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After 40 Years of 'Helping People,' Jeanne Van Tyle Retires

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PUBLISHED ON Jun 26 2017

Professor of Pharmacy Jeanne Van Tyle discovered her love of teaching in what sounds like a moment scripted for television. Four weeks into her teaching assistantship for her master’s program, the professor she was assigned to had a heart attack. He told Van Tyle where the class notebook was, and she was left to teach the class while he recovered.

“That was the first thought I’d given to teaching,” Van Tyle explained.

Originally thinking she would go into research and work for a company like Eli Lilly, her direction suddenly changed.

That was about 45 years ago, and now Van Tyle is exiting Butler after 40 years of teaching.

“I came to pharmacy school thinking I wanted to help people,” she said. “So this brings me back to my base roots of service. When we ask students on the first day of classes, ‘Why do you want to be a pharmacist?’ the number one answer is, ‘to help people.’ Many have seen grandparents struggle or have a personal history which perked their interest. In addition, I come from a social justice background as well. I truly believe that ‘to those to whom much is given, much is expected.’”

Van Tyle grew up on the southwest side of Indianapolis and intended to go to school at Indiana University. But her presentation at a high school science fair—doing a tissue culture to measure the effects of drugs on chick embryos—earned her a half-tuition scholarship to Butler.

She lived at home while at Butler and finished her Bachelor of Pharmacy degree in 1974. Two years later, after earning her Doctor of Pharmacy from Mercer University in Atlanta, Georgia, Butler’s College of Pharmacy recruited her to join the faculty.

Over the next several years, she impacted the Butler culture in at least two significant ways.

Initially, when she was hired, she was in a 50-50 position—that is, half her salary was paid by Butler and half by St. Vincent Hospital. She spent time in the mornings with doctors and students at St. Vincent, then the afternoon at Butler—many elective courses were offered in the evening division at the time. The 50-50 appointment is common now among pharmacy faculty so that pharmacy students can have access to faculty at sites. She was at both sites every day while working at St. Vincent, she said, but she was the first in this type of appointment.

Her second significant change was when she married another Pharmacy Professor, Kent Van Tyle, in 1982. It was rare at the time for faculty members to marry and have both stay at Butler, but the dean agreed with the decision.

At Butler, faculty appointments are based around teaching, research, and service. Van Tyle’s teaching areas are in pharmacokinetics and women’s health issues. She has taught in the Pharmacy, Physician Assistant and Health Sciences program. As for research, she’s also published articles in various scholarly journals like Pharmacotherapy and Annals of Surgery, and in pharmacy journals such as Pharmacy Times, some with her fellow colleagues. She has written several book chapters for textbooks in pharmacokinetics.

Service, however, is what Van Tyle has truly focused on for the past 40 years through teaching, mentoring students, training pharmacists, and volunteering in the community. For the past 20 years, she has served as a volunteer pharmacist for the Gennersaret Free Clinics, which provides healthcare for the homeless.

Rebecca Seifert, Executive Director of Gennersaret Free Clinic, has known Van Tyle as both a volunteer and as a member of the organization’s board.

“She goes above and beyond in terms of just caring,” Seifert said. “She has one of the most caring and compassionate hearts.”

At Butler, Van Tyle’s volunteer service included serving as Co-Chair of the Gender Equity Commission, a study of campus atmosphere for faculty, staff, and students, and as Chair of the Faculty Senate for one term.

“Both of these roles emphasize working with other across campus and helps to unite us in common causes,” Van Tyle said. “It is too easy to work by yourself and just your college. Cross campus activities help build new relationships and friendships.”

Van Tyle said Butler has been an ideal workplace because of the interaction with many bright students and colleagues, and the ability to integrate the service aspect of her life into her career so heavily.

At the end of the day though, she’s ready for the next stage, and to spend more time with her husband and two daughters, Rachel and Emily ’13, both of whom have inherited her service nature.

“I’ve spent so much time and energy working, I don’t know what all is out there,” Van Tyle said. “Everyone I know who is retired says they don’t look back but move on to new things.”

Like everything else she’s fully immersed herself in, that’s what she’s planning to do.

