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Big Break

Megan Ward MS ’13

from Spring 2016

Guns N’ Roses. Senses Fail. Thomas Rhett. Florida Georgia Line. All are musical influences of KaraKara, a band out of Louisville, Kentucky, who has opened for The Ataris, Asher Roth, and Walk the Moon among others. KaraKara also is the latest to sign with Butler’s Indyblue Entertainment. Chris Allen ’89, who has scouted many great bands and is a Vice President of A&R for Global Music Publishing, connected KaraKara with Cutler Armstrong, Creative Media and Entertainment (CME) Instructor at Butler. 

The whirlwind process of making an album hasn’t been without its challenges for KaraKara. The biggest being writing every song “long distance without a single band member being in the same city. We had only one weekend of rehearsals with everyone in the same room before we recorded,” said member Sam Varga. 

And the biggest surprise? “The talent and insights of the [Butler] students involved with the project. Not only is the studio amazing, everyone behind the board was awesome. We never felt like we were missing out on anything [by working] with the students and Indyblue,” added Varga. 

In fact, it was invaluable to KaraKara to get the feedback of their peers—and target audience—while recording. During the intense three-and-a-half days of recording, Butler students pushed KaraKara to experiment with different sounds—“a cool experience” according to the band. 

Each year Butler students produce a full album— everything from finding talent and recording to mixing and mastering the final product—as part of their capstone course in the Recording Industry Studies program. Past artists include locals Jenna Epkey and Jai Baker Band. 

“I believe it’s better to have hands-on experience versus learning from a PowerPoint,” said Armstrong. 

He isn’t alone. Two grants—one from Butler’s Innovation Fund (earned by CME Department Chair Ken Creech), and one from the Music and Entertainment Industry Educators Association—were awarded to create Indyblue Entertainment. 

Throughout the recording process, students work with Armstrong and Technical Services Coordinator Mark Harris—both vital to the recording process, listening and providing valuable feedback to the students. Visiting Professor Richard Ash also was instrumental in the recording process, even demonstrated various mixing techniques. Ash is a multiple gold- and platinum-record earning mixer/producer and former Vice President of Guitar’s Center’s professional division. 

At Indyblue, students also get to collaborate with other industry pros like mastering engineer Andy VanDette and Indianapolis-based lawyer Robert Meitus. Names not familiar? VanDette has worked with Whitney Houston and the Beastie Boys (to name a couple) and Meitus specializes in entertainment contracts and intellectual property. 

KaraKara has hopes of working with industry heavyweights as well. “Dreaming big” Varga said he hopes Scott Borchetta or Shane McAnally take a listen to the band’s album. 

As for the album release, it’s slated for early 2016. While there aren’t any concrete plans, Varga promised, “There will be a party. There is always a party.” 

About Indyblue Entertainment

Since its launch in 2013, Indyblue has released six albums. Along with a full-length album, each year students produce and market other recordings, including a music sampler of local artists and various audio productions for radio and internet. Any profits go toward funding the next year’s project. CCOM has two, industry-standard professional recording studios on Butler’s campus. 

Indyblue Student Team 

Recording and Mixing Engineer/ Producer: Ryan Hallquist 

Assistant Engineers/ Producers: Marco Rosas, Phillip Tock, Jesse May, Jordan Fuchs, Matt Brooks, Dan Fuson, Charell Luckey, Javier Perez 

Assistant Mix Engineers: Marco Rosas, Jesse May, Phillip Tock 

Album Artwork and Photography: Cate Pickens 

Liner Notes and Credit Coordination: Matt Brooks 

Social Media Coordination: Grey Gordon 

Student Life

Big Break

by Megan Ward MS ’13

from Spring 2016

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Day in the Life: Logan Schwering

Megan Ward MS ’13

from Fall 2016

Logan walking to classTold early on in his Butler career to take advantage of all that Butler offers—connect with professors, participate in student organizations, and take on leadership opportunities—it’s clear Logan heeded these wise words. Seriously, just look at his typical day (see sidebar).

An Eagle Scout and a runner who averages 25–35 miles per week, Logan also gets a workout carrying his backpack all day. His must-haves to get through the day include the obvious—textbooks/notebooks, laptop, and pencil bag— and several extras: snacks (“and lots of them”); KGP—Knowing God Personally—booklets (“never know when there may be a friend who needs encouragement”); dry-erase marker; loose change; a spoon (for snacks); and glasses. Now we know why he never turns down Pancake Night in Atherton!

Logan typically studies in a classroom in Jordan Hall, listening to music unless he’s studying for an exam. Group studying? Only with people who he knows will keep him focused and motivated.

To stay motivated and recharge during free time and on the weekends, Logan takes advantage of good weather by running on the Canal and Monon trails, as well as exploring Broad Ripple and downtown Indy. Cheering on the Dawgs from the Dawg Pound and trying new restaurants with friends also are favorites.

Unable to pick a single favorite experience at Butler, Logan gave me seven. Yes, seven. The list included Dinner with 10 Bulldogs (thank you, alumni!), serving as a Resident Assistant, being elected Vice President of Student Initiatives for SGA, and studying abroad as part of Leadership London. While there are “lots of must-dos before [he] graduates,” he has two in particular on his mind: going to Devour Downtown in Indy and seeing the men’s basketball team win the NCAA championship. No pressure, though. He’d be okay if the latter happened after he graduates.

LOGAN’S TYPICAL MONDAY

7:00 AM—Wake up—time for an early-morning workout before classes!

7:30-9:15 AM—Workout at the HRC or go for a run around campus/ Indy area. Love starting my day with a long run!

9:30 AM—Quick shower, get dressed, and pack backpack for class. Let the long day of class begin!

10:00 AM—First class of the day, the lecture-based GHS: Postcolonial Studies—Caribbean.

11:00 AM—Next up, is a hands-on Information Technology class.

Logan in classNOON—Lunch in Atherton with some fellow RAs, then back to room to pack my bag for afternoon classes.

1:00 PM—Off to Organizational Behavior in the basement of Irwin Library; at least we get to mix it up with lectures, presentations, and in-class activities.

