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Indianapolis Public Schools Requests a Second Butler Lab School

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 23 2017

The 6-year-old IPS/Butler Lab School has been so successful and in demand that the Indianapolis Public Schools has asked Butler’s College of Education to create a second school.

Inside the Lab School in 2015.

If all goes as planned, the Eliza A. Blaker School 55 at 1349 East 54th Street, named for the founder of the school that eventually became the Butler College of Education, will become the second lab school overseen by the University. The new school, located about three miles from the Butler campus, would open in fall 2018.

The original Lab School, located at 3330 North Pennsylvania Avenue, teaches pre-kindergarten through eighth grade. Officials from Butler’s College of Education officials and Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS) are still discussing which grades would be taught in the second lab school.

The IPS Board is expected to decide on the second lab school in September.

College of Education Dean Ena Shelley said IPS Superintendent Lewis Ferebee and Deputy Superintendent for Academics Wanda Legrand have asked to replicate the first Lab School because of the large waiting list for the current school.

“They’re very pleased with the success of the Lab School,” Shelley said. “It’s been so well received by the community. So many parents are really interested and intrigued by this idea. They love not only the approach, which is different, and the environment, which looks different, but they love the University involvement and commitment to this.”

The Lab School, inspired by the teachings of Reggio Emilia Italy, is a project-based school that builds its curriculum with the children’s interests in mind. Classes often engage in long-term projects that intertwine into all aspects of the day.

The school uses the workshop method for teaching reading, writing, and math, which means that once the students are taught a lesson in that subject area, they are then released to work throughout the room. Children are encouraged to communicate and ask questions of one another during these times, and they frequently work in pairs and groups to encourage communication and problem-solving strategies.

In practicing the Reggio Emilia philosophy of teaching and learning, the school considers the environment to be the third teacher. Students are encouraged to explore and interact with their surroundings. Instead, the students choose seating that fits their learning/work style.


Ron Smith, Principal of the Lab School.Nearly all the teachers at the first Lab School are Butler alumni, as is Principal Ron Smith ’88, MS ’96 and Assistant Principal Nicole Ciegelski Kent ’10.

“It is a joy to work with a staff where most graduated from Butler and all share similar values and beliefs about children and learning,” Smith said.

Smith said the Lab School’s academic performance data is on the rise. “This year, our third-grade mathematics competition team finished second in the district and our fourth-grade team finished first.  Attendance is consistently over 97 percent and our family involvement is extraordinary. There is much to celebrate.”

Shelley said she is happy to see the Lab School idea expand.

“I smiled,” she said, “and I thought: Eliza, you would be so happy to know that this is where the College of Education is today.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Indianapolis Public Schools Requests a Second Butler Lab School

The 6-year-old IPS/Butler Lab School has been so successful and in demand that the Indianapolis Public Schools has asked Butler’s College of Education to create a second school.

Aug 23 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler Welcomes the Class of 2021

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 17 2017

Butler University will welcome 1,065 first-year students on move-in day, Saturday, August 19. Classes begin on Wednesday, August 23.

This year, 14,638 prospective students applied to Butler, a 13 percent increase compared with 2016. In the last two years, the University has seen more than 40 percent growth in first-year applications for admission.
Class of 2021Butler’s Class of 2021 continues the University’s track record of attracting high-quality, academically prepared students. Here’s a look at some numbers.

-36 Valedictorians and 11 Salutatorians

-6 National Merit Finalists

-16 Lilly Scholars

-234 (22 percent) in the top 10 percent of their high school graduating class

-GPA (average): 3.8

The Class of 2021 comes from 35 states and five countries. 43 percent are from Indiana, and 57 percent are from out of state. Fifteen percent of the class is from the Chicagoland area. This year’s class shows significant growth in new students from the Mid-Atlantic region (42), double the number from last year’s class.

Sixteen percent of the class are U.S. students of color or international citizens. Fourteen percent of the class is multicultural and 2 percent are international.

The most popular majors this year are Pre-Pharmacy (107), Exploratory Studies (107), and Biology (73).