Media contact:
Krisy Force
kforce@butler.edu
317-940-6842

People

After 40 Years of 'Helping People,' Jeanne Van Tyle Retires

Professor of Pharmacy Jeanne Van Tyle discovered her love of teaching in what sounds like a moment scripted for television.

Jun 26 2017 Read more
Lacy School of Business
People

‘Doc’ McGowan in Retirement: Reading, Writing, Thinking

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PUBLISHED ON May 13 2017

For almost 25 years, Dick McGowan taught Butler students—mostly in the Lacy School of Business, and mostly about ethics. But the underlying lesson in everything he taught them was about hope.

Dick McGowan

McGowan would tell his classes about how, as an undergraduate at Colgate University, he had been unprepared to leave home and not ready for the academic rigors of college. In his first three philosophy courses, he got a C-plus, a D, and a C.

“I made sure my students knew that,” he said, “because I wanted them to understand redemption. What happens can be overcome. There’s hope. I want to teach hope. I think professors have to teach hope. If they don’t, they’re not doing their entire job. What I like to say is, ‘George W. Bush is not the only C student who did something with his life.’”

And now that McGowan has retired—2016–2017 was his final year—he looks back proudly at what he achieved.

*

McGowan grew up on the north shore of Long Island, New York. His father was an athletic director working with disadvantaged kids; his mother stayed home to raise eight children.

After graduating from Colgate in 1971, McGowan moved back to Long Island and became a field supervisor, overseeing the construction of about 80 houses. He guesses he would have been a multimillionaire if he’d stuck with that profession.

“But it didn’t suit my nature,” he said. “I had a boss who wanted us to skimp. But if you don’t follow the contract, that’s a mistake. It’s a moral shortcoming.”

Instead, he moved out to Washington state, where he worked as a bartender, forklift operator, hot-tar roofer—anything to support his habit. The habit of learning. He finished his master’s at Washington State University in 1976.

From there, McGowan went to Marquette University, where he worked as a teaching assistant and earned his doctorate in Philosophy in 1985. He also met and married his wife, Barbara, a research scientist, and they began a family that grew to three sons, all now adults.

After graduation, he found himself teaching at the Milwaukee School of Engineering, “which had very little use for ethics,” he said. His wife’s job was going to lose funding, so they started to look for work elsewhere. McGowan landed a position at St. Joseph’s College in Rensselaer, Indiana, as an associate professor and director of the school-wide required ethics course.

Rensselaer was great for him, but not so much for Barbara, who was underemployed and unhappy. He decided to “commit career suicide” and follow her to Indianapolis. She worked, and he stayed home with the boys. In 1993, Butler hired him for a part-time position teaching business ethics.

“What they learn in ethics is going to impact everything, whether they’re in business or whether they become firefighters,” said McGowan, who was elevated to instructor in 2001. “Basics ethics courses are for everything, all human activity. All voluntary human activities needs an ethics course.”

*

Over the years, McGowan taught a variety of courses, including ancient philosophy, biomedical ethics, introduction to ethics, introduction to philosophy, and assorted First-Year Seminar classes. He also ran the Undergraduate Research Conference for five years.

Students—who call him “Doc”—and faculty alike found him helpful and influential.

“Doc has inspired me to do the impossible,” said Nyree Modisette ’19, a political science major. “I never thought I could publish any of my work; however, Doc changed that for me. He helped me publish my essay titled ‘Framing the News; Dividing the Country,’ which has been published in the Kokomo TribuneUSA TodayThe Commercial AppealBurlington Free Press, and other places. He saw something in me that I did not see. Doc deserves to be celebrated and recognized for all the great work he has done for all of his students.”

Connor Brooks ’18, a finance major, said McGowan encouraged and sponsored him to present a paper during the Butler Undergraduate Research Conference last spring. He described McGowan as “a friend, mentor, and professor—in that order.”

“Doc made a personal connection with me and from the beginning has encouraged and challenged me to pursue my passion,” Brooks said. “He sees the good in people and encourages students to be better people in the classroom, on campus and in society as a whole. I am grateful for professors like Doc who encourage and support students both in and outside the classroom.”