2:25 PM—Time for Business Law in Holcomb Observatory… wait, why are we in the observatory, again?!

3:45 PM—Do homework at library before meetings begin. Must. Focus.

5:15 PM—Ross Hall staff meeting… hopefully it includes some good snacks!

6:00 PM—Dinner in Atherton. Fingers crossed it’s Pancake Night!

7:00 PM—Check in and study with frat brothers at Phi Delta Theta before my Student Initiatives Board meeting at 9:00 PM.

10:00 PM—Finish up homework/studying in Jordan Hall before heading back to my room to talk with residents— you never know who might stop in to chat!

MIDNIGHT—Get ready for bed. Every day is an adventure, but I’m blessed to be a Butler Bulldog!

Student Life

Day in the Life: Logan Schwering

by Megan Ward MS ’13

from Fall 2016

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Day in the Life: Cristina Alma McNeiley

Megan Ward MS ’13

from Fall 2016

Cristina with students“You’re going to leave this place and go to college” are the words first-generation college student Cristina heard from her parents. She admits that, during her first semester of college, it was a struggle to find a good balance between schoolwork and having fun. Her advice? “Use your time wisely when it comes to schoolwork, and take advantage of any free time you have to do what makes you happy.”

Cristina clearly has found the sweet spot, balancing a heavy course-load, SGA leadership, and outings to downtown Indy. Speaking of sweets, they’re a favorite of Cristina’s at the dining hall. She says, “Atherton really hooks it up with the desserts”—soft cookies, a sundae bar, and vanilla cake with pink frosting—she’s “in heaven.” It sounds like Butler basketball in Hinkle isn’t the only thing that fills her heart with joy!

To avoid running back-and-forth to her room throughout the day, Cristina packs everything she needs for the day in her backpack: books, supplies, and, of course, snacks! And, if she could, every semester she would take a class with Professor Jess Butler, who “keeps sociology interesting” and “cares about how her students are doing in and out of the classroom—which says a lot.”

During her (rare) free time, Cristina enjoys going out to eat, taking advantage of SGA late-night programs, watching movies, and napping. As for the future, she’s dreaming of doing the “fountain hop” before graduating and attending law school after graduation. She hopes to practice law in Indy or Chicago and have her own law firm someday; then, she wants to own an art gallery. Ultimately, she wants to say, “I always did what I loved.”

Cristina's Typical Monday

9:30 AM—Wake up, eat breakfast, pack and prepare for my morning meeting and then class.

10:45 AM—Leave Apartment Village and walk to Atherton for my

11:00 AM meeting with Jen Agnew to talk about what I’ll cover in my Diversity and Inclusion Board meeting later today… or sometimes we just talk about how everything is going.

Cristina walking to classNOON—Statistics class. I’m not the greatest when it comes to math, but I try my hardest to pay attention and ask questions.

1:00 PM—Time for Research Methods. I try to stay focused, but sometimes it gets hard—it’s one of my longest classes.

2:15 PM—Time to grab something to eat at C-Club, say “hi” to people in the Diversity Center, or walk back to my room for a power nap.

3:50 PM—YES, last class of the day. Juvenile Justice and Delinquency is so interesting, and I have a few friends in this class.

5:05 PM—Head to Atherton for my board meeting at 6:00 PM. I’m looking forward to our great upcoming programs!

7:00 PM—Time to grab some food and go back to Apartment Village to eat, or my boyfriend will come over and we eat together.

9:15 PM—Final meeting of the day! I love being around these individuals in SGA Cabinet. We make sure that we get the important things done first, but always save time to catch up and relax. Sometimes, it’s my favorite part of any Monday.

10:40 PM—Time to get some work done at the library or the apartment.

1:00 AM—Bedtime! I try hard to get to sleep by this time—depending on my workload.

Travel Bound

Cindy Dashnaw

from Fall 2016

What is the most surprising thing a student learns from a Butler University study-abroad trip?

Current Senior Danielle Wallace’s answer speaks for everyone she knows who has ever taken this journey.

“Recognizing my own capabilities,” she said.

Student traveling abroad in AustraliaWallace’s learning curve began on her first day in Rome in a scenario Butler faculty members often repeat.

“Our professor said, ‘You’ve all got maps and each other, so see you later!’ and we had to find our own way. I started recognizing that I could figure things out and became more self-sufficient than I might have discovered I could be if I’d stayed in the United States.”

Rebecca Pokrandt ’15 said studying abroad gave her courage, too.

“I never would have had the confidence to apply for a Fulbright scholarship in Croatia if I hadn’t done GALA.”

GALA, short for Global Adventures in the Liberal Arts, is the cornerstone of Butler’s Center for Global Education in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. GALA allows students to take primarily core classes in several locations abroad during the same semester. They travel with a resident Butler faculty member who also teaches a course; other faculty members join the group for two- to three-week teaching stints.

There’s no other program like it in the country.

According to Open Doors 2015, a study of the Institute for International Education, only one in 10 undergraduate students in the United States studies abroad. Yet, an extraordinary one-third of Butler undergrads study abroad each year.

It’s a statistic that has held true for years. So what does Butler do to make study abroad so popular among its students, their parents, and its professors?

A BIG DRAW TO BUTLER

Wallace already knew she wanted to study abroad when she did her first college search.

“The fact that Butler had such an outstanding program was definitely a draw for me,” she said. “I’d be able to take actual classes for credit and visit lots of countries instead of just one. No other university offers that.”

In GALA, students can take a full load of sophomore, core-credit classes while traveling through several countries within a region of the world. GALA trips have visited sites in Europe, East Asia, Latin America, and South Africa.Student in New Zealand

Like Wallace, Alyssa Setnar ’16 knew she wanted to study abroad. However, with the coursework of a five-year, dual-degree program ahead of her, many advised her to forego travel.

“I just didn’t take that as an answer, and Butler made it work,” Setnar said. Butler Associate Professor Ania Spyra has led two GALA trips. She is a nativeof Upper Silesia Poland and has studied in Stockholm and Quebec, lived in England and Romania, and traveled in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas.