Individual student achievements include:

Entrepreneurs:

Austin Valleskey (Hoffman Estates, Illinois) – Developed Impossible Rush, a game intended to improve cognitive skills, which has over 1 million downloads on iTunes to date and was featured on NBC, WGN, Forbes, Business Insider, and the Huffington Post.

Isabella Ruscheinski (Peoria, Illinois) – At 15, started her own cupcake/catering business, which she still runs.

Philanthropists:

Tamalynn OGrady (Dexter, Michigan) – Disheartened by the rising costs associated with the arts, she founded a community service organization aimed at providing free music education to those who may otherwise not have the means. She gave free cello lessons seven days a week during the summer of 2016.

Ethan King (West Olive, Michigan) – When he was 10, he founded Charity Ball, which has raised money to hand-deliver thousands of soccer balls and clean drinking water to kids in impoverished areas all over the world.

Lifesaver:

Haylie Hansen (Pewaukee, Wisconsin) – Saved her cousin’s life with CPR her freshman year of high school.

Legacies:

Will Butler Haughey III (Concord, California) – The great, great, great, great grandson of Ovid Butler. He is also the great, great, great grandson of William Wallace, whose brother wrote Ben-Hur.

Henry Johnston (Arlington Heights, Illinois) – His great, great, great, great grandfather was married to Mabel Butler, sister of Ovid Butler.

The University will also welcome 80 new transfer students to campus this fall, including one Lilly Scholar.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Welcomes the Class of 2021

Butler University will welcome 1,065 first-year students on move-in day, Saturday, August 19.

Aug 17 2017 Read more
Campus

Zotec Partners Continues Sponsorship With Butler Athletics

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 08 2017

Zotec Partners announced on August 14 that it will continue a multi-year sponsorship agreement with Butler University’s Athletics Department that allows the company's logo to be displayed alongside the University’s logo on the Hinkle Fieldhouse court.
Scott Law

T. Scott Law, President and CEO of Zotec Partners, notes that the sponsorship, which began in 2011, means much more than just advertising the Zotec Partners brand.

“To us, it is a symbol of our Butler pride and support for the Indianapolis community at large, which is home to 350 Zotec employees,” he said.

As a former student-athlete, Law believes it is important to support the University and its sports teams that will directly benefit from the sponsorship commitment. “I am delighted we can honor the drive, dedication, and teamwork of Butler’s student-athletes,” he adds. “The University’s students, alumni, faculty, and staff are an important part of our company’s history and future, and it is our privilege to support them.”

For more than eight decades, Hinkle Fieldhouse has upheld a reputation as one of the nation’s great sports arenas. The classic facility was constructed in 1928 and has withstood the test of time, maintaining the splendor, character, and atmosphere that made it one of the nation’s most famous basketball arenas in a state that is practically synonymous with the sport. Today, Butler men’s basketball, women’s basketball, and volleyball teams play their home games at Hinkle.

“We are thrilled to continue our partnership with Zotec. Scott Law knows that putting together a great team—as he has at Zotec—takes commitment and support from many participants,” said Athletic Director Barry Collier. “Zotec’s continued, unwavering support greatly benefits our student-athletes, Butler University, and the Indianapolis community.”

In addition to supporting Butler Athletics, Zotec has a long relationship with the Lacy School of Business through the Zotec Business Competition, a competition for sophomore business students involved in the Real Business Experience (RBE) practicum course.

Butler President James M. Danko said the University deeply appreciates the devotion to Butler by Scott and Zotec Partners. “We are not only grateful for their financial contribution, but for their partnership to impact the quality of the student experience at Butler.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Zotec Partners Continues Sponsorship With Butler Athletics

Butler Alumnus and Zotec Founder and CEO Scott Law Proud for his Company to Support Student-Athletes.

Aug 08 2017 Read more
Campus

Holcomb Observatory Presents 'All American Eclipse'

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 07 2017

In the days prior to the first total solar eclipse to pass over the continental United States in 38 years, Butler University’s Holcomb Observatory and Planetarium will present the planetarium show All American Eclipse focusing on this astronomical event.