*

Around Butler, McGowan became known for a number of disparate characteristics. He rode his bicycle to work most days, a commute of about 16 miles round trip. He paints tiny pictures that he gave to people as gifts. He kept espresso candies in his desk that he shared with anyone who needed a little burst of energy.

Associate Professor Hilary Buttrick, who is taking over the ethics classes McGowan taught, remembers getting one of those candies when she came to Butler to interview for her faculty position. She met McGowan at the end of that day.

“I think he could tell that I was exhausted, stressed,” she said. “He sat down and looked at me and said, ‘What kind of books are you reading right now?’ So we spent most of our interview time talking about books that we’d read, books that we want to read. So I will always think of Dick as somebody who has tremendous compassion for the people he’s working with and he encounters, and compassion for his students.”

McGowan counts among his proudest achievements helping Fraser Thompson ’01 became Butler’s first and only Rhodes Scholar (“One of the cleanest, clearest writers I’ve ever had”) and helping the women’s lacrosse club get off the ground.

“I thought it was important for women to run around and hit each other with sticks, consistent with Title IX,” he said with a smile.

In retirement, McGowan plans to continue painting, reading, writing, thinking, traveling, and riding. He said if he has any regrets, it’s that he didn’t pursue baseball after high school. He was a pitcher in high school, he wishes he had seen how far he could have gone.

He loves baseball, roots for the Milwaukee Brewers and the Atlanta Braves, and for years led a quixotic campaign to get pitcher Virgil Trucks into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Trucks, who pitched two no-hitters in one season (1952), and McGowan ultimately became friends.

Hank Aaron, the great home run hitter, was one of McGowan’s idols.

“He was what I wanted to be,” McGowan said. “But being a philosophy professor wasn’t bad.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Lacy School of Business
People

‘Doc’ McGowan in Retirement: Reading, Writing, Thinking

For almost 25 years, Dick McGowan taught Butler students—mostly in the Lacy School of Business, and mostly about ethics. But the underlying lesson in everything he taught them was about hope.

May 13 2017 Read more
People

Butler Senior's Foundation Receives Second LIDS Foundation Grant

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 19 2016

For the second time this year, the Little Wish Foundation—founded and operated by Butler senior Liz Niemiec—has received a major gift from the LIDS Foundation. This time, it was a $75,000 Tip the Hat Award.

Senior Liz Niemiec (second from left) receives her second award from the LIDS Foundation.
Senior Liz Niemiec (second from left) receives her second award from the LIDS Foundation.

Little Wish Foundation delivers wishes, such as laptops, gaming systems, and desirable apparel, to pediatric oncology patients at children’s hospitals throughout Central Indiana. In February, the LIDS Foundation presented Little Wish with a $100,000 award.

“Both the LIDS Foundation and the LIDS Sports Group recognize the importance of uplifting and rewarding those who are shaping today’s youth into tomorrow’s leaders,” said Glenn Campbell, LIDS co-founder and LIDS Foundation board member. “This year’s recipients are a wonderful representation of varying causes that are undoubtedly impacting the lives and futures of children throughout the country.”

The LIDS Foundation is the philanthropic support arm of retailer LIDS Sports Group.

“The Tip-the-Hat Award has been the cherry on top of a year full of LIDS support and love,” Niemiec, an Arts Administration major, said. “Not only am I looking forward to celebrating the granting of our 500th little wish this May, but now this $75,000 gift was added onto our blessings. It's a pretty cool way to end senior year.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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AcademicsPeopleCampus

51 Years and Counting: Mulholland Still Makes Sweet Music

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 07 2016

You might think that having just turned 81, Professor of Music James Mulholland would be in the winter of his career. If so, it’s a mighty busy winter.

During March and early April, Mulholland:


James Mulholland, rehearsing choirs in Carnegie Hall.

-Served a week in residency at University of Wisconsin Eau Claire, which culminated with a concert of Mulholland compositions by the various ensembles of the School of Music. While there, he coached the all-male choral ensemble The Singing Statesmen on his latest commission for them, in honor of the group’s 50th anniversary.

-Visited the University of Illinois for the 2016 Intercollegiate Men’s Choral National Seminar. Ten choirs came from all over the country, and Mulholland’s music was featured.

