out where ice is available,” she said. “That’s how we’re spreading information.”

Those that don’t have internet are relying on word of mouth and the help of neighbors.

“Every time you approach someone in the street, they ask how you are and how your family is,” Mackenzie said. “There have been a lot of people helping and that’s the coolest part.”

The islanders have been told it will take six to 12 months to restore power. There’s no word on when the students will start school again.

“Private schools are getting back in class sporadically,” Mackenzie said. “But I work for a public-school system and I lost all the windows in my classroom. The wall is concave.”

One of the school buildings that is intact is being used by the Red Cross for disaster relief.

Mackenzie though, hopes classes can resume quickly.

“Coming back to school will be the only sense of normal stability for these kids. There’s no routine right now.”

The children are learning one lesson you can’t learn in a classroom though: resiliency.

“We’re going to rebuild,” said Mackenzie. “We’re going to be OK.”

Hurricane Irma Destruction
CampusCommunity

Hurricane Irma, Up Close and Personal

Vanessa Mackenzie ’15, who is teaching on the U.S. Virgin Islands, hopes to get back to her classroom soon.

Sep 18 2017 Read more
Campus Drone
Campus

Butler Named 'Most Innovative School' In the U.S. News 2018 Rankings

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 12 2017

Butler University is the only Midwest Regional University to earn the U.S. News designation as Most Innovative School, according to the magazine’s 2018 rankings released on Tuesday, September 12. For the eighth consecutive year, Butler ranks No. 2 overall among 171 Midwest Regional Universities. Butler is also recognized among the best in the nation for four co-curricular programs that enhance the educational experience for students.

U.S. News created the Most Innovative School category three years ago “so high-ranking college officials could pick schools that the public should be watching because of the cutting-edge changes being made on their campuses.” Butler has claimed the top spot in the Midwest Regional Universities category every year.

A fundamental part of the University’s strategic vision, Butler 2020, is a commitment to creativity in all aspects of the learning environment and organization. “We’ve set a course to become an innovative leader in the creation and delivery of transformative, student-centered education,” said President James M. Danko. “These rankings demonstrate that we’re living up to this commitment and that our academic peers are taking notice.”

Some notable innovation initiatives at Butler University include:

  • launching 18 new majors and 11 new minors in the past 6 years;
  • awarding 43 Innovation-Fund grants to support inventive ideas among students, faculty, and staff;
  • creating the first-of-its-kind student-run captive insurance company;
  • partnering with The Speak Easy to launch a downtown space devoted to collaboration, creativity, and learning among entrepreneurs and students; and
  • co-developing technology solutions for higher education with partners including High Alpha’s ClearScholarand Salesforce.org.

Butler’s commitment to innovation stems from its goal to prepare graduates to make a meaningful impact in the world. This year’s U.S. News rankings list Butler among the best in the nation for internships, the first-year experience, study abroad, and undergraduate research/creative projects.

Internships. Schools that make this list require or encourage students to apply what they’re learning in the classroom to the real world. Seventy-five percent of Butler students graduate having completed an internship. In the Lacy School of Business, all students are required to complete two internships.

First-Year Experience. According to U.S. News, “Many schools now build into the curriculum first-year seminars or other academic programs that bring small groups of students together with faculty or staff on a regular basis.” Through Butler’s first-year experience, students know what to expect inside and outside the classroom through peer-to-peer and faculty engagement.

Study Abroad. Programs ranked in this category are recognized for substantial academic work abroad for credit—a year, a semester, or an intensive experience equal to a course—and considerable interaction with the local culture. One-third of Butler students study abroad, and cite their experiences as some of the most transformational and enriching of their time as undergraduates.

Undergraduate Research/Creative Projects. Through the Undergraduate Research Conference—the largest in the Midwest—the Center for High Achievement and Scholarly Engagement, and the Butler Summer Institute, Butler encourages students to investigate and explore research projects alongside faculty mentors.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus Drone
Campus

Butler Named 'Most Innovative School' In the U.S. News 2018 Rankings

Butler University is the only Midwest Regional University to earn the U.S. News designation as Most Innovative School, according to the magazine’s 2018 rankings released on Tuesday, September 12.

Sep 12 2017 Read more
Campus

Adam Grant to Speak at Butler

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 12 2017

Adam Grant, one of the world’s 25 most influential management thinkers, will speak about “Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World” October 4 at 7:00 PM in the Schrott Center for the Arts.

Adam GrantAdmission is free, but tickets are required. Public tickets will be available beginning at 10:00 AM Tuesday, September 19, at the Clowes Hall box office and ButlerArtsCenter.org.