Holcomb ObservatoryThe show will take place August 17-19. On August 17 and 18, doors will open at 6:30 PM, with shows at 7:00 PM and 8:00 PM. On August 19, doors will open at 3:45 PM, and shows will take place at 4:00 PM, 7:00 PM, and 8:00 PM.

Additional shows will be added if needed.

Admission is $3 for children and $5 for adults for the planetarium show. (Cash only accepted.) Viewing through the telescope is always free.

All American Eclipse will examine historical eclipses, types of eclipses, how and where to observe this eclipse, and what to expect. Following the informational eclipse portion of the program, the planetarium comes alight with a tour of the night time sky pointing out stars, constellations, and planets currently visible in our Hoosier skies.

After the planetarium show, visitors will have an opportunity to view through Indiana's largest telescope, weather permitting. Objects that are being viewed this season include the sun (if daytime), the planets Jupiter and Saturn, M13 (a globular star cluster), Albireo (a binary star), and M57 (the Ring Nebula).

Holcomb Observatory will be closed on the day of the solar eclipse (August 21) so that faculty, students, and staff can travel to get the best view of the eclipse. The path of the eclipse will cut through the United States from Northwest to Southeast. Most of the United States, including ALL of Indiana, will only experience a partial solar eclipse.

Holcomb Observatory and Planetarium is located on the north end of the Butler University campus and can be reached by heading west on 46th Street from Meridian Street. In addition to the planetarium shows, the Observatory will be selling NASA-approved eclipse glasses while supplies last.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Holcomb Observatory Presents 'All American Eclipse'

All American Eclipse will examine historical eclipses, types of eclipses, how and where to observe this eclipse, and what to expect.

Aug 07 2017 Read more
Campus

Schwitzer is Gone. Long Live Schwitzer.

BY Todd Leone

PUBLISHED ON Aug 01 2017

Schwitzer Residence Hall came to life in 1956 and for 60 years was called "home" to many Butler alumni and current students. Demolition of Schwitzer Hall was completed March 1, 2017, and construction of the new residence hall is currently underway. Although Schwitzer Hall has been removed physically, its ashes will be spread throughout campus and it will continue to serve a relevant purpose throughout the Butler University grounds.
A Butler Collegian photo of Schwitzer Hall.In the early stages of construction, bed frames, mattresses, chairs, and desks were removed from Schwitzer and donated to Goodwill. Existing doors, hardware, and equipment were also removed. These will aid in repairs for other Residence Halls throughout campus. The original stone entryway arches and sections of the building facade were removed and preserved. These parts will be incorporated elsewhere on campus. Thus, beloved Schwitzer Hall will continue to live beyond its useful life.

As Schwitzer's walls and floors were taken down, its remains began to fill the site of 750 West Hampton Drive.

As part of the LEED building process, all existing brick, concrete, and stone will be recycled onsite and used as backfill for the new residence hall. The bones of Schwitzer will continue to serve a purpose as the foundation for the new facility.

Shiel Sexton Company is General Contractor for the new $30 million residence hall, which is being developed by American Campus Communities. This is the second phase in the new frontier of modern student housing, a continuance Irvington House renderingof Fairview House. The new student housing will contain 660 beds in apartment-style units, a fitness center, study lounges, game rooms, a large community meeting space, and much more.

In the end, this traditional residence hall gives way to a modern facility, but the ashes of Schwitzer Hall will lay the foundation for a new place that will soon be called "home" to many at Butler University.

Campus

CUE Farm Manager Earns River Friendly Farmer Award

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jul 31 2017

Tim Dorsey, Manager of the CUE Farm at Butler, has won the 2017 River Friendly Farmer Award, a statewide initiative that recognizes farmers who do an outstanding job of protecting rivers, lakes, and streams through their everyday conservation management practices.
Tim Dorsey

The award is given by the Marion County Soil & Water Conservation District. Dorsey will be recognized by Lieutenant Governor Suzanne Crouch and leaders of the Indiana Conservation Partnership at this year’s Indiana State Fair.