-Attended the Gotham SINGS! Collegiate Choral Showcase at Carnegie Hall, where choirs from four universities performed selections by composers such as Mozart, Mendelssohn, Rachmaninoff, and, yes, Mulholland. He rehearsed the university choirs prior to their performance.

-Hosted students from Iola/Scandinavian High School of Wisconsin, who made a two-day trip to Indianapolis to attend a choral clinic with Mulholland and tour the Butler campus.

-Finished a composition for the combined Indianapolis Children’s Choir and full orchestra to perform at the retirement extravaganza for Choir Founder and longtime Butler Professor Henry Leck.

While doing all this, he only missed one class.

“I’m booked through 2018,” said Mulholland, who is finishing his 51st year of teaching at Butler. “As far as my career artistically and academically, I’m still in demand. And I’m not cheap.”

Mulholland travels frequently to work with choral groups around the country, and he is among the world’s most-performed composers. In his doctoral dissertation examining music selected by high school honor choirs, James Spillane, now Director of Choral Studies at the University of Connecticut, found that the five most-programmed composers are, in order, Handel, Brahms, Mendelssohn, Mulholland, and Mozart.

In 2015, the Southern Chorale at the University of Southern Mississippi, Mulholland’s undergraduate alma mater, released a CD of his compositions called Back Home in Southern Mississippi: The Music of James Quitman Mulholland. The discs features 11 selections in which Mulholland married his music to texts by William Butler Yeats, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Lord Byron, and others.

Reviewing the CD in The Choral Scholar, the online journal of the National Collegiate Choral Organization, C. Michael Porter, Director of Choral Organizations at Boise State University, wrote: “James Quitman Mulholland’s compositions have garnered a respected position within today’s choral canon. Because of their rich sonorities and expansive melodic lines, Mulholland’s compositions appeal to musicians and audiences of all levels…. Through their moving and impeccable performance, the Southern Chorale demonstrates why Mulholland’s works are synonymous with choral excellence.”mul2

Gregory Fuller, the Director of Choral Activities at Southern Mississippi, said he’s known of Mulholland’s work since he was a high school student in the late 1970s. What makes Mulholland’s music distinctive, Fuller said, is its “lush, romantic sound—lush harmonies and beautiful melody.”

“There are a couple of things that make him a standard-bearer,” he said. “Number one, he’s been at it a long time. He’s written a lot of music that is not only beautiful, but it’s accessible for a lot of different types of groups—school groups, community groups, professional groups, collegiate groups. And one of the reasons I think his music is profound is that you will struggle to find any piece by James Mulholland that does not include substantive text. He chooses great poetry, and he does not waste his time on things that are not profound or have not stood the test of time.”

Mulholland said he’s written the lion’s share of his more than 600 compositions on the piano in his second-floor office in Lilly Hall. He remains enormously proud of his service at Butler, including his 41 years on the Athletic Committee, and notes that next year, one of his students will be the third generation of his family to take one of his classes.

“I’m going to make music until I die,” he said. “And the only thing I enjoy more than making music is sharing it. Where better than you share your knowledge and love of music, the passion of it, than at a university? It’s also nice to have a captive audience. It gives me a fuel for my creativity.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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People

Prof. Kelly's Book Explains How Conservatives Won the Culture Wars

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PUBLISHED ON Mar 30 2016

In a groundbreaking study of Hollywood films produced since 2000, Butler University Associate Professor of Critical Communication and Media Studies Casey Kelly has found that the overwhelming majority of movies now associate premarital sex with shame and degradation, while they romanticize traditional nuclear families, courtship rituals, and gender roles.

caseykelly10Kelly published his findings in Abstinence Cinema, a new book from Rutgers University Press that looks through the lens of approximately 180 movies at the outcome of the culture wars—which, he says, conservatives won.

“They won quite simply by choosing to participate in the public culture of sex talk,” Kelly said. “From the 1970s onward and in education in particular, cultural conservatives created their own curriculum, think tanks, policy institutes, and political lobbies to win the culture war over sex. Instead of resisting sex education, they created their own and had help from sympathetic family values politicians. In popular culture, abstinence advocates began selling the idea that virginity was sexy and hip, which made it something more accessible for Hollywood filmmakers to garner an audience.”

