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Meet Butler’s Bulldog Beauty Queens and Kings

By Sarah Bahr

 Butler University’s beauty queens and kings lick the runway, sniff purses for cookies, and do more slobbering than Snapchatting.

But these bulldogs are no pampered pets, though some of them have the (three-dresser!) wardrobes of international pop stars.

They’re there to win.

More than 100 bulldogs are expected to compete for accolades such as “Most Beautiful” and “Best Mean Mug” at Butler’s 18th annual Bulldog Beauty Contest on Saturday, Sept. 29. The competition kicks off at 9:30 A.M. in the west end of the Hinkle Fieldhouse parking lot, and is expected to last around an hour. Admission is free for both spectators and competitors.

The contestants come from all over the country, Butler University Director of External Relations Michael Kaltenmark, who’s emceed the contest for the past 18 years, said, as Butler alumni return to their alma mater for the Homecoming Week kickoff event.

The contest has ballooned from the 50 to 100 people who attended the first event — most, Kaltenmark said, who were tailgating in the Hinkle parking lot and “happened to see us making a bunch of noise and holding bulldog puppies in the air” — to the nearly 2,500 spectators who turned up last year.

A panel of five judges — which in the past has included local celebrities such as Indianapolis Star Butler beat writer David Woods and Fox 59 chief meteorologist Brian Wilkes — selects the top dog in each category.

This year’s event features seven categories, though each dog can only enter two: “Most Beautiful Bulldog,” “Best Mean Mug,” “Best Dressed Bulldog,” “Best Bulldog/Human Tandem,” “Best Bulldog Trick,” “Most Butler Spirit,” and “Mr. & Mrs. Bulldog Congeniality.” A winner and runner-up trophy are awarded in each division.

The category champs will then vie for the top prize, “Best in Show,” which earns the winning dog bragging rights, a trophy, and a year’s supply of dog food from City Dogs Grocery in Broad Ripple.

To impress the crowd — whose “huge laughs” and “big cheers” wield an outsized influence on the judges — a dog must have not only looks, but personality, Kaltenmark said.

Kurt Phillips, the official veterinarian of the Butler Blue Live Mascot Program and longtime judge of the Bulldog Beauty Contest, said judging isn’t a science.

“It’s whatever makes us smile, or makes us laugh, or makes the audience go crazy,” he said.

So if you’ve got a French, American, or English bulldog raring to roll over, don a French Fry costume, or strut the runway, you can show up on Saturday and throw your dog’s hat into the ring.

Just don’t try to backdoor your beagle in. 

“We used to have a ‘Wannabe Bulldog’ category,” Kaltenmark said. “But we had to do away with it when the contest got so big. Now it’s bulldogs only.”

 

Step 1: Choose a Costume

Things you might see this weekend outside Hinkle Fieldhouse: Minnie Mouse licking a Chipotle burrito. A peacock sniffing a bulldozer.

You never know what’ll turn up, Kaltenmark said. It seems like people get more creative every year.

People have dressed their bulldogs in lobster suits — then donned a matching hat and claws. They’ve affixed a lion’s mane to their dog’s neck and hoisted the dog-cub over their head like Simba. Wrestled them into a shark suit. Made them up like Cleopatra.

Kaltenmark’s favorite? One man donned a red hoodie, placed his bulldog in a milk crate attached to the handlebars of a BMX bike, and covered him in a towel so he looked like E.T.

One entrant, Jodi Madaj, who owns Butler Blue III’s sister Phoebe, even roped Kaltenmark’s sons, Miles, 3, and Everett, 7, into participating in the “Best Bulldog-Human Tandem” category.

“My sons would walk these dogs up on stage in their Han Solo and Chewbacca costumes with Trip’s sister Phoebe dressed as Princess Leia, and it was too much for the judges to handle,” Kaltenmark said.

Madaj, who’s now taken home three category trophies, doesn’t shirk from enlisting strangers in her schemes, either.

When she was walking through the Butler bookstore in 2011, one employee was “getting a little cranky” about one of her bulldogs, Daphne, she said. The logical next step?

“I talked him into being Prince Charming, complete with tux, pillow, and glass slipper, in that year’s contest,” Madaj said. “Phoebe was Cinderella, and they won ‘Best Human-Dog Tandem.’”

So where does one buy a bulldog costume?

Not at Party City or Walmart, Kaltenmark said.

“We know what costume is popular at Target each year because three to five dogs show up wearing it,” Kaltenmark said. “The best costumes are either handmade or pieced together. You can’t just run out, buy a Halloween costume, and slap it on your dog and expect to win.”

 

Step 2: Master the Mean Mug

 

A bulldog can be a winner without wide eyes, wrinkly fur, or floppy ears.

“The ‘Best Mean Mug’ category is for the ugliest bulldog at the contest,” Kaltenmark said. “Not all bulldogs are good looking.”

Doug Welks, an English Bulldog breeder who’s participated in the event for the past decade, once brought a green-mohawked puppy, Mojo, who took home the pugnacious prize.

“He was a real sweetheart,” Welks said. “He just looked mean, like a ferocious teddy bear.”

But some bulldogs really are, well, curmudgeonly canines.

Butler alums Kyle Schwipps, 30, and his wife Alicia, 29, entered their 4-year-old bulldog, Beauford, last year.

While Beauford’s snarfing and scowling weren’t affronting enough to take top prize, Kyle Schwipps said his peevish pooch really is a grumpy old man at heart.

“We treated him like an only child for three years — we took him everywhere with us,” he said. “Then we had our son, Grayson, and he got thrown on the back burner.”

“Now he’s mad all the time because he’s not the center of attention anymore.”

 

Step 3: Play the Cute Card

Mirror, mirror on the wall, who’s the cutest bulldog of them all?

Bow in her hair, a doe-eyed, tan-and-white bulldog in a blue tutu peers at the crowd with quarter-sized, glistening eyes that put Fiona the hippo’s floppy folds of flesh, stubby arms, and slack-tongued grin to shame.

“The ‘Cutest’ category is hilarious because everybody throws their dog in,” Kaltenmark said. “It takes the longest to judge because everyone thinks their bulldog is cute.”

Puppies, unsurprisingly, have a leg up on their more mature competitors.

“The younger dogs are so stinkin’ cute that they’re literally showstoppers,” he said. “But it’s tough for them to repeat as champs.”

The best part? On Saturday morning, the Hinkle parking lot becomes a “quasi-Bulldog petting zoo” for spectators, Kaltenmark said.

“We’ve got around 100 bulldogs milling about behind the stage,” he said. “People who want to pet them can walk right up, snap a picture.”

 

A Loveable Loser

 

One dog, for the past nine years, has been neither ugly nor beautiful enough to get the judges’ attention. Like elevator music, he’s been lurking in the background, neither loved nor loathed.

Wilberforce, an English bulldog owned by 2004 Butler grads Daniel Pulliam and his wife, Noelle, entered every year until his death in February at age 9. But he never got so much as a “Best Mean Mug” title.

“They got all their kids involved, but they never took home the trophy,” Kaltenmark said. “It was heartbreaking.”

Daniel Pulliam said Wilberforce — Wilber for short —- enjoyed cheese, sunbathing on the couch, and playing with his buddy Butler Blue II.

“He was kind of like Brain on ‘Pinky and the Brain,’” Pulliam said. “He was pretty laid back, like ‘What are we gonna do today?’”

Daniel and Noelle had entered Wilber in the contest every year since 2009.

“He was a puppy then, so that year was our best chance,” Pulliam said. “But we didn’t win.”

But then the Pulliams’ children entered the equation, renewing their hopes. They entered their 6-month-old daughter alongside Wilber in 2011 in the “Best Bulldog-Human Tandem” category.

“Having a bulldog and a small child is a good way to impress the judges — or so we thought,” Pulliam said.

Alas, no dice. But the Pulliams really thought they had a chance in 2017, when they entered their four children alongside Wilber as characters from “PAW Patrol.”

“It wasn’t enough,” Pulliam said. “The competition was really tough.”

Kaltenmark is considering calling the Pulliams back up to the stage this year to present Wilber with a posthumous lifetime achievement award. Though they no longer own a bulldog, they’re still planning on attending, Pulliam said.

If you too want to watch but can’t make it in person, Butler will be live streaming the contest on Blue III’s Facebook page.

And if you do want to enter, Kaltenmark said those five seconds of fame are an equal opportunity — Butler’s never had a repeat “Best in Show” winner.

“A good costume, plus preparation, plus a good dog, plus kids the past few years is a formula that’s done really well,” he said.

 

Bulldog Beauty Contest
HomecomingStudent LifeCampus

Meet Butler’s Bulldog Beauty Queens and Kings

With more than 100 bulldogs competing, the Bulldog Beauty Contest is the cutest pageant around.   

AcademicsStudent Life

Butler Places 815 Students on Fall 2017 Dean's List

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 06 2018

Eight hundred fifteen students have been placed on Butler University's Dean's List for the fall 2017 semester.

Any degree-seeking undergraduate student earning at least 12 academic hours of grade credit in a given semester may be placed on the Dean’s List of the college of enrollment if the semester grade point average is in the top 20 percent of all eligible students in that college. Courses taken under the pass/fail option do not count toward 12 academic hours of grade credit.

In the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, it is the top 20 percent of COPHS students in each curricular year who are named to the Dean’s List.

Here is the fall 2017 Dean’s List:

Katie Aaberg, Dance-Performance, Ada, Michigan

Jenna Aasen, Exploratory, Vernon Hills, Illinois

Karl Agger, English, Glen Ellyn, Illinois

Seth Ahlden, Professional Pharmacy, Bourbonnais, Illinois

McKenna Albers, Biochemistry, Mason, Ohio

Lydia Alberts, Science, Technology, & Society, Indianapolis

Laura Allaben, History and Political Science, Noblesville, Indiana

Lucy Allan, Peace and Conflict Studies, Carmel, Indiana

Jack Allbritton, Health Sciences, San Diego, California

Michaela Althoff, Pre-Pharmacy, Pittsboro, Indiana

Siena Amodeo, International Business, Powell, Ohio

Gabrielle Amstutz, Marketing, Berne, Indiana

Grant Anschuetz, Sports Media, Tecumseh, Michigan

Mary Beth Apker, Marketing, Omaha, Nebraska

Rachael Apter, Exploratory, Orland Park, Illinois

Kate Armstrong, Political Science, Grand Haven, Michigan

Camille Arnett, French, Granger, Indiana

Sarah Ault, Theatre, Overland Park, Kansas

Angela Avgerinos, Critical Communication & Media, Oak Brook, Illinois

Ben Babione, Exploratory, Diosd, Hungary            

Katharine Baird, Marketing, Novi, Michigan

Grant Baker, Pre-Pharmacy, Brownsburg, Indiana

Ally Balan, Exploratory (Business), Flat Rock, Michigan

Heather Baldacci, Actuarial Science, Algonquin, Illinois

Aislinn Baltas, Science, Technology, & Society, Manhattan, Illinois

Adam Bantz, Strategic Communication, Albany, Indiana

Nick Bantz, Chemistry, Albany, Indiana

Bronwyn Bartley, English, Indianapolis

Alex Bartlow, Accounting, Bloomfield, Indiana

Jen Barton, Health Sciences, Brownsburg, Indiana

Julia Bartusek, Peace and Conflict Studies, New Prague, Minnesota

Grace Bassler, Pre-Pharmacy, Washington, Indiana

Addison Baumle, Health Sciences, Payne, Ohio

Sydney Bebar, Psychology, Joliet, Illinois

Abby Beckman, Actuarial Science, Lexington, Kentucky

Livia Bedwell, Dance-Performance, Memphis, Tennessee

Michael Behna, Health Sciences, Naperville, Illinois

Zach Bellavia, Economics, Woodstock, Illinois

Adam Bender, Digital Media Production, Boulder, Colorado

Thomas Bennett, Economics, Grosse Ile, Michigan

Bailey Berish, Health Sciences, Greencastle, Indiana

Nina Bertino, Strategic Communication, Lockport, Illinois

Erica Biagini, Marketing, Skokie, Illinois

Holloway Bird, Dance/Arts Administration, Aledo, Texas

Carter Bisel, Exploratory, Crown Point, Indiana

Elizabeth Bishop, Strategic Communication, Jeffersonville, Indiana

Madi Blair, English, Johns Creek, Georgia

Elizabeth Blevins, Arts Administration, Glen Ellyn, Illinois

Natalie  Bloom, Middle/Secondary Education, Naperville, Illinois

Maddie Blum, Risk Management and Insurance, Wolcottville, Indiana

Brittany Bluthardt, Journalism, Antioch, Illinois

Lauren Bogart, Exploratory (Business), North Webster, Indiana

Tyler Bolger, Middle/Secondary Education, Chicago

Courtney Boos, Accounting, Winamac, Indiana

Bri Borri, Psychology, Ada, Michigan

Sydney Borror, Finance, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Lauren Boswell, Elementary Education, Fishers, Indiana

Zach Boudler, Finance, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Amy Boyd, Digital Media Production, Fishers, Indiana

Jaclyn Boyer, Criminology and Psychology, Indianapolis

Ashley Boylan, Sociology, Peoria, Arizona

Anna Claire Bradbury, Middle/Secondary Education, Lindenhurst, Illinois

Anna Bradley, English, Brownsburg, Indiana

Micah Brame, Mathematics, Libertyville, Illinois

Lauren Briskey, Actuarial Science, Avon, Indiana

Anna Broadhurst, Communication Science & Disorders, Oak Forest, Illinois

Katherine Bromley, Elementary Education, Oak Park, Illinois

Amy Brown, Accounting, Saint Charles, Missouri

Chloe Brown, Digital Media Production, Parker, Colorado

Chris Brown, Sports Media, Brentwood, Missouri

Courtney Brown, Chemistry, Londonderry, New Hampshire

Darby Brown, English, Franklin, Tennessee

Julia Brown, Elementary Education, Shelbyville, Indiana

Katie Brown, Elementary Education, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Kyla Brown, Communication Science & Disorders, Hanover, Indiana

Ryan Brown, Finance, Crete, Illinois

Shelby Brown, Pre-Pharmacy, Connersville, Indiana

Katie Brownlee, Elementary Education, Northbrook, Illinois

Brad Broyles, Pharmacy, New Castle, Indiana

Joey Brunk, Elementary Education, Indianapolis

Ethan Buchman, Entrepreneurship & Innovation, Warsaw, Indiana

Sydney Buck, Finance, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Macy Burkhart, Exploratory, Greensburg, Indiana

Shelby Burmeister, Actuarial Science, Normal, Illinois

Patrick Burns, Software Engineering, Deerfield, Illinois

Laura Burr, Exploratory (Business), Cincinnati, Ohio

Kenny Burton, Exploratory (Liberal Arts and Sciences), Kokomo, Indiana

Marissa Byers, Environmental Studies, Indianapolis

Katherine Cackovic, Dance-Performance, Wheaton, Illinois

Rachel Cairns, Pre-Pharmacy, Amherst, Ohio

Sean Callahan, Biology, Batavia, Illinois

Ally Carlson, Health Sciences, Glen Ellyn, Illinois

Kelli Carney, Elementary Education, Terre Haute, Indiana

Faith Carroll, Elementary Education, Whitehouse, Ohio

Mallory Carter, Pre-Pharmacy, Brownsburg, Indiana

Caden Castellon, Entrepreneurship & Innovation, Canal Winchester, Ohio

Bridget Cato, Marketing, Chicago

Jeremy Caylor, Biology, Tipton, Indiana

Victoria Cervoni, Strategic Communication, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Parker Chalmers, Risk Management and Insurance, Cincinnati, Ohio

Alena Chilian, Environmental Studies, Roanoke, Indiana

Gabby Chinski, Strategic Communication, Bourbonnais, Illinois

Noah Chopp, Actuarial Science, Grafton, Wisconsin

Holly Christensen, Web Design and Development, Shoreline, Washington

Nicolet Christensen, Elementary Education, Oak Brook, Illinois

Madi Christiansen, Entrepreneurship & Innovation, Etters, Pennsylvania

Elizabeth Clark, Pharmacy, Salem, Indiana

Ryan Clark, Finance, Carmel, Indiana

Caitlin Clement, Accounting, McCordsville, Indiana

Salena Clevenger, Pharmacy, Fortville, Indiana

Evan Cobb, Accounting, Avon, Indiana

Caroline Cohen, Entrepreneurship & Innovation, Carmel, Indiana

Liza Cohen, Criminology and Psychology, Indianapolis

Claire Colburn, English, Indianapolis

Hannah Coleman, Pharmacy, Danville, Indiana

Julissa Collazo, Middle/Secondary Education, Chicago

Claire Collett, Entrepreneurship & Innovation, Seymour, Indiana

Jaclyn Collier, Pre-Pharmacy, Indianapolis

Victoria Combs, Psychology and Political Science, Kokomo, Indiana

Grant Comella, International Business, Lafayette, Indiana

Kitty Compton, Theatre, Evansville, Indiana

Katey Conley, Elementary Education, Indianapolis

Catie Conlon, International Business, Brookfield, Wisconsin

Dana Connor, Communication Science & Disorders, Tallahassee, Florida

Mark Connors, Accounting, Carmel, Indiana

Maggie Considine, Psychology, Woodridge, Illinois

Allison Cook, Health Sciences, Evansville, Indiana

Vickie Cook, Biochemistry, Woodburn, Indiana

Delaney Cordell, Biology, Fishers, Indiana

Meredith Coughlin, Human Communications and Organizational Leadership, Tipp City, Ohio

Abigail Counts, Music, Powell, Ohio

Paige Cowden, Pre-Pharmacy, Ellettsville, Indiana

Britney Cowling, Health Sciences, Mount Carmel, Illinois

Carter Cox, Exploratory (Business), Louisville, Kentucky

Claire Cox, Marketing, Indianapolis

Abby Craig, Mathematics, Hudson, Illinois

Trent Craig, Marketing, Huntley, Illinois

Matthew Croaning, Finance, Carmel, Indiana

Katie Crouse, Music, Annapolis, Maryland

Olivia Crowder, Pre-Pharmacy, Cayuga, Indiana

Shelby Crum, Science, Technology, & Society, Rockville, Indiana

Ryan Cultice, Accounting, Warsaw, Indiana

Mary Curley, Pre-Pharmacy, West Terre Haute, Indiana

Adrian Daeger, Music Performance, Indianapolis

Maggie Danicek, Health Sciences, Grand Haven, Michigan

Erin Dark, Pharmacy, West Lafayette, Indiana

Tate Datweiler, Finance, Herscher, Illinois

Audrey Davenport, Pre-Pharmacy, Zionsville, Indiana

Eric Davidson, Actuarial Science, Newburgh, Indiana

Melody Davidson, Finance, Anderson, Indiana

Ali Davignon, Chemistry, Terre Haute, Indiana

Evan Davis, Theatre, Brentwood, Tennessee

Elena DeCook, English Writing, Holland, Michigan

Brett DeWitt, Psychology, Anderson, Indiana

Jarod Deckard, Pre-Pharmacy, Springville, Indiana

Matthew Del Busto, English, Carmel, Indiana

Alyssa Del Priore, Health Sciences, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Walker Demel, Music, Elgin, Illinois

Paige Dempsey, English, Harlan, Indiana

John Denger, Arts Administration, Carmel, Indiana

Michael Denner, Accounting, Ottawa Hills, Ohio

Kaitlin Detmar, Psychology, Schererville, Indiana

Sarah Dixon, Communication Science & Disorders, Pendleton, Indiana

Joshua Doering, Sports Media, Canton, Michigan

Maggie Dolph, Elementary Education, Western Springs, Illinois

Anna Doran, Accounting, Brentwood, Tennessee

Mattie Doran, Marketing, Winona Lake, Indiana

Sarah Doran, Music Education, Granville, Ohio

Gabby Douglas, Exploratory, South Bend, Indiana

Blake Dreihaus, Health Sciences, Dillsboro, Indiana

Marissa Duco, Pharmacy, Indianapolis

Ally Dudman, Pre-Pharmacy, Geneva, Illinois

Danielle Duff, Biology, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Elizabeth Duis, Arts Administration, Sheldon, Illinois

Kelliann Duncan, Journalism, Bartlett, Illinois

David Dunham, Middle/Secondary Education, Zionsville, Indiana

Jessica Dupree, Psychology, Arcadia, Indiana

Michelle Duritsch, Health Sciences, Troy, Ohio

Serenity Dzubay, English, Indianapolis

Dakota Eash, Pre-Pharmacy, Elkhart, Indiana

Mikayla Eaton, Marketing, Union Mills, Indiana

Grant Eberle, Exploratory, Naperville, Illinois

Nick Ebl, Finance, Glen Ellyn, Illinois

Ashlyn Edwards, Philosophy, Floyds Knobs, Indiana

Katie Edwards, Marketing, Libertyville, Illinois

Luke Edwards, Exploratory (Business), Libertyville, Illinois

Rachel Efroymson, Communication Science & Disorders, Indianapolis

Max Egenolf, Accounting, Avon, Indiana

Monika Eisenhut, Finance, Indianapolis

Beth Ann Ellingson, Pre-Pharmacy, Elgin, Illinois

William Emerson, Recording Industry Studies, Indianapolis

Grant Emrick, Marketing, Forsyth, Illinois

Kaitlyn Enderle, Chemistry, Carmel, Indiana

Erich Endres, Sports Media, Louisville, Kentucky

Claire Epley, Marketing, Edwards, Illinois

Emily Erickson, Accounting, Marion, Indiana

Ale Escobedo, Psychology, South Bend, Indiana

Ben Evans, Chemistry, Indianapolis

Erin Evans, Professional Pharmacy, O'Fallon, Illinois

Melissa Evans, Psychology, Lexington, Kentucky

Natalie Evans, Music Performance, Goshen, Indiana

Chiara Evelti, International Studies, Decatur, Illinois

James Ewing, Biology, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Niki Ezeh, Strategic Communication, Grand Rapids, Michigan

Hannah Faccio, Psychology, Belmont, Michigan

Branson Facemire, Pharmacy, Madison, Indiana

Tatum Farlow, Dance-Performance, Germantown, Tennessee

Molly Farmer, Exploratory, Terre Haute, Indiana

Megan Farny, Health Sciences, Evansville, Indiana

Natalie Farrell, Music, Carol Stream, Illinois

Alec Fenne, Music Education, Geneva, Illinois

Grace Finley, Accounting, Indianapolis

Laura Fischer, Pre-Pharmacy, La Porte, Indiana

Lisa Fischer, Professional Pharmacy, La Porte, Indiana

Brea Fisher, Criminology and Psychology, Columbia City, Indiana

Taylor Fisher, Finance, Solon, Iowa

Megan Fitzgerald, Elementary Education, Dublin, Ohio

Emily Flandermeyer, Psychology, Indianapolis

Rachel Fleming, Marketing, Chicago Heights, Illinois

Kati Forbes, Pre-Pharmacy, Carmel, Indiana

Gabbi Forsythe, Software Engineering, Brownsburg, Indiana

Matt Fox, Finance, Appleton, Wisconsin

Nicholas Fox, Risk Management and Insurance, Country Club Hills, Illinois

Hannah Frank, Pre-Pharmacy, Homer Glen, Illinois

Emma Frasier, Communication Science & Disorders, Bloomington, Indiana

Travis Freytag, Actuarial Science, Cincinnati, Ohio

Ryan Friedrich, Pre-Pharmacy, Terre Haute, Indiana

Hope Frieling, Marketing, Holland, Michigan

James Frieling, Exploratory (Business), Holland, Michigan

Margaret Fries, Communication Science & Disorders, St. Louis, Missouri

Erica Frisby, Communication Science & Disorders, Lindenhurst, Illinois

Maggie Fuhrman, Health Sciences, Wauwatosa, Wisconsin

Connor Fuller, Accounting, Lancaster, New York

Ivan Fuller, Physics, Yardley, Pennsylvania

Sarah Galbreath, Elementary Education, Bloomington, Indiana

Caleb Gall, Economics, Valparaiso, Indiana

Nick Ganly, Chemistry, Brazil, Indiana

Brandon Gansell, Risk Management and Insurance, Plano, Texas

Eric Garcia, Music Performance, Fishers, Indiana

Alyssa Garelli, Pre-Pharmacy, Elmhurst, Illinois

Rachel Gathof, Accounting, Louisville, Kentucky

Kelsey Gausman, Marketing, Batesville, Indiana

Anna Geist, Risk Management and Insurance, Arvada, Colorado

Lydia Gentry, English, Troutville, Virginia

Ari Gerstein, Finance, Carmel, Indiana

Mario Giannini, Entrepreneurship & Innovation, Grayslake, Illinois

Kyle Giebel, Entrepreneurship & Innovation, Frankfort, Indiana

Jenna Gilberg, Journalism, Middleburg, Virginia

Chedae Gillam, Professional Pharmacy, Indianapolis, Indiana

Mary Bridget Ginn, Finance, Columbus, Ohio

Tyler Girton, Pharmacy, Greenfield, Indiana

Jimmy Gleichmann, Accounting, Whippany, New Jersey

Alex Glickfield, Physics, Greentown, Indiana

Robin Glicksberg, Middle/Secondary Education, Lincolnshire, Illinois

Madeleine Glogas, Pre-Pharmacy, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Isaac Gluesenkamp, Biology, Nashville, Indiana

Brian Goldner, Finance, Indianapolis

Jack Goldstein, Computer Science, Omaha, Nebraska

Tyler Goodrick, Finance, Osceola,  Indiana

Katelyn Gordon, Pharmacy, Indianapolis

Lauren Goslee, Exploratory, Maineville, Ohio

Zachary Gossett , Political Science, Terre Haute, Indiana

Alyssa Grabinski, Journalism, Naperville, Illinois

Becca Graham, Professional Pharmacy, Lawrenceburg, Indiana

Kerry Gray, Biology, Avon Lake, Ohio

Maddie Greer, Strategic Communication, Russiaville, Indiana

Jacklyn Gries, Pharmacy, Evansville, Indiana

Ally Griffin, Exploratory (Communication), Barrington, Illinois

Meredith Grossi, Marketing, Hinsdale, Illinois

Anthony Gurovski, Computer Science, Libertyville, Illinois

Allison Haan, Dance-Pedagogy, Holland, Michigan

Corey Hagerty, Finance, Louisville, Kentucky

Landen Haney, Healthcare and Business, Rockford, Michigan

Alaina Hanke, Criminology and Psychology, Bloomingdale, Illinois

Lauren Hannemann, Computer Science, Chicago

Zach Hanquier, Music, Greenwood, Indiana

Ali Hanson, English, Rosiclare, Illinois

Alex Hardiek, Actuarial Science, Dieterich, Illinois

Makiah Harper, Human Communication and Organizational Leadership, West Chester, Ohio

Logan Harris, Economics, O'Fallon, Illinois

Morgan Harrison, Pharmacy, Hillsboro, Indiana

Jillian Harrod, Exploratory (Business), South Elgin, Illinois

Auboni Hart, Accounting, Indianapolis

DeLaney Hartman, Health Sciences, Lebanon, Ohio

Kelli Hartman, Healthcare and Business, Batesville, Indiana

Elizabeth Hauk, Professional Pharmacy, Fairview, Pennsylvania

Blakely Heaton, Biology, Bloomfield, Indiana

Ryan Hecker, Strategic Communication, Chicago

Jordan Hennings, International Studies, Wheaton, Illinois

Nicole Henrich, International Business, West Bend, Wisconsin

Harry Hensel, Elementary Education, Indianapolis

Miranda Herman, Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies, Indianapolis

Mary Hermann, Software Engineering, Chelsea, Michigan

Thomas Hermsen, Psychology, Kaukauna, Wisconsin

Ryan Heumann, Mathematics, Indianapolis

Carly Hewitt, Actuarial Science, Mound, Minnesota

Molly Hicks, Anthropology, Fishers, Indiana

Allie Highsmith, English, Indianapolis      

Charlotte Hilker, Psychology, Des Moines, Iowa

Lilly Hinckley, Exploratory, Cincinnati, Ohio

Hannah Hinkle, Communication Science & Disorders, Warsaw, Indiana

Maddi Hinton, Biology, Pendleton, Indiana

Jessica Hock, Elementary Education, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Allison Hoffert, Health Sciences, Leesburg, Indiana

Sam Hoffman, Elementary Education, Noblesville, Indiana

Bailey Hogan, Elementary Education, Indianapolis

Jonny Hollar, Marketing, Warsaw, Indiana

Noah Holloway, English, Zionsville, Indiana

Ryan Holmes, Exploratory (Business), Carmel, Indiana

Kate Holtz, Risk Management and Insurance, Godfrey, Illinois

Alexandra Hopkins, Human Communication and Organizational Leadership, Sheridan, Indiana

Tori Horton, Finance, Verona, Wisconsin

Brooks Hosfeld, Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies, Carmel, Indiana

Asif Hossain, Chemistry, Carmel, Indiana

Samantha Howald, Health Sciences, Toledo, Ohio

William Howard, Biology, Carmel, Indiana

Zach Howe, Professional Pharmacy, O'Fallon, Missouri

Chandler Howell, Professional Pharmacy, Centerville, Indiana

Nicholas Huang, Finance, Geneva, Illinois

Fiona Huber, Dance/Arts Administration, Atlanta, Georgia

Maggie Hunt, Elementary Education, Indianapolis

Kate Hussey, Psychology, Cincinnati, Ohio

Peter Hutson, International Studies, Columbus, Ohio

Katie Hybarger, Middle/Secondary Education, Sheridan, Indiana

Lyla Iannaccone, Arts Administration, Glendale, California

Courtney Irwin, Human Communication and Organizational Leadership, Burr Ridge, Illinois

Kayla Irwin, Health Sciences, Lemont, Illinois

Michaela Ivory, Anthropology, Indianapolis

Claire Jaffee, Marketing, Michiana Shores, Indiana

Shea Jamieson, Biology, South Bend, Indiana

Ben Janson, Accounting, Saint Joseph, Michigan

Karla Jeggle, Actuarial Science, Upper Arlington, Ohio

Rachel Jennings, Actuarial Science, Goshen, Kentucky

Logan Jester, Health Sciences, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Bobby Johnson, History, McDonald, Ohio

