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Rec Department, COE Team Up With Special Olympics

BY Kailey Eaton ’17

PUBLISHED ON Apr 05 2017

Andrew Peterson is a talented long distance runner. He is a former Special Olympics Games gold medalist who is currently training to qualify for the Boston Marathon.

And he’s also a catalyst for inclusion of people with disabilities on Butler University’s campus.
Andrew Peterson

Peterson is a decorated Special Olympics athlete who was identified as a student with an intellectual disability during his schooling.

He has been selected to be a part of a pilot inclusion program being offered through a new partnership with the Recreation Department, the College of Education, and Special Olympics Indiana.

The program brings a Special Olympics athlete to campus to have them audit a class for the semester. This means that the athlete can be fully immersed in the class without receiving a grade or course credit.

Peterson is auditing a Track Physical Education class this semester at the Health and Recreation Complex (HRC), PE207.

His mentor is Erin Garriott, an instructor in the Multilingual and Exceptional Learners program. She said the goal of this new program is two-fold.

“We want to empower our BU students to fight for inclusion, now and in their future,” Garriott said. “We believe we can do that by giving them the opportunity to have meaningful experiences with people with disabilities, so they have a sense of who they are fighting for. The other side of our goal is to give Andrew a sense of inclusion.”

She said Andrew is getting practice in new social situations, which can be difficult to teach because there are so many unwritten social norms. He is also learning to navigate the HRC, a space that was unfamiliar to him before coming to campus.

Not only is Andrew benefitting from the course, but the students in his class are benefitting from his presence as well.

“From my perspective, I think meeting Andrew has challenged some of the students to question their own beliefs about ability,” Garriott said. “It only took one class before a student came up and asked questions about Andrew. He said, ‘tell me a little more about Andrew. I'm just so interested.’ I think curiosity leads to understanding.”

Garriott hopes to continue to grow these inclusion programs so that more Butler students have the opportunity to learn from people of all abilities. After the spring semester is over, the pilot program will be evaluated in hopes of bringing more Special Olympics athletes to campus in the coming semesters.

This month, Butler will be hosting its first Special Olympics event on campus called the Athlete Leadership Program (ALP). Around 75 athletes and their mentors will be on campus taking classes and learning how to be leaders.

With these programs and many others in the works, Butler is well on its way to true inclusion on campus.

“I truly believe that experiences can shift our beliefs, which can change our behaviors,” Garriott said. “Hopefully these experiences stay with students as they transition to jobs and life off campus.”

Campus

Rec Department, COE Team Up With Special Olympics

Butler University is taking part in a pilot inclusion program that brings a Special Olympics athlete to campus to audit a semester-long class.

Apr 05 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler Names New Vice President for Student Affairs

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 04 2017

Frank E. Ross III, a national leader in student affairs with 22 years of experience and degrees from both Ball State and Indiana universities, has been named Butler University’s new Vice President for Student Affairs.

He will take over the position in June.

Frank RossRoss comes to Butler from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, where he has served as Vice President for Student Life. Prior to that, he was Vice President for Student Affairs at Northeastern Illinois University, Associate Provost for Student Success and Dean of Students at University of North Texas at Dallas, and Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Life at IUPUI.

He earned a B.S. in Psychology and an M.A. in Adult and Community Education from Ball State, an M.A.E. in Student Affairs from Western Kentucky University, and his doctorate in Higher Education and Student Affairs from Indiana University-Bloomington.

Butler President James M. Danko praised Ross as “a national leader in the student affairs profession with involvement in NASPA, the preeminent international association dedicated to the advancement, health, and sustainability of the student affairs profession.”

Ross served as a member of the NASPA: Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education Board of Directors, was the national director of Knowledge Communities, and served as chair for the 2016 NASPA Annual Conference. He also was a member of the James E. Scott Academy Board for senior student affairs officers.

Ross has received awards and recognition from NASPA, the National Resource Center on the First-Year Experience and Students in Transition, the National Academic Advising Association, the Association of American Colleges and Universities, and the American College Personnel Association for his work and research. In addition, he received the 2016 Robert H. Shaffer Distinguished Alumni Award from Indiana University.

Ross will be joined in Indianapolis by his husband, David, and their son, Mason, both of whom share in the excitement about coming to Indianapolis and joining the Butler community.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Names New Vice President for Student Affairs

Frank E. Ross III, a national leader in student affairs with 22 years of experience and degrees from both Ball State and Indiana universities, has been named Butler University’s new Vice President for Student Affairs

Apr 04 2017 Read more
Campus

Owen Schaub: After 37 Years at Butler, the Curtain Closes

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 03 2017

Owen Schaub accumulated a raft of memories during his 37 years as a Butler professor, but this one, from around 1990, stands out: After speaking at a luncheon for new students and their parents, a father plunked himself down next to Schaub and said, “You said you like being at Butler. What do you like about it?”