She led her second GALA trip in spring2015 to Italy, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Ireland.

“A GALA trip is an intense experience,” said Spyra. “It’s very different from the general study-abroad programs offered elsewhere, where students go attend a university in another country. There, they become just another person in the classroom. With GALA, they have a professor with them at all times, they’re with other Butler students—they’re seeing foreign places but traveling in the ‘Butler bubble.’”

Robin Turner led a GALA trip to South Africa in spring 2016. An Associate Professor of Political Science at Butler, she also is a visiting research associate at the University of the Witswatersrand in Johannesburg.

“It’s been a privilege to watch students grow as they venture far outside the ‘Butler bubble,’” Turner said. “For me and for them, spending 13 weeks with a small group of people is an immense learning opportunity. The students did a great job of building and maintaining a cohesive group in which they cared for each other and themselves, addressing conflicts as they arose.”

The bubble—or comfort zone—may give parents a reason to relax a little, but it certainly doesn’t keep students from fully experiencing a culture and its people. Spyra told of a haunting visit to a Belfast dairy.

“We took a tour through Dublin, where our guide was a local historian telling us about revolutionary Ireland fighting to gain its independence from England. Then we drove to Derry and Belfast, and our two guides had fought in the Northern Ireland conflict: one on the Catholic side and one on the Protestant. They now give these tours and work toward reconciliation. What they shared with us had a big impact on the students.”

In South Africa, Turner said, she took students well beyond their comfort zones.

Students abroad“Some of the experiences were difficult or uncomfortable,” she said. “It’s not easy to be a hyper-visible white American in a black South African community—who lacks fluency in the dominant language—or to encounter signs of immense wealth and deep poverty in the same day.”

However unfamiliar, though, students view intimate encounters like these as invaluable.

“The adventures and life experience are very necessary in order to write as comprehensively as I’d like to,” said Wallace, a Creative Writing major. “No matter how wonderful the classes are, certain things you just can’t learn until you’re out there seeing and doing them yourself.”

Pokrandt already is applying those adventures as an elementary school teacher.

“I really try to give my class a global sense of a topic. For instance, we talked about the Syrian refugee crisis in terms of it being the world’s concern, not just an American problem.”

She recalled her own jarring perspective shift in Paris.

“I was the only American in the room when the news of the Boston Marathon bombing came on, and no one else seemed to care,” she said. “It made me realize how desensitized we can be when we see news about other countries. It was eye-opening.”

CHANGING PROFESSOR PERSPECTIVES

Professors who travel with students have some eye-opening experiences of their own.

“Spending lots and lots of time with students outside the classroom space has helped me to better understand their lives—their differing perspectives, backgrounds, struggles, and strengths—and I hope this will make me a better teacher,” Turner said.

Grading students at the end of the semester is the toughest thing for Spyra.

“By then, I know who they are and who is getting the kind of experience I want them to get. They have time to talk to us (professors) at any time, so we get close.”

Maddy Fry ’18 corroborated Spyra’s statement.

Student in Israel“The most surprising part of the trip for me was the relationships you build with professors. You’re with them almost all of the time, in and outside the classroom. They get to know you on an even more personal level than usual, and it remains when you get back on campus. It’s really special,” Fry said.

FROM STUDENT TO PROGRAM ADVOCATE

Study-abroad students become vocal advocates of the Butler GALA program. Many tout the ability to see more than one country on a trip they didn’t have to plan themselves or the chance to go somewhere besides Europe.

“Not too many students can say that they’ve been to Africa. It felt mysterious and exciting, so I knew I had to apply for this trip,” said Fry.

Extensive planning by the University is a plus for both students and families.

“I tell people that ‘phenomenal’ doesn’t even begin to describe how Butler planned the trip. Everything we needed was done for us: who to contact in the city, where we’d be staying, a detailed itinerary before we left—all really helpful to share with our families and friends,” she said.

Students found that earning credit abroad for the same tuition they’d pay on campus was a big selling point for parents, too.

“You have to take these classes anyway, and at what other time in your life are you going to get these experiences at this cost?” said Pokrandt.

Almost no trip goes off without a hitch, but GALA students learn to handle every new situation.

“There have been highs and lows and everything in between, but it isn’t something I would trade for anything. I have learned so much, whether it be academically or just about myself, in the short time I’ve been here–much more than I expected,” said Fry.

The Center for Global Education offers 110 study-abroad programs in more than 70 countries. Find a current list of approved programs and Study Abroad FAQs at www.butler.edu/global-education.
AcademicsStudent Life

Travel Bound

Butler’s study-abroad program truly is one of a kind.

by Cindy Dashnaw

from Fall 2016

Read more
Study Abroad
AcademicsStudent Life

Study Abroad Program Among Best in Country

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jun 13 2018

Butler University's Study Abroad Program has been named one of the Top 30 in the country by the website bestvalueschools.org.

"Butler University students can choose from over 200 study abroad and exchange programs in over 60 countries," the website said. "Butler also works with the neighboring Institute for Study Abroad (IFSA) as a provider of study abroad programming for U.S. undergraduates. In addition to providing transcripts for all IFSA students, Butler University endorses all IFSA-taught courses."

Butler University offers over 200 study abroad programs in over 70 countries to meet the diverse needs of the student population. About 40 percent of Butler students study abroad at some point. Students are permitted to study abroad as early as the first semester of their sophomore year and as late as their senior year, if allowed by their College. Butler's Center for Global Education (CGE) provides study abroad advising and organizes pre-departure and re-entry sessions to help guide students through the study abroad process. The CGE maintains the List of Approved Programs, titled Where Can I Go? to research approved study abroad programs. All programs on the list meet Butler’s high standards for academic excellence.

Among the other schools in the Top 30 are Duke, Stanford, and Michigan State, as well as the BIG EAST's Georgetown and St. John's. To compile the list, the website said it used two surveys from the Princeton Review and U.S. News that surveyed hundreds of thousands of respondents including students, faculty, and administrators to find out what schools they believe have the best study abroad programs.