“Tim works tirelessly each year to refine and improve conservation practices on the CUE Farm, and it shows in the quality of produce we are able to offer to our customers,” said Julia Angstmann, Director of Butler’s Center for Urban Ecology. “When an ecosystem is in balance, there is no need for artificial fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides that are so harmful to our water resources. The farm’s native and cultivated organisms—pollinators, predatory insects, and carefully selected and placed plants—create checks and balances in the system that benefit all life on the farm."

Nestled between the White River and the Central Canal, the Butler Center for Urban Ecology Farm produces mixed vegetables, fruits, nuts, herbs, flowers, and mushrooms. In recognizing Dorsey, the Soil & Water Conservation District noted that his goals are soil regeneration and holistic farm management, and that he uses a variety of techniques for conserve water and improve soil.

Under his watch, water infiltration has improved visibly, which has made denser plantings possible. That not only improves revenue opportunities but combats weeds.

The CUE Farm has also recently begun to see the presence of reptile life on the farm, which could be attributed to the layered perennial cover available as habitat. Butler University also maintains a managed prairie and riparian buffer adjacent to the farm.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

CUE Farm Manager Earns River Friendly Farmer Award

Tim Dorsey to be honored at this year's Indiana State Fair.

Jul 31 2017 Read more
Campus

The Total Solar Eclipse is Coming (South of Us)

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jul 24 2017

The first total solar eclipse over the continental United States in 38 years will be visible south of Indianapolis in Illinois and Kentucky on August 21, but Indianapolis residents will still get to see a 91 percent partial eclipse, Associate Director of Butler University’s Holcomb Observatory and Planetarium Rick Brown says.

And the best place to see the eclipse locally? Probably your own back yard.

Eclipse Glasses“You don’t need to go anywhere to see it except an open area where the sun would normally be visible,” Brown said. “But you’ll need to wear solar eclipse glasses during this time if you want to look at the sun. They have special filters that prevent your eyes from having permanent damage.”

The partial eclipse—which occurs when the moon passes directly between the sun and earth—will be visible in Indianapolis beginning at 12:57 PM and will end at 3:48 PM, reaching its maximum blockage at 2:24 PM when the moon will block approximately 91 percent of the sun.

The total solar eclipse begins in Oregon and moves eastward along an arching path that includes Kansas City, St. Louis, Nashville, and Charleston, South Carolina.

During a total solar eclipse, the corona of the sun—the gas that surrounds the sun—is visible, Brown said. Normally, it can’t be seen because the sunlight is too bright.

“Sometimes during a total solar eclipse, if you’re lucky, you get to see some stars in the background during the daytime,” Brown said. “And sometimes you can see solar flares and prominence, which are explosions on the surface of the sun.”

Brown said that the Holcomb Observatory and Planetarium will be closed on August 21. Staff members will be heading south to get the best possible view of the total eclipse.

“There’s really no benefit to being at an observatory during our partial solar eclipse,” he said. “The sun takes up about half a degree in the sky, which is less than the width of your finger at an arm’s length. So if you looked at that through a telescope, first of all you’d be magnifying the sun’s light, which would make it even more dangerous, and secondly we would be enlarging it out of our telescope, so you’d only be able to see a small portion of it.”

Special glasses to view the eclipse are for sale for $2 each at the Holcomb Observatory during weekend hours, which begin at 8:15 PM. For more information, visit https://www.butler.edu/holcomb-observatory.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

The Total Solar Eclipse is Coming (South of Us)

And the best place to see the eclipse locally? Probably your own back yard.

Jul 24 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler Again Featured in Fiske Guide to Colleges

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jul 11 2017

Butler University is again among the roughly 300 schools listed in the Fiske Guide to Colleges, a reference book for prospective students looking for “the best and most interesting schools.”

The 2018 edition, which is now available, notes that “the University’s most popular programs are also among its best and include Marketing, Biological Science, Elementary Education, and pre-professional tracks in Pharmacy and Physician Assistant studies.”