Drew Johnson, Pharmacy, Noblesville, Indiana

Gordon Johnson, Art + Design, Elmhurst, Illinois

Luke Johnson, Biology, Indianapolis

Marissa Johnson, Performance & Music Education, Avon, Indiana

Jennifer Johnston, Health Sciences, Greenfield, Indiana

David Jones, Marketing, Westfield, Indiana

Sarah Jordan, Dance-Performance, Oak Park, Illinois

Daria Jouzdani, Economics, Boulder, Colorado

Emily Joyce, Political Science, Bloomingdale, Illinois

Jakob Jozwiakowski, Chemistry, Sudbury, Massachusetts

Michelle Jugovich, Music, Western Springs, Illinois

Colton Junod, Biology, Vincennes, Indiana

Rachel Kappeler, Pharmacy, Hartland, Wisconsin

Kelsie Kasper, Sports Media, Munster, Indiana

Kaitlyn Kastberg, Pre-Pharmacy, Chesterfield, Missouri

Nicole Katzin, Exploratory, Chicago

Hannah Kaufmann, Psychology, Pendleton, Indiana

David Kaylor, Pharmacy, Westfield, Indiana

Mahmood Kedo, Biology, McCordsville, Indiana

Annie Keirn, Communication Science & Disorders, Collinsville, Illinois

Jenna Kendrick, Professional Pharmacy, Rising Sun, Indiana

Morgan Kenny, International Business, Lafayette, Indiana

Jenny Kern, Communication Science & Disorders, Bartlett, Illinois

Maggie Kieffer, Exploratory, Morton, Illinois

Joe Killion, International Studies, USAF Academy, Colorado

Allison Kinsinger, Health Sciences, Washington, Illinois

Jessie Kirchoff, Professional Pharmacy, Terre Haute, Indiana

Klaudia Kirk, Marketing, Noblesville, Indiana

Joe Kirkpatrick, Pre-Pharmacy, Anderson, Indiana

Noa Klausner, Biology, Las Vegas, Nevada

Dillen Klemchuk               , Sociology, Fairfax, Vermont

Abby Klupchak, Marketing, Homewood, Illinois

Emily Knaub, Middle/Secondary Education, Channahon, Illinois

Danny Knauff, Music Education, Carmel, Indiana

Hunter Koch, Finance, Bedford, Indiana

Natalie Koch, Exploratory, Mililani, Hawaii

Kristen Koehl, Professional Pharmacy, Indianapolis

Hannah Koehler, Elementary Education, Mundelein, Illinois

Jarrod Koester, History and Political Science, Wadesville, Indiana

Jess Kolanowski, Entrepreneurship & Innovation, Saint John, Indiana

Brandi Kordes, Communication Science & Disorders, Saint Anthony, Indiana

Charles Kovarik, Economics, Downers Grove, Illinois

Andrea Krebs, Pharmacy, Indianapolis

Ray Kreloff, Economics, Valparaiso, Indiana

Anne Krietenstein, Biology, Plainfield, Indiana

Joey Krisko, International Business, Manteno, Illinois

Hannah Kroehler, Marketing, Fishers, Indiana

Nicole Krueger, Communication Science & Disorders, Willow Springs, Illinois

Allison Kubacki, Health Sciences, Rochester Hills, Michigan

Hannah Kurath, Elementary Education, Golden, Colorado

Lucas LaRosa, Actuarial Science, Indianapolis

Mariesa LaRosa, Communication Science & Disorders, Indianapolis

Emma LaVelle, Accounting, Columbus, Indiana

Alyssa Lach, Computer Science, Algonquin, Illinois

John Lacheta, Management Information Systems, Warsaw, Indiana

Caitlin Ladd, Individualized Major, Floyds Knobs, Indiana

Tori Lampert, Anthropology, La Grange Park, Illinois

Spencer Lang, Biology, Longmont, Colorado

Grace Langford, Actuarial Science, Avon, Indiana

Maddie Larsen, Health Sciences, Chicago

Annie Larson, Marketing, Victoria, Minnesota

Kyra Laubacher, Dance-Performance, Wexford, Pennsylvania

Zoe Law, Anthropology, Zionsville, Indiana

Emily Lawson, Chemistry, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Lance Lawyer, Health Sciences, Mooresville, Indiana

Jenna-Laine LeBleu, Strategic Communication, Aurora, Illinois

Allison Ledder, Exploratory (Business) Crystal Lake, Illinois

Adam Lee, Finance, Kirkwood, Missouri

Dana Lee, Journalism, Northbrook, Illinois

Jessica Lee, Biology, Chesterton, Indiana

Stephanie Lee, Pharmacy, Carmel, Indiana

Meghan Leete, Economics, Spring Lake, Michigan

Sara Lefere, Elementary Education, Jackson, Michigan

Emily Leiderman, Psychology, Geneva, Illinois

Cade Leinbach, Music Composition, Goshen, Indiana

Blake Leonard, International Business, Dexter, Michigan

Rachael Lewis, Marketing, Danville, Illinois

Samantha Lilly, Marketing, Indianapolis 

Morgan Linzmeier, History and Anthropology, Pulaski, Wisconsin

Monica Livorsi, Arts Administration, Minnetonka, Minnesota

Julia Lohan, Middle/Secondary Education, Lincolnwood, Illinois

Nick Lombardo, Finance, Glen Ellyn, Illinois

Austin Long, Professional Pharmacy, Mooresville, Indiana

Elizabeth Longthorne, Strategic Communication, Indianapolis

Jesse Longtin, Accounting, Kankakee, Illinois

Haley Loquercio, Theatre, Chicago

Melissa Louis, Health Sciences, Loveland, Ohio

Madeline Lowry, Risk Management and Insurance, Springfield, Virginia

Nick Lucas, Accounting, Johnston, Iowa

Hannah Luedtke, Accounting, North Barrington, Illinois

Abbie Lueken, Professional Pharmacy, Bloomington, Indiana

Cole Luty, Professional Pharmacy, Indianapolis  

Meghan Lynch, Communication Science & Disorders, Indianapolis             

Maggie MacBeth, Biology, Indianapolis  

Missy MacCarthy, Health Sciences, Saint Charles , Illinois

Cole Mackey, Pre-Pharmacy, Shelbyville, Indiana

Dustin Mailloux, Accounting, Bloomington, Illinois

Colleen Major, Elementary Education, Willowbrook, Illinois

Grace Malone, Digital Media Production, West Lafayette, Indiana

Brittney Man, Actuarial Science, Indianapolis

Izzi Mandli, Exploratory (Business), Whitefish Bay, Wisconsin

Addie Mann, Health Sciences, Bluffton, Indiana

Theo Maris, Pre-Pharmacy, Villa Hills, Kentucky

Allyson Marks, Marketing, Germantown Hills, Illinois

Justin Markus, Marketing, New Lenox, Illinois

Lindsay Marohn , Exploratory (Natural Sciences), Saint Joseph, Michigan

Kylie Mason, Elementary Education, Bourbon, Indiana

Elly Mawi, Biology, Indianapolis

Hillary May, Psychology, Mount Vernon, Indiana

Grace Maynard, Mathematics, Normal, Illinois

Eleanor McCandless, Marketing, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Lauren McCartt, Exploratory, Indianapolis

Eryn McCloy, Exploratory, Hortonville, Wisconsin

Katie McConnell, Elementary Education, Mesa, Arizona

Maeve McCormack, Accounting, Oak Park, Illinois

Bryce McDonald, Exploratory (Business), Canton, Michigan

Johnny McDonald, Accounting, Vernon Hills, Illinois

Kelsey McDougall, Biology, Canton, Michigan

Kirsten McGrew               , Pharmacy, Prospect, Kentucky

Morgan McInturff, Finance, Indianapolis

Addy McKown, Strategic Communication, New Castle, Indiana

Lauren McQuarters, Psychology, La Porte, Indiana

Carli Medina, Health Sciences, Crown Point, Indiana

Kasey Meeks, Health Sciences, Robinson, Illinois

Michael Melbardis, Music, Fishers, Indiana

Alex Mendelson, Finance, Evanston, Illinois

Abby Meredith, Elementary Education, Indianapolis

Nicole Miceli, Digital Media Production, Des Plaines, Illinois

Eric Michel, English Writing, Tipton, Indiana

Madison Millard, Psychology, Indianapolis

Alyssa Millen, Biochemistry, Valparaiso, Indiana

Allison Miller, Health Sciences, Warsaw, Indiana

Connor Miller, Pre-Pharmacy, Elkhart, Indiana

Katherine Miller, International Studies, Columbus, Indiana

Kiley Miller, Accounting, Carmel, Indiana

Shelby Miller, Communication Science & Disorders, McCordsville, Indiana

Travis Miller, Actuarial Science, Middlebury, Indiana

Karina Milvain, Theatre, Colorado Springs, Colorado

Jordan Minnick, Science, Technology, & Society, Las Vegas, Nevada

Bryce Minor, Accounting, Brazil, Indiana

Ntinyari Miriti, Music Education, Lexington, Kentucky

Madeline Mitchell, Pharmacy, Effingham, Illinois

Madeline Mleziva, Digital Media Production, Appleton, Wisconsin

Nyree Modisette, Political Science, Indianapolis

Kaeli Moffett, Professional Pharmacy, Indianapolis

Gabby Moline, Journalism, Schererville, Indiana

Matthew Monge, Human Communication and Organizational Leadership, Edwards, Illinois

Eliana Montalvo, Dance-Performance, Modesto, California

Lauren Monteith, Communication Science & Disorders, Indianapolis

Cecilia Moore, Communication Science & Disorders, Nashville, Tennessee

Matthew Moore, Chemistry, Cincinnati, Ohio

Rachel Moran, Science, Technology, & Society, Glen Ellyn, Illinois

Ashley Morgan, Health Sciences, Avon, Indiana

Erin Morrisey, Middle/Secondary Education, Glen Carbon, Illinois

Arianna Morrison, Dance-Performance, Seffner, Florida

Julia Mucci, Exploratory (Business), Canton, Michigan

Sam Mueller, Marketing, Westfield, Indiana

Daniel Mulawa, Health Sciences, Saint Charles, Missouri

Jacob Mummert, Sports Media, Amboy, Indiana

Gracie Munroe, Political Science, Crawfordsville, Indiana

Amanda Murphy, Exploratory, Arlington Heights, Illinois

Kelly Murphy, Human Communication and Organizational Leadership, Dublin, Ohio

Maeve Murphy, Elementary Education, Champaign, Illinois

Con Murray, English, Cincinnati, Ohio

Lindsey Myers, Elementary Education, Nashville, Tennessee

Kristen Mylcraine, Biology, Plainfield, Indiana

Maham Nadeem, Biology, Carmel, Indiana

Jack Napoleon, Finance, Arlington Heights, Illinois

Garrick Nate, International Studies, Plymouth, Indiana

Carl Nelson, Digital Media Production, Wheaton, Illinois

Emily Nettesheim, Health Sciences, Lafayette, Indiana

Jordyn Newett, Music Education, Greenwood, Indiana

Kendra Newman, Biology, Danville, Indiana

Josey Noel, Biology, Jeffersonville, Indiana

Ariel Norris, Marketing, Noblesville, Indiana

Carolan Norris, Dance/Arts Administration, Cumming, Georgia

Sean O'Brien, Psychology, Munster, Indiana

Sheila O'Keeffe, Exploratory, Orland Park, Illinois

Megan O'Neill, Marketing, Lemont, Illinois

Macey OBrien, Marketing, Northbrook, Illinois

Elise Offutt, Elementary Education, Arlington, Virginia

Sarah Opperman, Pre-Pharmacy, Valparaiso, Indiana

MacKenzie Orbaugh, Elementary Education, Zionsville, Indiana

Bailey Osler, Elementary Education, McCordsville, Indiana

Claire Ottmar, Middle/Secondary Education, Saint Joseph, Michigan

Andrew Ozga, Physics, Wauconda, Illinois

Claire Paciga, Pre-Pharmacy, Orland Park, Illinois

Lauryn Padgett, Biochemistry, Carmel, Indiana

Kenia Padron, Communication Science & Disorders, Panama       

Corbin Panturad, International Studies, Aledo, Texas

Nicolia Papadeas, Health Sciences, Greenwood Village, Colorado

Maddie Paraskos, Elementary Education, Mason, Ohio

Allie Parker, Anthropology, West Lafayette, Indiana

Kyleigh Parks, Finance, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Sara Patel, Accounting, Cleveland, Ohio

Amber Patrick, English, Hilliard, Ohio

Cassidy Patscot, Marketing, Wales, Wisconsin

Kinsey Paulson, Human Communication and Organizational Leadership, Bettendorf, Iowa

Natalie Pawlak, Communication Science & Disorders, Appleton, Wisconsin

Paige Pearson, Strategic Communication, Edina, Minnesota

Leah Peavler, Arts Administration, Brookfield, Wisconsin

Michael Peay, Finance, Phoenix, Arizona

Breann Pempek, Middle/Secondary Education, Indianapolis

Allie Pence, Arts Administration, Fishers, Indiana

Anne Perez, Pre-Pharmacy, Elmhurst, Illinois

Braden Pershing, Accounting, Greencastle, Indiana

Jack Peterson, Finance, Rockville, Maryland

Caitlin Pethick, Biology, South Bend, Indiana

Robert Petrakis, Accounting, Peoria, Illinois

Lauren Pfeil, International Studies, West Des Moines, Iowa

Allie Phillips, Pre-Pharmacy, Noblesville, Indiana

Mackenzie Phillips, Health Sciences, Humble, Texas

Jack Pilcher, Finance, Zionsville, Indiana

John Plate, Music Performance, Wheaton, Illinois

Tyler Pollard, Economics, Highland, Illinois

Julia Pomeroy, Chemistry, Akron, Indiana

Noemi Ponzoni, International Studies, Sulbiate  

Sarah Poore, Marketing, Carmel, Indiana

Jessica Porter, Middle/Secondary Education, Elberfeld, Indiana

Malayna Pottschmidt, Accounting, Fishers, Indiana

Hannah Protich, Pharmacy, Plainfield, Illinois

Taylor Pugh, Digital Media Production, Los Alamitos, California

Tori Puhl, Actuarial Science, Mequon, Wisconsin

Krista Pulley, Chemistry, Noblesville, Indiana

Shannon Purcell, Professional Pharmacy, Geneva, Illinois

David Purdum, Mathematics, Noblesville, Indiana

Rehan Qureshi, Pre-Pharmacy, Carmel, Indiana

Courtney Raab, Health Sciences, Highland, Indiana

Gabrielle Raab, Communication Science & Disorders, Oldenburg, Indiana

Carter Raleigh, Finance, Cincinnati, Ohio

Isabelle Ramey, Dance-Performance, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Armando Ramirez, Pharmacy, Decatur, Indiana

Courtney Ramirez, Dance/Arts Administration, Littleton, Colorado

Libbie Rammage, Strategic Communication, Wataga, Illinois

Allison Ramsey, Actuarial Science, Fishers, Indiana

Alea Rashid, Exploratory (Natural Sciences), Streator, Illinois

Anna Rather, English, Bargersville, Indiana

Jordan Rauh, Pharmacy, Wabash, Indiana

Jacob Reeves, Biology, Odum, Georgia

Kayla Reeves, Exploratory (Business), Des Plaines, Illinois

Maggie Regan, Art + Design, Manteno, Illinois

Taylor Reid, Elementary Education, Zionsville, Indiana

Lauren Reineke, Health Sciences, Valparaiso, Indiana

Jenna Repkin, Middle/Secondary Education, Vernon Hills, Illinois

Maggie Reynolds, Communication Science & Disorders, Darien, Illinois

Emma Richards, Communication Science & Disorders, Effingham, Illinois

Kate Richards, Communication Science & Disorders, Effingham, Illinois

Chanel Richardson, Pharmacy, Greenwood, Indiana

Lindsey Ridlen, Professional Pharmacy, Seymour, Indiana

Jaret Rightley, Accounting, New Palestine, Indiana

Mason Rinks, Accounting, Swartz Creek, Michigan

Ellen Rispoli, Psychology, Savoy, Illinois

Paul Ritter, Actuarial Science, Batesville, Indiana

Kade Roach, Finance, Salem, Indiana

Sophie Robertson, Dance/Arts Administration, Gig Harbor, Washington

Jacob Robleski, Accounting, Wheaton, Illinois

Cole Rodgers, Dance/Arts Administration, Woodbury, Minnesota

Lauren Rodgers, Psychology, Perrysburg, Ohio

Joseph Rodriguez, Music Education, Lafayette, Indiana

Avery Roe, Peace and Conflict Studies, Columbus, Ohio

Kyle Roe, Finance, Indianapolis

Tommy Roers, Middle/Secondary Education, Kildeer, Illinois

Rachel Rogers, Finance, Tipp City, Ohio

Evan Rolston, Pharmacy, Anderson, Indiana

Raven Roth, Marketing, Orange Village, Ohio

Joe Rowan, Exploratory, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Kelsey Rowley, Elementary Education, Connersville, Indiana

Connor Ruffing, Actuarial Science, South Bend, Indiana

Molly Rumble, Dance-Pedagogy, Virginia Beach, Virginia

Bella Ruscheinski, Exploratory (Business), Peoria, Illinois

Megan Rush, Marketing, Salisbury, Maryland

David Ryskamp, Biology, Caledonia, Michigan

Cobi Sabo, Computer Science, Homewood, Illinois

Mariam Saeedi, Art + Design, Bloomington, Indiana

Abdul Saltagi, Biology, Fishers, Indiana

Briana Sanchez, Marketing, Grand Forks, North Dakota

Andrew Sandlin, Actuarial Science, Indianapolis

Meredith Sands, Elementary Education, Valparaiso, Indiana

Logan Sanford, Marketing, Liberty, Indiana

Karnjanakorn Sapianchai, Dance-Performance, Thailand                

Payton Sassano, Communication Science & Disorders, Deerfield, Illinois

Madison Sauerteig, Sociology (Social Work) & Psychology, Arcadia, Indiana

Justin Savona, Exploratory (Business), Northville, Michigan

Kaitlyn Sawin, Marketing, Appleton, Wisconsin

Keegan Sawin, Psychology, Appleton, Wisconsin

Abby Schabel, Pre-Pharmacy, Westport, Indiana

Morgan Schaffer, Professional Pharmacy, Dayton, Ohio

Fiona Schicho, Anthropology, Blairstown, New Jersey

Jenny Schick, Communication Science & Disorders, Libertyville, Illinois

Leah Schissler, Elementary Education, Tinley Park, Illinois

Alexis Schmidt, English, Chillicothe, Illinois

Annika Schmidt, Sports Media, Zionsville, Indiana

Elizabeth Schmidt, Performance & Music Education, Crystal Lake, Illinois

Lauren Schmidt, Pre-Pharmacy, Columbia, Illinois

Rachel Schmidt, Marketing, Saline, Michigan

Riley Schmidt, Science, Technology, & Society, Mukwonago, Wisconsin

Becca Schmiegel, History, Valparaiso, Indiana

Emma Schneir, Marketing, Carlsbad, California

Kerianne Schoff, Communication Science & Disorders, Rockford, Michigan

Corey Scholl, Astronomy & Astrophysics, Indianapolis

Megan Schroeder, Biology, Richmond, Indiana

Lindsey Schuler, Health Sciences, Fishers, Indiana

Olivia Schwan, Marketing, Mattawan, Michigan

Kelly Schwantes, Theatre, Barrington, Illinois

Christa Schwinke, Management Information Systems, Teutopolis, Illinois

Daniel Scofield, Dance/Arts Administration, Fisherville, Kentucky

Blayre Scott, Health Sciences, Shelbyville, Indiana

Ana Segovia, Health Sciences, Nicholasville, Kentucky

Gwenyth Sell, Music Performance, Noblesville, Indiana

Brittan Semler, Strategic Communication, Spring Grove, Illinois

Sarah Semmen, Biology, Woodstock, Illinois

David Sexton, Political Science, Richmond, Indiana

Emilie Sgutt, Professional Pharmacy, Herrin, Illinois

Emma Shafer, Theatre, Quincy, Illinois

Khusbu Shah, Health Sciences, Schaumburg, Illinois

Umy Shaikh, Health Sciences, Carmel, Indiana

David Shammas, Healthcare and Business, Carmel, Indiana

Alex Shanafelt, Music Composition, Carmel, Indiana

Matt Shapiro, Exploratory, Wilmette, Illinois

Ben Sharp, Computer Science, Indianapolis

Sarah Sharpe, Health Sciences, Munster, Indiana

Katie Shelford, Biology, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Sydney Shelton, Middle/Secondary Education, Greenfield, Indiana

Jack Shirley, Critical Communication & Media, Brentwood, Tennessee

Kristen Shively, Actuarial Science, Columbia City, Indiana

Molly Shoffner, Biology, Russiaville, Indiana

Marley Shovlin, Health Sciences, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Abby Sikorcin, Health Sciences, Lisle, Illinois

Hanna Silverman, Sociology (Social Work) & Psychology, Deerfield, Illinois

Derek Sims, Biology, Elwood, Indiana

Meghan Singer, Exploratory, Vernon Hills, Illinois

LauraJane Skillern, Exploratory (Business), Mooresville, Indiana

Elizabeth Small, Elementary Education, Zionsville, Indiana

Abigail Smith, Accounting, Winona Lake, Indiana

Adilyn Smith, Elementary Education, Cincinnati, Ohio

Allison Smith, Communication Science & Disorders, Antioch, Illinois

Bre Smith, Accounting, Danville, Indiana

Bret Smith, Exploratory (Business), Brownsburg, Indiana

Emi Smith, Political Science, Des Moines , Iowa

Genavieve Smith, Political Science, Mount Juliet, Tennessee

Layne Smith, Professional Pharmacy, Winchester, Indiana

Jenny Snedeker, Music Performance, Indianapolis

Michael Snyder, Finance, Peoria, Illinois

Spencer Spaulding, Biology, Madison, Indiana

Gwen Spencer, Actuarial Science, Waxhaw, North Carolina

Joe Spenchian, Marketing, Des Plaines, Illinois

Emma Sporer, Elementary Education, Wheaton, Illinois

Delainey Spragg, Communication Science & Disorders, Attica, Indiana

Lilly Springer, Economics, Indianapolis

Tyler Springer, Journalism, Lakeville, Minnesota

Caroline Squatrito, Marketing, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

Samantha Stanley, Biology, Greenfield, Indiana

Mary Stazinski, Sociology (Social Work) & Psychology, Valparaiso, Indiana

Graham Stecz, Finance, Dublin, Ohio

Halle Stelbasky, Communication Science & Disorders, Strongsville, Ohio

Kailey Steward, English Writing, Oak Forest, Illinois

Kylie Stine, Exploratory (Business), Frankfort, Indiana

Emma Stockrahm, Communication Science & Disorders, Terre Haute, Indiana

Shelby Stone, Health Sciences, Wabash, Indiana

Sarah Stopczynski, Pre-Pharmacy, South Bend, Indiana

Sophie Strasheim, Music Education, St. Louis, Missouri

Riley Strauss, Elementary Education, Deerfield, Illinois

Delaney Straw, Pre-Pharmacy, Speedway, Indiana

Charlee Striebinger, Health Sciences, Overland Park, Kansas

Hannah Stroup, Middle/Secondary Education, St. Louis, Missouri

CJ Stump, Accounting, Noblesville, Indiana

Keith Sustich, Computer Science, Lake Zurich, Illinois

Hayley Sutherland, Pre-Pharmacy, Wauconda, Illinois

Shelby Swihart, Biology, Goshen, Indiana

Andrew Sysak, Finance, Goodrich, Michigan

Maria Szeszol, Pharmacy, Lindenhurst, Illinois

Brad Sznajder, Finance, Aurora, Illinois

Sara Taft, Psychology, Goshen, Indiana

Anis Tai, Pre-Pharmacy, Indianapolis

Avery Tanenhaus, Entrepreneurship & Innovation, Roslyn Heights, New York

Nick Taylor, Pre-Pharmacy, Nashville, Tennessee

Reagan Taylor, Communication Science & Disorders, South Bend, Indiana

Tyler Taylor, Psychology, Crete, Illinois

Marissa Terando, Accounting, Westfield, Indiana

Garrett Terhune, Pre-Pharmacy, Greenwood, Indiana

Sydney Theerman, Exploratory, St. Louis, Missouri

Madison Theile, Exploratory (Business), Bloomington, Indiana

Mckenzie Theis, Exploratory (Business), Mundelein, Illinois

Anna Thomas, Psychology, Naperville, Illinois

Maddie Thomas, Exploratory, Hamilton, Ohio

Michael Thomas, Health Sciences, Springfield, Illinois

Sean Thomas, Accounting, Western Springs, Illinois

Mackenzie Thompson, English, Franklin, Indiana

Ashley Thopiah, Dance-Performance, Champaign, Illinois

Hanna Throgmorton, Psychology, Carmel, Indiana

Lilly Thuma, Exploratory (Business), Edina, Minnesota

Lauren Tibbets, Actuarial Science, Converse, Indiana

Cassidy Tiberi, Psychology, New Lenox, Illinois

Shelbi Tidd, Psychology, Fishers, Indiana

Yzabel Tio, Music Education, Terre Haute, Indiana

Maxwell Todd, Health Sciences, Sullivan, Illinois

Avery Tolliver, Pharmacy, Tolono, Illinois

Viki Tomanov, English, Lombard, Illinois

Cole Tonucci, Exploratory (Business), Dublin, Ohio

Hannah Tourville, Entrepreneurship & Innovation, Kaukauna, Wisconsin

Noah Troxell, Management Information Systems, Golden, Colorado

Megan True, Art + Design, New Palestine, Indiana

Ryan Tsai, Actuarial Science, Canton, Ohio

Ashley Twigg, Biology, Columbus, Ohio

Joe Ulrey, Healthcare and Business, Mooresville, Indiana

Erin Underwood, Elementary Education, House Springs, Missouri

Sydney Ungar, Health Sciences, Eden Prairie, Minnesota

Jasmeen Uppal, Exploratory (Business), Plainfield, Indiana

Gwen Valles, International Studies, Hammond, Indiana

Logan Van Ravenswaay, Pre-Pharmacy, Palmyra, Illinois

Morgan Vance, Professional Pharmacy, Indianapolis

Reagan Vance, Marketing, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Sam Varie, Marketing, Indianapolis

Meredith Varner, Middle/Secondary Education, Vernon Hills, Illinois

Ian Veen, Accounting, Speedway, Indiana

Elizabeth Verkamp, Accounting, Jasper, Indiana

Ashlyn Vitoux, Pharmacy, Winona Lake, Indiana

Alexander Waddell, Accounting, Martinsville, Indiana

Kate Wade, Philosophy & Psychology, Fishers, Indiana

Tyler Wagner, English Writing, Avon, Indiana

Caleb Wakefield, Middle/Secondary Education, Indianapolis

Michael Walker, Pre-Pharmacy, Sullivan, Indiana

Skyler Walker, Pharmacy, Racine, Wisconsin

Madison Walrod, Health Sciences, McCordsville, Indiana

Rachel Walters, Art + Design, Zionsville, Indiana

Joe Wandro, Music Performance, Des Moines, Iowa

Elizabeth Wang, Health Sciences, Madison, Wisconsin

Ellen Ward, Human Communication and Organization Leadership, Towson, Maryland

Kate Warma, Anthropology, Carlinville, Illinois

Kylene Warne, Theatre, Nineveh, Indiana

Elaine Warner, Elementary Education, North Manchester, Indiana

Katherine Waters, Biology, Brownsburg, Indiana

Lucas Wathen, Exploratory, Deerfield, Illinois

Megan Watson, Elementary Education, Urbandale, Iowa

Madeline Watterson, History and Political Science, La Porte, Indiana

Megan Waxman, Biology, Highland, Michigan

Sarah Wede, Pre-Pharmacy, Carmel, Indiana

Emily Weiler, Biology, Batesville, Indiana

Carol Weirich, Music Education, Elkhart, Indiana

Lauren Weirich, Music Education, Elkhart, Indiana

Noah Weiss, Marketing, Richland, Michigan

Nathan Weller, Pre-Pharmacy, Bloomington, Indiana

Kylie Wermund, Health Sciences, Stevensville, Michigan

Daniel Whalen, International Business, Indianapolis

Kiersten White, Middle/Secondary Education, Indianapolis

Megan Whitwam, Exploratory, Stevensville, Michigan

Jillian Wickham, Health Sciences, Clarendon Hills, Illinois

Lauren Wiggins, Exploratory (Business), New Palestine, Indiana

Kait Wilbur, Digital Media Production, Manito, Illinois

Rachel Wilburn, History, Valparaiso, Indiana

Riley Wildemann, Pharmacy, Plainfield, Indiana

Celina Wilk, Middle/Secondary Education, Mt Prospect, Illinois

Cameron Willett, Biology, Prospect, Kentucky

Rachel Williams, Chemistry, Dayton, Indiana

Tyler Williams, Marketing, Osceola, Indiana

blake Williams, Pre-Pharmacy, Fishers, Indiana

Hannah Willmore, Music, Edwardsville, Illinois

Emma Wilson, Human Communication and Organizational Leadership, Columbus, Indiana

Laura Wilson, Finance, Greenwood, Indiana

Ross Wilson, Recording Industry Studies, Chandler, Arizona

Tim Winter, Computer Science, Decorah, Iowa

Layla Wisser, Health Sciences, Elgin, Illinois

Reagan Wohlford, Biology, Huntington, Indiana

Samantha Worden, Health Sciences, Middleton, Wisconsin

Rachel Worley, Musical Arts, Lebanon, Indiana

Alexander Wright, Chemistry, Fishers, Indiana

Heather Wright, Music, Indianapolis

Maddie Wright, Health Sciences, Mooresville, Indiana

Abigale Wynn, Mathematics, Madison, Indiana

Zhenzhen Xiang, International Studies, Beijing   

Jill Yager, Biology, Rushville, Indiana

Danny Yanosko, Finance, Cleveland, Ohio

Alyssa Yarosz,  Strategic Communication, Morristown, New Jersey

Sam Yeaton, Accounting, Akron, Ohio

Ryan Young, Marketing, Louisville, Kentucky

Xiaofu Yu, Exploratory (Business), Shanghai         

Ash Zehr, Professional Pharmacy, Indianapolis   

Kelsey Zetzl, Performance & Music Education, Hagerstown, Indiana

Lindsey Zimmerman, Marketing, Carmel, Indiana

Helen Zorn, Exploratory, Chicago, Illinois

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

AcademicsStudent Life

Butler Places 815 Students on Fall 2017 Dean's List

Top 20 percent of students are on the list.

Feb 06 2018 Read more

Joey Brunk: A Big Man with a Big Heart

By Sarah Bahr

JO-EY! JO-EY!

Twenty-one-year-old Butler men’s basketball center Joey Brunk has just checked into the game, and the cheers from the 9,100 fans packing Hinkle Fieldhouse are thunderous.

"He’s so likeable that people cheer like crazy just when he enters the game,” Butler Associate Athletic Director John Dedman says. “Luckily Nate [Fowler] understands that fans aren’t cheering that he is going to the bench.”

Brunk pushes a soft, loose wave of what Twitter users have called the “golden mane” and “the best hair in college basketball” away from his face, a grin peeking through his Matthew McConaughey-inspired beard and mustache, and steps to the line. Swishes the free throw.

Tonight, he can’t miss.

An hour later, he walks off the court, through the locker room …

… and heads back to his dorm, where he’ll strip off his size-17 sneakers, maybe read some poetry or a JFK biography (“He’s my favorite president”) before curling his 6-11 frame into a bed not made for a man who could nearly stand head to head with a small adult elephant.

In the morning, it’ll be time to teach poetry to second-graders.

 

In a Class of His Own

Brunk, an Elementary Education major and aspiring teacher, spent last semester student teaching in a second-grade class at the Butler University Laboratory School on Wednesdays.

His first full-class lesson was an introduction to emotion poetry.

“I was a little worried they might come in with negative attitudes, but they enjoyed it,” Brunk says. “I had them read a poem and then act out different emotions—I was the photographer, and everyone else was an actor.”

“It got lots of laughs.”

Brunk says there aren’t a lot of men in elementary education—last semester, he was one of only two guys in his elementary-education class.

“The kids thought it was cool that I was a guy teaching them,” he says. “I tried to be cool, whether it was talking ESPN, last night’s NBA games, or SportsCenter highlights.”

But as he rests his fist on his chin in a pose reminiscent of Rodin’s The Thinker sculpture, the mid-morning sunlight streaming into Hinkle Fieldhouse streaking his wavy hair, it isn’t hard to believe the hard-charging center whom Butler Director of Basketball Operations Brandon Crone calls a “gentle giant” is a poetry aficionado.

“He’s so patient,” Crone says. “He just has a presence. I have a 3-year-old son, and Joey’s always one of the first to give him high fives and hugs in the locker room.”

No one in Brunk’s immediate family is a teacher, but after volunteering in a fifth-grade class at Southport Elementary School a few days per week his senior year of high school, he was sold.

“I wanted the kids to be able to have a positive role model,” he says.