In his speech, Grant, a leading expert on how we can find motivation and meaning, and live more generous and creative lives, will explore how we can all get better at recognizing and championing new ideas, and how to build cultures that welcome diverse perspectives and honest feedback.

Grant is The New York Times bestselling author of three books that have sold over a million copies and been translated into 35 languages: Give and Take, Originals, and Option B with Sheryl Sandberg. His TED talks have been viewed more than 9 million times, and his keynote speaking and consulting clients include Facebook and Google, the NBA, the Gates Foundation, Goldman Sachs, and the U.S. Army and Navy.

He is the Saul P. Steinberg Professor of Management and a Professor of Psychology at the Wharton School of Business, where he has been the top-rated Professor for six straight years.

Grant has been recognized by Fortune’s 40 under 40, Oprah’s Super Soul 100, and a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader, and received distinguished scientific achievement awards from the American Psychological Association and the National Science Foundation. He writes for The New York Times on work and psychology, and serves on the Lean In board and the Department of Defense Innovation Board.

Grant, whose insights on unleashing originality have been praised by J.J. Abrams, Richard Branson, and Malcolm Gladwell, received his bachelor’s degree from Harvard University and his doctorate from the University of Michigan.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Adam Grant to Speak at Butler

Author/professor/thought leader explains how people with groundbreaking ideas made them happen.

Sep 12 2017 Read more
Campus

History As Seen Through the Eyes of the Disney Company

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 08 2017

Jason Lantzer’s family trips to Disney World started as vacations. They ended up becoming research for his new book, Dis-History: Uses of the Past at Walt Disney’s Worlds.

In the book, Lantzer, Assistant Director of the Butler University Honors Program, looks at the way Walt Disney’s theme parks have presented history over the years. Each area of the parks, starting with Main Street, gets dissected—what’s there, what’s missing, what’s changed, and what Walt Disney wanted to do as he attempted to reflect his vision of America.

Dis-History“In some ways, Walt Disney is a public historian as he’s fashioning Disneyland, which opened in 1955,” Lantzer said. “And that carries over into Disney World 16 years later—that notion that we’re going to have an educational component to what we do, that it’s not just about going and seeing characters from movies and riding rides. They were helping shape public discourse at the time.”

Early on, the Disney Company was interested and active in “edutainment” about subjects as broad as Davy Crockett and space exploration. Lantzer said that when Disneyland opened, Frontierland was supposed to give visitors the sensation that they were stepping into the past. The original exhibit had horses and a stagecoach, and real Native Americans talking about their customs and traditions.

Lantzer writes that in a speech when the park opened, Disney said he wanted to connect today’s youth with what their parents and grandparents had to go through to settle in this country.

“Davy Crockett was a huge part of that,” said Lantzer, who also teaches an Honors Seminar at Butler called “Disney in American Culture.” “He has almost no presence in the Disney parks today.”

But Disney was a different company then, Lantzer said. It didn’t have the mythology—or the raft of characters—it has today. So while longtime history-related exhibits like the Hall of Presidents still spark interest and discussion among visitors, Disney now has its own history and doesn’t need to rely on the grand American historic narrative anymore.

“In the Epcot theme park, the Norwegian pavilion has been taken over by Frozen,” he said.Jason Lanzter

Lantzer said the Disney Company cooperated in the writing of the book, giving him access to corporate archives. Among the nuggets he was able to glean: Disney had planned history-intensive exhibits that let visitors “experience” the signing of the U.S. Constitution and see what Boston was like before the Battle of Lexington and Concord, but those were never built.

The archives do not indicate why.

In the book, Lantzer also looks at the quality of the history Disney presents—both positive and negative. He particularly likes the Hall of Presidents and American Adventure at Epcot.

“It’s hitting on everything possible,” he said. “Does it get everything? No, of course not. But what it does do, it does surprisingly well for a 20-minute show exposing American history from the Colonial period to the present.”

Overall, Lantzer said, Disney does a reasonably good job presenting history.

“Could they do things better? Sure,” he said. “But that’s not their business. They are a company, for profit, and they are trying to find ways that are going to hit with the public. If history is a tool in that regard, then they’re going to use it.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

History As Seen Through the Eyes of the Disney Company

Jason Lantzer’s family trips to Disney World started as vacations. They ended up becoming research for his new book, Dis-History: Uses of the Past at Walt Disney’s Worlds.

Sep 08 2017 Read more
Campus

The Butler Arts Center Sees the Big Picture (20x40 Feet)

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 07 2017

The Butler Arts Center has unveiled The Journey from Outside In, a 20-by-40-foot painting by Indianapolis artist Justin Vining that required 263 hours of work spread over three months and 25.5 gallons of paint.