“I said,” Schaub recalled, “and I still think this is true, that at Butler, you’re allowed to try new things, to explore things for yourself, and people won’t make judgments about you because you’re going to do something that seems different from your discipline or your orientation. And that’s welcome.”
Owen Schaub has taught at Butler for half his life.

Schaub, 75, said that’s one of the many things he’ll miss about Butler when he retires at the end of this academic year.

He will also miss the students (“We’ve always attracted very nice young people who come from good family backgrounds and are sensible 18- to 22-year-olds”), his colleagues (“Everyone is very talented and qualified in the areas they work in, so we have a coherent and, I think, successful approach to theatre”), and the classes he’s taught in both theatre and the core curriculum.

He’s seen a lot of changes in personnel—five presidents, five deans in the College of Fine Arts, and five department chairs in the Theatre Department—and to the campus, and he’s especially thankful for the addition of the Schrott Center for the Arts. “We have needed a middle-sized, well-equipped theatre for a very long time. It is a joy that that’s here.”

In the Theatre Department, the soft-spoken Schaub is known for his encyclopedic knowledge of theatre history.

“One of us on faculty or a visiting guest artist will hear about some intricate detail from theatre history and share it with the group,” Theatre Chair Diane Timmerman said. “Invariably, Owen will launch into a richly nuanced description of the topic because he knows all about this time in theatre history. Whenever a guest lecturer says, ‘You probably will not have heard of this...,’ I always respond, ‘Well, one of us has.’ And I am always right about that.”

*

Schaub grew up in Massapequa, New York, son of a construction-equipment operator and licensed practical nurse, in a house where he could hear the Atlantic Ocean and was in proximity to New York City. He “stumbled” into theatre almost literally, when he saw a high school friend moving a lighting rig through the halls. Schaub helped him carry the lights and soon was involved in a production.

He went to Hofstra College (now Hofstra University) for his bachelor’s degree in theatre, graduating in 1963, and spent 2½ years in active duty in the Army, mostly in Germany. There, he met Heidi, the woman who would become his first wife. They had their first daughter there, then moved to Bloomington, Indiana, where Schaub earned his M.A. in Theatre.

He started his teaching career at the University of Hawaii (and Heidi gave birth to their second daughter in Honolulu), then moved on to Dalhousie University, Kent State—where he earned his doctorate in theatre—and Newberry College in South Carolina.

In 1980, he answered an ad seeking a Theatre Department Chair at Butler University.Owen Schaub

Schaub said that when he started, he wanted to be a good technical director and then a good scene designer—“and that’s what I did for a long time.” Timmerman said students from the past 15 years probably don’t know that Schaub worked in the design and tech part of Butler Theatre productions during his early years here. He designed lights for many productions and also designed and built sets.

Soon, he added academic courses—dramatic literature, text analysis, five different History of Theatre courses he rotates.

“Given my graduate education, I’m doing exactly what I was prepared to do by getting an M.A. and then a Ph.D., even though there were times when I was still designing and being a technical director,” he said.

Schaub is proud of the students he’s taught, some of whom have gone on to be professors, lawyers, founders of theatre companies, and drama therapists.

Jim Senti ’05, who went on to earn his MFA at Harvard University and now is an actor in Los Angeles and professor at California State University, Northridge, calls Schaub “one of the most admirable characters in my life so far.” Senti remembers when Schaub cast him in a role in the Caryl Churchill play Vinegar Tom that featured a lengthy monologue. In rehearsal, Senti stumbled over the words. He went to the side afterwards, clearly frustrated.

“He came up to me,” Senti remembered, “and said, ‘This is what rehearsal is for. In a few weeks, this will be just a memory. You’re going to be great.’ And I remember him saying, ‘The stumbling now is necessary so we can stumble less later. So do the work now.’ That has stayed with me, not only as a professional actor, but just as a person.”

*

In 2006, Schaub wife, Heidi, died of breast cancer. A couple of years later, he met a woman named Donna McCleerey at a group bereavement session. They found out they had something in common—they both worked at Butler. (She is the administrative specialist for the men’s basketball team.) This year, they will have been married nine years.

When the school year ends, Schaub will have spent 47 years teaching in college and 60 years in the theatre. Both teaching and theatre will play a part in his retirement: He’s planning to continue writing an analysis of Hamlet that he started during a sabbatical in 2015.

Although he’s spent half his life in Indiana, Schaub said he’s “always sort of been a permanent New Yorker. I remain a New Yorker in my head.”