Media contact:
Marc Allan MFA '18
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Study Abroad
AcademicsStudent Life

Study Abroad Program Among Best in Country

Butler University's Study Abroad Program has been named one of the Top 30 in the country by the website bestvalueschools.org.

Jun 13 2018 Read more
Student LifePeople

Five Butler Students Earn Prestigious Scholarships

BY

PUBLISHED ON May 30 2018

Five Butler students have been awarded prestigious scholarships—two to study in the United Kingdom, two to teach English abroad, and one to continue his education in math and physics.

Huang
Nick Huang

Nick Huang and Marissa Schoedel have received Fulbright U.S. Student Program awards for English Teaching Assistantships for the 2018-2019 academic year from the U.S. Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board. Huang ’18, a Business major from Geneva, Illinois, will be teaching English at the Macau Polytechnic Institute. Schoedel ’18, a German major from Crown Point, Indiana, will be teaching English in Saarland, Germany.

Madisyn Smith ’22, from Coatesville, Indiana, and Megan Waxman ’21, from Highland, Michigan, will participate in the Fulbright Summer Institute in the United Kingdom, one of the most prestigious and selective summer scholarship programs operating worldwide. They will study at the University of Exeter and the University of Strathclyde/Glasgow School of Art, respectively.

And Robert “Alex” Glickfield '19 has been named a Goldwater Scholar for the 2018-2019 academic year. Glickfield, a mathematics and physics major, is from Greentown, Indiana. His career goal is to earn a doctorate in mathematical physics and conduct theoretical physics research while teaching at a university. 

Schoedel
Marissa Schoedel

“I have been ecstatic with our applicants’ successes," said Dacia Charlesworth, Director of Undergraduate Research and Prestigious Scholarships, who assisted students in the application process. "For example, with only 60 Fulbright UK Summer placements available nationwide, I am particularly pleased that Butler University students have, on average, comprised almost 4 percent of the entire population for the past three years. And in terms of the Goldwater Scholarship, it’s amazing that we have had four consecutive years with either a Scholar or an Honorable Mention from Butler.”

Huang and Schoedel, both members of Butler University’s Honors Program, join over 1,900 U.S. citizens who will study, conduct research, and teach abroad for the 2018-2019 academic year through the Fulbright U.S. Student Program.

"I am looking forward to engaging with my students and the community in Saarland through the game nights I will be hosting as a part of my proposed community engagement project,” Schoedel said. “I am ecstatic to be able to share my American perspective with learners of English and gain insight into their learning experience."

*

Smith
Madisyn​ Smith

As a participant in the Fulbright UK Summer Institute, Smith, a Pharmacy major, will be one of four students to participate in the program “Issues in Climate Change” at the University of Exeter. She will learn about environmental change and its consequences through both field work and classroom learning with faculty from the University of Exeter’s Geography department, which is one of the most successful in the U.K. and ranked in the top 25 in the world.

“I am beyond thankful to have been selected to participate in the Fulbright UK Summer Institute at the University of Exeter. Southwest England is a perfect destination for a first-time study abroad trip, and I am excited to see what this area has to offer,” she said.

Waxman, who is earning dual degrees in Biomedical Engineering and Biology, was one of 10 students selected to participate in the joint Summer Institute hosted by the University of Strathclyde and Glasgow School of Art that focuses on Scottish Technology, Innovation, and Creativity. She will gain a unique perspective on the cultural and political forces that have shaped modern Scotland, with a strong emphasis on the nation’s role as a technological pioneer. 

“I'm looking forward to immersing myself in Scottish culture and being able to experience all the technology and creativity Scotland has to offer firsthand,” she said.

Waxman
Megan Waxman

Fulbright UK Summer Institutes cover all participant costs. In addition, Fulbright summer participants receive a distinctive support and cultural education program including visa processing, a comprehensive pre-departure orientation, enrichment opportunities in country, a reentry session, and opportunity to join our alumni networks.

*

Glickfield, as a Goldwater scholar, joins 210 undergraduate sophomores and juniors across the United States and was selected from a field of 1,280 applicants nominated for the award.

“Winning the Goldwater Scholarship is easily my proudest achievement thus far," he said. "As it is one of most prestigious STEM scholarships in the country, I feel as though I have a great chance at standing out when applying to graduate schools like Berkeley, UCLA, and University of Chicago.”

He thanked his mentors, professors and research advisors Gonzalo Ordoñez, John Herr, Prem Sharma, and Manuel Gadella as well as the Goldwater Campus Representative and Butler’s Director of Undergraduate Research and

Glickfield
Alex Glickfield

Prestigious Scholarship Dacia Charlesworth for her assistance throughout the application process.

Glickfield continues Butler’s recent success associated with the Goldwater scholarship: Caitlyn Foye ’18 was a 2017-2018 Goldwater Scholar, both Lauryn Campagnoli ’17 and Whitney Hart ’17 received honorable mentions in 2016, and Luke Gallion ’16 was named a Goldwater Scholar in 2015.

The Goldwater Scholarship is the preeminent undergraduate award of its type in these fields and covers the cost of tuition, fees, books, and room and board up to $7,500 per year for one or two years. 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan MFA '18
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

Student LifePeople

Five Butler Students Earn Prestigious Scholarships

Four receive Fulbright awards, one is Goldwater Scholar.

May 30 2018 Read more
Arts & CultureStudent Life

Booting Up A New Club

BY Jackson Borman '20

PUBLISHED ON May 16 2018

For John George ’18, video games were always a casual interest. When he first came to Butler University, he loved playing games like Super Smash Bros. and Mario Kart with friends.

“It wasn’t until sophomore year when I really got into watching esports and watching competitive video gaming,” George said. “That’s when I really wanted to see what the feeling for it was on campus.”

In his junior year, George started thinking about starting a club, but he struggled to find other students who were interested in competitive gaming. He also wanted to find a professor to be a club advisor who was as passionate about esports as he is.

“I didn’t know anyone who watched competitive video gaming like I did,” George said.