The painting, which will hang in the Clowes Memorial Hall lobby for a year, depicts sunrise over the Indianapolis skyline, the Butler University campus, and farmland on the outskirts of town. The Clowes Hall lobby is open to visitors Monday through Friday from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

The Journey from Outside In“My inspiration for the painting really stems from my time as an elementary art school teacher, and a lot of my early work as a professional artist,” Vining said. “Super whimsical, very brightly colored, tons of movement. Because of its massive scale, there’s a lot of room for playful fun. When thinking about this, I had a lot of different ideas churning, but I thought that style of my artwork would lend itself best to this project.”

A time-lapse video of The Journey from Outside In, from start to unveiling, can be seen here. An interview with Vining is here.

Vining’s painting is the first piece commissioned by the Arts Center. Ty Sutton, Executive Director of the Butler Arts Center (Clowes Hall, the Schrott Center for the Arts, the Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall, and Lilly Hall Studio Theatre), said a painting of this size is “a true challenge for any artist.”

“This is the size of a two-bedroom apartment at 800 square feet,” he said. “When I met with Justin for the first time, I was confident that he was the perfect choice for our first commission. The amount of work and dedication, and the extraordinary number of man-hours and support this took from Justin’s entire community of supporters is really something special.”

Vining is an Indianapolis-based artist, specializing and landscapes and cityscapes. He studied Art Education at Purdue University and taught elementary art for three years. Following his tenure as a teacher, Vining attended Valparaiso Law School, where he rekindled his love for creating between classes and clerking. Shortly after graduating and passing the bar in 2010, he decided to pursue art full time and hasn’t looked back since.

Originally from a small farm town in Indiana, Vining finds inspiration from American regionalist painters and WPA-era public works. In his progress as a full-time artist, his artwork has evolved from bright, whimsical watercolors and acrylics to more classical oil scenes. In his exploration of oils, he’s begun working en plein air and exploring more muted, natural tones. In 2017, he plans to continue his exploration in oils, balancing this new found love of plain air painting with his studio work.

Starting in 2009, Vining’s work has been displayed in cities and towns throughout Indiana. His exhibits and shows in 2017 have included the 93rd Annual Hoosier Salon Exhibit, Juried Exhibit at the Indiana State Museum; “Painting in the Parks,” a group exhibit in the Garfield Park Art Center; and “Chasing Daylight,” new work by Indiana Plein Air Painters, Hoosier Salon, Carmel.

 

Media contact:
Joanna Hodges
jhodges@butler.edu
317-940-6411

Campus

The Butler Arts Center Sees the Big Picture (20x40 Feet)

Because of its massive scale, there’s a lot of room for playful fun.

Sep 07 2017 Read more
Campus

President Danko Responds to DACA

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 06 2017

On September 7, 2017, Butler University President James M. Danko sent the following letter to Indiana’s U.S. Senators and Indiana’s U.S. Representative for District 7 concerning the proposed changes in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

Campus

President Danko Responds to DACA

On September 7, 2017, Butler University President James M. Danko sent the following letter to Indiana’s U.S. Senators and Indiana’s U.S. Representative for District 7 concerning the proposed changes in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

Sep 06 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler Bowl Gets a New Name

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 05 2017

The Butler Bowl, Butler University’s longtime home for football and soccer, will be officially renamed the Sellick Bowl on September 16 in honor of Winstan R. “Bud” Sellick ’47 and his wife, Jacqueline (Blomberg) ’44.

Sellick BowlButler President James M. Danko and Athletic Director Barry Collier will unveil the plaque during an invitation-only ceremony shortly before the 6:30 PM football game between Butler and the Taylor Trojans.

The Sellicks’ generosity toward their alma mater spanned a third of a century, and it culminated this spring with a $9.4 million gift from their estate that is being shared by Butler Athletics, the Lacy School of Business, and general University support.

In honor of their gift, the Butler Bowl becomes the Sellick Bowl, the Champions Room inside the Sellick Bowl is now the Bud and Jackie Sellick Room, and the Registrar’s Office is the Jacqueline Blomberg Sellick Registrar's Suite.

“The Sellicks had a tremendous concern for the well-being of future generations of Butler students,” Danko said. “This generous gift will ensure Bud and Jackie’s wonderful legacy—that current and future Bulldogs will have access to the same great education and campus experiences that they enjoyed.”

The Sellicks had asked longtime friends Dan Yates and Bob Wildman to assist in the transfer of their final gift to Butler. Wildman noted that the Sellicks “were special people with a special place in their hearts for Butler.”

“During their long history with the school, they saw it grow and prosper and I know they were quite happy and proud to be a part of its success,” he said. “They would be extremely grateful to Butler for this recognition by the University of their generous gift.”