And a Bulldog at heart.

“What I like about Butler is that the people you come in contact with are genuine human beings who are working to do the best that they can in whatever job or assignment that they have,” he said. “There’s little in the way of selfishness or ego or self-importance. Having been at Butler has been a very warm, rewarding and humane experience.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Owen Schaub: After 37 Years at Butler, the Curtain Closes

“Having been at Butler has been a very warm, rewarding and humane experience,” he says.

Apr 03 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler Students Sweep Awards for Top Papers at URC

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 03 2017

Four Butler students have been named Top Four Paper Winners at the University’s 2017 Undergraduate Research Conference.

Kelsey McDougall, John Anderton, Taylor Pearson, and Viki Tomanov’s projects were judged to be the best among the 21 students from five different universities who submitted their completed papers for competitive review.Undergraduate Research Conference

McDougall, a junior Biology and Chemistry major from Canton, Michigan, wrote Recontextualizing Rhetorical Constructions of Hegemonic Masculinity in Jessica Jones.

Anderton, a junior Middle/Secondary Education major from Rocky River, Ohio, wrote Strength in Numbers: How the NBA Dunk Contest Reifies Hegemonic Masculinity for its Audience.

Pearson, a senior Criminology/Psychology/Spanish major from Indianapolis, wrote Selective Sexualization and Censorship: Freeing the Nipple and Challenging the Male Gaze.

Tomanov, a sophomore Middle/Secondary Education major from Lombard, Illinois, wrote Reifying Hegemonic Masculinity in Tau Kappa Epsilon Recruitment Videos.

The abstracts for the four papers are below.

To evaluate the papers, all identifying features of the authors were removed. The papers were then sent to faculty across the nation who volunteered to serve as reviewers and were selected because of their ability to conduct interdisciplinary research.

Of the 21 students who submitted, 11 were Butler students.

All 21 papers were reviewed by three faculty members. Twelve of the top-ranked papers were then sent to an additional two reviewers since three sets of four papers were very close. The top eight papers were then sent to another set of two reviewers.

The abstracts for the four papers:

Recontextualizing Rhetorical Constructions of Hegemonic Masculinity in Jessica Jones.

Television is a significant rhetorical indicator of the construction of hegemonic masculinity—the culturally idealized form of masculinity—in media. Netflix is changing the way television series are viewed and accessed. Netflix’s Jessica Jones is a highly-rated Netflix original series, making it a good candidate for analysis. The show features a villain, Kilgrave, who both embodies and challenges traditional characteristics of hegemonic masculinity. I apply Trujillo’s five core characteristics of hegemonic masculinity (physical force and control, occupational achievement, familial patriarchy, frontiersmanship, and heterosexuality) as well as a “gray area" of hegemonic masculinity. I contend that Kilgrave embodies the characteristics of familial patriarchy, heterosexuality, and the gray area of hegemonic masculinity that involves the failure to accept responsibility for his hegemonic actions; however, he challenges the hegemonic characteristics of physical force and control, occupational achievement, and frontiersmanship. Ultimately, Kilgrave achieves hegemonic masculinity by using his mental abilities, rather than physical strength, and achieves power in a way that challenges the traditional characteristics of hegemonic masculinity. Thus, Kilgrave’s challenges to traditional characteristics of hegemonic masculinity reaffirm the idea that the construction of hegemonic masculinity, and masculinity in general, is fluid and subject to changes in cultural values and beliefs.

Strength in Numbers: How the NBA Dunk Contest Reifies Hegemonic Masculinity for its Audience

Televised basketball is a worthy area of study that communicates specific values and messages to the audience watching both at home and at the events. The NBA dunk contests have been held for more than four decades and are worthy of analysis with relation to the field of gender studies. Each competition is based around the idea of performing different types of dunks, which are then judged officially by judges at the event and unofficially by the announcers on the television. Based on those scores, a champion is chosen from all the dunkers involved. I apply Trujillo’s five characteristics of hegemonic masculinity (physical force and control, occupational achievement, familial patriarchy, frontiersmanship, and heterosexuality), Fiske’s characteristics of the masculine hero narrative, and Messner, Dunbar, & Hunt’s Televised Sports Manhood Formula. I contend that the NBA dunk contests reify masculinity through the presenters’ comments as well as video images of both the players and the fans reacting to the event. Analysis of the events shows that features from each idea regarding masculinity are used extensively by the television crews to elevate players who uphold the ideals of masculinity so that viewers can observe and aspire to be like each champion. When the format of the event changes to feature a non-masculine characteristic, the announcers struggle to elevate a champion and inspire the viewers to see what each athlete can do. The results of the analysis show that the construction of the NBA dunk contests by the television corporations as a winner-take-all event lead to the reification of masculinity.