Fiske Guide to Colleges“Other solid offerings include Dance, Theater, International Business, and English, especially the creative writing track. The Risk Management and Insurance major focuses on teaching students how to mitigate and manage risks through a combination of insurance and non-insurance techniques; graduates of the program can work in the insurance and financial services industries.”

The book recognizes the Honors program (“designed to foster a diverse and challenging intellectual climate”), undergraduate research, study abroad, “and a strong undergraduate liberal arts experience.”

“Butler University offers quality education, friendly and approachable professors, plenty of opportunities for involvement, and an overall friendly atmosphere,” one student is quoted as saying.

And, of course, the Butler’s entry in Fiske touches on basketball. “Those who attend this small Midwestern University know that Bulldogs basketball is representative of the Butler way of life, which emphasizes teamwork, tenacity, and solid fundamentals,” the book says. As for Hinkle Fieldhouse, it “has reigned as one of the nation’s great sports arenas for more than eight decades.”

The book notes the park-like setting of the Butler campus—“centuries-old trees, open landscaped malls, curving sidewalks, fountains, a nature preserve, a prairie, a historical canal, a formal botanical garden, an observatory, and jogging paths”—as well as the cultural advantages available in Indianapolis.

“Butler truly becomes a community for our students,” says a sophomore. “The students and faculty all work to make Butler life an enjoyable experience for all.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Again Featured in Fiske Guide to Colleges

“Butler University offers quality education, friendly and approachable professors, plenty of opportunities for involvement, and an overall friendly atmosphere.”

Jul 11 2017 Read more
Campus

Placement Rate Rises to 97 Percent for 2016 Graduates

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jul 10 2017

A survey of 2016 Butler graduates has found that six months after graduation, 97 percent were successfully employed, enrolled in or preparing for graduate school, or participating in a gap-year experience—a 2 percentage-point increase compared with the previous class.

The average starting salary for all graduates was $50,000.

“We should definitely be proud of this,” said Courtney Rousseau ’03 MS, a Career Advisor in Butler’s Office of Internship and Career Services (ICS), who led the survey. “It shows the return on investment from a Butler education. Our students are walking away with the skills needed to take that next step.”

The “First Destination Survey” of the 999 graduates found that College of Education graduates had a 100 placement rate—as it has every year for more than a decade.

The Lacy School of Business, which is ranked by Bloomberg BusinessWeek as No. 1 in the nation for internships, had a 99 percent placement rate. All students in the Lacy School interview for and complete two internships for credit, with guidance from a career mentor. The School boasts a network of over 2,000 internship employers, and many internships turn into post-graduate employment.

The placement rate for the Jordan College of the Arts was 98 percent, followed by the College of Communication at 97 percent, and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at 92 percent. The College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (COPHS) had an overall 97 percent placement rate; 95 percent in Pharmacy.

Gary Beaulieu, Director of Butler’s Office of Internship and Career Services (ICS), said his office takes great pride in Butler’s placement rate. ICS assists graduates with their career development at no cost for life—a service that is not guaranteed at many institutions.

“This is a fantastic success for ICS to celebrate,” he said. “This is why we do the work we do.”

Beaulieu said Butler students are well prepared for careers thanks to what they learn in the classroom and also because 75 percent of Butler students complete one or more internships for academic credit.

The knowledge collected from both the survey and reports from across campus identifies graduates’ first post-graduate experience. Overall, ICS captured data from 766 people, meaning 76 percent of 2016 graduates.

Rousseau said the study results are a combination of self-reported data—graduates responding to a survey—and knowledge-based information where the University found the graduates through social media and other measures, including reports from the colleges and departments.

Major employers of Butler’s newly minted graduates include Eli Lilly and Company, Interactive Intelligence, IU Health, Allstate, Community Health Network, and PriceWaterhouse Coopers. Nearly 25 percent of graduates went on to graduate school, with many in medical school or dental school.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Placement Rate Rises to 97 Percent for 2016 Graduates

Major employers of Butler’s newly minted graduates include Eli Lilly and Company, Interactive Intelligence, IU Health, Allstate, Community Health Network, and PriceWaterhouse Coopers.