It’s a role Brunk also tries to play for his younger brother, Johnny, a sophomore guard at Roncalli High School, about 20 minutes south of Butler.

Being able to stay close to Johnny was one of the reasons Brunk, a four-star prospect out of Southport in 2016, chose Butler over offers from a bevy of Big Ten schools, including Indiana and Purdue.

“I went to Butler so I could see my brother play,” Brunk says. “I grew up in a family where everyone was at everyone else’s stuff.”

Which meant his Friday nights were never exactly, umm, wild.

“I was expected to be at every one of my brother’s Little League games and practices,” Brunk says. “And he attended all my practices and workouts.”

But supporting his younger brother has never been a chore for the Butler big man.

“He was there to support me, so I want to support him,” Brunk says.

Family first.

So it was never a question for Brunk to forego the remainder of his first-year season to spend time with his dad after Joe Brunk was diagnosed with brain cancer in November 2016.

 

His Biggest Fan

Brunk has been to the Indianapolis Zoo no fewer than 500 times.

He would go with his family once or twice a week from age 2 on, always wanting to look at the same things—the lions, tigers, and his current favorite animal, the red panda. And the animal-lover also says his parents enabled a fearsome Zoobooks addiction.

“They paid for a monthly subscription, and it went on so long that I’d have three copies of the exact same issue,” he says.

He honors his dad by visiting a local zoo with Butler play-by-play radio announcer Mark Minner whenever the team travels for a tournament. It’s a way for Brunk to keep his hero with him.

Brunk and his dad, a two-time NAIA All-American at Hanover College, bonded over basketball from the beginning. They attended games at Hinkle Fieldhouse together, and Joe Brunk was his son’s first AAU coach.

“He was my biggest critic—and my biggest fan,” Joey Brunk says.

His dad would pick him up from middle school every day and drive him to the gym for workouts, a dedication that paid off when Brunk was a Top 100 recruit and one of the three finalists for the statewide IndyStar Mr. Basketball award as a high school senior.

“There were lots of mornings when—God bless both my parents—they’d get up at 5:30 AM to drive me to the high school for a workout,” Joey Brunk says. “My dad would rebound for me, and my mom would pack me breakfast, lunch, and something for the way home from school so I could eat again before going to the gym.”

Joe Brunk was there to watch Joey’s Southport team beat Ben Davis 60-57 for the sectional championship during Brunk’s senior year—and Joey hoped he’d one day get to watch Butler win an NCAA Championship.

Then, in November 2016, his dad was hospitalized while visiting friends in Las Vegas.

“It was completely unexpected,” Joey Brunk says. “I flew to Nevada right away.”

The diagnosis? A brain tumor.

Brunk stayed at his dad’s side in Southport for the next six months, foregoing the remainder of his first-year season to spend the last moments of his dad’s life with his hero.

“We laughed; we cried; we told stories,” Joey Brunk says. “There was never any dead airspace.”

Joe Brunk died April 15, 2017, at age 56.

But, true to his dad’s mantra of living with passion, Brunk made a vow: He wouldn’t be depressed.

He’d be the Energizer Bunny.

 

Butler’s Energizer Bunny

Drop in on a Hinkle Fieldhouse practice, and you’d be hard-pressed to find a happier guy than Brunk. He wears his dad’s No. 50 jersey, another reminder of the man who helped him achieve his dream of playing Division I basketball.

Brunk doubled down on his dedication to the sport this summer, using the offseason to transform his body with as many as four workouts each day, ranging from hot yoga to shooting with his brother at Roncalli. He dropped 10 pounds, from 240 to 230, and increased his maximum bench press from 230 to 260 pounds.

And it’s paid off: He’s averaging 8.6 points per game this season, compared to last year’s 1.3. His average rebounds per game are up to 4.4 from 1.8. And his average minutes per game have quadrupled, from five to 20.

The NCAA granted Brunk an additional season, awarding him a hardship waiver for his first year, as he only played in seven games before stepping away to be with his dad. That means he’s a redshirt sophomore this season, with two years of eligibility remaining.

Crone says that, despite his dad’s death, nothing about Brunk’s personality has changed.

“He’s the same Joey I’ve known for five years,” he says. “He’s the Energizer Bunny in the locker room.”

“Dad and I always talked about living your life in a way that you’re excited to wake up,” Joey Brunk says. “There are lots of people who would die to be in this position.”

Joey Brunk
UnleashedStudent Life

Joey Brunk: A Big Man with a Big Heart

The Butler Men's Basketball center is dedicated to achieving his dream and helping others do the same. 

Indy 500Student LifePeople

Four Butler Students Named 500 Festival Princesses

BY

PUBLISHED ON Mar 02 2018

Taylor Bowen                                  Natalie Cole     

Katie Pfaff                                    Anna Rather

                         

Four Butler University students have been selected as 500 Festival Princesses for 2018.

They are:

-Taylor Bowen, Michiana Shores, a senior majoring in Digital Media Production and Art Plus Design.

-Natalie Cole, Westfield, a junior majoring in Violin Performance with emphases in Music Theory and Music History.

-Katherine (Katie) Pfaff, Lewisville, a junior majoring in Strategic Communication: Public Relations.

-Anna Rather, Bargersville, a junior majoring in English Literary Theory, Culture and Criticism.

Each 500 Festival Princess will receive a $1,000 scholarship. In addition, 500 Festival Princesses are involved with the 500 Festival’s statewide community outreach programs, volunteering at 500 Festival events, and participating in various Indianapolis Motor Speedway functions, including the pre-race ceremonies and Victory Circle celebration for the 102nd running of the Indianapolis 500.

The 2018 500 Festival Princesses represent 14 Indiana colleges and universities and 21 cities and towns across the state. With a cumulative GPA of 3.72, this year’s 500 Festival princesses were selected from hundreds of applicants based on communication skills, academic performance and community involvement.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

Like a Pro

By Rachel Stern

DETROIT—It’s hard to catch Jimmy Lafakis.

The first time, his phone goes straight to voicemail. The next, after about two rings, it goes to voicemail again. But this time, Lafakis follows up with a text message.  “I’m on the court shooting Michigan State-Bucknell, can we talk after the game?” he writes. “The atmosphere is insane.”

He steals a few minutes to talk during a media timeout, in the bowels of Little Caesars Arena. It’s fitting. Most of Lafakis’ college career has been spent dotting the country, following the Butler men’s basketball team from arena to arena, squatting on baselines, documenting the action for The Collegian, Butler’s student newspaper.

Then, there are games like Michigan State-Bucknell. The Butler junior has no real reason to shoot photos of this game. But that’s not how he sees it at all. In Lafakis’ eyes, it’s impossible to count all the reasons. He has a media pass, he is a basketball fanatic, he loves photography, it’s March. The list goes on.

Take Friday for example.

He rose at about 4:00 AM, drove from Indianapolis to Detroit with his parents. Went straight to Little Caesars Arena. Arrived in time to shoot the Purdue-Cal State Fullerton game at noon. Then shot the Butler-Arkansas game (a perfect game, he says). And when he takes a quick break to chat, it is about 9:00 PM and he is in the midst of shooting the Michigan State-Bucknell game (he’s running on adrenaline, he says. He isn’t even tired, he says).

March is his favorite time of the year. According to Jimmy, the tournament “is unlike anything else in the universe.” Which is no surprise, considering what a basketball junkie he is. But what is a surprise, if you talk to him for just five minutes, is that he had never even heard of Butler University until he was in eighth grade.

A lot has changed since then.

 

A Student of the Game

Lafakis is from Schererville, Indiana. Hoops country. But, believe it or not, he grew up without a favorite college basketball team. How did a hoops-obsessed kid from Indiana grow up teamless?  “Well, my dad went to IU and everyone I knew had a team, but I was waiting for a reason to really fall in love, you know?” Lafakis says.

Lafakis played basketball in middle school, but was just OK, he says. However, he was always a student of the game. And then there’s his memory. Jimmy Lafakis remembers everything. He says this carries over to most things in life. But when it comes to basketball, well, his memory is extra sharp. He likes to play a game with his friends where they name a professional basketball player, and Lafakis fires back with the college he went to. Lafakis is rarely stumped.

So, when he started to get really into hoops, he, of course, remembered everything. Every game he watched, every player he saw, most stats. There was that day in seventh grade when he was watching SportsCenter and saw highlights of A.J. Graves and Butler. Naturally, it stuck and he was instantly hooked, he says.

“A.J. Graves was getting buckets,” Lafakis says, recalling specific highlights from a clip he saw in seventh grade. “I remember thinking, wow, he is good and Butler is good. I have to go to Hinkle. It was perfect timing because they were on the brink of bursting onto the national scene.”

 

A Butler Love Affair is Born

Obviously, Lafakis can reel off the first time he went to Hinkle Fieldhouse. He was in eighth grade, it was Halloween, and the Bulldogs were playing an exhibition game against Florida Southern. “I instantly fell in love with Hinkle,” he says. “That was the moment I knew I had to go to Butler.”

I instantly fell in love with Hinkle,” he says. “That was the moment I knew I had to go to Butler.

Jimmy’s parents, John and Kathy, toured the campus with Jimmy that day. They walked into the bookstore and walked out “with basically the entire store,” Jimmy says. Most notably? A blue sweatshirt that Jimmy still wears. Holes and all. “My mom and I still wear it. My dad tells me it is time to throw it out, but it means way too much,” Jimmy says. “There is too much history in that sweatshirt.”

The game against Florida Southern was just the beginning that year. The crew then went to Valparaiso in January (they lost in overtime, Jimmy says). Then it was onto New Orleans for the Sweet 16, where the Lafakis family watched Butler beat Wisconsin. After that game, the family headed back to Indianapolis, but made a pitstop at Butler, specifically Atherton Union, to watch Butler beat Florida in the Elite Eight. The game was projected on a wall inside the Reilly Room and Jimmy recalls the feeling of jubilation when the buzzer sounded (Shelvin Mack scored 27, he says), and he and about 200 Butler students ran onto the lawn outside Atherton to celebrate.

Now, a junior journalism major, Jimmy cannot believe how lucky he is. Instead of Atherton Union, he takes in most games from the baseline, Canon Rebel T6S camera, the same one he got June 1, 2015 for a graduation present around his neck. Snapping away. Posting to Twitter, Instagram, and publishing for The Collegian.

 

Experiences  

It’s hard to believe, Lafakis says, with a chuckle. But the first Butler game he ever shot photos for was exactly five years to the day after the first one he saw as an eighth grader with his parents. Halloween, 2015. And of course, he starts getting into the details of the game. An exhibition game. From 2015.

Lafakis first got into photography when he was a sophomore in high school. The girls basketball team was really good, and he started shooting their games. He saw this as a perfect way to blend his love of sports with journalism. Butler has allowed him to grow that passion, on a much larger scale, he says.

“I have worked for The Collegian since my freshman year and I really thank my lucky stars everyday,” says Jimmy. “It is really so special and unique. I don’t think too many other folks have the opportunity to do what they love, on this level, all over the country, while they are still in college. It’s really special.”

Following the team for the better part of his college career has sent Lafakis to Memphis, Portland, Detroit, Cincinnati, and West Lafayette, to name a few. Since he takes full advantage of these trips and snaps as many games as possible, he has captured some of basketballs biggest names. There has been Lonzo Ball, LeBron James, Magic Johnson, and Russell Westbrook (that was a selfie, he notes). NFL and NBA players have retweeted his photos.

But being around fellow journalists has been one of the most impactful parts, Lafakis says. It has given him a unique opportunity to seek out advice and learn from the best in the business. Jeff Goodman, of ESPN, for example, has offered words of encouragement. And he has developed a close relationship with the Indianapolis Star’s Gregg Doyel.

“There’s so much you learn in the classroom that prepares you, which I have been so fortunate at Butler to have some awesome professors. To mix that with the opportunities I have had in the field is irreplaceable. In the field, you really get thrown into the fire, which is where the real-world experience that I wouldn’t normally have so much of at this point in my life is so helpful. I am so lucky for that,” he says.

 

Making his Mark

Gregg Doyel remembers Lafakis’ presence in his inbox before actually meeting him in person. And he wasn’t exactly impressed. Lafakis would email Doyel some stories when he first got to Butler and ask for advice.

“I thought, ‘you are not very good,’” Doyel says. “Two years later, he is fabulous. Jimmy is like a basketball player who gets to college and cannot walk and dribble and then by the time he is a sophomore, he is an All-American.”

Doyel says Jimmy has become a regular at Butler men’s basketball games. Lafakis sends Doyel photos all the time. For example, Doyel recently published a story about Trevon Bluiett and Kelan Martin. Later that day, Lafakis pops up in his inbox, an email with photos of Bluiett and Martin together.

“Jimmy is the sweetest kid,” Doyel says. “He’s really smart. The thing about Jimmy is, and very few people have this, and I am not exaggerating, he is sincere. He’s got this thing where he embeds himself into your heart. He is not just a guy who takes pictures and writes stories, the entire team loves him. He is part of the team.”

A few weeks ago, Doyel was speaking to a College of Education class at Butler. He referenced a story he wrote and brought up Jimmy Lafakis, as he was mentioned in the story. He asked the class, about 20 women, if any of them knew Lafakis. “I’m telling you about 18 of them were nodding and smiling at me,” Doyel says. “I blurt out, ‘Why do you all know Jimmy?’ And someone says, ‘Well, everyone follows his Instagram because he is always taking beautiful pictures of Butler, and we want to see Butler through his eyes’…He is everywhere. He deserves everything. He is happy and humble, and all he does is bring happiness to everyone.”

 

Documenting in Detroit

It’s 9:30 AM on Sunday morning and Jimmy arrives at Little Caesars Arena. He likes to get to the arena on game day “as early as possible. Every time.”

Tip off against Purdue is over two-and-a-half hours away, the court is nearly empty, but Jimmy heads to his usual spot on the baseline. Questions swirl around the health of Butler’s Paul Jorgensen and Purdue’s Isaac Haas, and Jimmy wants to make sure he sees how each look during warmups. And of course, document it.

Minutes later, Jorgensen emerges from the tunnel to test his ankle. At seemingly the same time as Jorgensen hits the court in real life, images of him running up and down the court appear on Jimmy’s Twitter account.

“This school literally means everything to me,” he says. “These guys on the court are some of my good friends. I love basketball, trust me, but it is about so much more than being able to do what I love while I watch what I love. It is about being at a place that means so much to me with lifelong friends and memories that I will have forever.”

It is about being at a place that means so much to me with lifelong friends and memories that I will have forever.

See, that is what Jimmy loves about photography so much. That is why he gets to the arena on Sunday morning around 9:30 AM. That is why he shoots as many games as he can. And that is why, he estimates, he has shot hundreds of thousands of photos since he stepped onto Butler’s campus nearly three years ago, only missing a handful of Butler basketball games.

“It’s fun capturing moments. I love catching the emotion. It’s really cool to look back on. I love looking back at all of my pictures and seeing all the emotion and the memories,” he says.

If Jimmy has it his way, he will get a job in sports journalism after he graduates in 2019. Ideally, doing both writing and photography. But for now, he doesn’t want to even think about graduating from the place that has been “life changing,” he says.

“Being a senior will be extremely emotional. I don’t even want to talk about it,” Jimmy says. “Butler is such a special place. I am really nervous to be a senior. I want to savior every morsel of junior year.” But, when the time comes to graduate, Gregg Doyel, of the Indianapolis Star, thinks Jimmy is more than ready. Maybe a little too ready. “I’m not sure what he does better, write or take photos. He can really do both. He could write for any paper in America tomorrow, but he might be an even better photographer. And that is sincere,” Doyel says. “I just hope that little sucker doesn’t take my job someday.”

 

 

Student LifePeople

Like a Pro

DETROIT—It’s hard to catch Jimmy Lafakis. The first time, his phone goes straight to voicemail.

Like a Pro

By Rachel Stern

Meet the Class of 2022: Maria De Leon

Maria De Leon
Major: Peace and Conflict Studies
Hometown: Indianapolis, Indiana
High School: Crispus Attucks Medical Magnet High School


“I’m really looking forward to growing my professional network in my Butler experience.”

 


 

Incoming first-year student Maria De Leon is leading her family in a number of firsts.

She’s the first of her family members to graduate high school.

She’ll be the first to attend college. This fall, Maria will be one of 1,357 first-year students in Butler University’s Class of 2022, the University’s largest class ever.

Maria is also the first in her family to travel to Washington DC to participate in a sit-in to persuade senators to vote “yes” for a clean Dream Act.

And—as a result of participating in that protest—she’s definitely the first to text her Butler admission counselor to ask how getting arrested might affect her admission.

Luckily, Maria didn’t need to worry about the answer to her text. She was not arrested for her participation, although some of her travel companions were. But the protest was still an emotional experience for her.  While she isn’t directly impacted by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) legislation, her family and many of her friends are.

“My parents are immigrants, so they are affected by the immigration laws that the current administration is trying to put into place. Whatever happens with DACA will have a direct impact on my parents and my peers who want to attend college but might not be able to,” she explained.

Maria’s civic involvement began long before her DC trip. The Crispus Attucks High School salutatorian participated in last year’s nationwide “A Day Without Immigrants” rally.

“It was after this experience that I started asking more questions,” Maria said. “I asked, ‘How can I be more involved?,’ and ‘What can I do to help?’”

It was questions like these that landed her in contact with the Central Indiana Community Foundation, where she had the opportunity to be a Community Ambassador. In this role, Maria conducted in-depth research on a community of her choosing. As the daughter of two Guatemalan immigrants, Maria chose to research the Hispanic and Latino communities in Indianapolis.

“I wanted to know what my community was facing. Just because I’m Latina and have immigrant parents doesn’t mean I know everything,” she said.

Beyond rallies, Maria was also heavily involved in advocacy and raising awareness about various social issues at her high school. She founded the International Club at Crispus Attucks and was also a leader in her school’s NO MORE Club, designed to raise awareness about domestic violence. She’s interned with the Domestic Violence Youth Network and the Center for Victim and Human Rights (CVHR), and a teen dating violence policy she worked on will be implemented at Indianapolis Public Schools this fall.

These leadership efforts helped her earn the competitive Lilly Endowment Scholarship, which offers four-year, full-tuition scholarships to select Indiana students in all 92 counties. Candidates for the prestigious award must display “notable abilities, leadership skills, and civic potential through community service, exemplary school citizenship, and outstanding academic performance.” Maria is one of 20 Lilly Scholars in Butler’s incoming class this year.

Maria will continue her advocacy efforts at Butler, where she plans to double major in Peace and Conflict Studies and Political Science. She’s already lined up a gig on campus as an assistant in the Office of Health Education and Outreach Programs.

Butler’s Associate Director of Health Education and Outreach Programs Sarah Diaz believes Maria will be an excellent fit for their office.

 “She is coming in with this very solid foundation of knowledge around sexual violence, also some knowledge of the resources within our community because she done work with them, and she has had the experience of being a peer educator,” Diaz said. “She’s  the whole package of what our office does.”

Whole package, indeed.

Maria De Leon
Welcome WeekStudent LifePeople

Meet the Class of 2022: Maria De Leon

Incoming first-year student Maria De Leon is leading her family in a number of firsts.  

10 Restaurants in 10 Minutes

There are so many great restaurants in Indy! In fact, Conde Nast Traveler called it “the most underrated food city in the U.S.” Here are just a few choices within a short drive, bike ride, or even walk from campus.
 

BREAKFAST  Metro Diner

You can practically stumble out of bed and into campus’s Metro Diner. With traditional offerings like omelets and Belgian waffles, and some new favorites like avocado toast and chicken and waffles, the portion sizes are huge.

Pro Tip: You can order breakfast all day long so don’t worry about waking up early.
 

 

 

PREGAME MEAL  Scotty’s Dawghouse

The Butler themed décor and large TVs broadcasting sports makes Scotty’s the perfect place to head to before you continue down the path to Hinkle Fieldhouse or The Sellick Bowl. With lots of burgers, wraps, and appetizers to choose from, you’ll be able to cheer on the Dawgs with a full heart and belly.

Pro Tip: On game day, get there early! The place fills up quickly.
 

 

 

BURGER  Twenty Tap

A local favorite, Twenty Tap takes its name from its emphasis on micro and local brews. This family-friendly gastropub also has excellent burgers, tasty cheese curds, and some yummy vegetarian options.

Pro Tip: Grab a spot outside and enjoy some of the best people watching in Midtown.
 

 

 

BBQ  Fat Dan’s Deli

With an emphasis on food that pairs well with a cold drink, Fat Dan’s has some of the best brisket, smoked ribs, and wings around. If you are from the Chicago area and want a taste of home, the Chicago dogs and Italian beef sandwiches are as authentic as they get.

Pro Tip: They have tater tots. TATER TOTS!
 

 

 

PIZZA  Byrne’s Grilled Pizza

This is definitely an upgrade from your average pizza. Byrne’s has wood fired pizzas and stromboli that are a massive step up from the delivery you get at the residence halls. Perched within walking distance from campus, it is super conveniently located.

Pro Tip: Make it a big night out and grab ice cream, coffee, or cupcakes on the same block.
 

 

 

SANDWICH  Ripple Bagel and Deli

This place is an institution. Ask any Butler grad from the last decade where to get a sandwich and without hesitation, they’ll point you to this spot on the strip in Broad Ripple. They steam the sandwiches, which sounds a bit weird, but believe us, it’s tasty!

Pro Tip: The menu is massive, and everyone has a favorite. Ask a friend for their pick before you go.
 

 

 

MEXICAN  La Piedad

Super casual and super good, this beloved restaurant is named for the owner’s hometown in Mexico. When the weather is nice, you can sit out on the deck and enjoy your chips and salsa under twinkling lights.

Pro Tip: BRICS ice cream is just a block away. Grab a cone and walk the Monon Trail after dinner.

 

 

 

THAI  Chiang Mai Noodle

With large portions, a good atmosphere, and a menu with just about any Thai dish you can think of, Chiang Mai specializes in more than just their noodle dishes. There’s an outdoor patio that is great for a date or night out with friends.

Pro Tip: Want to enjoy it from your couch? You can also order delivery or carry out.

 

 

 

SUSHI  Sushi Bar

A simple name and an even simpler façade, you might be inclined to discount what’s inside this restaurant on the Broad Ripple strip. But if you like sushi, this is a can’t miss destination. Everything is reasonably priced and tasty.

Pro Tip: The patio is pet friendly, so all Dawgs—even the four-legged kind—­­­­­are welcome.

 

 

 

VEGETARIAN/VEGAN  SoBro Café

This farm-to-table restaurant is open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner seven days­ a week. With locally sourced meat, vegan, and vegetarian options on the menu, you’ll leave feeling full and happy.

Pro Tip: Get a Bhota Chai, a specialty blended tea custom-made by the owner.

 

 

 

For a look at our tour of food in Indianapolis, visit our campus map.

Metro Diner
Summer in IndyStudent Life

10 Restaurants in 10 Minutes

Conde Nast Traveler called Indy “the most underrated food city in the U.S.”

AcademicsStudent LifePeople

Butler Prepares to Say Goodbye to the Class of 2018

BY Peyton Thompson '20

PUBLISHED ON Apr 11 2018

One of the hardest challenges in life is saying goodbye, and as graduation day draws near at Butler, we prepare to send the seniors into adulthood.  

The seniors who will receive their diplomas on May 12 are more than just students. They're mentors and friends who will leave a lasting impact on this campus.

We asked some of the seniors about their Butler experience:

Tyler WidemanSenior basketball player and Human Movement & Health Science Education major Tyler Wideman: “I have a good relationship with my professors and faculty here at Butler. Mainly because everyone here is so easy to talk to and so friendly, it helps out a lot. It has been a great four years. I’d like to thank everyone who has helped me in some type of way to become a better person. I am also thankful for all the friends that I’ve made here and wouldn’t trade it for anything. Go Dawgs!”

Wideman said he hopes to be remembered as a good person, on and off the court.

After graduation: “I plan to play basketball after college, or to get into coaching or any aspect of athletics.”

                                                                        *

Basketball Manager and Human Movement & Health Science Education major Davis Furman: “I think our 2018 class has a strong impact on the campus for years to come. Since we came onto campus, we have endured a lot of changes in this Davis Furmanphysical landscape of campus and in the social aspects. Because of these changes, we have had to adapt a lot and I think we have mentored the younger classes so that they could adapt easier as well. I think the changes that have been made on campus and the students in our class will continue to have a strong impact on the university even after we graduate.          

“I think what I will miss most about Butler is all the different people I have come in contact with and get to see on a regular basis. I don’t think I really realize the amount of people I have bonded with here and that will become a much heavier realization once everyone has moved on to the next chapter of their lives.”     

After graduation: “After college I hope to get into collegiate basketball coaching. It’s always been a dream of mine.”

                                                                        *

Elementary Education major and Butler Dance Team member Emily Loughman: “Coming to Butler was the best choice I have ever made; it has been the best four years of my life! Everyone at Butler is so welcoming and loving, especially in the College Emily Loughmanof Education. Knowing every professor always has my back is a feeling I didn't always have in school growing up and that's what inspired me to become a teacher. I came to Butler for the Education program but I had no idea the impact that the Butler Dance Team, Delta Gamma, all my friends, and opportunities would have on my life forever. Butler has shaped me into the person I am today!”

Emily has also had the opportunity to dance with her younger sister, sophomore Caroline Loughman.

“Dancing with Caroline on BUDT has been a dream come true. While we are very different, we are also very similar. She is my best friend! Having the opportunity to dance with her again was so much fun.”

After graduation: "I plan on finding a teaching job either somewhere in Indy or around the Chicago suburbs where I grew up. I also would LOVE to have the opportunity to be a dance team coach since dance has been my passion since I was 3!”

                                                                        *

Science, Technology, and Society Major Riley Schmidt: “Butler has made me a better student over the last four years because of the challenging, supportive, and dynamic academic environment. The professors have taught me that it is OK to ask for Riley Schmidthelp, a grade does not define you, and how to study more effectively. The small class sizes have allowed me to participate frequently and develop a close relationship with my professors. Because of Butler I have met my lifelong friends and role models who helped me become a person that I am proud of and the best version of myself."

After graduation: "I plan on going to graduate school. It is an 18-month accelerated Master of Science in Nursing program. I hope to work for a couple years in the field and then go back to school to become a Nurse Practitioner.”

                                                                        *

Chaz GabrielSenior Education Major Chaz Gabriel: “Butler has helped me realize what my passions are and how to pursue them. Before Butler I knew I was interested in teaching, but through the COE I realized I’d never be truly happy pursuing another career.”

After graduation: Chaz hopes to work as an elementary school teacher in the Indianapolis area.

                                                        

                                                                        *

Senior Arts Administration major Emmy Cook: “Studying at Butler has definitely ignited my ambitions. The incredible instruction from my professors, the mentor relationships I’ve developed, the professional opportunities I’ve been lucky enough to have Emmy Cookand the leadership experience I’ve gained throughout my undergraduate career all have shaped me to be the person that I am now. Butler helped me to expand on my strengths, explore my goals, refine my personal qualities and skills and become more confident in my ability to succeed. I don’t know that I would feel as competent and ready to enter the workforce or being ‘adulting’ if I hadn’t gone to Butler.”

After graduation: “I’m interested in the more entrepreneurial route after graduation. I’ll be developing my own event planning business, specializing in weddings as well as corporate and social events.”

    

Tips from Seniors to Underclassmen

Davis Furman: “I would definitely advise the younger students at Butler to really savor their time here. As cliché as it sounds, I cannot believe how fast my four years have gone by here. Take in and cherish every moment.”

Emmy Cook: “My biggest tip for underclassmen would be to take full advantage of what Butler has to offer. If there’s a free event in the Reilly Room, go to it! Go see the ballets and plays. If there’s a seminar on financial management or leadership development, attend that seminar. Get outside of Butler, too. Don’t forget that Butler is such a piece of Indianapolis, and there’s a lot happening outside of Butler—be a part of something bigger than yourself and absolutely dive in. Get involved in service and philanthropic efforts, start interning early. Choose to take a few classes that maybe you don’t necessarily need to take, but simply because they sound interesting and you want to learn. In short, show up and do as much as you can do before you graduate, because you won’t have access to this high a volume of experiences and opportunities probably ever again”.

Riley Schmidt:

1. Study smarter, not harder.

2. It’s OK to switch your major. It’s better to figure out what you want to do now rather than later!

3. Get involved, try something new, and then put your time and effort into the organizations you’re most passionate about.

4. STUDY ABROAD! It is the experience of a lifetime packed full of adventure.

Strategic Communications major Sarah Thuet: “Make every moment count. Get involved with something and put your whole heart in it. If you spread yourself too thinly you’ll be exhausted always, but when you find that sweet spot then you get to do what you love and share it with everyone. Also, treat everyone with respect. This campus is full of administrators, professors, staff, and students who truly care about you. Use them to your advantage and someday hopefully you’ll be able to help them in return. Butler is absolutely what you make of it, so make the most of it. These people and this place just might change your life like it did mine.”

AcademicsStudent LifePeople

Butler Prepares to Say Goodbye to the Class of 2018

Graduating seniors share their memories, plans.

Apr 11 2018 Read more

Jimmy Lardin ’18

Student Profile

Major / Program: Political Science

 

Meet Jimmy Lardin. SGA president (2017–2018, after two years on Student Senate). Student Orientation Coordinator (promoted after two years as a Student Orientation Guide). Education Reflection Chair for Fall Alternative Break. Four minors (English, Ethics, Environmental Studies, and Peace and Conflict Studies). Campus tour guide.

And that’s just a partial list.

“Out of the three S’s—socialize, sleep, and study—I don’t sleep,” he said with a laugh.

Lardin expected to be active in college. Just not here. The Shelbyville, Indiana, native was “1,000 percent determined not to go to school in Indiana.”

But a friend who was a year ahead of him chose Butler and invited him to campus. Lardin sat in on a business class and, six minutes into the lecture, belched. Loudly. The professor made light of it and used that as a way to incorporate Lardin into the class and make him feel at ease. Afterward, the professor offered her email and phone number in case Lardin had questions about Butler.

Then at lunch in Atherton, Lardin’s friend’s friends told him how passionate they were about Butler. Others chimed in too.

“That’s what sold me,” he said. “People who had no idea who I was were still interested in sharing their love of the school with me.”

He’s seen that love up close in the years since. In summer 2016, Lardin was diagnosed with cancer. He went through surgeries, then chemotherapy.

“The feedback and support I got was outstanding—and far beyond what I could have ever imagined,” including from professors who reached out to express support and offer accommodations for missed classes. Lardin said the cancer is in remission.

“I’m thankful that happened on this campus versus a school where you’re considered more of a number,” he said. 

Lardin is now looking at public policy programs for graduate school, though he wants to work for a while first—ideally on environmental justice issues. In June, he went to India for a month through the School for International Training to work on a food security/climate change project and see if he wants to do international work. He does.

He said Butler has proved to be a great fit, giving him opportunities and satisfying his social nature.

“It’s small enough that I can’t walk from my house to my classes without running into two or three people who I know and love dearly,” he said, “but it’s large enough that I meet one or two new people every single day.”

 

 

 

 

Jimmy
CommencementStudent LifePeople

Jimmy Lardin ’18

Meet Jimmy Lardin. SGA president. Student Orientation coordinator. Education Reflection chair for Fall Alternative Break. Four minors. Campus tour guide.

Jimmy

Jimmy Lardin ’18

Student Profile

Sarah Sharpe

Student Profile

Intended Major
Health Sciences
Expected Grad Date
2018
Extracurricular Activities
Butler University Dance Team and Greek Life
Hometown
Munster, IN
High School
Munster High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
Hinkle Fieldhouse!


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

I would love to be a Physician Assistant potentially in the field of dermatology!