Kelly said the results—romanticizing traditional nuclear families, courtship rituals, and gender roles—are not necessarily negative. “But when virginity is constructed as the sole determinant of women's value, a physical ritual only accessible for heterosexual couples in the privileged institution of marriage, or a double-standard not valued in men (in popular culture and film), it has the effect of reinforcing discriminatory ideologies and practices.”

“You can see this not only in expected sites, like the Twilight films, but surprising ones, like the raunchy comedies of Judd Apatow,” he said. “These movies are particularly disempowering for young women, concocting plots in which the decision to refrain from sex until marriage is the young woman’s primary source of agency and arbiter of moral worth.”

Bonnie J. Dow, author of Watching Women’s Liberation, 1970: Feminism’s Pivotal Year on the Network News, calls Kelly’s book “smart textual analysis and informed feminist critique … a welcome addition to scholarship that takes popular culture seriously for its participation in the struggles of contemporary public life.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

 

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Student LifePeople

Video is Their Business (And Their Business is Good)

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PUBLISHED ON Mar 10 2016

They’re not even finished with college yet, but already Joshua Gaal and Tim Valentine are successfully building up Train 918, the video production, marketing, and branding company they founded as sophomores and will run after graduation.

Timothy Valentine and Joshua Gaal show their cameras to children in Kenya.

For 10 days in February, the Butler seniors were in Kenya, making promotional videos for a company called Roots Coconut Oil. Their job: show the process of harvesting coconut oil and explain Roots’ focus on providing good wages, clean water initiatives, and more for the Kenyan people. The results will be posted on rootscoconutoil.com this summer.

“Being able to go to Kenya and not be in class for seven days—I’m sure it doesn’t make the professors happy, but they were very understanding,” said Valentine, a Digital Media Production major and Marketing minor from Cincinnati, Ohio.

Gaal and Valentine said the experience was extraordinary. They shot footage on the island of Pate, about 300 miles from the capital city of Nairobi. They didn’t have a lot of downtime, but they managed to see giraffes, a pack of lions, and lush scenery.

Gaal, an Art + Design major and Digital Media Production minor from Whiting, Indiana, said one of the challenges he enjoyed was meeting the children on the island and gaining their trust.

kenya 4“You take a photo and then you show them, and they all swarm you and they hug you and they want you to look in their camera and they want you to take more photos,” he said. “I think that moment of trust between you and a kid from your town was probably my favorite moment.”

Valentine and Gaal got the job with Roots through a Butler connection—senior Riley Supple, an intern with the coconut oil company, recommended them. He had good reason to: Junior year, Valentine and Gaal worked on an admission video for Butler Marketing that has served as a calling card to attract future business.

The positive reaction to that effort led them to create Train 918, which they named for a train car they rode in as sophomores during a College of Communication trip to Germany.

They followed the admission video this semester with a video for the Butler University Police Department showing the best practices to follow if there’s an active shooter on campus.kenya 1

After graduation, Train918 will move into the Speak Easy, a warehouse in Broad Ripple that calls itself “a place for Indy’s entrepreneurial community to call home.”

“I think it’s really cool that Butler University has allowed Josh and me to become who we are and do what we do,” Valentine said. “We’re called Train918, but a lot of our ties are right here with Butler and it’s pretty cool that a university of this size takes care of its students this way.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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People

Butler University’s Oldest Living Graduate Turns 105

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PUBLISHED ON Feb 25 2016

He commuted to Butler in his Model T Ford, walked around campus when the only buildings were Jordan Hall, Butler Fieldhouse, the Phi Delta Theta house, and the Campus Club, and played on the Butler baseball team with Oral Hildebrand, who pitched in the major leagues from 1931-1940.

He’s Sam Arnett ’33, believed to be Butler’s oldest living graduate. And on February 25 he turns 105.

Sam Arnett shows off one of his birthday gifts, a shirt and vest from Butler.

Back in the day, he grew up in Indianapolis and went to Tech High School with thoughts of being in pharmacy like his father.