Selective Sexualization and Censorship: Freeing the Nipple and Challenging the Male Gaze.

I analyze the #FreeTheNipple movement, which gained popularity as a collective response to social media platform guidelines specifically banning photos of female nipples, but not male nipples. Using hegemonic masculinity, sociological structuralism, and communications and linguistic theories as analytical lenses, I determine that this trend is only a feminist movement in that it is intended to benefit women, but is ultimately too exclusionary and hegemonic to be considered liberating. Specific photos shared under #FreeTheNipple are discussed, implications are explained, and suggestions for improvement of the campaign are offered.

Reifying Hegemonic Masculinity in Tau Kappa Epsilon Recruitment Videos.

Fraternity members constitute a large percentage of leading working professionals in highly influential jobs. Fraternity men usually spend the majority of their undergraduate college experience in a single-gender community (i.e., their fraternity house), thus, it becomes essential that masculinity be at the forefront of examination when acknowledging the great societal impact of fraternities during and after college. Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE), the fraternity with the largest amount of chapters nationwide as of 2016, is the focus of my analysis. Its popularity among college campuses signifies that its recruitment is successful and that, regardless of initiation into the fraternity, many men (and women) view TKE as an example of masculinity. In my analysis, I focus on TKE recruitment videos from various universities that span the Northeastern, Southern, Midwestern, and Western regions of the United States. My analysis is divided amongst five markers that indicate an abidance to hegemonic masculinity, or the varying construction of the “ideal” man that is impossible to fully achieve. These markers of hegemonic masculinity are: Dominance (ascendency), sexual objectification of women, heteronormativity, alcohol use, and recreational movement of the body. I use these markers to demonstrate how TKE’s sustainment of hegemonic masculine ideals is problematic to society as a whole given the influence of fraternities beyond campus borders.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Students Sweep Awards for Top Papers at URC

Four Butler students have been named Top Four Paper Winners at the University’s 2017 Undergraduate Research Conference.

Apr 03 2017 Read more
Campus

Brett McNeal ’08 Gets a Dose of Reality

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 03 2017

The court of public opinion is about to get tested by a new TV show, and a couple of Butler alumni will be part of the proceedings.

Brett McNeal ’08 and his fiancé Darvin Lewis will appear on the April 21 episode of You the Jury as plaintiffs in a case pitting them against the owner of a northern Indiana pizza restaurant who refused to serve gay patrons. Their friend Amanda DiMaio Livarchik ’08 will be a witness for their side.
Brett McNeal '08 and Darvin Lewis will be on the new Fox series "You the Jury."

"Brett and I always joked over the years that our lives would make for great reality TV,” Livarchik said. “Little did we know we would one day end up on Fox."

Fox News personality and former daytime judge Jeanine Pirro is host of the show, which features real civil court cases being argued by recognizable attorneys, with viewers voting on the verdict live as the show airs. Each episode focuses on a case concerning a current hot-button issue, such as online trolling, the limits of free speech, and the constitutional clash of gay rights with religious freedom.

“The experience was totally and utterly surreal,” McNeal said. “When we had intermission, we were escorted back to the dressing room and I just had to lay on the couch, asking myself, 'What did we sign up for?' But I always kept in the back of my mind that we were fighting for a cause.”

McNeal and Lewis said they were chosen because “they wanted to cast a nice, loving, gay couple in Indiana going against the guy from up north.”

The crew came into town early March 2016 and “took over our house,” Lewis said. “They interviewed our friends and family. Then we were informed that we would be going to L.A. for the final taping. In the beginning, we didn’t think it would be more than a People's Court kind of thing. However, the more we spoke to the producers, the bigger it got. Suddenly, we were told that there would be a live audience.”

McNeal, who works in renewals for a local company, said he and Lewis will be watching the outcome at a public viewing party at Tini, a martini bar on Massachusetts Avenue in Indianapolis.

“We are contractually obligated not to publicly discuss the details of the episode until it has been announced,” McNeal said. “But we hope to drum up support for both the big vote on the episode and the ongoing LGBT cause.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Brett McNeal ’08 Gets a Dose of Reality

The court of public opinion is about to get tested by a new TV show, and a couple of Butler alumni will be part of the proceedings.

Apr 03 2017 Read more
Campus

Brain Sculptures Come to Butler

BY

PUBLISHED ON Mar 28 2017

Twelve 5-foot-by-5-foot brain sculptures, each linked to a different theme in neuroscience, will be on the Butler University campus for six weeks beginning March 29 as part of One Butler: The Brain Project.