Over the summer leading into his senior year, George met the founder of the esports club at Clemson University, who gave him tips and advice about how to get a similar club started at Butler.

At the start of the 2017–2018 academic year, George met College of Communication Professor Ryan Rogers, who was new to Butler but had previously done research about video games and was planning to create a class on esports.

That class eventually would turn into a team.

“Esports has always been interesting to me and something that I could really see taking off [on a college campus],” Rogers said.

George and Rogers got started planning early in the year and decided that they wanted individual teams in different games. George went to the Facebook pages of each Butler graduating class and posted information about the new club, looking to find students who might be interested in competing.

The first callout meeting was in the fall.

“It was a really fun meeting just introducing each other and it seemed like there was a ton of interest because most of the people there said that they had three or four friends that just couldn’t make it,” George said. “Actually finding a group of people that was into esports and the gaming culture like I am was awesome.”

*

After that first meeting, the group got together for a second time in November, where they decided which games they wanted to play, split into teams for each game, and selected team captains who were responsible for finding tournaments for the teams to play in, and scheduling practices.

The club started out playing League of Legends, Overwatch, Call of Duty, and Hearthstone. Eventually, after holding tryouts, it added Rocket League and FIFA.

The esports group also merged with a more casual group, the Butler Gaming Club.

“It can be kind of intimidating to jump right in to competitive video gaming,” George said. “I thought the casual side was a good way to attract people who love playing fun games and then once they find out about [the esports club] they can get into that.”

In the fall, the Big East reached out to the Athletic Department and Mike Freeman, Butler’s Senior Associate Athletic Director External Operations, about esports on Butler’s campus. That was the same week that George and Rogers met to discuss forming a team.

Freeman said the Big East approached each school to try to find out what was going on regarding esports. The conference found that some schools were active, while others had done little.

Freeman knew Rogers had a background in esports, so he reached out about getting involved with the Big East. The conference had partnered with ESL, an esports company that organized tournaments around the world, in hopes of starting competition between Big East schools.

Rogers helped to organize the group with the Big East while George held tryouts and streamed the club’s game play.

*

On May 7 and 8, Butler Rocket League and Butler League of Legends competed in Big East play for the first time. Three members of the Butler team competed in Rocket League and five competed in League of Legends.

The League of Legends team was swept in Big East play, but the Rocket League team placed fourth.

“We went 2-4 [in Rocket League] but we were a lot closer with a lot of the teams and were very close to winning more games,” George said.

For the team, the Big East Invitational was a great experience, and in George’s eyes, a great stage for the world of esports.

“I would love if the Big East keeps doing competition because I think that is very established and attracts casual viewers more because they know those teams,” George said. “We play those teams in basketball and other sports. For example, I was really hyped to see us play Xavier in Rocket League because that is a really classic rivalry.”

Since the Big East Invitational, Freeman and Rogers have been trying to get the word out about esports on Butler’s campus.

“There are huge benefits if we grow that club the right way,” Freeman said. “In the next few years, there could be people that come to Butler because they want to be a part of the esports club. It is a similar structure to people who are deciding if they want to be on a sports team.”

Freeman compares the esports club to the way the Butler Athletic Department was when it first started out.

“One hundred and twenty-five years ago, Butler kind of had an athletic department with a football team," Freeman said. "And then we formed a basketball team. But now we have 20 athletic teams and dance team and cheerleading and we compete in all these different leagues. Within the esports club, you have all these different teams because there are all different games that people could play.”

As a graduating senior and the founder of the group, George’s time with the club has been short, but he said it's been a fantastic experience. In addition to being fun and an opportunity to meet new people, it allowed him to gain valuable leadership experience.

“The club is awesome, not only for people who want to compete but for people who are interested in business or communications,” George said. “I was able to run the stream and be a commentator and analyze what was going on and work on the media side of it.”

The club also has a treasurer and a social media chair, which George said are great opportunities for students to hold leadership positions in a group they are passionate about.

Freeman thinks that the club can have huge benefits to students after graduation as well.

“The end goal [of a Butler education] is to get you ready to go out into the world and do great things,” he said. “The people that are on these teams have some really high-level majors, and if [cities like] Indy are growing as a tech community, then we have that subgroup of people who are in the tech world and are also doing great things with their majors. It’s an area where there are businesses that are very interested in what’s going on.”

To stay up to date with Butler’s esports club, check out their Twitter account and Facebook page. The club hold tryouts for all games each semester. Current and incoming Butler students are invited to reach out to be invited to its Discord channel.

 

Arts & CultureStudent Life

Booting Up A New Club

Students take the controls on Butler esports team.

May 16 2018 Read more
AcademicsStudent LifePeople

Butler Journal of Undergraduate Research Is Ready to Be Read

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 25 2018

An examination of an Indianapolis food cooperative's work to stem food insecurity, measurements of job satisfaction among those employed by intercollegiate sport organizations, and the underrepresentation of women in U.S. elected political offices are some of the topics covered in the fourth annual Butler Journal of Undergraduate Research (BJUR).

A full list of topics is below.

Volume 4 of the journal contains 12 student papers, including four from Butler students. Sixteen Butler faculty members in addition to the co-editors served as reviewers in selecting the best papers from among the various submissions for this issue.

Kenneth Colburn, Butler Sociology Professor and Co-Editor of the journal, said there have been more than 13,000 downloads of BJUR articles from many different institutions around the world.

"The academic exposure for Butler is very nice," he said. "Everyone knows about our basketball team, but we think it's important that a large audience also understands that Butler is a place for student scholarship."

BJUR was created to build on the success of Butler's Undergraduate Research Conference, which just completed its 30th year, and to complete the cycle—from doing the research to presenting the findings to publishing.

"We enjoy giving students this outlet," said Psychology Professor Tara Lineweaver, a Co-Editor of BJUR. "I have mentored four students who have submitted their honors theses to the journal, and I can say that each and every time they're thrilled to have their paper published in BJUR. It's a very good resume/CV builder for them. And it feels like the project is complete when you get to the stage of seeing it in publication."