“‘You’ll work a lot of hours, you’ll make poor money,’” he recalls his father saying.

So he came to Butler, where he majored in Business Administration. Butler “was a very enjoyable place to go to school,” he said.

He remembers Tony Hinkle as a nice man (“I never heard a word against him”) and describes his time at Butler like this: “We attended our classes, we made our grades and played baseball.” He was a “good enough” outfielder.

After graduation, Arnett went on to Purdue University for a second bachelor’s degree and a master’s, then went to work for Eli Lilly and Co., retiring after 41 years. He moved to Florida for 20 years, then returned to Indiana to be closer to his family.

These days, Arnett lives in at Wellbrooke of Westfield, an assisted-living facility, where he keeps a Butler pennant on his wall and copies of The Drift, Butler’s yearbook, and clips from The Butler Collegian nearby.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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People

Two Butler Sophomores Selected 500 Festival Princesses

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PUBLISHED ON Feb 17 2016

Butler sophomores Caitlyn Foye and Monica Wright are among 33 college-age women who have been selected as Indianapolis 500 Festival Princesses for 2016.

Foye, from Newburgh, Indiana, is a graduate of Castle High School and a sophomore majoring in Biology. Wright, who is from Indianapolis, is a graduate of Cathedral High School and a sophomore majoring in Marketing and International Business.

Each 500 Festival Princess will receive a $1,000 scholarship, participate in the 500 Festival’s statewide community outreach programs, volunteer at 500 Festival events, and take part in various Indianapolis Motor Speedway functions—including the pre-race ceremonies and Victory Circle celebration for the 100th running of the Indianapolis 500.

“For more than 50 years, the 500 Festival Princess Program has recognized Indiana’s brightest college-aged women,” said Leslie Carter-Prall, 500 Festival board member and princess program committee co-chair. “The program’s new personal and professional development initiative and the scholarships given to each young woman will reinforce its rich history. The 500 Festival is proud to take the lead on investing our time and resources to shape Indiana’s next generation of leaders.”

The 2016 500 Festival Princesses represent 13 Indiana colleges and universities and 21 cities and towns across the state. This year’s 500 Festival Princesses were selected from hundreds of applicants based upon their communication skills, commitment to service, leadership, scholarship, and professionalism. They have an average GPA of 3.5.

One of the 33 Princesses will be selected as the 2016 500 Festival Queen and will receive an additional $1,500 scholarship. The queen will be crowned May 21 during the 500 Festival Breakfast at the Brickyard.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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People

Samantha Vidal '08 Honored for School Counseling Work

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PUBLISHED ON Feb 01 2016

Samantha Vidal MSC ’08 was honored in Washington, D.C., the week of January 25 for being one of the six nationalist finalists for the 2016 School Counselor of the Year Award.

Samantha at awards ceremonyThe ceremonies, which included recognition from First Lady Michelle Obama, were timed to coincide with National School Counseling Week, February 1-5.

“Being selected as a finalist has been an unbelievable and surprising honor,” Vidal said. “I know so many amazing school counselors who go above and beyond for their students every day and do not get the recognition they deserve. It is an amazing feeling to be honored by my peers, ASCA (American School Counselor Association), and The First Lady.”

Vidal has worked at Creekside Elementary School for seven years. Previously, she worked at the high school level at an urban, parochial school and also briefly as a part time elementary school counselor in an urban setting in Indianapolis. She was previously recognized as the 2014 Indiana Elementary School Counselor of the Year by the Indiana School Counselor Association (ISCA) and served as ISCA’s President 2013–2014.

Vidal received her B.A. in Zoology from Miami University (Ohio) and her Master’s in School Counseling from Butler University. Vidal and her husband, Rory, have an infant daughter, Annie.

“I would not be in this position without the guidance and support of the professors at Butler University,” she said. “Their program and preparation for PSCs is unmatched. Not only that, their professors' involvement in Indiana School Counselor Association, American School Counselor Association, and advocacy efforts have opened so many doors for me. I am forever grateful!”