The sculptures, commissioned by neuroanatomist Jill Bolte Taylor, will be displayed throughout campus—some inside and some outside.

“‘The Celebration of Brains’ adds a creative dimension to the yearlong campus-wide focus on the brain and the role of neuroscience of our lives,” said Ena Shelley, Dean of the College of Education.

The Twelve Brains Include:

  • World Music
  • Mental Health
  • Brain Food
  • Branches- Nature/Neuro
  • Communication
  • Evolution of Learning
  • Thinking Outside the Box
  • Brain Scanning
  • Helmet Brain
  • Growth and Development
  • Anatomical “Library” Brain
  • Seeds of Thought

In August, Butler announced that it would devote the 2016-2017 academic year to “One Butler: The Brain Project,” a series of presentations exploring brain development, brain anatomy, mental health, traumatic brain injury, concussion, memory, Alzheimer's disease, addictions, post-traumatic stress disorder, and more.

The goal of the project has been to introduce the community to knowledge about the brain and all the ways they can use this knowledge to live their best lives.

The Brain Project transcends academic disciplines and is led by a steering committee with representatives from each of the six colleges, the library, performing arts venues, and the Learning Resource Center. Suzanne Clifford, Senior Vice President, Integrated Primary Care at Community Health Network and Bob (BU trustee) and Kathi Postlethwait, community advocates for mental health services, are also members of the steering committee.

The project concludes in April with two events:

Brian Hainline
“The Neuropsychiatric Benefit of Sport and Exercise”
April 11, 7:30 PM
Ford Salon

Hainline is Senior VP and Chief Medical Officer of NCAA. He will be on campus all day to meet with athletes, trainers, educators, and members of the health and recreation staff.

Education Neuroscience Conference
April 29, 8:00 AM to noon
Reilly Room

Conferees will discuss neuroscience related to emotional regulation and the attention engagement. Strategies for strengthening self-regulatory capacity and self-reliance functioning will be shared.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Brain Sculptures Come to Butler

Twelve 5-foot-by-5-foot brain sculptures will be on the Butler University campus for six weeks.

Mar 28 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler to Offer 16 Arts and Music Camps This Summer

BY

PUBLISHED ON Mar 27 2017

In the words of William Shakespeare, “We know what we are, but know not what we may be.” And with that in mind, the Butler Community Arts School will be offering Theatre Camp 2: Focus on Shakespeare for the first time this summer for students in grades 9-12.

The camp—one of 16 arts- and music-related camps being offered on the Butler University campus this summer—will meet July 9-14. For more information on this and all the summer camp offerings, visit https://www.butler.edu/bcas/summer-camps.

Butler Community Arts School“The focus on Shakespeare is a niche we believe nobody else is serving in Indianapolis, and we have the expertise on our faculty to offer a high-quality experience in Shakespeare,” said Karen Thickstun, Director of the Butler Community Arts School, which provides high-quality, affordable instruction in music, theatre, and dance to Indianapolis and the surrounding area. “This is high school only, so it gives the more serious high school theatre campers a high-quality experience with their own age.”

Butler Community Arts School camps are taught by Butler faculty and Butler students. Camps for students ages 12 and up have both residential and commuter options, and need-based scholarships are available.

“We encourage anybody who’s worried about the finances to fill out the scholarship form,” Thickstun said. “We try to serve as many as we can with the grant funding we get for the summer. Especially for commuters, we’ve been able to reduce the costs as much as 60-70 percent.”

Deadlines to register for all camps except Ballet Summer Intensive is May 1. The deadline for Ballet Summer Intensive was March 15, but late applications will be accepted for as long as there is space.

The Shakespeare camp is the second theatre camp the Butler Community Arts School (BCAS) will offer this summer. Other camps are:

Percussion Camp, ages 12-18 (June 11-15)

Bass Camp, ages 12-21 (June 11-16)

Snare and Tenor Camp, ages 12-21 (June 16-18)

String Scholars Camp, ages 12-18 (June 18-22)

Piano Camp 1, ages 12-18 (June 18-23)

Theatre Camp 1, ages 12-18 (June 18-23)

Jazz Camp, ages 12-18 (July 9-14)

Voice Camp, ages 15-18 (July 16-21)

Ballet Summer Intensive, ages 13-18 (July 9-29)

Brass Camp, ages 12-18 (July 16-20)

Woodwind Camp, ages 12-18 (June 25-29)

Ages 7-11 only:

Piano Camp 2 (9:00 AM to 12:30 PM daily, June 26-30)

Strings Camp (9:00 AM to 12:30 PM daily, July 17-21)

Arts Camp 1 and 2 (1:30-to 5:00 PM daily, June 26-30 and July 17-21)

Adult:

Big Band Workshop (evenings, June 4-9)

Thickstun said the camps are an opportunity for students to get a campus experience, whether they live at Butler during the week or commute.