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

My favorite course has been genetics because it was interesting, in-depth information that has been applicable to the real world. My professor poured an immense amount of time, energy, and passion into the class, and I learned so much that will help me in my future profession.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

The Butler Community is unlike any other. I would use words such as passion, determination, excellence, and support to describe all the people that surround me. There is a true sense of camaraderie and joy that allows everyone to thrive and work towards their potential.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

Not only has the education in the classroom taught me skills for beyond graduation, but also my experiences outside of academics have been extremely influential. I have learned communication and leadership skills as well as decision-making skills that will better my life when I enter the real world.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

My favorite memory was when I performed at my first-ever basketball game as a part of the dance team. I was a first-year student, and I was nervous, anxious, and excited to be on the court. When I looked around at the tip-off, I saw thousands of avid fans cheering and screaming with Butler pride. Right then, I knew I chose the best school in the world. I distinctly remember the endless support and spirit that the crowd gave to their Butler Bulldogs, and I still get to see that passion as a senior. Butler basketball has really impacted my college career, and I am so grateful to be a part of this close community.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

I was looking for a small school with a good major that could lead to the healthcare field. After being here, however, I now know it is also important to look for the "personality" of the school, and I would say our school is friendly and ambitious, which is important to a college choice.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

I am most proud of the community aspect of our school because I feel a strong connection between the students, faculty, staff, our president, and everyone in between. We have a great support system and network to rely on in which all members want you to succeed and want what is best for you.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler Way is evident in my daily experiences here. Reflecting on the past four years, I can say that we have a group of passionate and humble students that show gratitude and commitment. Our professors show servanthood towards each student as they share their enthusiasm for their jobs, and together we unite to have a group of people that care for each other and our successes.

Student Life

Sarah Sharpe

Sarah feels a strong sense of connection to the entire Butler community.

Sarah Sharpe

Student Profile

Maria De Leon: A Lifelong Activist

By Sarah Bahr

Twelve-year-old Maria De Leon was on the phone with a doctor 40 years her senior.

She was translating a pain-pill prescription from English for her Spanish-speaking parents—but struggling with unfamiliar words like ‘hydrocodone’ and ‘acetaminophen.’

The language is rife with false cognates; each an opportunity for disaster.

‘Intoxicado’ doesn’t mean intoxicated, but ingested. ‘Embarazada’ means not embarrassed, but pregnant.

“That was something my parents didn’t understand,” she says. “Even though I do know English, I don’t know all the words.”

She would translate insurance claims, doctor’s appointments, sometimes even conversations with lawyers.

It was challenging, she says—her parents, who moved to the United States from Guatemala before she was born and have the equivalent of elementary-school educations, don’t speak enough English “to survive,” in her words.

Which meant that in high school, she was on her own to navigate the FAFSA, scholarships, SAT, and college application process.

But she didn’t end up a dropout.

She graduated salutatorian.

And won a full-tuition scholarship to any college in Indiana.

 

“Will Getting Arrested Keep me From Attending Butler?”

Except she almost didn’t.

Butler admission counselor Whitney Ramsay’s phone buzzed one morning last winter.

Will getting arrested keep me from attending Butler?

De Leon, then a senior in high school, was planning to participate in a sit-in protest in Washington, D.C. in January to lobby senators to approve a “clean” Dream Act, or one that creates a pathway to citizenship for immigrants without adding additional stipulations.

Would being arrested for civil disobedience, she wanted to know, affect her eligibility to attend Butler—and her Lilly scholarship?

Ramsay talked to her supervisor: De Leon’s admission decision wouldn’t automatically be rescinded, but any disciplinary infraction would be reviewed by a committee. (Butler later issued a statement reading: “Applicants to Butler University who respectfully engage in meaningful and authentic discourse regarding important issues within our society will not be penalized in the admission process”).

“I told her to be safe, be smart, and listen to her gut,” Ramsay says.

De Leon ultimately decided to stop short of being arrested—though some of her fellow protesters were.

“I felt like me going and protesting was enough at that moment,” she says.

De Leon’s passion for civic engagement started at Crispus Attucks High School on the northwest side of Indianapolis. She was a community ambassador for the Central Indiana Community Foundation, researching Indianapolis’ Hispanic and Latino communities to discover their biggest challenges. She interviewed student DACA recipients, as well as police officers who worked in the Hispanic community.

She also volunteered with the Domestic Violence Youth Network and became a leader of Crispus Attucks’ NO MORE Club, which raises awareness of teen dating violence and sexual assault.

But De Leon wanted to do more than just join a club. Why, she wondered, did Indianapolis Public Schools not have a teen dating violence prevention and response policy?

According to a 2017 Indiana Youth Institute Report, one in eight high school students said they had been “forced to do sexual things they did not want to do by someone they were dating or going out with.” That’s higher than the one in 10 national average.

De Leon worked with Lindsay Stawick, the Youth Program Manager at the Domestic Violence Network, and three other students to draft a policy. It took eight months.

When the policy was enacted at IPS schools this fall, it was the first teen dating violence prevention and response policy in Indianapolis, Stawick says. It holds school staff accountable for preventing abusive behavior and punishes students who participate in it. It also mandates training for teachers and places a teen dating abuse advocate in every IPS school. 

That policy was possibly De Leon’s most significant achievement at Crispus Attucks, but she didn’t wait until her senior year to get involved with organizations she was passionate about.

She began volunteering at TeenWorks, an Indianapolis college-and-career readiness and youth employment nonprofit serving at-risk Marion County teens, her freshman year of high school.

TeenWorks President and CEO Tammie Barney says De Leon can reach the students in a way the adult volunteers can’t.

“It’s rare to see that level of boldness and leadership in such a young person,” Barney says. “She seizes the day to get the most out of every opportunity.”

Her go-getter attitude is one the reasons De Leon says Butler has been a perfect fit.

“I’ve learned that Indy is a city where if an opportunity isn’t there, you can create it,” she says.

 

A DIY Education

Just because her parents didn’t speak English doesn’t mean they weren’t her fiercest academic cheerleaders, De Leon says.

They accompanied her to the many college preparation programs she’d enrolled in as a show of support—even though they couldn’t understand what her instructors were saying.

When De Leon graduated from Crispus Attucks last spring—the first in her family to graduate high school—her parents, two younger brothers, and younger sister were all there to see her walk across the stage.

She gave the second half of her salutatorian speech in Spanish to honor her parents. She was proud to be a role model for her siblings, and the ear-to-ear smiles on her mom’s and dad’s faces said it all.

Her mom’s mantra growing up—and one that De Leon included in her personal statement for Butler—was that her daughter’s U.S. citizenship wouldn’t matter if she didn’t pursue an education.

So De Leon networked like her life depended on it in high school, printing professional business cards and job-shadowing mentors. She knocked out a semester’s worth of college credits from dual-credit courses before ever arriving on the Butler campus.

But sweetest of all?

A full-tuition, four-year Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship, which 143 Indiana students from the state’s 92 counties receive each year. Scholars must be leaders, civically engaged, and academic all-stars—all boxes De Leon checked.

But she didn’t think she had a chance at the scholarship after she found out the valedictorian had also applied.

“We thought only one of us was going to get it,” De Leon says. “But then we both got it, which is crazy!”

 

Look Out, Joe Hogsett

When former first lady Michelle Obama spoke in Indianapolis last February, De Leon was in the audience. The quote that stuck with her?

“If there’s not a chair at the table, bring your own.”

That’s what De Leon is trying to do at Butler; The Political Science and Critical Communication & Media Studies double major recently established a Latino chapter of Butler’s Leading Women of Tomorrow initiative, a group focused on empowering women to seek public service careers. She applied to be vice president or secretary.

She was asked to serve as president.

And De Leon continues to volunteer with the organizations that triggered her passion for activism four years ago.

She’s a mentor with the Domestic Violence Youth Network, where she volunteers twice per month and during breaks, and she plans to continue to help with TeenWorks events this summer, from conducting mock interviews to providing resume advice.

De Leon’s goal is to work in politics after she graduates in 2022. She’d love to be the president of a youth-focused nonprofit organization like TeenWorks, but she’s also considering a run for mayor of Indianapolis.

Look out, Joe Hogsett.

Maria De Leon
UnleashedStudent Life

Maria De Leon: A Lifelong Activist

As a daughter, student, and mentor, first-year Maria De Leon works hard for herself and others. 

Arts & CultureStudent Life

Booting Up A New Club

BY Jackson Borman '20

PUBLISHED ON May 16 2018

For John George ’18, video games were always a casual interest. When he first came to Butler University, he loved playing games like Super Smash Bros. and Mario Kart with friends.

“It wasn’t until sophomore year when I really got into watching esports and watching competitive video gaming,” George said. “That’s when I really wanted to see what the feeling for it was on campus.”

In his junior year, George started thinking about starting a club, but he struggled to find other students who were interested in competitive gaming. He also wanted to find a professor to be a club advisor who was as passionate about esports as he is.

“I didn’t know anyone who watched competitive video gaming like I did,” George said.

Over the summer leading into his senior year, George met the founder of the esports club at Clemson University, who gave him tips and advice about how to get a similar club started at Butler.

At the start of the 2017–2018 academic year, George met College of Communication Professor Ryan Rogers, who was new to Butler but had previously done research about video games and was planning to create a class on esports.

That class eventually would turn into a team.

“Esports has always been interesting to me and something that I could really see taking off [on a college campus],” Rogers said.

George and Rogers got started planning early in the year and decided that they wanted individual teams in different games. George went to the Facebook pages of each Butler graduating class and posted information about the new club, looking to find students who might be interested in competing.

The first callout meeting was in the fall.

“It was a really fun meeting just introducing each other and it seemed like there was a ton of interest because most of the people there said that they had three or four friends that just couldn’t make it,” George said. “Actually finding a group of people that was into esports and the gaming culture like I am was awesome.”

*

After that first meeting, the group got together for a second time in November, where they decided which games they wanted to play, split into teams for each game, and selected team captains who were responsible for finding tournaments for the teams to play in, and scheduling practices.

The club started out playing League of Legends, Overwatch, Call of Duty, and Hearthstone. Eventually, after holding tryouts, it added Rocket League and FIFA.

The esports group also merged with a more casual group, the Butler Gaming Club.

“It can be kind of intimidating to jump right in to competitive video gaming,” George said. “I thought the casual side was a good way to attract people who love playing fun games and then once they find out about [the esports club] they can get into that.”

In the fall, the Big East reached out to the Athletic Department and Mike Freeman, Butler’s Senior Associate Athletic Director External Operations, about esports on Butler’s campus. That was the same week that George and Rogers met to discuss forming a team.

Freeman said the Big East approached each school to try to find out what was going on regarding esports. The conference found that some schools were active, while others had done little.

Freeman knew Rogers had a background in esports, so he reached out about getting involved with the Big East. The conference had partnered with ESL, an esports company that organized tournaments around the world, in hopes of starting competition between Big East schools.

Rogers helped to organize the group with the Big East while George held tryouts and streamed the club’s game play.

*

On May 7 and 8, Butler Rocket League and Butler League of Legends competed in Big East play for the first time. Three members of the Butler team competed in Rocket League and five competed in League of Legends.

The League of Legends team was swept in Big East play, but the Rocket League team placed fourth.

“We went 2-4 [in Rocket League] but we were a lot closer with a lot of the teams and were very close to winning more games,” George said.

For the team, the Big East Invitational was a great experience, and in George’s eyes, a great stage for the world of esports.

“I would love if the Big East keeps doing competition because I think that is very established and attracts casual viewers more because they know those teams,” George said. “We play those teams in basketball and other sports. For example, I was really hyped to see us play Xavier in Rocket League because that is a really classic rivalry.”

Since the Big East Invitational, Freeman and Rogers have been trying to get the word out about esports on Butler’s campus.

“There are huge benefits if we grow that club the right way,” Freeman said. “In the next few years, there could be people that come to Butler because they want to be a part of the esports club. It is a similar structure to people who are deciding if they want to be on a sports team.”

Freeman compares the esports club to the way the Butler Athletic Department was when it first started out.

“One hundred and twenty-five years ago, Butler kind of had an athletic department with a football team," Freeman said. "And then we formed a basketball team. But now we have 20 athletic teams and dance team and cheerleading and we compete in all these different leagues. Within the esports club, you have all these different teams because there are all different games that people could play.”

As a graduating senior and the founder of the group, George’s time with the club has been short, but he said it's been a fantastic experience. In addition to being fun and an opportunity to meet new people, it allowed him to gain valuable leadership experience.

“The club is awesome, not only for people who want to compete but for people who are interested in business or communications,” George said. “I was able to run the stream and be a commentator and analyze what was going on and work on the media side of it.”

The club also has a treasurer and a social media chair, which George said are great opportunities for students to hold leadership positions in a group they are passionate about.

Freeman thinks that the club can have huge benefits to students after graduation as well.

“The end goal [of a Butler education] is to get you ready to go out into the world and do great things,” he said. “The people that are on these teams have some really high-level majors, and if [cities like] Indy are growing as a tech community, then we have that subgroup of people who are in the tech world and are also doing great things with their majors. It’s an area where there are businesses that are very interested in what’s going on.”

To stay up to date with Butler’s esports club, check out their Twitter account and Facebook page. The club hold tryouts for all games each semester. Current and incoming Butler students are invited to reach out to be invited to its Discord channel.

 

Arts & CultureStudent Life

Booting Up A New Club

Students take the controls on Butler esports team.

May 16 2018 Read more
AcademicsStudent Life

Archaeology Mobile Lab Brings History to Life

BY Jackson Borman '20

PUBLISHED ON Mar 27 2018

When you walk into Dr. Lynne Kvapil’s office in Jordan Hall, you'll likely see a binder full of ancient Greek and Roman coins, a ceramic bowl or two, and stacks and stacks of other artifacts and replicas. And she will gladly show you any of them.

Kvapil is an Assistant Professor of Classics at Butler, as well as a practicing archaeologist. These items are all a part of the Ancient Mediterranean Cultures and Archaeology Mobile Lab, of which Kvapil is a director, along with Associate Professor of Classics, Chris Bungard.

“We have a bunch of stuff, and the goal is for students to get their hands on things,” Kvapil said. “Short term, we want to get these materials in more classes at Butler. I think the long term is to get them into the Indianapolis area, to really create a network of people in the Indianapolis area who want to see these resources coming in and out.”

The lab’s extensive collection is made up of materials that are relevant to the ancient world, specifically Greece and Rome, but there are some items that branch out around the Mediterranean as well, such as reproductions of Egyptian papyrus.

The lab operates as a collection, through which items can be loaned out to classrooms at Butler or kindergarten-through-high school classrooms in the Indianapolis area. Kvapil said that the primary purpose of the lab is to provide a way of learning that is different from a traditional classroom, but also to provide materials for possible research opportunities.

The lab started in fall 2015, financed by a Butler Innovation Fund grant, but they had only a year to spend the money. Most of the first year was shopping around to see what materials were out there for purchase.

Since the shopping has been completed, Kvapil said that the majority of the work to be done with the lab is regarding what to do about their loan policy.

“We are still trying to figure out things like what do we do if we loan out a cup and someone trashes it, how do we replace that and what is our legal policy there,” Kvapil said. “These are some nitty-gritty things that take some time to hash out.”

Because the lab has accumulated so many artifacts and other materials, there is always more work to be done. Kvapil employs two student-interns every year to help with the organization and curation of the lab.

“The interns really make this place run,” Kvapil said. “We want to always spotlight Butler students and what they are doing. I think it is really important to make sure that the people that work with us get some publicity.”

Wendy Vencel '20 has been an intern with the lab for the last two years. She is also the president of the Classics Club. Besides working to help keep the lab running smoothly, Vencel has been trying to use the lab to help plan events with the Classics Club as well.

“We are really trying to work with it to engage with the lab because it really is the perfect opportunity, at least in the Butler community,” Vencel said.

This year, the interns started a WordPress blog that contains an electronic flipbook of all of the materials that the lab has in stock, as well as an Instagram page with photos of items. Audrey Crippin, a P3 Pharmacy major, made the flipbook. They set up a pop-up museum in the on-campus Starbucks during Dawg Days, where Butler-bound students could experience a mock archaeological dig, in an attempt to showcase some of what the Classics Department has to offer.

Vencel said that experiences like the mock dig are important to her because similar experiences made her first years at Butler memorable.

“What got me into classics was when Dr. Kvapil came and talked to an Anthropology class that I was in, and I was like, ‘Oh my gosh there is an archaeologist here,’” Vencel said. “It was super cool and I didn’t know Butler had that to offer. During my sophomore year, I took Kvapil’s Greek art and myth class and I’ve been here ever since.”

Kvapil said that the best way for students to get involved with the lab is by applying to be an intern for next year, or by joining the Classics Club. Another option is simply by taking classes that can make use of the lab.

“People are really shy about being interested in that kind of thing," Kvapil said, "but we also promote them to take classes, not just in the Classics Department, but there are a lot of classes in the History and Anthropology Department, as well as Philosophy and Religion, that are involved with this kind of idea that the past can be alive through things.”

 

 

 

AcademicsStudent Life

Archaeology Mobile Lab Brings History to Life

Faculty and students work together to curate a collection of artifacts and replicas.

Mar 27 2018 Read more
Dance Rehearsal
Arts & CultureStudent LifeCampus

New Dance Work To Debut with More than 100 Student Dancers

BY Marc Allan

PUBLISHED ON Sep 05 2018

Dance Professor Cynthia Pratt wants to give Butler's Class of 2022 a welcome to remember. So she and four student choreographers from the Dance Department have put together a large-scale dance project that will feature the entire department performing on the grassy areas outside Irwin Library and Jordan Hall on Thursday, September 20, from 6:30-7:00 PM.

The dance will celebrate the start of the new academic year and will revolve around the themes and values of the Butler Way. The soundtrack for the dance is expected to incorporate snippets of interviews with students, faculty, and staff talking about their Butler experiences.

"I thought it would be a great opportunity for the department to welcome everyone back to campus," said Pratt, who is starting her 24th year at Butler. "The Dance Department here is significant, but many of the students don't know who we are or what we do. Even though this type of dance isn't what we're known for—we're known for ballet—I thought it would be a wonderful welcome for the whole student body, especially since we have the largest freshman class ever."

Pratt said the idea for an all-department project goes back four years, when she choreographed a dance as part of StreamLines, an outdoor art project that meshed arts and science. She said that project was tough—"they're outside, they're uncomfortable, they're hot, they're rolling around in grass, and there's stuff in that grass"—but it helped create a bond that lasted throughout their college careers.

More than 100 students will participate in the dance.

"We found in the department that when we did those large group dances, the morale in the department skyrocketed," she said. "We found that this was a really positive experience—not just for the students, but for the onlookers as well. These were really successful performances."

 

Media Contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Dance Rehearsal
Arts & CultureStudent LifeCampus

New Dance Work To Debut with More than 100 Student Dancers

The outdoor performance on September 20 will celebrate the start of the new academic year.

Sep 05 2018 Read more

To Be Greek Or Not To Be Greek

by Kyle Giebel ’20 and Rebecca VanVliet ’19

On Being Greek

By Kyle Giebel ’20

Greek Students Participating in Butler's Dance MarathonFor over one-third of Butler University students, building lasting relationships, developing skills as leaders, and organizing all-campus fundraisers through Greek Life is college at its best. With the potential to explore new experiences and activities, our chapters (five fraternities and nine sororities) plan formals and social events, perform service projects, and stay connected with alumni mentors while maintaining at least an average of 3.4 GPA. Additionally, in any given year, members of Butler’s Greek organizations contribute more than 20,000 hours in service to over 200 Indianapolis area nonprofits.

In my first year at Butler, I was dead set on being independent. I had seen movies like Revenge of the Nerds and Animal House, and with those in mind I was certain that Greek life was not for me. Going through first semester I also struggled with my identity. In high school, I was on the swim team. Without sounding cliché, that team was truly a family, and when I came to Butler, that family was stretched too thin to be reliable anymore. I was put in a position to become whoever I wanted to be and with whomever I wanted. That freedom of choice was too much for me to handle in that moment. I resorted to the few things I knew, swimming and working out. That is where I started to develop a relationship with Adam Bantz, who was a junior at the time. This man, as I grew to know him, was everything I wanted in a friend and in a role model. I eventually learned that he was a very active member of the Greek community. This then exposed me the true nature of Butler’s Greek life. The more people I met, in fraternities and sororities, the more I realized that the Greek population on campus was a true community of families and neighbors. After meeting the right people, I was hooked.

As a Junior, I am currently the president of one of the chapters on campus. My time as a member has been such a unique and rewarding experience. It is true that most of my stresses and time commitments stem from being a part of the Greek community, but my friends and support system were developed by the same community. Under further reflection, I would rather struggle with true friends than coast with a few acquaintances.

In the end, any group or organization will give you what you put into it. I see the Greek Community as my family. Yes, I am willing to sacrifice my time, energy, and effort daily to support my family members, make a positive impact, and build those relationships that I want and sometimes need. Greek life is not for everyone, but for me it was the perfect start for my future.

 

To learn more about Greek life on campus, visit our website.


On Being Independent

Rebecca VanVliet ’19

Students Studying on the MallI might be a senior now, but I still can remember posting on the Class of 2019 Facebook page for the first time: I’m Rebecca, I’m from Ohio, and I don’t plan on rushing.

Even then, before we were technically students, we all identified by our decision on whether or not to go Greek. Now, as an Independent student by choice, I know that I am much more than my decision not to rush.

Students who don’t join Greek life are often called “unaffiliated” – but in my experience, Independent students affiliate themselves with tons of organizations on Butler’s campus. With over 130 student organizations to choose from, religion to politics, professional to social, student government to special interests and beyond, we have so, so many opportunities to get involved on campus.

Just over the past three years, I’ve tried out many of the groups that Butler has to offer, including founding a new club, restarting another, and currently serving as president in a third. I don’t feel like my decision not to rush limited my involvement in these organizations – if anything, it allowed me to dedicate myself fully to other groups that were important to me. These groups have given me leadership opportunities, social activities, and the chance to meet some of my best friends – who are both Greek and Independent.

Greek houses host regular events on campus, and most students who join Greek life are proud of their houses and their involvement, and this can sometimes lead to so much Greek presence that it can feel overwhelming to Independent students.

As a student that has been overwhelmed by this, I think it’s important to remember that the majority of Butler’s students aren’t considered Greek; whether they are commuters, athletes, dropped out of or didn’t receive a bid from a Greek house, or students like me that simply chose not to go Greek. Only about 35% of Butler’s campus chooses to join a Greek organization, which means that most Butler students are a part of the Independent community.

This community is growing, with more Independent students coming together for campus events that were typically Greek-dominated, like BUDM and Spring Sports. The past year also brought the Independent Student Council back to campus, a group of Independent students that hope to bridge the gap between the Greek and Independent communities and offer ways for Independent students to get involved. Butler has also encouraged panels and conversations about the decision to go Greek, as well as offering programming during the winter Rush Week.

Independent students are welcome at all events, and belong on Butler’s campus. Though they might not find their homes in the Greek houses along Hampton Drive, Independent students can find their home in other organizations, their residence halls, within their friend groups, or wherever else they want to belong.

 

To learn more about campus life, visit our website.

To Be Greek Or Not To Be Greek

by Kyle Giebel ’20 and Rebecca VanVliet ’19
Student LifeCommunity

Message from Butler University Office of Admission

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 26 2018

Butler University is deeply saddened by the shootings that took place at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida. The students, teachers, staff, and the entire community of Parkland have been in our thoughts and prayers during this exceptionally difficult time.

Future Butler students should know that community involvement is one of our University’s core values. And we applaud individuals who choose to serve, and advocate, as responsible members of society. As articulated in The Butler Way, we appreciate and identify with individuals who understand humility, passion, unity, servanthood, and thankfulness.

Applicants to Butler University who respectfully engage in meaningful and authentic discourse regarding important issues within our society will not be penalized in the admission process.

Meet the Class of 2022: Kate Callihan

Kate Callihan
Major: Sports Media
Hometown: Austin, Texas
High School: Westlake High School

 

"I am most excited about the growing Sports Media program. It offers so many opportunities here and around Indy, and the professors show so much interest in the students already and classes haven't even started yet. Working with people who are likeminded and driven is going to be just incredible."
 


 

Like many high schoolers, Kate Callihan and her classmates studied the Vietnam war during their junior year.They read The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien, heard from veterans who visited their class, and, as a final assignment, researched an American soldier who died in, or as a result of, the war.

Unlike many high schoolers, though, Kate took this assignment to the next level–and discovered a passion for storytelling in the process.

The name Kate was assigned was Michael Meyhoff. Rather than do some cursory research, she tracked down his family in North Dakota and made a 20-minute documentary using home movies, photos, and recollections of family and friends.

"I absolutely loved every second of it," she said.

Kate said she'd always loved writing, but it wasn’t until this project that she realized how much she loved storytelling. She narrated the video, "and at the beginning you can hear how timid I was and by the end of it I really found my voice and confidence."

"I realized that by telling this story I was not only impacting my grade and my own agenda, but there was a whole community that benefited from it and it was an absolutely incredible experience," she said.

Kate's English teacher, Dr. James Moore, wrote this about her effort: "The work you put in with calls, interviews, and emails eclipsed that of your classmates tenfold at least. I can tell that you really delved into the material, too, mining it for any little detail that would help fill out your story. "

Kate will continue honing her storytelling craft as a Sports Media major at Butler this fall. She will be one of 1,357 first-year students in Butler’s Class of 2022, the University’s largest class ever.

Butler’s Sports Media program drew her to Indianapolis–and it’s drawn others, too. Since 2017, the number of first-year students enrolling in Sports Media has more than doubled. The program, an integration of Sports Journalism and Digital Sports Production, is the only degreed program of its kind in Indiana, and one of only a handful of degreed programs in the Midwest.

In addition to studying Sports Media at Butler, Kate plans to double minor in Marketing and Theology, with a focus on Monotheism and Biblical Studies. She hopes one day to combine her interests in sports media and theology to bring teams to third-world countries to teach the children there how to play sports.

But that's the future. For now, she said, "I feel blessed to be part of the young Sports Media program and blessed to be part of Butler."

Kate Callihan
Welcome WeekStudent LifePeople

Meet the Class of 2022: Kate Callihan

Butler's Sports Media program drew Kate to Indiana from Texas.

Homecoming at Butler

By Brittany Bluthardt '20

The energy of Butler University’s campus during homecoming week is unlike any other. As the leaves finally begin to turn and crisp breezes begin to blow, a certain electricity slips into the air. Decked out in blue and white, students will celebrate their pride at events throughout the week, and alumni and families will dawn their Bulldog gear on Saturday to cheer on their favorite team in the Sellick Bowl. Homecoming celebrations and events are some of the most exciting, most memorable moments of the year. From extravagant lawn decorations to the parade down Hampton Drive, members of the Butler community share their school pride with the entire campus.

“On homecoming, everyone feels that energy at Butler,” Jennie Jones, Director of Volunteer Engagement for Alumni and Family Programs said. “I think there really is something for everyone at homecoming.”

With this year’s celebration, close to 1,000 alumni will travel from near and far to celebrate their Butler experience. Nostalgia intersects with pride as graduates, young and old, reminisce about their time at Butler with their former professors and friends. Conversations about the way things were naturally evolve into discussions about the way things are and what will be.

According to Jones, for many graduates, their four years at Butler were some of the most special times in their life. “It’s important for our alumni to see how campus is evolving and growing, so they’re proud of their Butler experience and can pay that forward to other students,” she said. Whether through monetary gifts, volunteering their time, or simply by visiting campus, alumni share their experience and make connections with current students. From the Bulldog Boulevard tailgate to classroom visits in the Jordan College of the Arts, students have the chance to meet with alumni in and out of the classroom throughout the week of homecoming.

For Chris Sanders ‘19, a current student and SGA’s VP of Programming, this time of year is extremely special for all parts of the Butler community. His passion for homecoming and Butler traditions is evident in his determination to connect all students, past and present.

“The pride that I feel when I am experiencing homecoming week is something that I appreciate so much,” he said. “Sometimes we forget how lucky we are to be going to such a great university, but it's weeks like this that put everything back into perspective. I hope that every student, alumni, faculty, and staff also feels the same amount of pride.”

As students prepare for an exciting weekend, they’re reminded of what it means to be a Bulldog. Some of Butler’s most recent graduates pay it forward on the Young Alumni Board. They dedicate their time to enhance every alumni’s experience post-graduation. For board member, Caleb Schmicker ‘15, homecoming is a time for him to relive many of his favorite Butler memories. He stays connected with his Alma Mater to further develop every current student’s experience. Alumni often volunteer in the community and on-campus to educate students about professional life off campus. Caleb said this is what makes Butler University so special.

“Support comes from alumni who are willing to give back because they want future students to have the same or better experience that they had,” he said. “When you feel as if you are a part of the Butler community, you have more of a vested interest in the welfare of the school.”

 

Homecoming Highlights


 

Snack Attack and Lawn Decorations

Before the start of homecoming week, Butler Greek organizations are teamed up with a residence hall to compete in a series of competitions, games, and events that showcase their school spirit. Homecoming board aims to make this year’s homecoming as inclusive as possible - ensuring all first-years feel connected and a part of something larger than themselves.

Late into Thursday night of the week, the entire campus comes to life as teams decorate their Greek house lawns according to the year’s theme. Every hour on the hour, SGA delivers a new snack food for the teams to replenish and re-energize before decorating into early Friday morning.

 

Yell Like Hell

After weeks of practice, the homecoming teams strut their stuff in front of hundreds of students at Yell Like Hell, an annual tradition celebrated by Butler students in Hinkle Fieldhouse. The team with the best Bulldog spirit and representation of the year’s theme takes home a thrilling victory. Some alumni still reminisce on their greatest wins, funniest losses, and unforgettable moments when they return to campus for the homecoming game.

Students also participate in the King and Queen competition leading up to the performance. Nominated by their peers, these students campaign throughout the week - sharing their Butler experiences and passion for the Dawgs with the entire campus.

 

Bulldog Beauty Contest

Bright and early on the day of homecoming, members of the community and their furry friends stop by Butler’s campus for the annual Bulldog Beauty Contest. Located in the heart of homecoming festivities, the contest kicks off the day with excitement and a contagious energy.  The bulldogs dress up in their finest outfits and costumes to impress the crowd and win one of the nine categories, from Best Dressed to Best Mean Mug. Every year, the competition grows in creativity as bulldog pups from near and far compete for the title of the Most Beautiful Bulldog - may the best dog win!

 

Bulldog Boulevard Tailgate

After a quick parade around campus, students head to Hinkle Fieldhouse to celebrate before the football game. Many Greek organizations, colleges, and clubs have a booth set up with food and games for current students and alumni to celebrate before kickoff. Starting in 2010, Bulldog Boulevard transformed the traditional tailgate experience into a Butler reunion and celebration for all.

 

FULL HOMECOMING 2018 SCHEDULE

Cheerleaders at Homecoming
HomecomingStudent Life

Homecoming at Butler

This exciting intersection of past and present has a little something for everyone.

Cheerleaders at Homecoming

Homecoming at Butler

By Brittany Bluthardt '20
AcademicsStudent Life

Butler's Undergraduate Research Conference Turns 30

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 03 2018

After footing the bill to send two students to present papers at an undergraduate research conference in the south, Butler Biology Professor Jim Berry decided that the university needed to host its own event.

He founded the Butler Undergraduate Research Conference (URC) in 1989 "to encourage undergraduate students to become involved in research," he wrote in the program. "We believe that the best way to teach science is by actually doing science. Only through the actual process of asking questions and solving problems can one become experienced in the methods of science."