Thus far, 19 of the 42 papers published have been written by Butler students. The journal also has published 23 papers authored by students from the University of Pittsburgh, Bellarmine University, Huntington University, Wabash College, Keene State, Columbia University, Hanover College (2), Midway College, Brandeis University, IU-Bloomington, University of Warwick (England), Cal Poly Pomona, DePauw University, University of Tennessee-Martin, University of Indianapolis, and Stanford University.

These are the papers and their authors from the fourth edition of BJUR:

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A Community's Collective Courage: A Local Food Cooperative's Impact on Food Insecurity, Community and Economic Development, and Local Food Systems
Tabitha C. Barbour

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Allopathic Medicine’s Influence on Indigenous Peoples in the Kumaon Region of India
Eliana M. Blum

PDF

Determinants of job satisfaction and dissatisfaction among practitioners employed in intercollegiate sport organizations
Ian Cooper, Chantel Heinsen, and Michael Diacin

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Individualized Music Improves Social Interaction of Women, But Not Men, With Dementia
Emily Farrer and Diana Hilycord

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Inferences on Criminality Based on Appearance
Hannah Johnson, Morgan Anderson, Hayley R. Westra, and Hayden Suter

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A Blend of Absurdism and Humanism: Defending Kurt Vonnegut’s Place in the Secondary Setting
Krisandra R. Johnson

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Do Black and White Americans Hold Different Views on Marijuana Legalization? Analyzing the Impact of “The War on Drugs” on Racialized Perceptions of Legalizing Marijuana
Benjamin S. Kaminoff

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Miguel de Unamuno: The Relationship among Women, his Life, Spanish Society and El marqués de Lumbría
Tina Maric

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Using Random Forests to Describe Equity in Higher Education: A Critical Quantitative Analysis of Utah’s Postsecondary Pipelines
Tyler McDaniel

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Public Financing and the Underrepresentation of Women in United States Elected Political Offices
Libby P. Moyer

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Holding on to Culture: The Effects of the 1837 Smallpox Epidemic on Mandan and Hidatsa
Jayne Reinhiller

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The Reification of Hegemonic Masculinity via Heteronormativity, Sexual Objectification, and Masculine Performances in Tau Kappa Epsilon Recruitment Videos
Viki Tomanov

The first three volumes of BJUR (2015-2017) were funded through a Butler Innovation grant; this year’s journal was funded by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Going forward, funding will be provided in part by the following annual sponsors who have committed financial support: English; Biological Sciences; College of Communication; College of Education; College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; Creative Media and Journalism; Critical Communication and Media Studies; Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies; History and Anthropology; International Studies; Jordan College of Arts; Neuroscience; Philosophy, Religion & Classics; Physics and Astronomy; Political Science/Peace and Conflict Studies; Psychology; Science, Technology and Environmental Sciences; Sociology and Criminology; Strategic Communication; Founding Partner-Irwin Library.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan MFA '18
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

AcademicsStudent LifePeople

Butler Journal of Undergraduate Research Is Ready to Be Read

The fourth volume of the increasingly popular annual publication is now online.

Apr 25 2018 Read more
AcademicsStudent LifePeople

Butler Honors Top 100 Students

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 23 2018

The Alumni Association has announced Butler University's Top 100 Outstanding Students, honoring the top juniors and seniors for the 2017–2018 academic year.

The list is below. Top 15 students have an asterisk next to their name.

The students honored each year continue the tradition of dedication and service to Butler. They reflect outstanding character, scholarship, engaged citizenship, leadership, and commitment to fostering diversity.To be considered a Top 100 student at Butler University, students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher and may not be on conduct probation during the application process or the announcement for Top 100 and Top 15.

The Top 100 students are determined by the Top 100 Selection Committee composed of representatives of each of the six colleges, student affairs, academic affairs, and alumni. Each candidate is judged against the core values of the program on a numeric scale. At the end of the judging period, all scores are tabulated, and the Top 100 students are selected.

Visit the Top 100 website to view guidelines for the program. 

The Alumni Association in conjunction with the Office of Student Affairs conducts the Outstanding Student Recognition program. The program is in its 57th year.

The full list of honorees, majors, and hometowns:

Lynn Alsatie, International Studies and French, Carmel, Indiana

Siena Amodeo, International Business and Marketing, Powell, Ohio

Deborah Arehart, Middle/Secondary Education and French, Dayton, Ohio

Thomas Baldwin, Biochemistry, Carmel, Indiana

*Adam Bantz, Strategic Communication, Marketing, Muncie, Indiana

Alex Bartlow, Accounting and Spanish, Bloomfield, Indiana

Leah Basford, International Business, Chinese minor, Centerville, Indiana

Brianna Borri, Psychology, Ada, Michigan

Lauren Briskey, Actuarial Science, Statistics, Avon, Indiana

Amy Brown, Accounting, Saint Charles, Missouri

Rachel Burke, Mathematics, Software Engineering, Mount Vernon, Indiana

Jeremy Caylor, Biology, Chemistry, Tipton, Indiana

*Parker Chalmers, Finance/Risk Management & Insurance, Wyoming, Ohio

Lauren Ciulla, Biology, Carmel, Indiana

Brooklyn Cohen, Elementary Education, Glenview, Illinois

Hannah Coleman, Pharmacy, Danville, Indiana

Dana Connor, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Tallahassee, Florida

Vickie Cook, Chemistry, Woodburn, Indiana

Meredith Coughlin, Human Communication and Organizational Leadership, Tipp City, Ohio

*Ryan Cultice, Accounting and Finance, Warsaw, Indiana

Ashley Dale, Physics, Electrical Engineering, New Palestine, Indiana

Erin Dark, Pharmacy, West Lafayette, Indiana

Darby DeFord, Biology and Chemistry, Spencer, Indiana

Matt Del Busto, English creative writing and Spanish, Carmel, Indiana

David Dunham, Human Movement and Health Sciences Education, Zionsville, Indiana

Suzanne Dwyer, Pharmacy, Tinley Park, Illinois

Shelby Jo Eaton, Psychology and Sociology, Indianapolis

Ashlyn Edwards, Philosophy, Critical Communication, and French, New Albany, Indiana