“They’re here on campus all day, and Butler students play a large part in the instruction of each camp,” she said. “Each has a faculty artist director, but many have Butler students running sectionals and small group instruction.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler to Offer 16 Arts and Music Camps This Summer

The Butler Community Arts School will be offering Theatre Camp 2: Focus on Shakespeare for the first time this summer for students in grades 9-12.

Mar 27 2017 Read more
Campus

Asia Is Luring Her Back, and She's Going

BY Hayley Ross '17

PUBLISHED ON Mar 20 2017

On May 6, Butler’s Class of 2017 will walk across Hinkle Fieldhouse, accept their diplomas, and step into the next chapter of their lives.

For Erin O’Neil ’17, that next step happens to be over 7,000 miles away. In June, she is heading back to China, where she spent her summer with the Butler in Asia program. (More about the program is below.)

Erin O'Neil“I thought about traveling China after college and my whole body filled with excitement,” said O’Neil, a Digital Media Production major from Columbus, Ohio. “It’s not a permanent job, but it’s a passion, and I would so much rather do that than anything.”

Her job is with the company Collective Responsibility, where she was a digital media intern this summer. The company helps businesses become more sustainable, and provides companies with research about the development of civil society, business sustainability, and social development in Asia.

“My primary role was to create graphics for the research projects and blogs they were working on,” O’Neil said. “I also worked a lot with the founder, Rich Brubaker. I’ve even been doing freelance work for him since I came home.”

O’Neil originally went on the summer program because she thought it would look good for the Fulbright-National Geographic Storytelling Fellowship. She had planned to apply for the fellowship this semester so she could focus on sustainability and urbanization.

After hearing a panel of fellows talk, she realized it wasn’t her path.

“It was a really hard decision not to apply, but I realized it wasn’t right for me at this moment,” she said. “I didn’t feel I had the story I wanted to tell. The decision was devastating, but I knew I would find something else”

That something else ended up coming from the founder of Collective Responsibility. Throughout the summer she worked with Brubaker, and he trusted her to help him with his vlog series on entrepreneurship in Asia.

“He emailed me this semester and says ‘I have an offer,’” she said. “’How do you feel about coming back to work for me?’ He made a comment about adding stamps to my passport and I immediately got excited.”

There was one line in particular that convinced her: “Expenses obviously paid. Equipment provided. Salary to be discussed. Awesome sh-- guaranteed.”

He wants to interview entrepreneurs and sustainability ambassadors all over Asia for a video series that hopes to inspire sustainable practices worldwide. She will be traveling Asia for 3-6 months.

“After I freaked out, I thought a lot about where I see myself six months after graduation, and that is a bit intimidating. But I'm helping someone create positive social change and that's my dream job."

Now, O’Neil can’t imagine not going to Shanghai this summer. She says between the GALA program (Global Adventures in the Liberal Arts) and Butler in Asia, she has gotten opportunities she would never have dreamed of.

“I owe my entire Butler experience to the Center for Global Education,” she said. “The personal experiences I have gained are entirely thanks to the opportunities they gave me.”

*

The Butler in Asia program is the product of a generous grant from the Freeman Foundation, whose aim is to provide U.S. college students “real work experiences in real work settings with direct interaction with local people in east and southeast Asia.”  This is an excellent experience offering students the long-term benefits of study abroad and resume-building opportunity of an internship.

Butler is one of only 23 universities in the United States that the Freeman Foundation is working with to create internship programs in East and Southeast Asia.

During the summer of 2015, the foundation awarded $99,500 for the initial summer internship program, which resulted in 19 students going to Shanghai. It followed up with a $339,000, two-year grant to expand the program both in students and in locations. The result: 19 students, including O’Neil, spent the summer of 2016 in Shanghai.

This summer, 45 students are slated to go—25 to Shanghai and 10 each in Beijing and Singapore.

The planning and implementing of the grant is done by Butler’s Center for Global Education, which works with nearly one-third of Butler students to have an overseas experience during their four years.

Campus

Asia Is Luring Her Back, and She's Going

Erin O'Neil '17 will spend the first six months after graduation in Asia, thanks to her experiences at Butler.

Mar 20 2017 Read more
Campus

Bolin Selected to International Band Directors' Hall of Fame

BY

PUBLISHED ON Mar 20 2017

Associate Professor of Music Education Daniel Bolin has been selected as the 2017 inductee to the Gamma Chapter, Phi Beta Mu Hall of Fame. Phi Beta Mu is the highest honorary fraternity for international band directors.