Today, Berry's creation is stronger than ever: On April 13, from 8:00 AM to 4:15 PM, Butler will welcome 896 participants from 23 states to present their work at the 30th annual URC.

Berry, now Professor Emeritus, will be recognized at the luncheon, and Major Matthew Riley '01 will deliver the keynote address. Riley is Department Chief at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, the Department of Defense’s lead laboratory for medical biological defense research. 

In its first year, the URC that Berry created included 171 participants in five disciplines—Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Engineering, and Social Science—all of whom were from Indiana. The next year, Music Professor Jim Briscoe ushered in Music and Arts.

This year's conference will feature presentations in 25 disciplines. Topics this year will be as varied as "Manufacturing: An Uncertain Future," "Beyond Godzilla: Reflections of National Identity in Japanese Horror Films," and "Can You Outsmart the ImPACT Test? A Study of Sandbagging on Baseline Concussion Assessments."

"Because of Jim Berry's hard work—and the hard work of other folks—we're now one of the largest undergraduate research conferences in the nation," said Dacia Charlesworth, Butler's Director of Undergraduate Research and Prestigious Scholarships.

Under Charlesworth's guidance, the URC has added research roundtables that allow students just embarking on their research projects to share their plans with experienced professionals and receive feedback and a competitive-paper division. This year, 28 students submitted competitive papers.

The Butler Collegian interviewed Berry about the URC in 1995. He described the conference then as "a district version of the big national conferences you always hear about. We’ve just brought it closer to home so that more students can take part.”

Charlesworth said that with 79 colleges and universities participating, the conference has expanded beyond what anyone expected.

"I'm happy we're continuing Jim’s mission," she said. "At the heart of it, we're still fulfilling his original intention: Helping students understand research by conducting research."

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan MFA '18
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

AcademicsStudent Life

Butler's Undergraduate Research Conference Turns 30

The URC has grown from 171 participants in 1989 to nearly 900 this year.

Apr 03 2018 Read more
AcademicsStudent LifePeople

Butler Honors Top 100 Students

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 23 2018

The Alumni Association has announced Butler University's Top 100 Outstanding Students, honoring the top juniors and seniors for the 2017–2018 academic year.

The list is below. Top 15 students have an asterisk next to their name.

The students honored each year continue the tradition of dedication and service to Butler. They reflect outstanding character, scholarship, engaged citizenship, leadership, and commitment to fostering diversity.To be considered a Top 100 student at Butler University, students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher and may not be on conduct probation during the application process or the announcement for Top 100 and Top 15.

The Top 100 students are determined by the Top 100 Selection Committee composed of representatives of each of the six colleges, student affairs, academic affairs, and alumni. Each candidate is judged against the core values of the program on a numeric scale. At the end of the judging period, all scores are tabulated, and the Top 100 students are selected.

Visit the Top 100 website to view guidelines for the program. 

The Alumni Association in conjunction with the Office of Student Affairs conducts the Outstanding Student Recognition program. The program is in its 57th year.

The full list of honorees, majors, and hometowns:

Lynn Alsatie, International Studies and French, Carmel, Indiana

Siena Amodeo, International Business and Marketing, Powell, Ohio

Deborah Arehart, Middle/Secondary Education and French, Dayton, Ohio

Thomas Baldwin, Biochemistry, Carmel, Indiana

*Adam Bantz, Strategic Communication, Marketing, Muncie, Indiana

Alex Bartlow, Accounting and Spanish, Bloomfield, Indiana

Leah Basford, International Business, Chinese minor, Centerville, Indiana

Brianna Borri, Psychology, Ada, Michigan

Lauren Briskey, Actuarial Science, Statistics, Avon, Indiana

Amy Brown, Accounting, Saint Charles, Missouri

Rachel Burke, Mathematics, Software Engineering, Mount Vernon, Indiana

Jeremy Caylor, Biology, Chemistry, Tipton, Indiana

*Parker Chalmers, Finance/Risk Management & Insurance, Wyoming, Ohio

Lauren Ciulla, Biology, Carmel, Indiana

Brooklyn Cohen, Elementary Education, Glenview, Illinois

Hannah Coleman, Pharmacy, Danville, Indiana

Dana Connor, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Tallahassee, Florida

Vickie Cook, Chemistry, Woodburn, Indiana

Meredith Coughlin, Human Communication and Organizational Leadership, Tipp City, Ohio

*Ryan Cultice, Accounting and Finance, Warsaw, Indiana

Ashley Dale, Physics, Electrical Engineering, New Palestine, Indiana

Erin Dark, Pharmacy, West Lafayette, Indiana

Darby DeFord, Biology and Chemistry, Spencer, Indiana

Matt Del Busto, English creative writing and Spanish, Carmel, Indiana

David Dunham, Human Movement and Health Sciences Education, Zionsville, Indiana

Suzanne Dwyer, Pharmacy, Tinley Park, Illinois

Shelby Jo Eaton, Psychology and Sociology, Indianapolis

Ashlyn Edwards, Philosophy, Critical Communication, and French, New Albany, Indiana

*Katie Edwards, Marketing and Finance, Libertyville, Illinois

Sarah Elam, International Studies and Spanish, Indianapolis

John Evans, Accounting and Finance, Indianapolis

Hannah Faccio, Psychology, Belmont, Michigan

Megan Farny, Pre-PA, Evansville, Indiana

Megan Fitzgerald, Elementary Education and Religion, Dublin, Ohio

Annie Foster, Spanish and Chemistry minor, Westfield, Indiana

Jacklyn Gries, Pharmacy, Evansville, Indiana

Hannah Hartzell, Strategic Communication and Spanish, Powell, Ohio

Patrick Holden, PharmD/MBA, Brownsburg, Indiana

Jonny Hollar, Finance and Marketing, Warsaw, Indiana

Kate Holtz, Risk Management and Insurance, Finance, Godfrey, Illinois

*Nick Huang, Finance and Marketing, Geneva, Illinois

Karla Jeggle, Actuarial Science, Upper Arlington, Ohio

Nathan Jent, Health Sciences/Pre-PA, Crawfordsville, Indiana

Drew Johnson, Pharmacy, Noblesville, Indiana

Jakob Jozwiakowski, Chemistry, Boston, Massachusetts

Colton Junod, Biology and Biochemistry, Vincennes, Indiana

Libby Kaufman, Elementary Education, Chanhassen, Minnesota

*Nida Khan, Pharmacy/Pre-Med, Noblesville, Indiana

Rachel Koehler, International Studies and French, Franklin, Tennessee

*Caroline Kuremsky, Elementary Education with a Mild Intervention Minor, Cincinnati, Ohio

Carly Large, Accounting, Bloomington, Illinois

*Emily Lawson, Chemistry and Mathematics (Pre-Med), Fort Wayne, Indiana

Becca Lewis, Biology and Chemistry, Danville, Illinois

Rachael Lewis, Marketing, Spanish, and International Business, Danville, Illinois

Kayla Long, Critical Communications and Media Studies, Digital Media Production, Spanish, Evanston, Illinois

Kelsey McDougall, Biology, Canton, Michigan

Kirsten McGrew, Pharmacy, Louisville, Kentucky

Kasey Meeks, Health Sciences and Chemistry, Robinson, Illinois

Rachel Metz, Health Science, Ferdinand, Indiana

Joshua Murdock, Pharmacy, Grand Junction, Colorado

*Kelly Murphy, Human Communication and Organizational Leadership, Dublin, Ohio

Emily Nettesheim, Health Sciences and Spanish, Lafayette, Indiana

Alexis Neyman, Biochemistry, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Olivia Nilsen, Communication of Sciences and Disorders, Neuroscience minor, Ballwin, Missouri

Gehrig Parker, Sports Media, Park Ridge, Illinois

Justin Poythress, Accounting and Finance, Geneva, Illinois

*Tori Puhl, Actuarial Science, Mequon, Wisconsin

*Salman Qureshi, Biology, Fishers, Indiana

*Courtney Raab, Health Sciences, Highland, Indiana

Jordan Rauh, Pharmacy, Wabash, Indiana

Allison Reitz, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Newburgh, Indiana

Kate Richards, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Effingham, Illinois

Sophie Robertson, Dance Arts Administration and Journalism, Gig Harbor, Washington

*Abdul Saltagi, Biology, Fishers, Indiana

Kaitlyn Sawin, Marketing, Appleton, Wisconsin

Olivia Schwan, Marketing and Spanish, Kalamazoo, Michigan

*Abby Sikorcin, Health Sciences, Lisle, Illinois

Sundeep Singh, Biology and Political Science, Fishers, Indiana

Maree Smith, Spanish and Marketing, Monticello, Minnesota

Lilli Southern, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Solsberry, Indiana

Madison Stefanski, Elementary Education and seeking licensure in Special Education with minors in Reading, Frankfort, Michigan

Isaiah Strong, Strategic Communication/Recording Industry Studies, Brooklyn Park, Minnesota

Natalie Van Ochten, Biology and Biochemistry, Shorewood, Minnesota

Alexander Waddell, Accounting, Greenwood, Indiana

Skyler Walker, Pharmacy, Racine, Wisconsin

Kathryn Warma, Science, Technology, and Sociology, Carlinville, Illinois

Riley Wildemann, Pharmacy, Plainfield, Indiana

Alexander Wright, Chemistry, Fishers, Indiana

Heather Wright, Music, Greentown, Indiana

Jill Yager, Biology, Rushville, Indiana

Due to a tie in scoring, more than 100 students are being honored for the 2017–2018 academic year. All honorees were recognized at the Outstanding Student Banquet on April 13, where the Top 15 Most Outstanding Students were announced.

This list includes all students who opted to post their names.

 

In the photo:

Front row: Emily Lawson, Nida Khan, Nicholas Huang, Caitlyn Foye, Katie Edwards, Adam Bantz, Kelly Murphy

Back row: Abby Sikocin, Abdul Saltagi, Courtney Raab, President Danko, Salman Qureshi, Tori Puhl, Ryan Cultice

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

 

AcademicsStudent LifePeople

Butler Honors Top 100 Students

This is the 57th year to recognize the Top 100 students' dedication and service to Butler.

Apr 23 2018 Read more

Katie Pfaff: A Small-Town Success Story

By Sarah Bahr

They were beautiful, those tiaraed Indy 500 Festival princesses in black-and-white sashes, visiting a Lewisville elementary school in a small, rural Indiana farm community more than a decade ago. They inspired a mesmerized Katie Pfaff to dream of one day donning a crown herself.

Though the 21-year-old Butler University senior’s big dreams would take her 60 miles west of the farm where she grew up—more on that in a minute—she’s always had a soft spot for driving down a backroad with no destination in sight, or digging into a slice of the apple-crumb pie her grandma would make her each April 25 because she didn’t like birthday cake.

Small-town life was comforting. There were euchre games with dozens of cousins around the fire on Friday nights, tractor rides through the rustling corn under the fading pinks and purples of an August Indiana sunset. The breeze tickled her hair as she clutched her brother’s back, looking up at the stars in wide, open spaces with no skyscrapers to fill them.

Her graduating class had 60 people in it, in a town of 366.

When both grandparents died on the same day before Christmas one year, her family didn’t cook for a week—her neighbors kept ringing the doorbell with plates of chicken and spaghetti. Their driveway was cleared of snow by an unseen phantom, as though someone had poured hot lava on the white mass and left a sparkling drive.

But Pfaff wasn’t content to accept the charity of others—she was ready to repay it.

 

A Gathering Place

Pfaff, her parents, and her older twin brothers Tyler and Tom started their own business her sophomore year of high school; a Lewisville wedding and event venue known as The Gathering. They converted an old church into a place to celebrate marriages, birthdays, and Christmas—anything that would bring people together.

But when Pfaff went off to college at Butler, some in her hometown thought she’d never come back. She’d become a city girl, forsaking her farm roots. Her role in the family business would be toast.

At first, it looked like they were right.

The minute Pfaff stepped on the Butler campus, the senior Strategic Communication and Human Communication & Organizational Leadership double major was smitten with the big-city school’s small-town feel.

“I don’t know everyone on campus, but it takes no more than a five-second conversation while getting coffee for someone to not feel like a stranger anymore,” she says. 

But all the opportunities could be overwhelming for someone who’d always wanted to do everything.

Her Ethics professor noticed her stress and offered to buy her coffee at the campus Starbucks last spring. But when she walked into class, setting her cup on the table, someone bumped into it, and her drink hit the deck.

“I was paralyzed,” she says. “But Professor Norris waited until everyone had left, bought me another cup of coffee, and sat down for an hour to talk about what I was feeling. He just wanted to know how he could make my day better.”

It was that conversation with Norris, she says, that inspired her to take on a leadership role with Butler’s BUBeWell initiative last spring, a program designed to keep stressed-out students sane while cultivating their mental, physical, and social wellbeing.

Going to Butler was a big adjustment for a small-town girl. She’d come across more people in a single day of walking across campus than she’d meet in an entire year in Lewisville. She missed her mom’s bacon-wrapped water chestnuts; Friday nights around the fire with her parents and brothers, biting into slices of ooey, gooey cheese pizza.

Then she realized: She needed structure.

She set a “golden rule” for herself: She’d be in bed by midnight every evening, no matter whether it was Tuesday or Saturday.

She joined a sorority and found friends like her roommate of two years, 21-year-old Butler pharmacy student Chloe Sandman, who also grew up in a small town and shares Pfaff’s love of ice cream and Hallmark movies.

Now that she was secure in herself, it was time to begin giving back. To the parents who invested in her. To the school that sculpted her.

To the town that raised her.

 

A Royal Coronation

But first, let’s talk about the 178-page paper she just finished writing. Not by herself, of course. The assignment was an eight-person group project for her senior communication capstone class. But 25 pages of that behemoth were hers.

It was that commitment to academics that propelled her to princesshood.

She was chosen as one of 33 Indianapolis 500 Festival princesses in spring 2018 out of a field of more than 2,000 women—just over 33 times the size of her high school graduating class.

Her days sometimes started as early as 3 AM and ended as late as 1 AM (sorry, “golden rule”). She could work as many as three events in a day.

“I spent countless hours doing community outreach in nursing homes and elementary schools,” she says.

But Pfaff’s internship advisor, Butler Communication professor Scott Bridge, says Pfaff has never been one to court recognition for her accomplishments.

“She doesn’t try to draw attention to herself,” he says. “But she does things so well that she can’t help it.”   

Pfaff is still involved in The Gathering’s operations in her hometown, from running social media to answering calls between classes, and coming home on weekends and breaks to help out. She’s raised hundreds of thousands of dollars to support the college ambitions of children in her community through an internship with her hometown scholarship foundation.

And when Cindy Oler, a Lewisville dance instructor who taught Pfaff for 13 years, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015, Pfaff choreographed a sign-language routine to the song “Blessings” by Laura Story and taught it to Oler’s dance troupe.

“The movements are simple, pure, and so beautiful,” Oler says. “We now teach it every year, invoking the name of the kind and loving heart that created the piece.”

But as soon as she got the call last February that she would be a 500 Festival princess, she knew there was one more thing she had to do.

 

Full Circle

The gleaming blue Chevy rolled up in front of the Lewisville school last May, dozens of eyeballs glued to the 2018 Indianapolis 500 pace car’s star-studded chrome wheels.

Pfaff and several other princesses brought the glitz and glamour of the “Greatest Spectacle in Racing” to Henry County, and Pfaff even got to wave the checkered flag at the end of the school’s tricycle race she’d pedaled in as a kid.

“It meant everything to me,” Pfaff says.

Being a princess comes with crazy hours—one 3 AM Mini Marathon wakeup call came after she’d stayed up past midnight the night before to finish a final paper—but she always keeps things in perspective.

“So many people would love to be where I am,” she says.

She’s one of Butler’s Top 100 students, a Chapman Champion Award recipient for her exemplary service to the University, and a soon-to-be intern with Indy Hub, an Indianapolis nonprofit designed to help the city attract and retain young professionals.

But most meaningful to her?

The smiles on those little Lewisville boys’ and girls’ faces.

UnleashedStudent Life

Katie Pfaff: A Small-Town Success Story

From rural Indiana to a princess, Katie's journey has always been focused on helping others. 

Meet the Class of 2022: Ben Varner

Ben Varner
Major: Engineering Dual Degree Program
Hometown: Metamora, Michigan
High School: Oxford High School

"What I'm looking forward to the most in my time at Butler is meeting new people and getting the opportunity to live and hopefuly, work in Indianapolis."

 


 

Ben Varner's dad took him to a local go-kart track when he was 7. That started his competitive fires.

And he’s counting on Butler University to keep them going.

For the past 11 years, Ben has been competing in go-kart racing—and winning. He has more than 60 career wins and a list of achievements that include: 2011 Great Lakes Sprint Series Season Champion; 2016 East Lansing Kart Track Season Champion; 5th Place US Pro Kart Series Season Championship; and WKA Manufacturers cup win.

In 2017, after 10 years of go-kart racing, Ben got enough funding to take a step up into Formula cars. The next step, he hopes, will be IndyCar. His dream is to win the Indianapolis 500.

Achieving that dream, though, requires finding financing, he said. In the complicated and expensive world of auto racing, it can take mid-six-figure investments just to get started.

"You could be the best driver in the country and not have any financial backing and you wouldn't be able to get anywhere," he said.

So while he works toward that, Ben also has a backup plan: He wants to be an IndyCar engineer. To achieve that goal, he chose Butler's Engineering Dual Degree Program (EDDP), figuring that attending school within seven miles of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway was a smart strategy.

“We were at the Indy 500 a few years ago, and my dad told me about Butler,” he said. “We went and visited during the 500 weekend. I really liked the campus, and we talked to Jessica McCormick (Academic Program Coordinator) about the engineering program. I knew it would be a really good fit.”

Butler’s 5-year Engineering Dual Degree Program integrates curriculum from Butler University and Purdue University. Students enroll at both universities, and courses are taught on Butler’s campus during the first three years. In the final two years, courses are held at Butler and at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Ben will be one of 1,357 first-year students in Butler’s Class of 2022, the University’s largest class ever. As a Michigander, he’ll be in good company on campus–76 other new Bulldogs are also from the state. Since 2015, applications for admission by Michigan high schoolers have increased by more than 80 percent.

Last May, Varner shadowed the engineers at Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing, and he hopes to work with them again.

While he's looking forward to starting his college career, he also appreciates what he's achieved so far.

"It's been a ride, that's for sure," he said.

Ben Varner
Welcome WeekStudent LifePeople

Meet the Class of 2022: Ben Varner

 Originally from Michigan, Ben is a competitive Forumal car racer who is majoring in Engineering.

What's It Like To Find a Roommate

By Malachi White '20

One of the most stressful and exciting aspects of going into your first year of college is who your roommate is going to be. Will I like them? Will they like me? What if they stay up all night, or aren’t very clean? What if they like to go to bed early and are super clean?

Having a random roommate can be a fabulous experience because you may become best friends. However, if your random match seems a bit too random, Butler University opens a window of time to switch roommates or switch dorms.

Another option other than going random is to use Facebook as a resource to find a compatible roommate(s). When accepted into Butler, students are added to a group on Facebook with the rest of their class. Many students use Facebook to meet and chat with potential roommates instead of getting paired. By selecting their own roommate, some find peace of mind because the decision is in their hands rather than the school’s.

My Experience

My first year experience was unique because I lived in Fairview House during its inaugural year. I had six pod mates and all of them were randomly assigned except one, Sean, who I met on Facebook. Moving from high school to college, from home to a dorm, came with a lot of change for everyone. The year was filled with a lot of laughs and some of your typical first-year drama. Maybe we were always destined to be friends or maybe it was the circumstances of first year, but of my six roommates, I found two of my very best friends, Sean who I met on Facebook and Eric, who I will live with again next year.  

Although we are very different, Sean and I can tell each other almost anything. He’s a supportive friend who has stood by me through thick and thin. When recruitment during Greek rush did not work out in my favor, Sean never turned his back on me even when he did receive a bid/invitation to join his now fraternity. I went to all his philanthropy events that I could fit into my schedule, and he came to as many of choral concerts as he could. We even had a near death experience when going to visit his best friend at Notre Dame where we slid on the road one snowy night!

Although Eric was randomly assigned to me my first year on campus, we realized pretty quickly that we had a lot in common. One of those similarities is that we are both very picky eaters. I can’t tell you how many times we took field trips to new local restaurants around Indianapolis to escape having to eat in the dining hall every day. I’ve gone back home with him and his girlfriend for Fall Break and finally had the opportunity to explore Chicago. Sure things aren’t always perfect...I can’t even count the number of times we’ve argued, but at the end of the day I know that Eric always has my back and vice versa.

No Perfect Formula

Like my own experience, there is no perfect formula when it comes to finding roommates. You may find two best friends, or probably just as likely, you may not. Stories of awful roommates are told all the time, but so are the stories of roommates who end up being groomsmen and bridesmaids. However, no matter the outcome, Butler provides a community for everyone to be a part of. College is a time for growth and learning, new experiences, and new people. So be optimistic about your first year at Butler and the people you will be surrounded by, because you can definitely create some of your fondest memories together.

 

 

Roommates
Student LifePeople

What's It Like To Find a Roommate

​One of the most stressful and exciting aspects of going into your first year of college is who your roommate is going to be.

10 Things Every Bulldog Should Do Before They Graduate

By Shannon Rostin '18

Four years of being a Bulldog will go by quicker than you can imagine.  Your years will be full of unique experiences in Indy, here is a list of bucket list items every bulldog should cross off before leaving Butler to conquer the world. 

  1. Cheer on the Indiana Pacers or Fever 
    Butler Basketball will always have your heart, but spend a night with the professionals cheering on the Pacers or Fever at Bankers Life Fieldhouse
     
  2. Live concerts
    Indy has access to some of the coolest live music venues, such as Ruoff Home Mortgage Music Center (formerly known as  Klipsch), The Old National Centre, and the HiFi. See your favorite artists come through Indy in intimate and unique venues. Seeing Rihanna live wasn’t on my bucket list when I came to college, but after experiencing it, it should have been.
     
  3. Walk to Newfields (formerly the IMA)
    Free membership for Butler students includes access to a world of art, almost in your backyard. Take a relaxing walk down the canal, and you’ve arrived at 152 acres of gardens, grounds, and galleries. Be sure to explore The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park: 100 Acres while
    Funky Bones
    Image courtesy of Newfields. 
    the weather is nice, including Funky Bones - a great spot for an afternoon picnic with friends.
     
  4. Intern in Indy
    Indy has access to cool, exciting intern opportunities. Indianapolis professionals have connections near and far that could help launch your career. Being an intern in Indianapolis lets you connect even more to the community and see why many young professionals call Indy home. Butler Students have had opportunities to work with The Indiana Pacers, Do317, Eli Lilly, Roche and more, bettering themselves and their city.
     
  5. Represent at a Colt’s Game
    Nothing makes you feel more a part of the Indy community more than being at a packed Colt’s game at Lucas Oil Stadium with fans clad in blue and white. Fun fact: you can also get a group together and tour the stadium.
     
  6. Festivals
    Fill up on the best Indy has to offer. Take a break from the grind of studying to check out popular festivals such as Heartland Film Fest, First Friday Food Trucks, The Taste of Broad Ripple, and the many art shows happening around Broad Ripple and Rocky Ripple areas.
     
  7. Volunteer with our non profits
    Working with Indianapolis nonprofits is fulfilling and there are many causes to get connected with. Bulldogs have had the chance to be inspired by organizations such as Girls Rock, Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, People For Urban Progress, and The Damien Center, among many other local nonprofits. Butler encourages its students to be active leaders on campus and within their communities, demonstrated by sending ‘Dawgs out to better Indy.
     
    Fountain Square
    Image dourtesy of Visit Indy.
  8. Fountain Square
    An artistic and lively section of Downtown, Fountain Square offers some of the best in entertainment, food, and nightlife. Fountain Square is known for its lively art culture and entertainment, with highlights such as the Fountain Square Music Festival, the iconic  Duckpin Bowling, RadioRadio venue, and the artist studios in the Murphy Building.
     
  9. Shop local (Mass Ave)
    Indy has no shortage of small and local businesses to support. Mass Ave is home to many locally owned shops and restaurants to explore on a fun weekend. Mass Ave is located a short 15-minute drive from campus, and you will never be bored roaming downtown’s shops and restaurants. Some Bulldogs favorite memories have been made by going to Mass Ave without a plan and finding their new favorite local restaurant or shop.
     
  10. Take cliche “I love my city & I never want to leave” pictures by Soldier and Sailors Monument / Monument Circle
    A popular tourist attraction, anyone new to Indy should go see Monument Circle. It’s especially fun when it is lit up during the holiday season. As one of the most photogenic spots in Indy, it may be the quintessential Indianapolis selfie sight. It’s almost like being a tourist in a city you’ve lived in for four years.
Downtown Indy
Summer in IndyStudent Life

10 Things Every Bulldog Should Do Before They Graduate

A bucket list of items every bulldog should cross off before leaving Butler to conquer the world. 

Beyond the Classroom

Patricia Pickett ’82 APR

from Spring 2018

While words like “innovation” and “entrepreneurship” are most often associated with the business world, they have also found their place nestled in Suite 200 of Atherton Union. 

That is the office occupied by the Office of Student Affairs and its newly appointed Vice President Frank Ross III. 

Since joining Butler less than a year ago, Ross has diligently researched the University’s culture, digging deep into student life at Butler in what he calls “a listening tour” of students, faculty, and staff. 

“I’ve been a Vice President at two previous institutions, but I’d be naïve to think because I’ve done this job before, I have all the answers,” he said. “This is a great area of opportunity to expand on my background of integrative learning. Student Affairs exists to support a university’s core mission of academics. I believe we can achieve that in innovative, collaborative partnerships throughout campus.” 

Indeed, Butler’s Office of Student Affairs is defined on the Butler website as, “Striving to integrate educational experiences into a campus setting with opportunities, challenges, and services that promote a student’s development as a total person. Whether it’s helping you find your place, get involved, or feel your best, our staff is happy to enrich your Butler experience beyond the classroom.” 

To Ross, those collaborations are all about approaching the whole student and every student. 

“We talk about a transformative experience, and I want to make sure we are including all students in that experience,” he said, pointing to conversations as diverse as “Tell me about the day of a typical first-year dance major?” to “How are commuter students making connections on campus?” “It’s all about understanding the culture as a whole at Butler,” Ross said. 

While Ross may be a long way from rural Southern Indiana where he was raised, those lessons of “scrappiness” — as he calls it — are evident. He’s not afraid to walk a different path, literally, admitting his comfortable office isn’t his favorite place to get things done. 

“I don’t feel particularly productive holed up in here,” he said motioning to the tree-lined sidewalk outside his window. “I have office hours in other buildings so 

“If we aren’t willing to articulate our own failures and how we can do better next time, how can we expect students to do the same? You can’t take students somewhere you can’t take yourself.” 

I can get to better know students and faculty. I find having walking meetings is a great way to break down barriers and allow people to think openly.” 

If Ross has an entrepreneurial calling card per se, it’s his dedication to encouraging a free flow of ideas. He identifies with the importance of failure in innovation and believes its integral to the mission of his office to embrace it as well. He recounts a “get to know you” exercise he conducted with Student Affairs leaders early in his days at Butler that sounds like a page out of the Fast Company playbook. 

“I asked them to answer three questions: 1) What did you do well last year? 2) Tell me something from your personal life you’re proud of, and 3) What was something you didn’t do well last year that you would call a failure? Failure is an important part of learning, as it is an important part of entrepreneurship,” he said. “If we aren’t willing to articulate our own failures and how we can do better next time, how can we expect students to do the same? You can’t take students somewhere you can’t take yourself.” 

Ross believes it’s the responsibility of a Student Affairs professional to nurture the willingness to try resilience in the face of failure within a safe and encouraging environment. “Our profession is grounded in theory—we know when to push and when to pull. We want students to learn from their experiences,” he said. 

While he harkens to the roots of his profession being traced all the way to 1636 at the founding of Harvard, he points to the incredible possibilities in the future, Frank Ross with studentsparticularly as it pertains to the digital space. “Social media has provided a great way to enhance access to students and a way for them to reach out to us,” he said. “Parents are able to engage with us via Twitter or Facebook Messenger. There’s no longer that 8-to- 5 limitation of office hours. Our students’ schedules are different. Responsiveness to students means reaching them where they are … and a great use of technology.” 

As Ross learns more about the inner workings of Butler’s culture, he will be instituting new programs and practices based on his findings as well as past experiences. He has been active in numerous leadership roles with NASPA, the leading association for the Student Affairs profession, including serving on its Board of Directors. That involvement has given him a front seat to innovative practices at institutions of higher education throughout the country. 

“What’s important to me as a professional is a commitment to emerging best practices. It’s not always about reinventing the wheel,” he said. “It doesn’t have to be universities just like Butler—there are both large research institutions and community colleges that are doing some great things in Student Affairs.” 

What’s the entrepreneurial bottom line on innovation for Ross? “Innovation and creativity should be at the heart of what we do in Student Affairs. It isn’t just trying new things. You have to stop saying “no” and instead, give your team the space and encouragement to share their good ideas.” 

Student Life

Beyond the Classroom

Entrepreneurial Innovation Takes its Place in Student Affairs 

by Patricia Pickett ’82 APR

from Spring 2018

Read more

Dani Aravich

Student Profile

Intended Major
Marketing and Entrepreneurship
Expected Grad Date
2018
Extracurricular Activities
Club soccer treasurer, Delta Gamma, SABL, former Butler student-athlete
Hometown
Boise, ID
High School
Bishop Kelly
Favorite Spot on Campus
Hinkle Fieldhouse


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Manager of an NFL team.

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

My favorite course at Butler was my First Year Seminar. This class is my favorite because of my professor. Angela Hofstetter still to this day is one of my favorite people.  She was so invested not just in our education, but in our personal lives, too. She wanted us to be better people as well as better students.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

The Butler Community means that no matter who you are on this campus, whether you are a student-athlete, professor, faculty, Greek, etc., every person cares about one another so much. You walk around campus and you will see plenty of people you know, but even if you do not know someone, they are sure to smile and say hi to you.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

I think the life lessons I have learned from professors and other students will help me out a lot after graduation. I think no matter where I end up in the country, I will be able to have a connection with many Butler grads. I cannot imagine another place to have spent my college years.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

There are so many amazing memories I have been lucky enough to experience here at Butler. One of my favorite from my Senior year has been winning the homecoming competition for my sorority. We put in so many hours of work in the hopes of winning, and it was the icing on the cake for senior homecoming to actually win!

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

Competing for a cross country team was a big factor for me, but I also wanted a private university that was around 4,000-10,000 students. I wanted a school that was on a national stage for athletics.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

I am proud to be a Bulldog because of who is in the Butler community around me. Butler is the greatest sense of community I have ever experienced. The people in this community are some of the kindest, smartest, most athletic, and impressive people I have ever met. Being surrounded by these outstanding individuals makes me proud to call myself a Bulldog.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

When I was a student-athlete, we heard a lot about the Butler Way. Even after no longer competing for an athletic team, the Butler Way is totally still applicable. The Butler Way is all about being the very best version of ourselves. At Butler, your faculty, staff, coaches, and fellow students encourage you to be the best you can be.

Dani Aravich
Student Life

Dani Aravich

Dani will never forget winning Homecoming for her sorority senior year.

Dani Aravich

Dani Aravich

Student Profile

#LoveIndy: 6 Questions for Chris Gahl

By Shannon Rostin '18

Butler students find a home in Indianapolis as soon as they arrive on campus. Exploring Indy and all it has to offer helps to shape a student's experience from weekend adventures to finding their favorite hidden gems in the city. Butler Grad and Trustee Chris Gahl ’00 serves as Senior VP of Marketing and Communications for Visit Indy and shared some of the perks of living and studying in Indianapolis.