Jul 10 2017 Read more
Campus

Twenty Years After First PA Class Graduates, the Program's Co-Founder Retires

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jun 30 2017

During the summer in between her junior and senior years at Indiana University, Laurie Pylitt, discovered her future career in the most unlikely place—Seventeen magazine.

Laurie PylittIt was the 1970s, at the height of many women’s rights movements. Pylitt, who was working in a physical therapy department, remembers finding the article, “15 Health Careers for Women,” and thinking how chauvinistic it sounded for the time. After reading it though, she learned about the Physician Assistant (PA) career field for the first time and thought that might be the right choice for her.

In 1976, Pylitt graduated from IU with a Physician Assistant certificate. She balanced full-time employment as a surgical PA in Chicago—a position she held for 15 years—while earning a Master of Health Professions Education from the University of Illinois.

In 1991, Pylitt moved back to her home state of Indiana when she married her husband, Bernard, whom most refer to as “Buddy,” and took a position at Methodist Hospital, now named Indiana University Health Methodist, as the Manager of Quality Assurance.

Her lifelong dream was to start a PA program, and when she was approached to do that at Butler, she said, “It was like a dream come true.”

“Butler and IU Health Methodist combined gave me the opportunity to do something I’ve wanted to do since I was a student,” Pylitt added.

Pylitt, in collaboration with Professor Emeritus Bruce Clayton, co-authored the proposal that started the Butler PA Program, and she served as its founding Program Director from 1994–1998.

“When I came to Butler to start the PA program, there hadn’t been a PA program in Indiana for 20 years,” Pylitt said. One of her goals “was to reintroduce the PA profession to the state.”

It has been 20 years since the first class graduated from Butler, and more than 750 PAs have finished since then. Pylitt takes pride in the fact that several current PA faculty are graduates of the program she was instrumental in starting.

One such student is Assistant Professor Matt Stinson, who is a graduate of the first PA class. He remembers there being much uncertainty during the creation of the program because it wasn’t accredited. And with no accreditation, the nine students in the program would be unable to start their career.

“Laurie was a trailblazer in starting the new PA program, and she worked hard,” Stinson said. “She was able to get the program accredited, I graduated, became a PA for 20 years, and was able to come back here to teach. I’m very appreciative of all the hard work Laurie put into the program.”

*

After a brief hiatus from Butler to work with the Indiana University School of Medicine’s Family Medicine Residency, Pylitt returned to Butler in 2007. She has served in multiple teaching roles: as part of the team teaching clinical assessment for Pharmacy students; as the Course Director for Pharmacy Therapeutics and Case Studies; and as the Co-Course Director for Therapeutics for PAs.

In 2010, she became the COPHS Director of Assessment. The next year, she was instrumental in the re-accreditation process for the Pharmacy program.

Associate Dean for the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Bonnie Brown said Pylitt has been a key player in many areas of the college. Perhaps her largest impact has been with assessment.

“She was all about assessments,” Brown said. “She was always willing to talk to students about assessments, making sure they understood the importance of course instructor evaluations and how that feeds into a system of how we make improvements for the next year. If a student group sees that their comments have been useful to change something for the better for the future, it does make them more aware of how they can provide feedback for change.”

Pylitt described her impact this way: The word “assessment” is no longer a negative word among faculty, staff, and students. Brown agreed.

*

Moving forward, Pylitt is unsure what retirement will bring. She said that since her mid-20s her career has been her identity, and it will be a large adjustment come retirement.

Despite the change, she’s looking forward to traveling more, cooking, listening to audiobooks—which she recently discovered and really enjoys—and working in her 40-foot-by-40-foot garden.

“I’ll continue to learn,” she said. “I like learning new things, or new ways to do old things.”

Media contact:
Krisy Force
kforce@butler.edu
317-940-6842

Campus

Twenty Years After First PA Class Graduates, the Program's Co-Founder Retires

During the summer in between her junior and senior years at Indiana University, Laurie Pylitt, discovered her future career in the most unlikely place—Seventeen magazine.