The award was presented at Purdue University on March 12 at the Indiana Bandmasters All State Band Concert.

Dan BolinThe Gamma Chapter of Phi Beta Mu was organized and the charter members initiated in 1953 at the state convention of the Indiana Music Educators Association.

Bolin joins a well-respected and dedicated group of lifelong music educators selected to the Hall of Fame. A complete list of former recipients is available at www.indianabandmasters.org under phi beta mu.

“It's a great honor to be the fourth director from Butler to receive this recognition,” Bolin said. “I was blessed with supportive parents, wonderful mentors, and outstanding students and colleagues throughout my 47-year career. This award is all about them.”

Bolin has taught at Butler since 1995. He served as Chair of the School of Music from 1995 to 2001 and again from 2009 to 2014. He received his Bachelor of Music and Master of Music degrees from Butler and his Ed.D. from Indiana University.  Prior to his appointment at Butler, he was an administrator in the Metropolitan School District of Perry Township serving as Assistant Principal at Southport High School, Director of Secondary Education, Assistant Superintendent and Interim Superintendent.

During his career in music education Dr. Bolin served as band director at Wood High School and Manual High School in the Indianapolis. He also developed outstanding bands at Lebanon and Southport High Schools.  His bands at Southport were selected to perform for the IMEA Conference, the ASBDA National Convention, and were twice honored by Butler by performances in Clowes Hall.  In 1977 he was elected into the ASBDA and selected as the Outstanding Young Band Director for Indiana. In 1981 he co-founded the Great Lake Music Camps which served middle school and high school musicians for 23 years.

His performing background includes the Philharmonic Orchestra of Indianapolis, the Carmel Symphony Orchestra, and principal tuba with the Indianapolis Symphonic Band. He has serves as an adjudicator, clinician and guest conductor throughout the United States and for Festivals at Sea.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Bolin Selected to International Band Directors' Hall of Fame

Associate Professor of Music Education Daniel Bolin has been selected as the 2017 inductee to the Gamma Chapter, Phi Beta Mu Hall of Fame.

Mar 20 2017 Read more
Campus

For These Students, the Sweet 16 Is That Much Sweeter

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PUBLISHED ON Mar 18 2017

Butler fans around the country have been rooting for the men’s basketball team this week, but three students had an extra incentive to cheer: Now that the Bulldogs have made it to the Sweet 16, juniors Alex Tison, Claire Cox, and Kaylynn Cline will be flown to Chicago to appear on a new ESPN quiz show called Bracket Genius.

The Butler team will play Kentucky, North Carolina, and UCLA on March 26 at 5:30 PM. Bonus round episodes will air Monday, March 27 at 6 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. ET. The final four teams will face off in the Bracket Genius championship episode scheduled to air on Tuesday, April 4 at 7 p.m.

The three students—and an alternate, sophomore Corrine Campbell—were chosen after winning a trivia contest and then going through a Skype audition. The producers used the audition to select students who projected personality as well as intelligence.

Bracket Genius“To stand out in the audition, I just tried to be as personable and talkative as possible,” said Tison, a junior Finance and Marketing major from Harrisburg, Illinois. “I just thought if I could leave an impression then they would be more likely to pick me. I also tried to interact a lot with the other people interviewing.”

Bracket Genius, hosted by Trey Wingo, will pit university academic teams, consisting of three undergraduate students, against one another in a bracket-style competition for the chance to have their team crowned the inaugural Bracket Genius Champion and share the prize of $100,000.
Alex Tison

The final 16 universities represented in the NCAA tournament will match up in the same head-to-head games on Bracket Genius, where the winning team advances by answering questions spanning history, geography, politics, literature, science, pop culture, the arts, and sports in a race to score as many points as possible against the clock and their opponent.

The opening round matchups are scheduled to air Wednesday, March 22, and Sunday, March 26, at 5:00 PM and 5:30 PM Eastern Time. Each half-hour episode will feature four teams vying for the chance to advance to the Bracket Genius championship episode.

Bonus round episodes will air Monday, March 27, at 6:00 PM and 6:30 PM. These half-hour episodes, Bracket Genius: Extra Credit, will give the four championship contenders a chance to win extra cash prizes of up to $25,000 per episode.

 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

For These Students, the Sweet 16 Is That Much Sweeter

Now that the Bulldogs have made it to the Sweet 16, juniors Alex Tison, Claire Cox, and Kaylynn Cline will be flown to Chicago to appear on a new ESPN quiz show called Bracket Genius.