For more information on Indianapolis and everything happening throughout the city, check out Visit Indy

 

How do you think being located in Indianapolis affects Butler students or shapes their college experience?

The ability to score meaningful internships is one of many ways Indy helps shape—and benefits from—Butler students. This aligns with Butler’s “Indianapolis Community Requirement,” a core-curriculum ensuring students get out of the classroom and into the community to learn.  For instance, collegiate sports are governed in Indy at the NCAA, an organization that is constantly looking for talented marketing interns.  Pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly’s international headquarters are here, regularly employing Butler business interns.  

 

What are some highlights that Butler students have access to?

Each year, Indy host more than 1,000 major music concerts, sporting events, festivals, and cultural events, allowing Butler students the ability to soak in the sights and sounds, all within minutes of campus. 

 

What is something (or a few things) you would recommend students do in Indianapolis before they graduate?

You can kayak the White River, a hidden jewel running more than 300 miles, with portions adjacent to Butler’s campus.  During the summer, it’s fun to watch a concert at The Lawn, an amphitheater in downtown Indy.  I’ve seen The Avett Brothers, Arcade Fire, and The Black Keys.  

 

What attracts students and young professionals to Indy?

Students and young professionals continue to gravitate to Indy’s big city amenities with the affordability of a smaller city. Indy has arrived, much like Butler, onto the national stage as a vibrant world class city. Travel & Leisure named Indy one of only “50 Best Places in the World to Travel" in 2017, right next to Honolulu, Hawaii and Cape Town, South Africa. 

 

What are some ways students can feel at home in or apart of the Indianapolis community?

Part of our DNA in Indy is hosting major sporting events. As part of this, we are in constant need for volunteers to help roll out the red carpet and welcome international visitors to Indy. We are always seeking ambassadors to give city tours, greet professional athletes, and donate time to staff information desks.  Volunteering for major sporting events—like an NCAA Men’s Final Four—helps the community all while providing an incredible networking opportunity.  

 

What makes Indy home to you?

Indy’s residents genuinely care about each other.  We are quick to smile and eager in our desire to help.  Servant leadership can be seen and felt daily, there’s even a name for it, “Hoosier Hospitality.” 

AcademicsStudent Life

BU Well to Publish Its Third Volume

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 09 2018

BU Well, Butler University’s open-access, multimedia, student-run healthcare journal, will publish its third volume on April 20. The volume will feature eight articles on a variety of health-related topics ranging from low-carbohydrate diets to electroconvulsive therapy for mental illnesses to retail therapy and its emotional impact.

BU Well uses three formats to deliver information: print, an informational YouTube video, and an infographic highlighting key aspects of an article or other health topic. The open-access journal will be available on Butler University’s Digital Commons website, http://digitalcommons.butler.edu/buwell/.

“BU Well is a unique experience that unites students from diverse backgrounds to create a journal that promotes health and wellness to an audience of all ages," said Skyler Walker, a second-year pharmacy student and Editor-in-Chief of BU Well. "Students gain valuable skills through the research, writing, infographic, and video process while learning their leadership style and how to effectively communicate interprofessionally. It's a one-of-a-kind experience that I have been privileged to be a part of these past two years, and I'm very excited to publish Volume 3."

Nearly 25 students from four of the six colleges at Butler University participated in the publication of the journal. Two Assistant Professors of Pharmacy Practice, Dr. Annette McFarland and Dr. Sheel M. Patel, serve as faculty advisors.

The fourth volume will accept submissions beginning in the fall semester. BU Well invites students, faculty, healthcare professionals and others to submit original healthcare-related articles for publishing consideration.

More information is available at BU Well’s Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/BUWellJournal and on Twitter and Instagram @BUWellJournal.

 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

AcademicsStudent Life

BU Well to Publish Its Third Volume

Student-Driven Multimedia Journal on Health, Wellness, and Life Sciences comes out April 20.

Apr 09 2018 Read more

Lee-gacy

by Sarah Bahr

“I’m already late for work, Dana!”

“It’ll take like five seconds, I promise!”

Butler University Collegian reporter Dana Lee pauses from reading her column-in-progress over the phone to her mother — a palliative care nurse in a northern suburb of Chicago who is, indeed, late for work.

Yes, the Collegian’s now-editor-in-chief and former ESPN and Indianapolis Star intern really does read (almost) every story she writes to her mom — who’s often cooking dinner in her kitchen 200 miles away.

Talking through her ideas helps her conquer writer’s block, Lee says.

The 21-year-old senior journalism major calls her parents at least once a week — but usually many times more. She called her dad before the first interview she did for the Indianapolis Star. During her freshman year when she was overwhelmed by Carmel, IN’s roundabouts. After she asked a security guard at Madison Square Garden to film her while covering the 2018 Big East Men’s Basketball Tournament in New York City for the Collegian. Her dad’s reaction? “I can’t believe you did that!”

Lee has written for ESPN, hobnobbed with celebrities (Bill Nye!), and embedded herself in former Butler basketball player Kelan Martin’s kitchen, but just try and tell her story without bringing up her parents (“They’ve read every story I’ve ever written”) and her two younger siblings, Jessica and Michael, who also attend Butler.

You can’t.

A Butler Family Lee-gacy

When Jessica Lee was weighing the pros and cons of attending Butler, her sister, Dana, landed squarely on the cons side.

“Which I didn’t know until halfway through my freshman year,” says Dana.

But Jessica, a junior Political Science and Strategic Communication double major, says that, without Dana, Butler likely wouldn’t have been on her radar. And, in the end, Butler’s internship opportunities, proximity to a big city, and beautiful campus proved too difficult to ignore.

Despite her older sister’s presence.

“I certainly had reservations about attending the same school as Dana,” Jessica, who’s a year younger than Dana, says. “Not because we aren’t close, but because I wanted my college experience to be my own.”

But Jessica says attending the same school as her siblings does come with perks; namely, Butler-themed inside jokes.

“It’s like speaking our own language. Like, ‘Have you seen Holcomb Gardens yet?’” Jessica says. “‘The leaves are turning and it looks BU-tiful.’”

While the siblings aren’t roommates, they live close enough together to walk to one another’s residences. Jessica and Dana lived in the same residence hall Jessica’s freshman year.

“It was nice having her closet nearby!” says Jessica.

Dana says she, Jessica, and Michael have always gotten along because they “didn’t have any other option.”

“Growing up, my parents would sit us on the staircase until someone gave someone else a hug,” Dana says. “We genuinely enjoy each other’s company.”

Michael, a freshman Digital Media Production major, says the siblings haven’t yet been on campus during the same semester.

Jessica is the culprit. She’s interning with the Democratic National Committee in Washington D.C. this semester, completed an internship with the European Union in Belgium last summer, and studied abroad in Germany last spring.

But even nearly 600 miles apart, the Lees are on the same wavelength.

Now the trio write for the Butler Collegian, Butler’s student newspaper. Dana is the editor-in-chief, Jessica is a co-news editor, and Michael is on the multimedia team. While Jessica says there’s no sibling rivalry, in the same breath, she contradicts herself.

“When Dana was the sports editor and I was the co-news editor, we would compete to see which section got the most clicks online,” Jessica says. “I most definitely won.”

But the siblings don’t share everything. When Michael committed to Butler last December, Dana and Jessica found out when he posted his decision on Instagram.

“So basically almost 500 people knew before I did,” Dana says. “Classic.”

A Sports Journalist in the Making

Though all the Lees played sports, it was Dana who was the family fanatic.

Mike Lee was a high school varsity baseball coach, so his daughter rode alongside him as he dragged baseball fields on a tractor, and wore his team’s uniform in the dugout during games.

Dana’s thirst for all things news — not just sports — was insatiable. In eighth grade, she wrote a persuasive essay petitioning her parents for an iPhone so she could read the The New York Times online before school (spoiler alert: she got it).

“My parents thought I was crazy,” she says, but it was this fanaticism that has made Dana successful as a student and a budding journalist

It’s a love she’s carried with her to college. Case in point: if inflating 500 basketballs in four hours would get her to ESPN, Dana Lee was going to do it.

Her first internship with the WNBA’s Chicago Sky the summer before her sophomore year was decidedly non-glamorous: As an unpaid community relations intern, she did the grunt work for the franchise. Including inflating all those basketballs.

“That was the lowest point of my internship,” she says.

Of the nearly 20 internships she applied for, Lee says the Sky position was the best offer she got.

Fast forward a year, and Lee had the opposite problem: too many opportunities.

Her offers: an Indianapolis Colts Media Operations internship, an Indianapolis Star reporting fellowship, a promotion to Butler Collegian sports editor . . .

So which one did she pick?

All of them.

Oh, and she also took 20 credit hours of classes that fall.

“Junior year was a nightmare,” Lee says. “I wouldn’t wish it on anyone.”

She put in 16 hours per week at The Star as an “Our Children” fellow, examining opioid addiction and spotlighting nonprofit success stories in her quest to find and tell the overlooked stories of Indianapolis kids. She spent Sundays at Lucas Oil Stadium, helping set up the press box before Colts home games and transcribing coach and player interviews. She coordinated the Collegian’s sports coverage whenever she had a free moment. She slept very little.

“It was a terrible idea to intern two different places,” Lee says. “I’d never, ever do it again, but it was a great time.”

Don’t Look Over Her Shoulder in Class

You may be wondering, at this point, about Dana’s social life.

Two of her friends, Butler Collegian Digital Managing Editor Zach Horrall and Managing Editor Marisa Miller, both seniors, shed some light.

The last time they hung out?

Last Saturday night, when the evening’s agenda included Lee creating a class schedule for next semester.

“When we hang out, it’s basically low-key work,” says Horrall.

Lee’s been involved with the Collegian every semester, first as a sports reporter her freshman and sophomore years, then as a sports editor last year, and now as editor-in-chief, which means she’s grown to love staying up until 2:00 AM  on weeknights before tests. Not because she’s cramming — because she’s designing and editing stories at the Collegian office.

The print edition of the weekly Collegian publishes on Wednesdays, and Lee must read every story that ends up in print and online before the page designers can go to work.

And, of course, reporters being reporters, much of the copy comes in just before the deadline.

“I try to start reading between classes on Tuesday,” Lee says. “I probably read more stories in class than I’d like to admit. I try to have all the stories read by 10:30 PM, but if I finish by 9:30 PM, we’re in really good shape.”

After arriving at the office around 7:00 PM, the rest of her night is spent helping the designers and dealing with any snafus. Typically around 2:00 AM — but sometimes as late (or early?) as 5:00 AM — she’ll head home to catch a few hours of sleep before her Wednesday morning classes.

“My dad asks me all the time ‘Why are you doing this?’” Lee says. “I went from thinking my sister was crazy when she’d stay late working on our high school paper to being that person.”

But she says editing the Collegian doesn’t feel like work.

“It’s so nice to be immersed in something I want to do after graduation,” she says.

A “Hail Mary” Internship

You’d never know it if you came across Lee in the newsroom, but she’s an introvert. Her parents are still in disbelief that she wants to talk to people for a living, she says.

But she says her Collegian experiences have forced her out of her shell, from interviewing Butler men’s basketball’s second all-time leading scorer, Kelan Martin, as he fried up a dozen slices of turkey bacon in his kitchen, to enlisting a Madison Square Garden security guard as her cameraman during the 2018 Big East tournament in New York City.

“Freshman me never would’ve done that; not in a million years,” she says.

At the end of her junior year, she decided it was time for a hail mary — and applied for a summer internship at ESPN.

She got it.

She and 50 other interns spent 10 weeks in Bristol, Connecticut (where ESPN is headquartered), New York City, Los Angeles, and Washington, D.C. this summer with the country’s foremost sports network.

She filmed Bill Nye demonstrating the physics behind a line drive. She covered the 2018 MLB All-Star Game in Washington, D.C. She shadowed SportsCenter newscasters Keith Olbermann and Chris Berman. She got a shout-out from ESPN sportswriter Seth Wickersham on Twitter.

But, true to form, Miller says the newly minted Collegian editor-in-chief still worked on the paper from Bristol.

“Even during her 40 hour-a-week internship, she was still updating our spreadsheets and planning guest speakers for the semester,” says Miller.

“She’s Very Talented, But She Doesn’t Always See It”

Every one of her friends, editors, and professors will tell you: Detail is to Lee what a lightsaber is to a Jedi.

She has a spreadsheet to keep track of every Chicago restaurant she’s eaten at, and those she wants to visit, with detailed notes about each, says Horrall. She interviewed Indianapolis Indians President and 1954 Butler graduate Max Schumacher for four hours just because she was curious. She filmed a standup shot at Hinkle Fieldhouse after the first Butler basketball game she covered 16 times to get it exactly right (Miller stood there until 11:00 PM holding the camera).

“I wish I had even 10 percent of her attention to detail,” Horrall says. “She homes in on things I’d never notice.”

She’ll Google restaurant names in Collegian stories to make sure ‘Bazbeaux’ doesn’t have an ‘s’ on the end of it, Horrall says, or check to make sure a movie theater really is in Carmel and not Indianapolis.

Nancy Whitmore, who’s taught journalism at Butler for 18 years, says Lee’s observational skills often surpass those of professional journalists.

“The insight and interpretation she brings to her reporting far exceeds her age,” says Whitmore.

Jessica Lee says her sister’s articles are an extension of her personality.

“Dana’s able to write these stories because she sits down with her yellow legal pad and blue pen and computer and she steps into [her interviewee’s] shoes,” she says.

Yet Lee doesn’t realize what she does is in any way out of the ordinary, says Horrall.

“She is very talented, but she doesn’t always see it,” he says. “Sometimes she thinks she’s gotten lucky, but she’s just really good at what she does.”

Her Parents Might Want to Look Into a Long-Distance Phone Plan

Her sister’s been to Belgium; her brother Cambodia. But outside of a two-week trip to Spain in high school, Dana Lee hasn’t left the country.

She wanted to spend a semester abroad last year, but as the Collegian’s sports editor, she couldn’t afford to leave Butler in the middle of basketball season.

But after graduation, she says, all bets are off.

“I’m looking at journalism fellowships abroad, particularly South Africa,” she says. “It’d be really interesting to look at the country post-apartheid.”

But one thing won’t change anytime soon.

“Jessica and Michael will always be my best friends,” she says.

FamilyStudent LifePeople

Lee-gacy

When Jessica was weighing the pros and cons of attending Butler, her sister landed on the cons side.

Lee-gacy

by Sarah Bahr
Julian
AcademicsStudent LifePeople

Julian Wyllie '16 Named to Politico Journalism Institute

BY

PUBLISHED ON Mar 20 2018

Julian Wyllie '16, a Lacy School of Business graduate and former editor of The Butler Collegian, has been named to the 2018 class of the Politico Journalism Institute (PJI), an educational initiative supporting diversity in Washington area newsrooms.

PJI, which will be held May 29 to June 9, will offer 13 university students intensive, hands-on training in government and political reporting. Programming includes interactive sessions, panels with industry leaders, mentoring, and an opportunity for students to have their work published by Politico.

The PJI Class of 2018 also includes students from Yale, University of Southern California, and Georgetown. Two of the students will be selected at the end of the program for a three-month residency in the Politico newsroom where they will write, edit, and produce content.

All costs for PJI participants, including room, board, and transportation, are provided by Politico. Students split time between American University in Washington, D.C., and Politico headquarters in Arlington, Virginia.

"We're thrilled to welcome this exceptional new class of PJI students," said Politico Editor Carrie Budoff Brown. "Our class this year reflects the racial, geographic, and socioeconomic diversity that Politico is committed to nurturing. Our newsroom is looking forward to mentoring these talented young journalists, who will be at the forefront of tomorrow's political news landscape." 

Since graduating, Wyllie’s career has included stops at Governing magazine and The Chronicle of Higher Education.

"My time in Washington has been more than amazing so far," Wyllie said. "Being associated with anything as big as Politico is a great thing. But the best part about this program is that it gives me the chance to meet other hard-working young writers, who are all going through the struggles of trying to make it. Being around them feeds my desire to keep pushing myself and not let up. Overall, the success I've had is a direct result of skills I gained while attending Butler, where at The Collegian I stumbled on my life's passion."

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Julian
AcademicsStudent LifePeople

Julian Wyllie '16 Named to Politico Journalism Institute

Program offers hands-on training in government and political reporting.

Mar 20 2018 Read more
Student LifePeople

Pictures Worth a Thousand Words

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 20 2018

By Jackson Borman '20

From the time that he got his first video camera, Thulani Smith ’20 has been documenting his life through the lens.

“I like to take pictures and reminisce instantly," he said. "My dad and I have traveled the world for my entire childhood, and I liked being able to go there and take a picture and then remember everything about each place.”

As a middle-schooler, Smith captured everything from family trips to everyday life. His specialty at the time was creating basketball trick shot videos of his brother and his friends shooting balls into trashcans in the front yard.

“We thought it was great," he said, "and then my dad said to me, ‘Thulani, are you ever going to film anything besides this?’ and I remember responding to him, ‘Dad, there is nothing more than trick-shot videos!’”

But Smith started experimenting and learning how to create visual effects, and he became more interested in the full potential that filmmaking had. Now, as a digital media production major at Butler, he already is getting the experience he needs to grow in his craft.

Smith currently posts his work on his Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram account is @Marshallmoviemaker.

Starting in his first year at Butler, Smith had Professor Farhad Anwarzai for his First-Year Seminar class called "The Coming of Age Story." Smith said that Anwarzai’s willingness to allow students to learn in ways that they enjoyed was a great start to his college experience.

“For our final project, he said just to do something creative, so I made a film,” Smith said. “He has really been a huge help in allowing me to grow in classes that I have been taking. Being able to take his class and have that relationship with him has been huge because it has restored my understanding of how I want to do college.”

Anwarzai said he was blown away with Smith’s work.

“I thought that the project was not only very well made and very well shot and edited, but it was very mature for a freshman to make,” Anwarzai said. “He’s good at telling these big stories but telling them through the lens of students. That’s one of the things that stands out in my mind when I think of Thulani. It was a spectacular job.”

In Smith's sophomore year, Anwarzai ended up as his professor for the Global and Historical Studies course "China and the Islamic Middle East." This time, he and Smith worked together to write a short film for the students’ final project.

“Having not seen a lot of faculty and student collaboration in the humanities, I wanted to test that, and I thought Thulani would be the perfect person to work with,” Anwarzai said. “In the end, he and the other students created a marvelous work. It added a great layer of depth to the conditions we deal with today.”

The 20-minute film, which was made in nine days with no budget, dealt with the preconceived notions that many have about China and the Middle East.

Last summer, Smith had an internship with a company called Train918 that was started by 2016 Butler graduates Tim Valentine and Joshua Gaal. The pair started the company in their senior year at Butler and now create commercials and promotional videos for groups like Downtown Indy Inc. and Indiana University.

“Working with them was a blast because I was able to grow with them while I was still growing,” Smith said. “They had almost the same experiences that I had as far as being a creative on Butler’s campus so they could give me some insight.”

Smith said that Valentine and Gaal allowed him to take a larger role in the company than a typical intern would, and he was able to take control of certain projects. For example, Smith took photos at a fashion shoot over the summer, just a month into the internship.

“It gave me the opportunity to have the camera in my hands, to shoot everything and to come up with concepts, edit it, and call it my own,” Smith said.

In between class projects and internships, Smith still works on projects of his own. He has created video compilations of Butler Basketball games. This winter, Smith went on a trip to Northern Ireland where he took more photos of the Irish landscape and worked on one of his projects. Over the past few months, Smith has also been working on what he calls "The Portrait Project," a series of photos and short videos of a subject that are compiled into a short, portrait-style video.

This spring Smith will be going abroad once again, this time through the College of Communication's trip to Germany.

Through his work, both on his own and at Butler, Smith hopes that he will be able to grow as a filmmaker and one day be able to create on a higher level.

“I think over the next couple of months what I really want to do is just create more,” Smith said. “I’ve done [a lot of projects], but I want to be able to have examples of my best work so that I can point people to that.”

 

Photo via Thulani Smith

Student LifePeople

Pictures Worth a Thousand Words

Sophomore Thulani Smith follows his passion for filmmaking.

Feb 20 2018 Read more

Meet the Class of 2022: Max Cordoba

When incoming first-year Theatre and Math major Max Cordoba flew to Los Angeles in February to attend the National Unified Auditions—a one-stop shop for high school seniors to audition for multiple universities—he had never even heard of Butler University. The Neward, California native’s intention was to audition for mainly private schools that had a special musical theatre degree, explore those options, and then pick whichever school felt right, offered the best financial aid, and allowed him to learn more about not only the fine arts, but math as well.

He spotted Butler’s name and decided it was in his best interest to at least do one more session—it was additional practice, after all.

In most auditions, Cordoba was asked to perform two monologues and two songs. In the audition with Butler, Professor of Theatre William Fisher asked Cordoba to do one of each to start. Cordoba chose to sing Beautiful City from the Broadway production Godspell. For his monologue, he chose to read an excerpt as Hank from Marvin’s Room—a piece he believed would put him “over the top for the audition.”

After his monologue, Fisher and Cordoba made an instant connection over Marvin’s Room.

"I almost thought my audition with Butler was going to be a practice session, but after my talk with Professor William Fisher, I thought this could be the right school,” Cordoba said.

Cordoba explained to Fisher that he is a big theatre lover, but he wanted to also major in something a little more practical.

“I didn’t want to put all my eggs in one basket, and I wanted to ensure I had math as a back-up since a major in theatre isn’t foolproof,” Cordoba said. “I really needed a school that understood that about me.”

Most schools Cordoba had talked to previously in the day had told him that pursuing math with a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) was not a possibility. Fisher explained that at Butler it’s not a BFA, but rather a Bachelor of Arts, which offers more flexibility, as well as the option to incorporate his passion for math.

“He really convinced me to at least explore more,” Cordoba said, “Even though it’s really far away, Butler seemed open to my diverse interests.”

In April, Cordoba—joined by his grandfather—started the on-campus college visit journey,  exploring the various schools he was interested in—including Butler. While on campus, Cordoba had the opportunity to speak with professors, including Chair of the Theatre Department, Diane Timmerman. He also sat in on an improv class.

“The students were making me laugh. Just from that show alone, I saw what I loved about theatre,” he said. “The students were super friendly and amiable, and they love to act and perform.” When he left for his trip, he was excited about all the schools he was about to explore. After the trip, though, he realized that when he was making his rounds, he always found at least one thing he didn’t like—except for when he was at Butler.

“What really set it in stone for me for Butler was that it was a smaller school than most I was looking at, but it had a big school feel,” Cordoba said.

Cordoba arrived on campus August 12, and feels just as excited as nervous—as most students are their first year. Cordoba’s distance from his friends and family definitely makes it harder, especially when he was so involved with various theatre and chorus groups for the past eight years.

Despite the nervousness of new surroundings and being so far from home, Cordoba said he feels honored, “to go to a school that is super accepting and diverse.”

Max Cordoba
Welcome WeekArts & CultureStudent LifePeople

Meet the Class of 2022: Max Cordoba

What brought Max from California to Indiana was Butler Theatre's faculty and flexibility. 

Pathways for Success

Monica Holb ’09

from Spring 2018

 

When Courtney (Campbell) Rousseau ’03, Butler University Internship and Career Services Career Advisor, meets with students in her office she is intent on providing tools to help them travel down paths that they may never have dreamed of. 

“I have to find what they are passionate about. I know it when I see it. When their faces light up … I know we are talking about something important to them,” Rousseau said.

The next four pages share incredible stories of students with vision and passion who are fulfilling their own dreams and doing it their own way. Rousseau knows exactly what it is like to follow your dreams—hers brought her right back to Butler.

Letting Passions Pave the Way

 

Career Advisor Courtney Rousseau ’03 is accustomed to students who are following a formula about what they should do with their careers. But those formulas can impede their innovation and dampen their passions. She and her Internship and Career Services (ICS) colleagues provide students traditional career services and the resources necessary to search for and secure internships, but they increasingly support students wandering beyond standard plans. 

More students are venturing out by obtaining unique internships or starting their own organizations. Rousseau pointed to trends such as social media connections, the popularity of “side hustles,” and professionals changing jobs more often as reasons why students are drawn to make their own way. 

She provides support to step away from a comfortable plan and helps validate students’ choices. “Butler students are very driven, very ambitious,” Rousseau said, which means many are looking to do something bold. Rousseau references the impressive but intimidating 97 percent placement rate after graduation and acknowledges the pressure: “Who doesn’t get freaked out? They wonder, ‘What if I am the three percent?’” Courtney Rousseau ’03 with student

Rousseau strategically supports students to take risks in their career planning by ensuring a favorable environment. “When you are planting flowers, to make them grow you have to plant them in space where they work. Sometimes we create a greenhouse to trick the plants to grow,” Rousseau said. The greenhouse she builds is made of students’ own strengths—strategic thinking, relationships, planning. From there, Rousseau guides students toward the best risks for them to take. “I never see anything as impossible. I think I probably prepare them, see the competition, and know the value of making connections and experiences,” Rousseau said. 

When students take the risk and it turns into a learning experience instead of the opportunity envisioned, Rousseau is quick to tell her own story. 

From graduating from Butler with a degree in French to teaching English in France, Rousseau found herself waiting tables and returning to Butler for career advice of her own. After a graduate program and a move to Oregon for a job that turned out to be a less than a perfect fit, Rousseau came back to Butler for her current role. She recognizes the non-linear path and ultimate success of her own risk tasking, as well as how students connect to the story. 

Rousseau hopes all students find their own way with their own passions. “I want students to know we are here. I don’t want people to be perfect. I prefer you come in with questions and fears. I want to take impossible situations and make it work, and make it something beautiful.” 

Weaving Old Threads into a New Company 

 

While in high school at Culver Military Academy, Aaron Marshall ’18 embraced self-expression beyond his uniform. He recorded hip-hop music in his dorm room with friends and wore thrifted clothing. His love for the music scene culture influenced his vintage style and would eventually influence his career path. 

Marshall came to Butler University for Recording Industry Studies. No other college offered the opportunity to turn his dorm room hobby into a major. Yet, Marshall’s studies were not contained to a library and the classroom. His interests spilled over into his life. His friends noticed, too. They came over to record music with Marshall, but after asking “Where’d you get that?” they might leave with a borrowed, one-of-a-kind, vintage sweater straight from Marshall’s closet. Aaron Marshall ’18

As he collected unique pieces in his thrifting trips with his family, he saw the market for selling finds to others and realized that maybe thrifting, not music, would be the passion to turn into a career. His business, Naptown Thrift, was born and grew by word of mouth. Marshall started an Instagram account that drew worldwide attention. With more stock and buyers, he moved the business to a large storage unit. But “storage unit” is an inaccurate description of what is ostensibly a store—racks of clothing for customers to browse on an appointment basis. 

“It doesn’t feel like work, so it is definitely something I can see myself doing in the long run. It’s become a passion of mine I didn’t know existed before coming to Butler,” Marshall said. With his family’s support, Marshall is looking ahead to opening a brick and mortar store after graduation. 

“My professors have been extremely supportive of me taking on my own endeavors,” Marshall said. His Recording Industry Studies Advisor Cutler Armstrong encourages him, even though he knows he won’t be going into music. 

The support comes from students as well. “People have genuinely wanted to see me succeed,” Marshall said. For example, in his Audio Capstone course, the class is helping record a commercial for Naptown Thrift, recognizing how they could complete their assignment and help Marshall at the same time. 

While ICS didn’t need to help Marshall figure out what to do with his life, Career Advisor Courtney Rousseau has assisted him in finding his way through the Career Planning Strategies course. “A lot of students are looking for jobs and internships. I love what I do already. The valuable thing in that course is Courtney helping me be more goal oriented. You have to have some sort of plan of what the next steps will be.” 

As Marshall graduates, he might be more likely to apply for building permits than jobs, but following his passion will be a solid step toward reaching his goals. 

A Runway from the Midwest to High Fashion 

 

Growing up in Tipp City, Ohio, the closest Meredith Coughlin ’18 got to the fashion world was glossy magazines. Reading the periodicals helped her learn about fashion, the editors, and what it would take to make it in the industry. 

Meredith Coughlin ’18But while Coughlin didn’t end up in fashion school, the Butler Human Communication and Organizational Leadership major used Internship and Career Services (ICS) to go after exactly what she wanted: A career in fashion. 

After a summer spent managing a boutique in Northern Michigan, Coughlin had experience with creating visual displays, directing photo shoots, executing a fashion show, buying products, and running social media. When she returned to campus in the fall, she was determined to reach her goal of working in fashion in New York City. 

She worked with ICS to improve her cover letter, but Career Advisor Courtney Rousseau, and Internship Advisor Scott Bridge, both knew Coughlin was venturing into uncharted territory for most Butler students. Coughlin was set on finding her internship on her own. “I knew what I desired was different,” she said. And sure enough, Coughlin, with ICS’s support and a great cover letter, earned an internship with Oprah Magazine in New York City. 

After that experience, Coughlin doubled down. In the fall semester of her junior year, she spent time studying fashion merchandising at The Westminster School of Fashion in London, a prestigious fashion program, through the Institute for Study Abroad-Butler. Then she completed another fashion internship on the East Coast with Vineyard Vines the next summer, all before her senior year. 

“I’ve always wanted real-life experiences,” Coughlin said. “Whenever I’m interning, I feel like I can see this is helping the store, this is helping the magazine, this is helping the company. I love to see the end result and accomplish my goals.” Coughlin’s story shows students they don’t have to wait until senior year to have hands-on learning experiences. 

The risks she took—moving to a place where she knew no one, building a career without a network in a new city—were tempered by the passion for the work. “I don’t follow the path. I seek out what I know I am passionate about. You don’t want to invest your time into something you aren’t passionate about,” Coughlin said. As she looks forward to graduation, Coughlin will certainly be able to design her own career to fit her passions. 

Making His Own Way

 

If you saw a resume for Anthony Murdock II ’17, it would show evidence of how he met with Career Advisor Courtney Rousseau at ICS about opportunities before he was even enrolled in classes. It would list internships with the Sagamore Institute and the City of Indianapolis. After graduation, the Political Science and Religion major is looking ahead to law school. A very traditional career path. 

And yet, Murdock is using creativity and innovation to create movements that didn’t exist before he stepped foot on campus, which has changed the way he sees his future. 

Anthony Murdock II ’17As an African American man and as a commuter, Murdock sometimes found himself in uncomfortable, outsider situations. He credits the challenge with giving him the opportunity to help advocate for other students. Butler ended up to be the perfect place for him to hone his leadership skills. 

“It put me in a place to say, ‘Are you going to let people you don’t know define who you are by the color of your skin and where you come from, or are you going to use this platform and opportunity of being marginalized to help yourself help other people?’ And that is what I decided I was going to do,” Murdock said. 

Murdock took that experience to heart and made a power move. With his fraternity brothers from Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc., they developed a new brand on campus. #PowerMovesOnly is a wave, a movement, and a shift in culture. The brand, fueled by hashtags and positive interactions with others, promotes success-oriented lifestyles and actions. “We were men who understood that it is one thing to do something for a moment and it is another to create sustainable change,” Murdock said of the beginning of the brand. “It was purely something we loved to do—see people benefit with great social meaning,” Murdock said. 

Murdock also founded Bust The B.U.B.B.L.E., a student movement that promotes the perspectives of students of color at predominantly white institutions through diversity education, cultural awareness, and action-oriented activism. 