Brandie M. Oliver, Assistant Professor of School Counseling at Butler and Past President of the Indiana School Counselor Association, was in Washington to see Vidal honored. She said Vidal “lives and breathes her role as a school counselor and works diligently to meet the needs of all of her students.”

At Creekside Elementary School, Vidal worked collaboratively with her staff, parents, community, and administrators to develop a comprehensive school counseling program that has received both the Gold Star School Counseling Award and the RAMP (Recognized American School Counselor Association) Model Program Award.

“Because of her comprehensive program that focuses on college/career readiness, academic success, and social/emotional development, Samantha is able to deliver classroom lessons, facilitate small groups, and counsel students individually that all work to meet the goals of her program,” Oliver said. “It is so exciting that she was selected as a national finalist. This opportunity has allowed her a platform to share the importance of elementary school counseling.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

AcademicsPeople

Dean Shelley Honored for Contributions to Teacher Education

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PUBLISHED ON Feb 01 2016

Ena Shelley, Dean of Butler University’s College of Education (COE) since 2005 and a professor in the College since 1982, has been selected to receive the Edward C. Pomeroy Award for Outstanding Contributions to Teacher Education from the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education (AACTE).

The award will be presented to the Dean on February 23 in Las Vegas.

The Pomeroy Award is given to a person or persons who have made exceptional contributions to AACTE, to a national or state organization involved in teacher education, or to persons responsible for the development of exemplary teacher education initiatives.

Shelley provided the leadership to create the first Butler University memo of understanding between the University and the Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS) to establish Shortridge Magnet High School for Law and Public Policy (now Shortridge International Baccalaureate High School). In addition, she led creation of the IPS/Butler University Laboratory School, focused on early childhood and elementary education.

She also was instrumental in bringing Reggio-inspired educational practices to Indiana through the Indianapolis Reggio Collaborative. She was able to bring an international exhibit from Reggio Emilia, Italy, to the Indiana Statehouse for a six-month stay that provided many professional development experiences for hundreds of educators from around and beyond the state.

“Each success in the College of Education is not from a solo experience in my role as a Dean, but rather it is a beautiful symphony created by colleagues in the College and in the schools,” Shelley said. “There is a saying that ‘a leader is only as good as the team that surrounds them,’ and I have found that to be very true. I truly have the dream team in my College.”

Shelley’s approach to education is well known around the COE and Butler: “The College of Education believes we must prepare our students for schools as they should be, not simply perpetuating schools as they currently exist. We must be willing to explore with our students the difficult issues of inequities that exist in our schools and society and to help them to become agents of change.”

Shelley’s COE colleagues said her efforts on behalf of the College, its faculty, staff, and students have been outstanding.

“She has always been charismatic, clear in her vision and integrity, but at her core profoundly decent and kind,” said Professor of Education Arthur Hochman. “This is the reason that she makes so many connections, achieves what might appear impossible, and the reason that so many want to walk in her wake.”

“If you are looking for a positive educator and advocate who challenges the status quo and works tirelessly at lifting up the greatest profession in the world, then look no further,” Associate Dean Debra Lecklider wrote on Shelley’s behalf.

Shelley earned her Bachelor of Science, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy from Indiana State University.

“Each day I see the future of education in the talented young people who have chosen it as their vocation,” she said. “These young people could do anything, and they want to teach. I see great teachers doing extremely difficult work as I spend time in the schools. It will be up to our society to invest in educators by valuing the teaching profession and remembering that our democracy was founded on providing a free public education to all citizens.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

AcademicsPeople

Dean Shelley Honored for Contributions to Teacher Education

Ena Shelley, Dean of Butler University’s College of Education (COE) since 2005 and a professor in the College since 1982, has been selected to receive the Edward C. Pomeroy Award for Outstanding Contributions to Teacher Education from the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education (AACTE).

Feb 01 2016 Read more
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Betsy Shirley '10 Earns Religion Writers' Fellowship

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PUBLISHED ON Jan 19 2016

Betsy Shirley ’10, an assistant editor with Sojourners magazine, has been named one of 28 Religion Newswriters Association’s Handa Fellows in Interreligious Communication, an achievement that will help broaden her knowledge of religion and the scope of her coverage.