The Sellicks were married for 69 years. A Marine Corps veteran, Bud served on Okinawa and in Korea. His association with Butler University was long and deep. When Bud was born, his father was the Treasurer of Butler University in Irvington, as well as a Professor of Economics at the school. In 1939, when he came to Butler as a student, an aunt was Assistant Registrar and a second aunt was a Librarian.

Bud’s pursuit of a degree was interrupted by World War II. He returned to Butler following the war, earned his degree in economics, and married his college sweetheart, Jacqueline Blomberg. As a student, he was involved in the band, Kappa Kappa Psi band honorary, and Delta Tau Delta fraternity. In 1947, he began his successful career as an insurance agent in the Indianapolis area.Sellick Bowl Sign

After fighting in Korea, he returned to Indianapolis, where he served as President and Owner of Bud Sellick Insurance Agency and the Blessing-Sellick Insurance Agency for several decades until his retirement. He was also involved in a successful real estate business in the Indianapolis area with his wife and brother-in-law.

Bud died March 30, 2015. He was 93.

Jackie was a lifelong resident of Indianapolis. She attended Shortridge High School, then went on to become a graduate of Butler University. During her Butler days, she was a member of Alpha Chi Omega sorority, a member of the Debate Team, and a recipient of the Ovid Butler Award.

Her career included over 20 years on the Industrial Board. She also owned and operated commercial real estate for 40 years.

Jackie died October 20, 2012. She was 89.

The Sellicks endowed three scholarships at Butler: The Winstan R. Sellick, Jacqueline Sellick, and Herman W. Blomberg Scholarship; the Sellick, Deming, and Schuler Scholarship; and the Winstan R. Sellick and Jacqueline B. Sellick Business Scholarship. They also made gifts to the Butler Fund and several athletic funds, including the restoration of Hinkle Fieldhouse.

In 2007, Bud and Jackie Sellick received the Ovid Butler Society Mortarboard Award. In 2014, Bud also was honored when he received the Butler Medal. He also was a donor and strong supporter of Delta Tau Delta Fraternity.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Bowl Gets a New Name

Stadium to be Named in Honor of Bud and Jackie Sellick.

Sep 05 2017 Read more
Campus

BITS Brings Out 1,500 Volunteers to Help In Indy

BY Hannah Hartzell '17

PUBLISHED ON Aug 23 2017

Reilly RoomYou would’ve thought there was a party in the Reilly Room on Saturday, August 26. Music was blasting and everyone was moving. But the students and community members were doing a lot more than just belting out tunes. They were boxing up food as part of Bulldogs into the Streets (BITS), Butler University’s annual day of service.

Sophomore Kayla Garrison was one of them. “Today, we are packing meals for Hoosiers that are food insecure. One in four kids in Indiana has trouble getting food right now,” she said. “So we’re packing for them.”

Garrison’s assembly line, dubbed “Dawgs Gotta Eat,” packed 180 meals within the first hour, adding to the grand total of 25,000 by the day’s end.

The packing party was spearheaded by the Million Meals Movement, a humanitarian food organization that feeds Hoosiers and empowers volunteerism.

Million Meals Movement’s Shane Scarlett said the BITS volunteers assembled and packed enough meals to feed 6,250 families of four that need food, right here in Indiana.Bulldogs into the Streets

And that’s just one BITS location.

Altogether, more than 1,000 Butler representatives volunteered in more than 40 locations. Butler President James M. Danko was pleased with the turnout.

“Our BITS participation has gone up 50 percent in only two years,” Danko said at the BITS kickoff Saturday morning. “We’re about to provide 4,500 hours—over $100,000 worth of labor—to our neighbors. Now, that’s the Butler Way.”

In other words: “It’s crazy great.” At least, that’s what Mark Varnau exclaimed as he bustled around the Boulevard Place Food Pantry helping supervise. “We don’t have the time or the energy to get some of this stuff done,” said Varnau, who regularly volunteers at the pantry.

Eight hundred families utilize the pantry each month, Varnau said. That’s why the BITS volunteers spent time organizing the food storage and cleaning up the grounds.James Danko and Students

Sophomore Alyssa Mason and first-year Jack Carlin were part of the clean-up crew. Mason, a BITS site leader, was tasked with encouraging and leading the other volunteers. But she wasn’t afraid to get her hands dirty.

“We’re weeding and putting down some mulch for their landscaping,” she said, adding: “You think that hard labor won’t be very fun, but when you’re with other people, it can be lots of fun.”

Carlin also noted the significance of such an event. “There are so many people on campus. It’s important that we reach out and help the town around us.”

Campus

BITS Brings Out 1,500 Volunteers to Help In Indy

BITS Brings Out 1,500 Volunteers to Help In Indy

Aug 23 2017 Read more

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