Jun 30 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler Summer Intensive Students to Perform at the Schrott

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jun 24 2017

Forty-nine dancers from around the country have come to Butler University to participate in the second annual Summer Intensive, a three-week program designed to immerse 13- to 18-year-olds in the culture of dance.

On July 29 at 11:00 AM in Butler’s Schrott Center for the Arts, the public will be able to see what these dancers can do when they perform the ballet Don Quixote as well as jazz and modern works choreographed by the faculty members working on the Summer Intensive program.

DancersAdmission to the performance is free.

Butler Dance Professor Marek Cholewa, who oversees the summer program as Artistic Director, said the purpose of the intensive is to help students grow and develop as they prepare for the next stages in their dance education.

The dancers participate in classes from 9:00 AM to 5:30 PM, Monday through Saturday. There is a strong focus on ballet, which is reflected in the ballet, pointe, partnering, and repertory classes. The students also take daily jazz, modern, and character classes, and all ballet, pointe, modern, character, and partnering classes include live accompanists.

There is even a physical therapist on site twice a week for the dancers to visit if needed.

This year, there are 49 female dancers, ages 12-17, participating in the intensive. Of those, 41 are out of state—coming from as far as California, Florida, and Connecticut. There are 43 who stay in Butler’s Residential College dorm and six who commute to campus every day.

“Students live here to immerse themselves in the culture,” Cholewa said. “We can talk about how we do things, but the best way for them to learn is when we work together.”

Four current Butler male dance majors, Nick Bentz, Francis Mihm, Graeham Toomey, and Nathaniel Tyson, also participate in the program so that the women have the opportunity to take partnering classes.

The faculty includes Butler Dance faculty members Cholewa, Derek Reid, and Susan McGuire, as well as adjunct professors Rosanna Ruffo, Monica Munoz, and Nick Owens.

The summer intensive is organized by the Butler Community Arts School and staff: Karen Thickstun, Director; Courtney Shelburne, Administrative Assistant; and Meredith Hunter-Mason, intern and current Dance major.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Summer Intensive Students to Perform at the Schrott

Forty-nine dancers from around the country have come to Butler University to participate in the second annual Summer Intensive, a three-week program designed to immerse 13- to 18-year-olds in the culture of dance.

Jun 24 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler, CTS Announce Campus-Sharing Partnership

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jun 12 2017

Butler University and Christian Theological Seminary on June 12 announced a campus-sharing partnership. President James M. Danko sent this email explaining the deal:Christian Theological Seminary

Since 2015-2016, Butler University and Christian Theological Seminary (CTS) have been exploring ways to expand and enhance educational experiences at our schools through academic partnerships, operational services, and shared space. After much discussion and community input, we are pleased to inform you that the Board of Trustees for both schools have drafted a campus-sharing strategy and partnership under which Butler would purchase a significant portion of the CTS campus.

Under the potential agreement, Butler would purchase all but a parcel of land on the far west side of the CTS property. CTS would continue to reside on campus—in a portion of the main building, counseling center, and apartments—through a special long-term lease.

This agreement is a creative collaboration that benefits both schools. It supports the growth and momentum of Butler 2020, providing our University with new physical space, including the CTS apartments, for potential development as we seek to further enhance the Butler academic experience. Meanwhile, CTS finds itself with an abundance of space and believes strongly in the responsible stewardship of its resources, including land and buildings. This partnership helps advance the vision of both institutions while keeping them independent.

I am pleased to announce that Butler’s College of Education would move to CTS beginning with the 2018–2019 academic year, providing the COE community with a space that will better fit its learning objectives. Furthermore, as part of this potential agreement, we would identify and pursue other areas of collaboration and shared operational services, such as our bookstore and buildings and grounds maintenance.

Over the next three months, Butler and CTS leadership will continue to work together to finalize the remaining details, with plans for final approval of the arrangement by the Boards of Trustees of both schools in early September. In the meantime, as always, I welcome your questions and thoughts.

Sincerely,

James M. Danko,
President
Butler University

 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler, CTS Announce Campus-Sharing Partnership

Butler University and Christian Theological Seminary on June 12 announced a campus-sharing partnership.

Jun 12 2017 Read more

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