The one-year fellowship includes numerous professional development opportunities—a dedicated mentor and webinars designed to sharpen the fellows’ writing and reporting skills—as well as possible travel opportunities.

BetsyShirleyHeadshot2“The fellowship helps younger reporters cover religions that aren’t Christianity or Judaism with much more depth and nuance,” she said. “When it comes to covering religion, we need reporters to be especially well trained in some of the religions that haven’t been as well represented.”

Shirley has been a writer and editor for Sojourners, which focuses on faith and social justice from a Christian perspective, since finishing her Master of Divinity at Yale Divinity School in May 2015. She said her interest in religion was stoked at Butler, which she chose for several reasons: She wanted a liberal arts education; her great-grandparents and her father were graduates; and in researching schools, she found that Butler rated high among students on a “happiness index.”

She majored in English writing, but added a minor in religion after taking Associate Professor Chad Bauman’s introductory course and Professor Paul Valliere’s “Faith, Doubt and Reason.”

“In that the first class, even the first week, we were out in Indianapolis observing a religious tradition that was very different from our own,” Shirley said. “I was assigned Sikhism and we were out talking to people who practice that religion. As someone who now works writing about religion and covering religion, that was especially valuable experience.”

After graduation, Shirley did a yearlong internship at Sojourners as an editorial assistant, then headed to Yale.

“I liked working at Sojourners and knew if I wanted to do this long-term, I needed a broader background in religion,” she said. “You need to be able to know what is a meaningful story and what is just Internet buzz.”

At Yale, she took courses in subject areas such as church history, biblical interpretation, and theology, as well as classes in other disciplines. That prepared her to cover stories like the Gay Christian Network Conference (a meeting of 1,500 LGBT Christians and allies), the role of hospital chaplains during the Ebola scare, and how a Los Angeles pastor uses karaoke to spread the gospel.

“I’ve had a lot of great training in religion,” she said, “but religion is complex and it deserves extra resources and training to fairly interpret it.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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People

Michael Hole '08 Named to Forbes's 30 Under 30

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PUBLISHED ON Jan 06 2016

Michael Hole ’08, a Boston Medical Center pediatrician and founder of an organization that works to reduce child poverty in America, has been named to the Forbes 30 Under 30 list of America’s most important young entrepreneurs, creative leaders, and brightest stars.

michael holeHole is the cofounder of StreetCred, which he describes on his LinkedIn profile as a company that works to reduce child poverty in America by improving access to money and services available to low-income families and individuals raising children.

The organization provides free tax preparation and financial literacy services in pediatric hospitals and clinics targeting families eligible for the Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit. It plans to expand services into one-stop-shops helping families apply for other community resources and public benefits like health insurance, food assistance, public housing, electricity, FAFSA, and savings plans all before they leave the doctor's office.

Hole, 29, was a double-major in Biology and Spanish at Butler. While at Butler, he founded Ambassadors for Children and Timmy Global Health, and he was active in Student Government Association and Delta Tau Delta.

After earning his bachelor’s, Hole went on to Stanford University, where he earned his MBA and Doctor of Medicine (M.D.).

Hole and the 29 others on the list were chosen from an initial screening of more than 15,000.

“Name a business sector, social issue or essential institution, they are taking it on and changing the rules of the game– or creating entirely new playbooks,” Forbes wrote. “In the past, youth was a handicap to professional success. Getting older meant more resources, more knowledge, more money. No more. Those who grew up in the tech age have way bigger ambitions — perfectly suited to the dynamic, entrepreneurial and impatient digital world they grew up in. If you want to change the world, being under 30 is now an advantage.”

The Forbes 30 Under 30 list includes some famous names—basketball superstar Stephen Curry, Star Wars: The Force Awakens leading man John Boyega, plus-sized supermodel Ashley Graham, Canadian crooner Shawn Mendes and YouTube gamer CaptainSparklez (Jordan Maron).

Forbes said the process to make the list is “intense.”

“We look at thousands of candidates from 20 different categories and consider their game-changing quotient along various dimensions, such as impact, use of cutting edge technology or creativity, scalability or adaptability, number of people reached and dollars raised/generated,” it said.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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