Before his experience at Butler, Murdock thought he would take the traditional path: Practice law, run for office, become a political analyst. Yet his untraditional experience on campus, and skills in starting brands and organizations creating change, has brought him to another path. It still includes law school, but will veer in a different direction: Murdock will pursue sustainable social justice change in Indianapolis. 

His empowering messages and actions toward change isn’t only shaping students’ experiences at Butler, but allowing Murdock to define his own career path as well. 

AcademicsStudent Life

Pathways for Success

Stories of the way less traveled

by Monica Holb ’09

from Spring 2018

Read more

Brooklyn Cohen

Student Profile

Intended Major
Elementary Education
Expected Grad Date
2019
Extracurricular Activities
Greek Life, BUDM, Student Ambassador, Student Orientation Guide
Hometown
Glenview, IL
High School
Glenbrook South High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
Starbucks! I love that I can study and socialize at the same time!


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Post-graduation I want to be an elementary school teacher, but a couple years down the line I hope to go back to school and become a principal or superintendent!

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

My favorite course at Butler has been my PCA: Arts and Exceptionality with Dr. Hochman and Dr. Esteves. Not only did I learn about myself but I learned about what it means to be an artist. As a class, we explored the question, "What is art?" with the Urban Artisans at ArtMix. Even though I took this class my first year at Butler, I still reference the lessons that I learned from this course in my other classes and in my daily life as well!

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

Being a part of the Butler Community has made me feel like an individual who has hundreds of people that make up my support system. I have never felt like "just a number" or that my ideas were not valid. At Butler, my peers are cheering me along on the sidelines through every step of my college career. My Butler Community is made up of my friends, my sorority sisters, my professors, my coworkers, my classmates, the Starbucks workers, the strangers, and the people who I've never met but still smile at me when we pass each other walking through Jordan Hall.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

The biggest thing I've learned at Butler is that it is ok to take risks. After graduation, I know that I can follow my heart, and no matter what the outcome is, I will learn a valuable lesson about myself and the people that I am surrounded by.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

My favorite memory at Butler so far actually occurred while giving a tour. One of the moms in my tour group had attended Butler and had majored in Elementary Education. It was sort of like I was looking at myself in 20 years. While passing through Jordan Hall on the tour, one of my professors came out of his office and actually joined in on the tour! Turns out, the mom had been texting him that she was on campus with her daughter and he wanted to say hello (how cool that they are still in contact after all this time). It was really special to have one of my professors come on my tour because he now has seen another part of my Butler identity: being a tour guide.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

I knew for sure that I wanted to go to a small school with a great education program. I first toured Butler my freshman year of high school when my older brother was looking at coming here. To be honest, all I remember from my visit was that even though it was a gloomy, rainy day, the students and faculty on campus were so genuinely happy to be here. During my college search, I kept coming back to Butler solely based on what I remember feeling from that first visit. As I did more research on Butler's education program, I knew that this was the perfect place for me as a learning, growing individual!

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

What makes me most proud to be a Bulldog is knowing that no matter what kind of day I'm having, there are people here who will support me through it all. What we have at Butler is so special and I truly believe that it cannot be found anywhere else.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

To me, the Butler Way is being nice. It is smiling at strangers on campus, holding doors from what seems like a mile away, respecting people’s belongings when they leave their things at a table in Starbucks, and most of all, the Butler Way is stepping up to assume any role that needs to be filled. At Butler, we care for each one of our peers as if they were a member of our immediate family—and that makes my mom really jealous!

Student Life

Brooklyn Cohen

Brooklyn saw a glimpse of her future while giving a campus tour.

Brooklyn Cohen

Student Profile

Going Places: Studying Abroad in the Sciences

By Marc Allan, MFA '18

Chemistry Professor Stacy O’Reilly remembers looking at the other science disciplines and thinking, "They're going places. Why can't we?"

O’Reilly wanted Chemistry students to have the opportunity to see the world, learn from other cultures, and put their classroom education into practice—something they didn't typically get to do because they were so busy with coursework.

That was in 2015.

Soon after, she got a call from a tour company about putting together a study-abroad trip for Chemistry students. In less than 10 months, she and colleague Michael Samide developed a course centered on Chemistry and sustainable energy in Germany and Switzerland. They took 18 students to visit two hydroelectric power plants and, by the time they left, better understood how water is used to create electricity, the finances required to build such a facility, and the economic impact a plant can have on a community.

Fast-forward three years: 87 students have taken Chemistry's study-abroad course in various incarnations: Chemistry and Food, Chemistry and Art Conservation Science, and Chemistry and Fermentation. There are courses with embedded study tours planned out through 2021—including one for Butler alumni, employees, their families, and friends called Beer, Wine, Cheese, and Chocolate. (More at https://blue.butler.edu/~msamide/AlumniTour2020/)

"So often, our science students are so engaged in the work to finish their science degree," O'Reilly says. "They don't have a lot of flexibility in their schedules. One of the things we like about this program is that it's not a full semester abroad, it's not a full summer abroad, but it gives them a taste of international travel."

"The language of science bridges culture," Samide adds. “There's a common bond they feel between cultures. I think it makes the world a little smaller for them. They feel more globally connected."

Students who take CH418 spend the semester building their background in the subject area, the idea being that they have the scientific knowledge they need before they travel. Then, when they go overseas in early May, they can integrate the science with the culture and society they're visiting and have conversations with experts.

Ben Zercher '16 was among the students who went on that first study tour. When he first heard about the opportunity to study abroad, he was excited because "Chemistry can get lost in textbook learning and memorizing."Student Feeding Goat

"I wasn't sure how they'd work chemistry into a study abroad program, but we started looking at renewable energy systems that are used around the world and I was excited for the trip because it would give the class some cultural context to the curriculum we go over," said Zercher, now a graduate student at the University of Washington in Seattle. "We moved around a lot and saw a lot of different applications of what we had learned in the course."

Zercher said what he looks for in Chemistry are ways to better society. The study-abroad trip showed him that the United States is lagging the leading countries when it comes to renewable energy. "Maybe I can help change the cultural acceptance of science and how we apply it to renewable energy," he said.

Heidi Kastenholz '19, took the Chemistry and Art Conservation Science tour in 2017, which met during the spring semester to prepare the students for what they would see at conservation and research laboratories in Germany.

She said she chose to go because she's always been interested in art and she wanted "to be able to take what I'm learning in class and see it applied to something I have a great interest in and to be able to learn and to see it in a new way."

The experience so intrigued Kastenholz that she continued to look into conservation science. This summer, she presented a Butler Summer Institute project called "Case Studies of Reference Materials in Conservation Science."

Kastenholz came to Butler wanting to be an optometrist. Until last summer, that was her goal.

"Because of my awesome experience, I'm actually having a really tough time trying to figure out if I do want to do optometry or if I want to pursue a career in culture heritage Chemistry because I think it's a fascinating field that most people don't know about," she says.

As for the Chemistry study abroad class, "I think it's my favorite class I've ever taken at Butler, and this is my fourth year," Kastenholz says. "I think that speaks a lot about what the Chemistry Department has been putting into these short-term study abroad programs. Sometimes, when you're a Chemistry or Biology major, you feel like you can't take that whole semester. But they're making it so easy to be able to go abroad for a short time. I don't know how you can say no to it."

*

Although study abroad is relatively new to Chemistry, it's been part of Butler's sciences programs for at least 30 years, dating back to Biology's first trip to look at marine life in Belize. Physics and Astronomy also has been taking students to Japan, Spain, Chile and China for at least 10 years.

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences believes so strongly in study abroad for science students that it offers financial assistance through Seitz Awards, which assist Natural Science students who desire to study science and conduct research abroad, outside the normal academic classroom setting. Sophomores and junior status majoring in Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics are eligible to apply. (Psychology majors studying Physiological or Cognitive/Neuropsychology, or Anthropology majors studying Biological Anthropology, Primatology, or Archaeology also are eligible to apply.)

The Seitz funds have provided financing for students to study all over the world—China, Tanzania, South Africa—and propelled the careers of graduates who've gone on to research and travel the world fighting infectious diseases.

The Biology Department has been taking students on study-abroad trips to Belize every other year since the 1980s, thanks in part to the Seitz Awards. There, students get what often is their first exposure to the tropics and marine ecosystems in the second largest barrier reef in the world, said Biology Professor Carmen Salsbury, who has led the trip, which goes every other year, since joining the Butler faculty 17 years ago.

"It gives us the opportunity to dive in deeply—excuse the pun—to those particular habitats," she said.

Prior to trip, students spend the first part of the semester learning about marine ecology. In the laboratory, they learn to identify organisms. They come to know what the fish are, as well as the ecology of the invertebrates. When they travel to Belize during spring break—they stay on one of the largest island off the coast of Belize, Ambergris Caye, which has a small fishing village that is a popular tourist destination—they're on or in the water from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM daily.

In evenings, there's class to review everything they saw. The students make a list of species and where they're found so they can see the different patterns of diversity.

They also take one day for a side trip to visit the Mayan ruins and the rainforest.

Salsbury says study abroad trips are important for students to broaden their worldview.

Students Abroad"This goes well beyond science," she says. "The walk from where we stay to the dock is maybe five blocks. The students walk by houses where there are no windows, there are dirt floors, there are feral dogs everywhere. Chickens and roosters wake them up in the morning because they're wandering the streets. The streets aren't paved. It's a very different experience. I don't think you can give students a sense of what's that about until they see it for themselves."

In the years when Biology students aren't going to Belize, they're traveling to Panama for an immersive tropical biology course. There, they walk the Pipeline Road, where over 400 species of birds can be observed at one time or another. They witness researchers collecting bats, take a crane ride more than 130 feet in the air to see the tops of the forest and meet the researchers on Barro Colorado Island, the most intensively studied tropical forest.

That course is heavily subsidized through an endowment from Frank Levinson '75, part of a $5 million gift to the sciences in 2007 that also enabled the University to buy the Big Dawg supercomputer and make upgrades to the Holcomb Observatory telescope. Biology Department Chair Travis Ryan said Levinson's endowment covers more than half the course and also pays for two Butler interns to spend the summer interning at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama.

One of every three Butler interns who works there becomes an author on a paper they helped collect data on, and most have their own independent project they're working on while they're interning, Ryan said.

*

Physics Chair Gonzalo Ordonez said his department has used Seitz Awards for several years. Professor Xianming Han has taken students to China, while Ordonez has gone with others to Japan and Spain.

"That's been really helpful for our students, and it really improves their prospects for grad school," Ordonez said. "They get involved in more serious research and they might get interested in a field that they didn't know before."

Bradley Magnetta '15 went to Osaka on a Seitz Award in the summer of 2014. He was in Japan for a month, studying and collaborating with Ordonez's colleagues there.

Magnetta participated in all the research opportunities available to him at Butler and had a wealth of experience in research in general when he took the study trip.

"I already had a base foundation for my project and I was really ready to start collaborating with people in general," he says. "I knew I wanted to start collaborating. I heard about this program and I knew that Dr. Ordonez had colleagues working on similar things that I was interested in. So it was a natural fit to pick Japan and Osaka."

He describes the experience as "excellent," not just academically but on a personal level. It was his first opportunity to leave the country, he collaborated with a graduate research group—"which as an undergrad was a really cool experience"—and he got to be around different people from different backgrounds and discover that there's a universal language in sciences and mathematics.

Magnetta said he went in with questions on his project and, through collaboration, was able to answer them. He published the results a couple of years later.

Today, Magnetta is working on a doctorate in applied physics at Yale University and grateful to have had the chance to study abroad.

"I absolutely recommend it," Magnetta said. "A trip like this really adds clarity because once I get into grad school, I felt very comfortable. When I joined a research group, it was a very familiar feeling because I had already spent a month with a graduate level research group in Japan. So it prepared me for what the group dynamics were. That trip prepared me for my future in a number of ways and I would recommend it to anyone."

Study Abroad Group in Germany
AcademicsStudent Life

Going Places: Studying Abroad in the Sciences

Although study abroad is relatively new to Chemistry, it's been part of Butler's sciences programs for at least 30 years.

Derek Dekoning ’18

Student Profile

Major / Program: Risk Management/MIS

 

Derek DeKoning spent a lot of his free time this summer—10–15 hours a week, he estimates—helping to establish Butler’s new MJ Student-Run Insurance Company. The payback: By the time DeKoning graduates, he will have made four Butler-paid trips to Bermuda, where the company is licensed.

“You can’t complain about that,” he said with a smile.

DeKoning came to Butler from Atlanta, Georgia, as an Exploratory Business major. As he took classes, he began to select majors, starting with Management Information Systems. He knew something about risk management—his father is in reinsurance—so he had exposure to the industry. But it wasn’t until taking Professor Zach Finn’s class creating the “captive” insurance company, which insures University-owned properties such as the live mascot Trip and the Holcomb Observatory telescope, that he found his place.

“Insurance is a great industry to be in, and my experience at Butler has given me so much real-world experience, both through my internships and my experience with the captive, that it should be a big advantage for me,” he said.

Since coming to Butler, DeKoning interned at a suburban Atlanta software company called Concurrent and the cyber-insurance company INSUREtrust. In fall 2017, he interned at M.J. Schuetz Insurance Services Inc. in downtown Indianapolis. He also is an active member in the Phi Delta Theta fraternity and works a part-time job at Woodstock Country Club.

DeKoning said he’s still deciding what he wants to do after graduation—perhaps work for a brokerage or independent insurance agency, or maybe do something in captive management. “Within risk management and insurance there’s so many different career paths that you can take,” he said.

But overall, he said, “I’ve just been thrilled with the environment Butler has provided and the class sizes. The professors I’ve had have been really dedicated to what they’re doing. Butler was my top choice on my list of schools and I’m glad to have been able to come here and end up in the Program I’m in.”

 

 

 

Derek
Student LifePeople

Derek Dekoning ’18

Derek DeKoning spent a lot of his free time this summer—10–15 hours a week, he estimates—helping to establish Butler’s new MJ Student-Run Insurance Company.

Derek

Derek Dekoning ’18

Student Profile
AcademicsStudent Life

David Brooks to Deliver Spring Commencement Address

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 06 2018

David Brooks, an op-ed columnist for The New York Times, and a commentator on The PBS Newshour, NPR’s All Things Considered, and NBC’s Meet the Press, will deliver Butler University's 162nd Commencement address on Saturday, May 12, at Hinkle Fieldhouse.

Brooks will receive an honorary doctor of humane letters. In addition, Butler will honor the legacy of the late Julia and Andre Lacy by presenting posthumous honorary doctor of humane letters degrees in their memory. Nearly 900 students are expected to receive their diplomas. Commencement will start at 10:00 AM.

“Butler has made a concerted effort to celebrate civil discourse this year, both inside and outside the classroom,” President James Danko said. “Our campus has welcomed thought leaders who demonstrate humility and respect for diverse opinions—including Senator Richard Lugar, Congressman Lee Hamilton, Rev. Dr. Jamie Washington, historian Doris Kearns-Goodwin—and now author, columnist, and commentator David Brooks. They each bring to life the greater good that can be achieved through intellectual and civic engagement.”

Brooks has been a columnist at The New York Times since 2003, weighing in on the most pressing issues of our time. He has also written four books, the most recent of which was a New York Times bestseller.

In his most recent book, The Road to Character, Brooks writes that we live in a culture that encourages us to think about how to be wealthy and successful, but many of us are left inarticulate about how to cultivate the deepest inner life. He suggests we should confront our own weaknesses and grow in response.

Brooks earned a bachelor’s degree in history from the University of Chicago and, from there, became a police reporter for the City News Bureau, a news service owned by the Chicago Tribune and Sun Times. He then worked at The Washington Times and The Wall Street Journal for nine years, serving as op-ed editor at The Journal.

Brooks has covered Russia, the Middle East, South Africa and European affairs. While at The Journal, he also served as movie critic and editor of the book review section.

Recognized as champions of business and education throughout Central Indiana, the Lacy Family offered their time, talent, and philanthropy to causes that improved communities and the well-being of others. Their most notable act of generosity came in 2016, when they made the largest gift ever given by an individual or family to Butler, $25 million, renaming the School of Business the Andre B. Lacy School of Business.

Butler's selection of commencement speakers and honorary degree recipients is a result of a nomination process, the feedback received from Butler community members, and the formal approval of the Board of Trustees.

More about Spring 2018 Commencement activities is available at www.butler.edu/commencement.

 

Media contact:
Rachel Stern
rstern@butler.edu
317-940-9257

 

 

 

AcademicsStudent Life

David Brooks to Deliver Spring Commencement Address

The op-ed columnist for The New York Times will deliver Butler University's 162nd Commencement address on Saturday, May 12, at Hinkle Fieldhouse.

Apr 06 2018 Read more

Kate Holtz

Student Profile

Intended Major
Risk Management and Insurance and Finance
Expected Grad Date
May 2019
Extracurricular Activities
Butler University Student Foundation, Delta Gamma - Alpha Tau Chapter, Butler University Dance Marathon, Butler Student Ambassador
Hometown
Godfrey, IL
High School
Marquette Catholic High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
The conference room on the second floor of Fairbanks


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

The Risk Manager of a company in the healthcare industry!

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

My favorite course at Butler was Business Statistics with Josh Owens. The subject material was very interesting to me and Professor Owens was able to apply every concept in the course to real-life applications and experiences. The ability for Butler professors, specifically in my experience with the Lacy School of Business, to share personal real-world experiences has been invaluable to my academic experience.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

To me, the best way to describe Butler is as a Community. Everyone looks out for one another; everyone is friendly and approachable; all students and faculty truly want to help whomever they can. My Butler Community grows more and more each year as I take more classes, join different organizations, meet with students based on similar interests or career paths. However, I think the most notable part about Butler is that my Butler Community includes everyone at Butler - even those individuals I do not know well or at all.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

I am already able to see how my Butler experience will able to help me after graduation! From a career perspective, Butler opens an unbelievable amount of doors in terms of job opportunities and network connections. I also know my ability to join a multitude of extracurricular activities and obtain multiple leadership opportunities on campus will help me in terms of personal development and "people skills" far after I graduate.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

This is such a hard one! The amazing memories at Butler are too many to even count at this point. I would say one of my favorites is always homecoming - I love seeing all the alumni come back to a place they still hold so close in their hearts. All the reunions, memories, and pure happiness of being back on campus create an infectious happy atmosphere for all present.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

From the beginning of my college decision process, I focused on size, the presence of a good business school, and extracurricular opportunities. To be completely honest, however, I ended up choosing Butler based solely on a feeling I had while being on campus. There was just something about this place that made me never want to leave - it sounds incredibly cheesy, but that was exactly how I felt. I felt comfortable, at home, and surrounded by so many genuine and friendly people. I am thankful every day I acted on that feeling, because I now get to experience that sense of comfort every single day.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

It makes me incredibly proud to be a Bulldog watching my peers and their accomplishments. There are so many people worthy of extreme recognition on this campus. From planning campus-wide events, scoring prestigious internships or job offers, to winning in athletics - Butler is full of some extremely talented students. They all make me proud.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

Personally, the Butler Way simply embodies the mindset of Butler students. At Butler, students are motivated, talented but humble, they put others first, and never expect anything in return. Students at Butler are simply a different breed, and that is something that I am incredibly proud to be a part of.

Kate Holtz
Student Life

Kate Holtz

Kate finds pride in the accomlishments of her peers and how it reflects on the Butler Community.

Kate Holtz

Kate Holtz

Student Profile

Grace Langford

Student Profile

Intended Major
Actuarial Science and Spanish
Expected Grad Date
May 2020
Extracurricular Activities
Butler University Dance Marathon Marketing Director, Butler University Student Foundation Alumni Relations Director, Radiate Bible Study Treasurer, Alpha Phi, Gamma Iota Sigma
Hometown
Avon, IN
High School
Avon High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
ResCo D2


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Product Development Actuary

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

My favorite course was my First Year Seminar, Faith, Doubt, and Reason. I am an actuarial science major and came into college only wanting to take classes in my major. However, all first year students are required to take a First Year Seminar. Faith, Doubt, and Reason stretched my mind every time I went to class. I enjoyed the discussions and how open minded the professor is. After my professor took me out to coffee to talk more about the class, l ended up becoming a religion minor! Now, I appreciate the balance in my class schedules as I get to bounce back and forth between classes on shorting stocks and financial derivatives to process theology and God of the Gaps.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

The Butler community is my sorority, my workplace, my friends in my classes, and my friends in my organizations. One of the best parts of Butler is that there is so much overlap in these groups with the same people. Therefore, you really know your community and feel like you have a place to call home. At the same time, there are always new Bulldogs to meet and so many amazing people at Butler!

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

My Butler experience will equip me extensively for my career as an actuary. I will have passed at least three exams by the time I graduate, which demonstrates the excellence of Butler's actuarial department. In addition, I will have ample job opportunities from Butler's rich network to insurance companies. Beyond actuarial work, I will be prepared to be a productive and educated citizen. My liberal arts education has taught me skills far beyond what I will use in calculating insurance rates.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

My favorite memory is the last day of school last year. I had just finished my last final of my first year at Butler, and my friends and I wanted to celebrate a great first year! Looking around our beloved D2 wing in ResCo, we became extremely sentimental about leaving the next day. We decided to grab dinner and then sit in my best friend's room, as we had many of nights, and reminiscence on the highs and lows of the year. At midnight, we sprinted over to star fountain and jumped into it! (Shhhh!) There was truly nothing better than getting to sit in a dorm room with my best friends and just appreciate how incredible our first years at Butler were.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

Often I was asked what I wanted in a college. Being a highschool student at the time, I was terribly confused at what I wanted in a college since I had never been to college. Ultimately, I looked for my favorite things in high school (community and mentors) in a college. The mentors at Butler University are unmatched. Whether it is a professor taking special interest in students and asking them to go to coffee to discuss how their year is going or upperclassmen taking the time to get to know younger students and mentor them through organizations and classes, there is no shortage of people who will go out of their way to help. In addition, the community of Butler is what truly makes it special. People do not just feel "eh" about Butler. THEY LOVE THE DAWGS! People watch out for each other and truly want the best for each other.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

I am most proud to be a Bulldog because of our culture. Butler fosters a growth mindset, encouraging students to find their fullest potential. Inside and outside the classroom, Butler students support each other. Whether it be cheering for the basketball team, studying for a difficult class, or planning for a philanthropy event, when Butler students do something, they are ALL IN.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler Way is not just a motto or set of values, it embodies daily life in the Butler University student body. The Butler Way is collaborating with friends while studying. The Butler Way is watching someone's personal belongings in Starbucks for them when they leave. The Butler Way is saying "Go Dawgs!" at least once a day. The Butler Way is upperclassmen pouring into younger students to enrich their experience. The Butler Way is professors getting to know you by more than just a grade. The Butler Way is community above all else

Student Life

Grace Langford

Grace liked her First Year Seminar so much she added a minor.

Grace Langford

Student Profile
AcademicsStudent Life

'The Mall' Lets First-Year Students Publish

BY Peyton Thompson '20

PUBLISHED ON Mar 22 2018

First-year class president Elizabeth Bishop is a Marketing and Strategic Communications double-major who has always had a passion for writing.

So when Jim Keating, the instructor in her First-Year Seminar (FYS) course Utopian Experience, and some of her friends encouraged her to submit her writing to The Mall, she said she would.

The Mall is a journal dedicated to showcasing exemplary FYS work. First-year students can submit a piece of literary analysis and criticism, a creative writing piece, or a personal essay. Bishop said she will be submitting an analysis of alienation in literature and why it is so common among characters.

"I'm so excited to have the opportunity to have my work published in The Mall," Bishop said. "I've really enjoyed my FYS and I feel as though it has definitely helped me develop as a writer. I think it's wonderful that Butler is giving us this opportunity and I'm highly anticipating reading everyone's entries!”

The Mall, now in its fifth year, was created by Adjunct Professor Nicholas Reading, with a push from English Professor Susan Neville.

"She sparked the idea of publishing student’s work, and just needed someone to take initiative and do it,” Reading said.

He said students are not required to have a certain grade on their work to submit. It is also possible to submit multiple papers, and in some cases, be published twice.

The most recent edition of The Mall was 201 pages, with all different kinds of pieces submitted by students. In all, 34 papers were published.

Reading said The Mall serves three primary goals:

-To present to the Butler community the FYS program and increase awareness about the program and the work that is produced in FYS courses.

-To build an FYS learning resource for instructors so that they will have the opportunity to use published essays as learning tools in the classrooms and to provide models of exemplary FYS writing to new students.

-To empower first-year students and give their voices and opinions a forum to be heard.

The Mall is edited by FYS students. Throughout the process, students exercise the peer-review and collaborative learning skills practiced in their FYS courses. Similarly, the journal provides a forum for students to be published and have an opportunity to showcase their work.

“Our purpose is to empower students in their writing," Reading said. "That is the end goal. To understand that the written word will always be an integral and indispensable facet of our existence. To understand that as writers, we have the opportunity to participate in larger discussions that work to elevate us all. To own that voice, and use it passionately and responsibly, can be an exhilarating feeling. And we try to showcase the results of that journey.”

Goals of FYS

  • To reflect on significant questions about yourself, your community, and your world.
  • To develop the capacity to read and think critically.
  • To develop the capacity to write clear and persuasive expository and argumentative essays with an emphasis on thesis formation and development.
  • To gain an understanding of basic principles of oral communication as they apply to classroom discussion.
  • To understand the liberal arts as a vital and evolving tradition and to see yourself as agents within that tradition.
  • To develop capacities for careful and open reflection on questions of values and norms.
  • To develop the ability to carry out research for the purpose of inquiry and to support claims.

                                                         

 

 

 

AcademicsStudent Life

'The Mall' Lets First-Year Students Publish

The journal is dedicated to showcasing exemplary FYS work.

Mar 22 2018 Read more

Anne Krietenstein

Student Profile

Intended Major
Biology
Extracurricular Activities
Timmy Global Health, SOG, Kappa Alpha Theta, Undergraduate Research, Biology Club
Hometown
Plainfield, IN
High School
Plainfield High School
Expected Grad Date
May 2018
Favorite Spot on Campus
Hinkle Fieldhouse!!


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?
I would like to work in a science related field, whether that be research, teaching, or medical practice. I simply hope in whatever I do, I utilize my strengths, help others, and find happiness.

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

Tropical Field Biology! In TFB lecture, I learned about coral reef ecosystems (my favorite of all the ecosystems). Then, over Spring Break, our class traveled to San Pedro, Belize to snorkel the second-largest barrier reef in the world. Being able to fully immerse myself in the reef and see the ocean life I had been studying all semester was unforgettable. Additionally, I learned about the severe anthropogenic effects humans have on coral reef survival. With the coral reef systems quickly falling victim to human induced climate change, it is my responsibility to spread the preventative knowledge I have gained from the TFB course. I frequently talk about coral reefs, bleaching, and subsequent consequences to my friends, family, and classmates in hope that someone hears.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community?

The Butler Community is home. At home, you have people who care about you and want you to succeed. The Butler Community is no different. Every member of our community, be it a professor, classmate, friend, or peer, wants each student to have success by their own definition. I find my most comforting communities lie in Butler Student Ambassadors and Kappa Alpha Theta. Each organization is composed of uplifting, positive people that genuinely care about my well being. They take interest beyond the normal surface level conversation and actively participate in being a true member of my community of caring friends.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

As a Butler student, I have learned to believe in myself. I am worthwhile, smart, unique, and should not be forgotten. Over the past four years, with the help of my professors, classmates, and friends, I have gained an incredible amount of self confidence. As an educated woman, I understand I am privileged and I have a great deal of power. It is my responsibility to take this knowledge with me after graduation and put it to use for the good of others. The strength that being a Butler Bulldog has given me will stay with me for the rest of my life. If I can only be proud of one choice I ever made, I made a really good one with Butler University.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

I hate to say it, but I peaked freshman year when my pledge class won First-Year Skits. All of the collaboration, creativity, late nights, patience, and struggles that went into constructing the skit paid off in that moment. It was the first time our pledge class really got to know, understand, and appreciate one another and from those practices, countless friendships formed. I recall looking around at the women surrounding me knowing that they were going to impact my life. I had no idea how right I was going to be.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

I am simple. I only required two things from a university. I needed small class sizes and something more than a diploma to be proud of after graduation. Fortunately, Butler was exactly that. As a senior in high school, I sat in on a class and at the end talked with the biology professor. He was very kind, interested in what I had to say, and said he hoped to see me in class next fall. I immediately felt comfortable in the classroom and sensed that I would absolutely succeed in this environment. Next, Hinkle Fieldhouse and Butler Basketball captured my attention. Standing mid court in Hinkle Fieldhouse, you can feel the spirit. You can almost hear the faint echo of cheering fans and the sound of the buzzer as the winning shot drains in the the bucket. Hinkle magic does not die. Hinkle magic is that something extra that I know I will always be proud of.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

I am proud to be a part of the Butler History Book. 162 years ago, a small Christian University opened its doors to any man and any woman of any color who sought education. That mindset has not ceased. Every student on this campus has a dream, a goal, a life aspiration that they seek to achieve through their education here at Butler. Despite working towards their personal goals, Butler students never hesitate to help a peer. Butler students understand that a campus community environment far surpasses an individualistic driven University. We work much better together than apart and when one of us succeeds, we all succeed.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

As we all know, The Butler Way demands commitment, denies selfishness, and accepts reality, yet seeks constant improvement while promoting the good of the team above self. When I hear the meaning behind the Butler Way, I cannot help but reflect on the friendships I have made at Butler.  My friends are fiercely loyal. They encourage me to face my fears, challenge myself, and they reassure me by reminding me of my own strengths. They would drop anything to help me if I needed it and they continually put the good of our friendship above the good of any situation. Because we are all Butler students, I think the Butler Way subconsciously acts within us and it will forever as long as we live.

Anne Krietenstein
Student Life

Anne Krietenstein

Anne looks to Butler's past and sees how the Butler Community rallies around each other.

Anne Krietenstein

Anne Krietenstein

Student Profile

Camille Ruff

Student Profile

Intended Major
Sociology and Criminology
Expected Grad Date
2020
Extracurricular Activities
BUDM, Delta Gamma
Hometown
Jasper, IN
High School
Jasper High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
The Mall


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Forensic Anthropologist

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

Religions Of The World. It has vastly expanded my horizons and helped me better understand the world around me and those who share it.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

The type of person that is attracted to Butler are the kind of people who really invest in each other. The kind of people who hold the door open for you and call you by name. The kind of people who look out for each other regardless.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

One thing that sets my Butler experience apart is the push for hands-on experience.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

Block Party 2016. The whole school was outside on the mall representing their respective organizations and looking to get involved in someone else's.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

The vibe I got from visiting campus was unmatched by any other university. This is a campus full of intelligent, driven, and passionate students, faculty and staff.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

A top university in academics, athletics and community? This is DAWG NATION.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler Way is pushing yourself and others to be the best versions of themselves in all areas of life.

Student Life

Camille Ruff

He broadened his horizons by learning about world religions.

Camille Ruff

Student Profile

Julia Bartusek

Student Profile

Intended Major
Peace and Conflict Studies and Human Communication and Organizational Leadership
Expected Grad Date
May 2020
Extracurricular Activities
Butler Student Ambassador, Fall Alternative Break Executive Board, Butler University Student Foundation, Ambassadors of Change Team Builder,  Alpha Chi Omega, Fulbright Ambassador
Hometown
New Prague, MN
High School
New Prague High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
The top of the parking garage when the sun is setting! It is absolutely beautiful!


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

As of now, my ultimate goal is to be a public policy analyst for the United States Department of Education. But we will see; I am always ready for a new adventure!