*Katie Edwards, Marketing and Finance, Libertyville, Illinois

Sarah Elam, International Studies and Spanish, Indianapolis

John Evans, Accounting and Finance, Indianapolis

Hannah Faccio, Psychology, Belmont, Michigan

Megan Farny, Pre-PA, Evansville, Indiana

Megan Fitzgerald, Elementary Education and Religion, Dublin, Ohio

Annie Foster, Spanish and Chemistry minor, Westfield, Indiana

Jacklyn Gries, Pharmacy, Evansville, Indiana

Hannah Hartzell, Strategic Communication and Spanish, Powell, Ohio

Patrick Holden, PharmD/MBA, Brownsburg, Indiana

Jonny Hollar, Finance and Marketing, Warsaw, Indiana

Kate Holtz, Risk Management and Insurance, Finance, Godfrey, Illinois

*Nick Huang, Finance and Marketing, Geneva, Illinois

Karla Jeggle, Actuarial Science, Upper Arlington, Ohio

Nathan Jent, Health Sciences/Pre-PA, Crawfordsville, Indiana

Drew Johnson, Pharmacy, Noblesville, Indiana

Jakob Jozwiakowski, Chemistry, Boston, Massachusetts

Colton Junod, Biology and Biochemistry, Vincennes, Indiana

Libby Kaufman, Elementary Education, Chanhassen, Minnesota

*Nida Khan, Pharmacy/Pre-Med, Noblesville, Indiana

Rachel Koehler, International Studies and French, Franklin, Tennessee

*Caroline Kuremsky, Elementary Education with a Mild Intervention Minor, Cincinnati, Ohio

Carly Large, Accounting, Bloomington, Illinois

*Emily Lawson, Chemistry and Mathematics (Pre-Med), Fort Wayne, Indiana

Becca Lewis, Biology and Chemistry, Danville, Illinois

Rachael Lewis, Marketing, Spanish, and International Business, Danville, Illinois

Kayla Long, Critical Communications and Media Studies, Digital Media Production, Spanish, Evanston, Illinois

Kelsey McDougall, Biology, Canton, Michigan

Kirsten McGrew, Pharmacy, Louisville, Kentucky

Kasey Meeks, Health Sciences and Chemistry, Robinson, Illinois

Rachel Metz, Health Science, Ferdinand, Indiana

Joshua Murdock, Pharmacy, Grand Junction, Colorado

*Kelly Murphy, Human Communication and Organizational Leadership, Dublin, Ohio

Emily Nettesheim, Health Sciences and Spanish, Lafayette, Indiana

Alexis Neyman, Biochemistry, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Olivia Nilsen, Communication of Sciences and Disorders, Neuroscience minor, Ballwin, Missouri

Gehrig Parker, Sports Media, Park Ridge, Illinois

Justin Poythress, Accounting and Finance, Geneva, Illinois

*Tori Puhl, Actuarial Science, Mequon, Wisconsin

*Salman Qureshi, Biology, Fishers, Indiana

*Courtney Raab, Health Sciences, Highland, Indiana

Jordan Rauh, Pharmacy, Wabash, Indiana

Allison Reitz, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Newburgh, Indiana

Kate Richards, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Effingham, Illinois

Sophie Robertson, Dance Arts Administration and Journalism, Gig Harbor, Washington

*Abdul Saltagi, Biology, Fishers, Indiana

Kaitlyn Sawin, Marketing, Appleton, Wisconsin

Olivia Schwan, Marketing and Spanish, Kalamazoo, Michigan

*Abby Sikorcin, Health Sciences, Lisle, Illinois

Sundeep Singh, Biology and Political Science, Fishers, Indiana

Maree Smith, Spanish and Marketing, Monticello, Minnesota

Lilli Southern, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Solsberry, Indiana

Madison Stefanski, Elementary Education and seeking licensure in Special Education with minors in Reading, Frankfort, Michigan

Isaiah Strong, Strategic Communication/Recording Industry Studies, Brooklyn Park, Minnesota

Natalie Van Ochten, Biology and Biochemistry, Shorewood, Minnesota

Alexander Waddell, Accounting, Greenwood, Indiana

Skyler Walker, Pharmacy, Racine, Wisconsin

Kathryn Warma, Science, Technology, and Sociology, Carlinville, Illinois

Riley Wildemann, Pharmacy, Plainfield, Indiana

Alexander Wright, Chemistry, Fishers, Indiana

Heather Wright, Music, Greentown, Indiana

Jill Yager, Biology, Rushville, Indiana

Due to a tie in scoring, more than 100 students are being honored for the 2017–2018 academic year. All honorees were recognized at the Outstanding Student Banquet on April 13, where the Top 15 Most Outstanding Students were announced.

This list includes all students who opted to post their names.

 

In the photo:

Front row: Emily Lawson, Nida Khan, Nicholas Huang, Caitlyn Foye, Katie Edwards, Adam Bantz, Kelly Murphy

Back row: Abby Sikocin, Abdul Saltagi, Courtney Raab, President Danko, Salman Qureshi, Tori Puhl, Ryan Cultice

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

 

AcademicsStudent LifePeople

Butler Honors Top 100 Students

This is the 57th year to recognize the Top 100 students' dedication and service to Butler.

Apr 23 2018 Read more
jimbagnoli

The Game of Life

Krisy Force

from Fall 2017

Alumnus Jim Bagnoli ’75 remembers his entrance into the “real world” didn’t really hit him until his first day on the job. He had important responsibilities, and people and a company depending on him. Bagnoli says working a job is not like going to college.

“I was starting all over making new friends, establishing relationships, and building my reputation,” he said. “Along with a paycheck, there were bills and rent to pay. I had not been planning responsibly for my career and financial future.”

Looking back, Bagnoli wishes a college program or an event could have bestowed a little real life experience on him. This is why, as a member of the Butler Alumni Association Board, he was excited to partner with Butler’s Student Government Association’s Student Initiatives Board, the Young Alumni Board, and Butler’s Academic Affairs staff to offer Butler juniors and seniors a taste of the real world through an event called The Game of Life.