Mar 18 2017 Read more
Campus

On to the Sweet 16! Bulldogs Beat Middle Tennessee

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PUBLISHED ON Mar 18 2017

Butler advanced to its first Sweet 16 since 2011 with a 74-65 win over Middle Tennessee State Saturday night in Milwaukee. The Bulldogs advance to play Friday in Memphis against North Carolina, which defeated Arkansas, 72-65.

The Bulldogs are now 25-8 on the season. Middle Tennessee State, the 12th seed in the South Region, finishes the season at 31-5.

NCAA TournamentThe biggest shot of the night belonged to senior Andrew Chrabascz. Butler had built a 12-point lead with 7:18 remaining in the game. MTSU then scored the next nine points to pull within three at 59-56 with 3:40 to play. On the ensuing play, coach Chris Holtmann called Chrabascz's number, getting him involved in a two-man game that resulted in a wide-open look from the left wing. The senior knocked it down to push the lead back to six.

"Really proud of our guys. We beat a really good team in Middle Tennessee," said Holtmann. "We've got so much respect for how Kermit (Davis)'s team plays and how they compete. And we saw it in film for the last, you know, 36 hours and impressed. I loved our guys. I loved the fight they showed possession after possession. And players win games. We've got really good players and they had a heck of an effort."

Middle Tennessee State would not get any closer than five the rest of the way after Chrabascz's three-pointer as Butler went 10 of 12 from the free throw line down the stretch.

The Bulldogs shot 51 percent in the contest, jumping out to an early lead by hitting six of their first seven attempts from behind the arc. That catapulted the Bulldogs to a 35-22 lead with 4:28 to play in the first half. MTSU responded with six straight points and eventually pulled within 36-31 at the half.

Butler steadily built the lead in the second half, capped by a Kelan Martin three that game Butler the 59-47 lead with 7:18 remaining.

Martin led the Bulldogs with 19 points on 6-of-9 shooting. He and Kethan Savage each pulled down six rebounds. Chrabascz added 15 points with 13 of those coming in the second half. Freshman Kamar Baldwin had 13 points. He, Martin and Tyler Lewis each had four assists as the Bulldogs helped on 16 of their 24 made field goals.

Butler's defense, led by Baldwin, held MTSU's Giddy Potts scoreless on eight shots. He averaged 15.8 points per game entering Saturday's contest, most recently earning Conference USA Tournament MVP honors.

MTSU shot 44 percent, but only 4-of-19 from distance. JaCorey Williams led the Blue Raiders with 20 points and nine rebounds. Antwain Johnson added 19.

The Bulldogs advance to their sixth Sweet 16 (1962, 2003, 2007, 2010, and 2011) with the win. Butler is now 10-0 in the NCAA Tournament against teams seeded lower than the Bulldogs. Butler is the No. 4 seed in the South Region.

Butler never trailed in the game. Butler out-scored MTSU, 14-0, on points off turnovers.

Media contact:
John Dedman
jdedman@butler.edu
317-940-9414

Campus

On to the Sweet 16! Bulldogs Beat Middle Tennessee

Butler advanced to its first Sweet 16 since 2011 with a 74-65 win over Middle Tennessee State Saturday night in Milwaukee.

Mar 18 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler's New Fraternity Is ...

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PUBLISHED ON Mar 13 2017

Butler University has selected Beta Theta Pi as its new fraternity, with colonization of the Butler chapter to begin in fall 2017.

A location for a future chapter house will be determined, and the University will assist in selecting the site.

Beta Theta Pi“In selecting Beta Theta Pi, the Expansion Committee considered Beta's commitment to high standards and resources dedicated to chapter success,” said Becky Druetzler, Director of Greek Life. “As a fraternity, they prioritize partnerships, which was very evident during their presentation and echoed by other campuses. The addition of Beta Theta Pi will complement our existing chapters. We're excited to begin this relationship.”

Beta, which returns to Butler after more than a century away from campus, will be the University’s fifth fraternity.

“This invitation establishes a perfect partnership between two storied institutions with aligned values of intellectual growth, mutual assistance and integrity,” Beta Theta Pi Executive Director Jeff Rundle said. “With support from campus students and administrators, Fraternity staff and more than 1,800 Beta alumni living in the Indianapolis area, we are confident that Beta Theta Pi will become a valuable asset to Butler’s Greek community.”

The selection process began in January 2016 when the University contacted 25 national fraternities that had previously expressed interest in Butler's fraternity and sorority community. A committee of staff, students, alumni, and faculty reviewed eight extensive proposals and recommended three finalists.

The last time a chapter was established as a new initiative and not a recolonization was Phi Kappa Psi in 1971. Phi Delta Theta was recolonized in 2008–2009.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler's New Fraternity Is ...

Butler University has selected Beta Theta Pi as its new fraternity.

Mar 13 2017 Read more

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