The event, which was loosely based off of the popular board game, Life, had students enter the room with a chosen profession after they graduated. They were then given a salary. Students moved from table to table where they dealt with a variety of circumstances, like the price of life insurance, eating out, student loan programs, and at Bagnoli’s table, the cost of renting a one-bedroom apartment in various parts of the country. 

“It was really interesting to watch their expression,” Bagnoli said, laughing. One student, Logan Schwering ’18, commented most students, including himself, were surprised to discover how the average cost of all the expenses students have after graduation slowly chip away at a salary. 

“Seeing how it all came together and started chipping away from your salary was eye-opening,” Schwering said.

Although the program, and the actual Life board game, don’t exactly mirror the real world, both incorporated a few hysterical similarities. 

“It was just a good, thought-provoking experience for students to realize they’ll have to put a budget together, and make lifestyle changes,” Bagnoli explained.

After going through the life tables, students attended a panel discussion with Bagnoli and four other alumni. Later on, students were able to ask questions and mingle with alumni, allowing them to “learn from one another,” Bagnoli said. 

“To have alumni who are so dedicated to giving back not only financially, but with their wealth of knowledge, is what sets  Butler apart from other institutions,” Schwering said. 

Schwering elaborated that he felt extremely fortunate to have the opportunity to interact with alumni with varying skillsets and life experiences. He urges future students to take advantage of programs about life after graduation, adding “graduation may seem far away, but the years go by quickly.”

jimbagnoli
Student Life

The Game of Life

by Krisy Force

from Fall 2017

Read more

What's It Like To Find a Roommate

By Malachi White '20

One of the most stressful and exciting aspects of going into your first year of college is who your roommate is going to be. Will I like them? Will they like me? What if they stay up all night, or aren’t very clean? What if they like to go to bed early and are super clean?

Having a random roommate can be a fabulous experience because you may become best friends. However, if your random match seems a bit too random, Butler University opens a window of time to switch roommates or switch dorms.

Another option other than going random is to use Facebook as a resource to find a compatible roommate(s). When accepted into Butler, students are added to a group on Facebook with the rest of their class. Many students use Facebook to meet and chat with potential roommates instead of getting paired. By selecting their own roommate, some find peace of mind because the decision is in their hands rather than the school’s.

My Experience

My first year experience was unique because I lived in Fairview House during its inaugural year. I had six pod mates and all of them were randomly assigned except one, Sean, who I met on Facebook. Moving from high school to college, from home to a dorm, came with a lot of change for everyone. The year was filled with a lot of laughs and some of your typical first-year drama. Maybe we were always destined to be friends or maybe it was the circumstances of first year, but of my six roommates, I found two of my very best friends, Sean who I met on Facebook and Eric, who I will live with again next year.  

Although we are very different, Sean and I can tell each other almost anything. He’s a supportive friend who has stood by me through thick and thin. When recruitment during Greek rush did not work out in my favor, Sean never turned his back on me even when he did receive a bid/invitation to join his now fraternity. I went to all his philanthropy events that I could fit into my schedule, and he came to as many of choral concerts as he could. We even had a near death experience when going to visit his best friend at Notre Dame where we slid on the road one snowy night!

Although Eric was randomly assigned to me my first year on campus, we realized pretty quickly that we had a lot in common. One of those similarities is that we are both very picky eaters. I can’t tell you how many times we took field trips to new local restaurants around Indianapolis to escape having to eat in the dining hall every day. I’ve gone back home with him and his girlfriend for Fall Break and finally had the opportunity to explore Chicago. Sure things aren’t always perfect...I can’t even count the number of times we’ve argued, but at the end of the day I know that Eric always has my back and vice versa.

No Perfect Formula

Like my own experience, there is no perfect formula when it comes to finding roommates. You may find two best friends, or probably just as likely, you may not. Stories of awful roommates are told all the time, but so are the stories of roommates who end up being groomsmen and bridesmaids. However, no matter the outcome, Butler provides a community for everyone to be a part of. College is a time for growth and learning, new experiences, and new people. So be optimistic about your first year at Butler and the people you will be surrounded by, because you can definitely create some of your fondest memories together.

 

 

Roommates
Student LifePeople

What's It Like To Find a Roommate

​One of the most stressful and exciting aspects of going into your first year of college is who your roommate is going to be.

Growing Community Connections

By Morgan Skeries '20

An Indianapolis Community Requirement, also known as an ICR, is a learning experience that integrates classroom knowledge with activities in the Indianapolis community. Students are required to take one course in any part of the university that involves active engagement with the Indianapolis community, and there are many classes that offer this.

Grace Bowling, junior strategic communications major, explains that an ICR helps students to learn more about Indianapolis and the way it is unique to other cities. “An Indianapolis community requirement is a way that Butler students can broaden their horizons and make themselves well rounded students,” Grace said. “It is a way that we can reach out to the community we live in and impact them on a deeper level.”

ICR’s are a great way to push Butler University students out of their comfort zones. Moreover, Grace said it was important to be apart of something that is bigger than herself. By fulfilling her ICR requirement in a science course, called “The World of Plants,” and by partnering with students at the Indianapolis School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, she found that she loved connecting with the students. She found that she really enjoyed the experience and being able to get involved into the community.

“A lot of what we did was very hands on,” Grace said. “For example, our ICR required a project that helped us connect with students from ISBVI. We made butterflies with them, planted plants in their personal butterfly garden, and explored the Indianapolis Zoo's Butterfly Garden.”

The experience really impacted her positively and showed her that doing something bigger than herself is always important to pursue. “I loved getting to know the community better and learning more about the place that I live in,” she said.

Want to learn more? Information all about ICRs can be found on Butler University’s Indianapolis community requirement page.

Green House
Student LifeCommunity

Growing Community Connections

Indianapolis Community Requirement’s are a great way to push Butler University students out of their comfort zones.

Green House

Growing Community Connections

By Morgan Skeries '20

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