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

This is a tough one. I have honestly enjoyed all of my courses thus far at Butler. But if I had to pick one it would be Activism with Dr. McEvoy-Levy. I took this class last Spring when I had just declared my majors and it completely solidified my decision and passions. In this class, I learned so much about the world around me, people from different corners of the globe, and how to talk about current activism in the news. Dr. McEvoy-Levy also made it known that she believed in me, which I needed at the time. After this course I was so excited to pursue my dreams and continue my education. I had a newfound confidence in my abilities and future.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

I think what is so special about the Butler Community is that it is not just your closest friends or mentors, it is everyone. The Butler Community consists of the stranger you pass on your way to class every single day who waves at you even though you have never had a conversation, the faculty member who you may not know but invests time into your personal development, or the alumni who you meet in the store who yells, "Go Dawgs!" from across the store. Being a part of the Butler Community is knowing that someone will always be there for you no matter the time of day. It is the absolute best feeling to know I am more than a number here; I am a person and valued for what makes me, me.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

My Butler experience has provided me the tools to excel in future graduate school, law school, and in the professional field. I know that, because of the rigorous courses mixed with passionate professors, I will always give full effort in the future. While my Butler experience will help me in my work, it will also help me in my ability to communicate and in the pursuit of even my highest goals. While being at Butler I have learned how to work towards my goals, learn from my failures, and to never doubt my abilities. This will help me as I navigate the world outside of the Butler Bubble.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

This is also a very hard question, as I think every day at Butler has granted me a new favorite memory. But if I had to pick one it would be the day I was offered a spot in the Fulbright Summer Institute. I opened the email walking down the hall in Ross, and when I read "Congratulations!" I ran to my friends' rooms and we all cried together in celebration. I then ran to my advisors and professors, and was met with hugs and so much genuine happiness. Throughout the day I had so many people congratulate me and tell me how proud they were. That same day my First Year Seminar class made me jump in star fountain to celebrate, and my friends surprised me with dinner and little gifts. I felt so special on that day, and was reminded of how strong the Butler Community is. It was such a personal accomplishment that my community recognized and honored me for. I don't think words do that memory justice; it was an incredible day.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

You've probably heard it before, but my primary factor in my college decision was "the feeling." When I looked at colleges I wasn't so much in search of the success statistics or price, as I was searching for the feeling of home, community, and a place I could grow into the person I was destined to be. When I toured Butler I had this feeling, and I knew it would be my future home. It simply felt right. I think this feeling was perpetuated by the balance that Butler strikes between being a small school but with plenty of excitement and opportunity. I knew here I would be treated as a person, not a number, and that I would always have opportunities to grow, to have fun, and to learn. I wanted a college that would be more than the academics, and while Butler has phenomenal academic opportunities, I found a community and a place that would accept me for who I was which is what I valued most.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

My fellow Bulldogs are what make me so proud to be a Butler Bulldog. The friends I have made here will change the world in every possible way. From my friends in pharmacy, to education, to business, to political science and every space in between, Bulldogs lead with their passion. The impact that Butler students have on the world around them and the responsibility they place upon themselves to make the world a better place inspires me every single day and makes me so proud to be a bulldog. I know that one day when I watch the news, I will see my successful and motivated classmates making real-world changes. What makes me even more proud to be a Bulldog is that my classmates are not only passionate and successful in all they do, but they are genuine. The way Bulldogs support each other and love one another is simply outstanding. I am proud to be a Bulldog for many reason, but at the top of the list are my fellow Dawgs.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

To me the Butler Way means to never settle in pursuit of your dreams and to always remember those close to your heart. While being at Butler I have been constantly pushed and challenged to try more and to exceed all expectations. The Butler Way includes thinking about what to do next and how to improve. Bulldogs never settle, we always strive to do more and to be better people. This is possible because of the community fostered here. We support one another, advocate for each other, and push our classmates in a healthy way to achieve what we know they are capable of. The Butler Way is support, it is high achievement, and it is truly how we as students act in our daily lives.

Julia Bartusek
Student Life

Julia Bartusek

Julia felt supported when the entire Butler Community congratulated her on getting into the Fulbright Summer Institute.

Julia Bartusek

Julia Bartusek

Student Profile

Chelsea Groves ’20

Student Profile

Major / Program: Sports Media

Chelsea Groves is the poster child for the importance of paying attention, showing up, and doing your best work.

In early September of her first year at Butler, she and the other Sports Media majors received an email from Creative Media and Entertainment Professor Christine Taylor asking them to contribute to the Bulldog Blitz, a weekly show spotlighting Butler sports. Groves jumped at the chance. She set up an interview with Volleyball Coach Sharon Clark, “and it just started to expand through that.”

Her work on the Blitz, which aired during halftime of games that aired on butlersports.com, led to work with Butler Athletics, where she reported stories about Butler Baseball, the men’s and women’s golf teams, and several other sports.

“I put myself out there and responded to that email,” she said. “It was a big deal for me.”

Now in her sophomore year, “I just want to get better,” she said. “I want to be my absolute best and watch myself grow in other areas. I want to be better in the broadcast area and be prominent and be known for doing a great job.”

Groves came to Butler from Walkerton, Indiana, where her dad was the high school varsity football coach and also coached eighth-grade boy’s basketball. She remembers bringing her stuffed animals and American Girl doll to games when she was little and learning to keep score as she got older.

“I had one of the rosters, I got a pen from my grandma’s purse, and I would put a tally mark next to all the people who scored,” she said. “I just became enthralled with it. My dad was a big reason why I fell into sports.”

Her plan now is to develop her skills in school and ultimately become either a sideline reporter or analyst for men’s college basketball or baseball.

She said Butler is making her better.

“So many people around me—basically everyone—pushes you to be your absolute best all the time,” she said. “They critique me, tell me what to do—and what to do better—and I listen to them because they know what they’re doing and I trust them and I want to step up my game all the time. Butler is an amazing place, and I’m so glad I’m here.”

 

 

 

 

Chelsea Groves
Student LifePeople

Chelsea Groves ’20

Chelsea Groves is the poster child for the importance of paying attention, showing up, and doing your best work.

Chelsea Groves

Chelsea Groves ’20

Student Profile

Darius Hickman ’21

Student Profile

 

Major / Program: Dance Performance

 

It’s fall semester 2017, and first-year student Darius Hickman is getting his first impressions of Butler.

“I love it so far,” he said. “The thing I love the most is the people. I didn’t realize the people were going to be so nice. I really enjoy the people here—as well as my classes; I love all my classes—but the people, I really enjoy. I love meeting new people every day. So that’s been great.”

The Dance Performance major and Education minor said he didn’t know what to expect from Butler. In fact, for a long time, he planned to join a professional ballet company after high school rather than attend college. But his mother pointed out that dancers get injured and he should have an education to fall back on.

So he went to a college fair in Boca Raton, took a class with Butler Dance Professor Marek Cholewa, “and I fell in love with everything about it.”

Hickman came to Butler a bit of a celebrity—this summer, he was a contestant on the Fox network series So You Think You Can Dance, where he finished in the top 100. He also learned a few things about himself during that process: He’s persistent and resilient (the day he auditioned, he spent six hours in line and another four waiting once he got inside), and celebrity makes him a little uncomfortable.

Rather than shoot for superstardom on television, he said, he’s excited to experience personal growth over the next four years. “I’m excited to see where I will be in 2021 and see how I’ve changed. Because change is good, I think.”

He plans to spend the next four years preparing to be in a professional ballet company.

“I think I’ll definitely be ready by then, especially by being here,” he said. “I know they’re going to take care of me and make sure I’m ready when that time comes.”

Darius Hickman
Student LifePeople

Darius Hickman ’21

The Dance Performance major and Education minor said he didn’t know what to expect from Butler.

Darius Hickman

Darius Hickman ’21

Student Profile

California Girl to Butler Bulldog

By Morgan Skeries '20

When I tell people I'm from California, their response is usually the same. "Wow, why would you ever want to come here?" It is a valid question. Out of all the schools I applied to and visited, why Butler University? Before I answer that, let me walk you through my college application process.
 

Morgan at BeachI knew I wanted to go away for college because I wanted the ability to live on my own away from home. I was looking at schools all over the Midwest and East coast, and I knew I wanted to attend a small, liberal arts school. I was extremely interested in having small class sizes that would emphasize my learning and for my professors to know me on a first-name basis. It was important for me to have these connections with my classmates and my professors, so I would always have help if I needed it.

My college counselor at the time was helping me apply to schools that she thought would be a great fit for me, academically and socially. After doing some research, I found that Butler checked off many boxes on my list, including an impressive school for communication degrees, as I knew I wanted to study journalism. I sent in my application not thinking much of it. In the fall, I received a letter saying I was accepted to Butler University.

As soon as I stepped onto campus, something clicked. My college counselor was right, Butler did have everything I was looking for. Butler had a beautiful campus, small class sizes, and a college-town feel with a city only 15 minutes away. I remember thinking to myself, "I could really picture myself going here."


Although the weather was something I had to get used to, I am making amazing friends, and my professors are genuinely interested in my academic success. I am a member of a sorority and on the Student Government Association. As a journalism major, it is really beneficial that I live in a major city that has a variety of media sources available to me. I do not think I would have had the same opportunities at another school if I had not gone to Butler.


Although I miss my home in sunny California, I could not be happier with my college choice. I'm proud I get to yell, "Go Dawgs!" and be a part of a supportive community of people like me.

Morgan
Student Life

California Girl to Butler Bulldog

Although I miss my home in sunny California, I could not be happier with my college choice.

Morgan

California Girl to Butler Bulldog

By Morgan Skeries '20

Five Questions With A Butler RA

They’re one of the first people you meet on move-in day, and some of the last smiles you’ll see before you leave Butler University. Murjanatu Mutuwa is a senior RA in Irvington, the new, state-of-the-art residence hall on campus. Along with pursuing a double major in Strategic Communications and International Studies, Murjanatu spends countless hours with her residents on a daily basis. Butler RA’s are full-time students who dedicate their time to helping students find their home away from home on campus. Murjanatu gives a bit of insight into her leadership experience.


Why did you decide to become an RA?

“I thought it made sense. I loved being able to care for people and I like planning things. I also make a mean door dec, so I thought, ‘Hey, maybe this job was made for me!’”


What's your favorite memory as an RA?

“I threw my resident's a formal. It was so fun to see them all get dressed up and dance together. Afterwards, they sent me a card with a photo of all of us smiling together.”


How do you think being an RA has impacted your Butler experience?

“This isn't just a job, these are the people you live with and the people you end up caring the most for.”


What are some of the challenges you've had to overcome as an RA?

“It's a huge time commitment, and it's hard to be a student with all the academic and social expectations. Along with the school work, you are also a support system, advisor, and rule-enforcer for 40 individuals. It is hard to juggle all of that and to feel as though you are doing it well.”


What is your advice to future students interested in becoming an RA?

“It is the most rewarding role one can have on campus. If you take it seriously, you'll play a major role in your residents' lives, and they will a play key role in your Butler journey.”

 

Murjanatu
Student Life

Five Questions With A Butler RA

Murjanatu Mutuwa explains her experience as one of the most influential people on campus, an RA.

Delaney Carter

Student Profile

Intended Major
Critical Communications and Media Studies, Minors in Sociology, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Chinese
Expected Grad Date
2019
Extracurricular Activities
Greek Life, Butler Ambassadors for Special Olympics, Butler Student Ambassadors
Hometown
St. Paul, MN
High School
St. Paul Academy
Favorite Spot on Campus
Hinkle Fieldhouse or Starbucks


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Working for a non-profit organization that is focused on youth development (hopefully women and girls).

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

My favorite course at Butler has been Trumpism and the American Democracy because it was interesting to me to discuss such a political topic while it was happening. As the presidency continues to unfold, my professor will update the information to keep us up to date with the current political sphere. I've learned the trends of politicians before Trump and how those philosophies affect his presidency today.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

The Butler Community is complex. There are many organizations, groups, and majors that facilitate a unique discussion and an intricate community that allows many philosophies to flourish. My Butler Community is the people I live with, take classes with, and say hi to walking around campus. The people that make me laugh, smile, and push me to be a better person.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

I will understand that opinions are very different and that everyone has their own unique perspective of the world. Each individual has a diverse belief on how they can change the world; no major, passion, hobby, or job means more or less than another.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

My favorite memory of Butler so far has been Spring Sports. Planning it this year through Butler Ambassadors for Special Olympics (an organization I was selected to join), I was able to plan and facilitate a great day of twelve hour sporting events. It was so enjoyable to not only see a great amount of Butler students participate in all of the games but also to support and give money to Special Olympics.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

I wanted a school that had a large-school atmosphere in a smaller/medium-school setting. I wanted school spirit that made me feel just as passionate about a university as the student body felt. When I came to campus I was so thrilled to hear all of the students cheering at tours "go dawgs!" "come to Butler" "your tour guide rocks!". It made me excited to think that they cared so much about making my college process fun and appealing. When I visited several classes with a True Blue student, the teachers and students cared to ask me where I was from and most importantly what I was passionate about. I wanted students who want to help each other, not tear each other down; students who would cheer for each other when they do something good and pick each other up when they are worried, stressed, or not feeling their best. And that is exactly what I found when I visited and talked to Butler students.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

What makes me most proud to be a Bulldog are the many organizations that use their privilege to benefit and help others. Through our various groups on campus we can use our friends, families, and resources to bring awareness to certain causes and support the Indianapolis community in some way or another.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler Way means to always support those who are around you; to pay for someone in the Starbucks line or help pick up someones books if they fall; to call out when injustice is being had and to stand up for what you believe in. The Butler Way means that even if an individual may not benefit directly from an action, it doesn't mean others won't, and benefiting others is the greatest thing we can accomplish as a university. The Butler Way also means to do as best as we can in each endeavor, class, or organization so that we can expand our perspectives and better the world around us.

Delaney Carter
Student Life

Delaney Carter

Delaney will understand the diverse perspectives and opinions she encounters in the world.

Delaney Carter

Delaney Carter

Student Profile

Bettine Gibbs ’19

Student Profile

Bettine Gibbs said their “Butler moment” came at the beginning of her third year, during the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences’ White Coat Ceremony that marks students’ transition from the study of preclinical to clinical health science.

“It lets the students know that this is the time to be serious,” they said. “It’s not a game. You have people’s lives in your hands. Having all the faculty participate was really nice, and the speech the Dean gave was helpful in guiding me, having me think about which route I want to take and understanding that it’s not always going to be a straight line to where you want to go.”

Gibbs, who chose Butler because earning their PharmD degree would take six years here rather than eight at another school, has often traveled the road less taken. For starters, while Pharmacy is typically all-consuming for students, they found time to walk on to the track and field team for two years, competing in the BIG EAST outdoor championships at Villanova and indoor championships in New York. In addition, they have been an officer in the Black Student Union, where they have pushed for more diversity and inclusivity at Butler.

Then, because they had an internship over summer 2017—at Eli Lilly and Company, in the Bioproduct Research and Development sector—they spent the fall 2017 semester finishing her Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences at IU Health Methodist Hospital. They worked a full eight-hour day each Saturday or Sunday alongside pharmacists and physicians, making medication recommendations. (Their classmates completed their IPPE’s in larger blocks of time.)

And finally, while most of their classmates tend toward clinical pharmacy, Gibbs has decided they want to be a pharmaceutical scientist. Their goal is to either work for a company like Lilly, become a tenure-track professor at a research institution where they would have her own lab, or teach at a liberal arts college like Butler.

Gibbs said professors at Butler have backed her decisions.

“Finding a home in the Pharmaceutical Sciences Department has been the best thing about Butler,” they said. “I found support there when I didn’t want to go the traditional clinical route. I was able to find support in the Pharmaceutical Sciences Department as well as the Chemistry Department—and even some professors in Political Science and History and Anthropology helped me have ideas about what route I would like to go. It taught me that you don’t have to stay in one place in this University. You can go to different colleges and people will help you out.”

 

 

 

Bettine Gibbs
Student LifePeople

Bettine Gibbs ’19

Gibbs, who chose Butler for a PharmD degree has often traveled the road less taken.

Bettine Gibbs

Bettine Gibbs ’19

Student Profile
AcademicsStudent Life

Butler Selects Top 100 Students

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 26 2018

The Alumni Association has announced Butler University's Top 100 students, honoring the top juniors and seniors for the 2017–2018 academic year.

The list is below, and Butler Collegian coverage is here.

The Top 100 students are determined by the Top 100 Selection Committee composed of representatives of each of the six colleges, student affairs, academic affairs, and alumni. Each candidate is judged against the core values of the program on a numeric scale. At the end of the judging period, all scores are tabulated, and the Top 100 students are selected.

Visit the Top 100 website to view guidelines for the program.  

The Alumni Association in conjunction with the Office of Student Affairs conducts the Outstanding Student Recognition program. The program is in its 57th year.

Due to a tie in scoring, more than 100 students are being honored for the 2017–2018 academic year. All honorees will be recognized at the Outstanding Student Banquet on April 13, when the Top 15 Most Outstanding Students will be announced. 

Full Listing of Honorees (in alphabetical order)

Katie Allee, senior, Communication Science and Disorders, College of Communication (CCOM)

Lynn Alsatie, junior, International Studies, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS)

Siena Amodeo, junior, International Management, Lacy School of Business (LSB)

Deborah Arehart, senior, Middle-Secondary Education, College of Education (COE)

Thomas Baldwin, senior, Biochemistry, LAS

Adam Bantz, senior, Strategic Communication, CCOM

Alex Bartlow, senior, Accounting, LSB

Leah Basford, senior, International Management, LSB

Zach Bellavia, senior, Economics, LSB

Bri Borri, junior, Psychology, LAS

Lauren Briskey, junior, Actuarial Sciences, LAS

Amy Brown, senior, Accounting, LSB

Rachel Burke, junior, Mathematics, LAS

Jeremy Caylor, junior, Biology, LAS

Parker Chalmers, junior, Risk Management, LSB

Lauren Ciulla, junior, Biology, LAS

Brooklyn Cohen, junior, ELED.BS, COE

Hannah Coleman, senior, Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (COPHS)

Dana Connor, senior, Communication Science & Disorders, CCOM          

Vickie Cook, junior, Biochemistry, LAS

Meredith Coughlin, senior, Human Communication & Organizational Leadership, CCOM

Ryan Cultice, junior, Accounting, LSB

Ashley Dale, senior, Physics, LAS

Erin Dark, junior, Pharmacy, COPHS

Darby DeFord, junior, Biology, LAS

Matthew Del Busto, junior, English Literature, LAS

David Dunham, senior, Middle-Secondary Education, COE

Suzanne Dwyer, junior, Pharmacy, COPHS

Shelby Eaton, junior, Sociology and Psychology, LAS

Katie Edwards, senior, Marketing, LSB

Ashlyn Edwards, junior, Philosophy, LAS

Sarah Elam, junior, International Studies, LAS

John Evans, junior, Finance, LSB

Chiara Evelti, senior, International Studies, LAS

Hannah Faccio, senior, Psychology, LAS

Megan Farny, junior, Health Sciences, COPHS

Elizabeth Fecht, senior, Middle-Secondary Education, COE

Megan Fitzgerald, junior, Elementary Education, COE

Annie Foster, junior, Spanish, LAS

Caitlyn Foye, senior, Biology, LAS

Travis Freytag, junior, Actuarial Sciences, LAS

Jackie Gries, junior, Pharmacy, COPHS

Nathan Hall, junior, History and Political Science, LAS

Hannah Hartzell, senior, Strategic Communication, CCOM

Patrick Holden, senior, Pharmacy, COPHS

Jonny Hollar, junior, Marketing, LSB

Kate Holtz, junior, Risk Management, LSB

Nicholas Huang, senior, Finance, LSB

Karla Jeggle, senior, Actuarial Science, LAS

Nathan Jent, junior, Health Sciences, COPHS

Drew Johnson, senior, Pharmacy, COPHS

Jakob Jozwiakowski, senior, Chemistry, LAS

Colton Junod, senior, Biology, LAS

Libby Kaufman, senior, Elementary Education, COE

Nida Khan, junior, Pharmacy, COPHS

Rachel Koehler, junior, International Studies, LAS

Caroline Kuremsky, senior, Elementary Education, COE

Carly Large, senior, Accounting, LSB

Emily Lawson, junior, Chemistry, LAS

Rachael Lewis, senior, Marketing, LSB

Becca Lewis, junior, Biology, LAS

Kayla Long, junior, Critical Communication & Media Studies, CCOM

Nicholas Maicke, senior, International Studies, LAS

Kelsey McDougall, senior, Biology, LAS

Kirsten McGrew, senior, Pharmacy, COPHS

Kasey Meeks, junior, Health Sciences, COPHS

Rachel Metz, senior, Health Sciences, COPHS

Joshua Murdock, senior, Pharmacy, COPHS

Kelly Murphy, senior, Organizational Communications, CCOM    

Garrick Nate, junior, International Studies, LAS

Emily Nettesheim, junior, Health Sciences, COPHS

Alexis Neyman, junior, Biology, LAS

Olivia Nilsen, junior, Communication Science & Disorders, CCOM

Gehrig Parker, senior, Sports Media, CCOM

Justin Poythress, junior, Accounting, LSB

Tori Puhl, junior, Actuarial Science, LAS

Salman Qureshi, senior, Biology, LAS

Courtney Raab, senior, Health Sciences, COPHS

Jordan Rauh, senior, Pharmacy, COPHS

Allison Reitz, senior, Communication Science & Disorders, CCOM          

Kate Richards, senior, Communication Science & Disorders, CCOM         

Sophie Robertson, junior, Dance, Jordan College of the Arts (JCA)

Abdul Saltagi, junior, Biology, LAS

Kaitlyn Sawin, senior, Marketing, LSB

Olivia Schwan, junior, Marketing, LSB

Abby Sikorcin, junior, Health Sciences, COPHS

Sundeep Singh, senior, Biology, LAS

Molly Smith, senior, International Studies, LAS

Maree Smith, senior, Marketing, LSB

Lilli Southern, junior, Communication Science & Disorders, CCOM

Madison Stefanski, junior, Elementary Education, COE

Isaiah Strong, junior, Recording Industry Studies, CCOM

Jennifer Sutor, junior, Marketing, LSB

Natalie Van Ochten, senior, Biology, LAS

Alexander Waddell, junior, Accounting, LSB

Skyler Walker, senior, Pharmacy, COPHS

Kate Warma, junior, Science, Technology and Society, LAS

Riley Wildemann, senior, Pharmacy, COPHS

Alexander Wright, senior, Chemistry, LAS

Heather Wright, senior, Music, JCA

Jill Yager, senior, Biology, LAS

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

AcademicsStudent Life

Butler Selects Top 100 Students

Recipients to be recognized at April 13 banquet.

Jan 26 2018 Read more

Lauren Boswell ’20

Student Profile

Major / Program: Elementary Education

Lauren Boswell says she found her calling in a program at her high school called Cadet Teacher, which takes college-bound students into elementary schools to give them a sense of what it’s like to be a teacher.

“In that class, we got to visit the College of Education here and I just fell in love with it,” she said. “I fell in love with the faculty and all the ideals of the program. That was the main reason I came here. And I’m a big basketball fan, so that’s always a plus.”

Boswell said one of the great lessons she’s learned in the College of Education is that in teaching, “it’s all about the kids and the importance of individualizing learning for each student. You need to look at each student and help them learn based on their ways of learning.”

In addition to her coursework, she’s continued her longtime involvement with Best Buddies, a program that matches volunteers with people who have intellectual and developmental disabilities. “I’ve always loved working with people with disabilities, helping them be the best they can be. And I feel like I’ve learned so much more from them than I could ever teach them. They always have such a positive outlook on life, and that’s something I try to emulate.”

Ultimately, Boswell hopes to be a third-grade teacher. “They’re just developing those personalities. They’re getting witty and kind of funny and they’ll understand some of your humor, so that’s my ideal grade. But anywhere from kindergarten to fourth grade, I’d be really happy.”

And she said Butler has proved to be the right place for her.

“There’s just something about when you step on this campus,” she said. “I feel like it has such a great atmosphere. Even when I came back after being away for the summer, I felt happy. I felt like I was home. Even though I only live 30 minutes away, there’s something about the people here. It was so easy to make friends. Everyone here is just so kind and so enthusiastic about life. I’m really happy that I’m here.”

 

 

 

Lauren
Student LifePeople

Lauren Boswell ’20

Boswell said one of the great lessons she’s learned in the College of Education is that in teaching, “it’s all about the kids and the importance of individualizing learning for each student."

Lauren

Lauren Boswell ’20

Student Profile
Student Life

Welcome to Shakespeare: 'A Midsummer Night's Dream'

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 12 2018

Shakespeare moves onto the big stage Wednesday, February 28, at 7:00 PM when Butler Theatre presents a 90-minute adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream in Clowes Memorial Hall.

Tickets are $10-$25 and available at the box office.

Veteran Indianapolis actress Constance Macy will direct the production, which Butler Theatre Department Chair Diane Timmerman has adapted from the original script. Timmerman is the Producing Artistic Director of Indy Shakes, which performs Shakespeare at White River State Park each summer.

"This is straight up, welcome to Shakespeare," Macy said. "We decided to keep it sparse and open and let the story speak for itself."

That story, as summarized by Butler Theatre, is a "classic comedy that revolves around mistaken identities, lovers chasing each other through the woods, rustic workers trying to put on a play, and fairies creating magic everywhere." The Royal Shakespeare Company describes the story as one of "order and disorder, reality and appearance and love and marriage. Theseus, Duke of Athens, and Hippolyta, Queen of the Amazons, are to be married and great celebrations are planned."

"It's one of my favorite plays by Shakespeare," Macy said. "It's funny—very, very funny—it's a love story, there's magic, order vs. disorder, which is in almost every Shakespeare plot. But it's primarily a play about love. Because it's a comedy, the love is fickle and constant and jealous, and there's as much discord as harmony in these couples, almost to a ridiculous degree."

To stage the play, Associate Professor of Theatre Rob Koharchik designed a sparse set using lights rather than furniture and props. Strings of lights hanging from the ceiling will be used to create the illusion of the Port of Athens, trees in the forest, and more. Indiana Repertory Theatre Costume Designer Guy Clark is dressing the cast in clothing that reflects what Macy calls "a modern timelessness."

"It's not specific to any time or place," she said. "It's not Athens, but it's not Indianapolis. I just want it to feel accessible."

Macy said that when Timmerman asked her to direct the production, she was eager to do so. Macy used to teach acting at Butler as an Adjunct Professor.

"I always feel like the Butler students are a cut above everybody else," she said. "They're more focused, they're more eager, they're more enthusiastic about the work. So it's always fun to work with students here."

Macy also serves as a role model for students who want to learn how to forge an acting career while living in a small market. She has been an actor in Indianapolis for 25-plus years.

"That's something I'm very proud of," she said. "I have young people ask me about that all the time. They say, 'I want a house with a yard and a family and a dog and an acting career. How did you do it?' Certainly, I went through some slumps and there were times I thought if I'd only moved to L.A. or New York, I might have a better career. But ultimately, I do have a good career and a good life."

And she's having fun with A Midsummer Night's Dream.

"This play is funny," Macy said. "We end laughing. I think it will be cool to look at. The students who are in it are fully committed. A lot of them are playing multiple parts, so that is a challenge for them. I think people will dig it for the look of it, for the straightforwardness of it, for the comedy of it."

The cast:

Hermia/Snug: Haley Loquercio, Chicago

Helena/Starveling: Sarah Ault, Overland Park, Kansas

Demetrius/Snout: Isaiah Moore, Indianapolis

Lysander/Flute: Ian Hunt, Cincinnati

Bottom: Jeffrey Bird, Muncie, Indiana

Quince/Egeus: Emma Summers, Des Moines, Iowa

Oberon: Peter Jones, Lakewood, Ohio

Puck: Evie Davis, Nashville, Tennessee

Titania: Karina Milvain, Colorado Springs, Colorado

Peaseblossom: Hailey DeWolf, Hammond, Indiana

Cobweb: Glenn Williams, Bethesda, Maryland

Mustardseed: Jade Coley, Indianapolis

Theseus: Jacob Herr, St. John, Indiana

Hippolyta: Sydney Simms, Chicago

 

 

(In the photo: Isaiah Moore, Haley Loquercio, Sarah Ault)

                                        

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

                                                                               

 

Student Life

Welcome to Shakespeare: 'A Midsummer Night's Dream'

Butler Theatre's one-night-only performance is February 28.

Feb 12 2018 Read more

Natalie Jacobs

Student Profile

Intended Major
Special Education and Middle Secondary Education (Social Studies)
Expected Grad Date
May 2019
Extracurricular Activities
Morton Finney Diversity and Leadership Scholar; Kappa Alpha Theta; Greeks as Educators, Advocates, and Resources; Panhellenic Association- Recruitment Counselor; Resident Assistant- Residential College; Student Education Association (16-17 President)
Hometown
Fishers, IN
High School
Fishers High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
The bench at the top of the Bell Tower Stairs


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

7th Grade Teacher

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

Environmental Justice with Dr. Robin Turner. Not only is Dr. Turner my actual hero, but this class taught me more about the world and myself then I knew was possible and I met my best friend Jimmy. It was pretty stellar.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

I am blessed that my Butler community is multifaceted, interconnected, and constant. I can't walk on campus without seeing someone I love, who inspires me, who supports me. Butler is tight knit. We care. When you are a part of the Butler community you are part of something bigger than yourself, something that pushes you, something you invest in. We celebrate every fantastic moment, we grow from the hard ones, and we put each other before ourselves.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

As an educator, the Butler Way is something I want to bring to my classroom. No matter where I am, I want to ensure that I demand commitment from those around me, and that I deny my own selfishness; That I accept reality, yet seek constant improvement for not only myself but from those I care for. Most of all, I will always put my team above myself. Butler has taught me to care for others in a way that also betters myself.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

I met one of my best friends to this day the first night of college. Chris and I were on the same Family Feud team for the Atherton Takeover during Welcome Week. Chris and I clicked instantly. We had similar interests, grew up near each other, and were both really nervous about college. In my first few weeks, Chris showed me how fun college was going to be—meeting new people, having deep conversations, going to eat together, just coexisting with your best friends. I still vividly remember one night Chris and I were walking around campus. We got Starbucks right before it closed on a Saturday night and just walked and talked. We found a spot underneath the monument in Cornerstone Plaza to watch the stars and ask questions about life, what we expected college to be like, and about one another. To this day I still think about that conversation. How different we both are, how much different college is then we thought it would be, but mostly how lucky I am to have found such a wonderful friend right away and someone who I still call my friend today.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

When I grew up I was lucky enough to live in close proximity to Butler. I came to shows at Clowes, on tours in middle school, and my two best friends who lived down the street came to Butler. Fast forward to my time to choose a college, when I pictured a college campus I still pictured Butler—small, green, interconnected, everything in walking distance. And then I did my research and realized how different Butler was from most other campuses. Simply put, I wanted to be at Butler, and didn't know how I was going to make that happen. I poured my heart into my application, I worked hard my senior year to keep my grades up, and I crossed my fingers that financial aid would come through. During December of my senior year I found out I was accepted into the Butler class of 2019, but by that point I already thought I had my mind made up to go compete for a speech and debate team at a university down the street. On the way home from a subpar campus visit to that institution, I got lost and found myself on Clarendon Dr. I could see Butler's observatory, BU, and tree-lined mall appearing in the sunset. As I pulled up to the stop sign at Clarendon and Hampton I looked around and saw a banner on a light post that read "Bulldogs Never Settle" and I knew if I wasn't at Butler I would be settling on my dream school. I called my mom and cried, "I'm going to Butler!" and I haven't regretted it once.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

The Passion. The passion for Butler Basketball. The passion to make change. The passion about our studies. The passion about this place. The passion about caring for one and other. Nothing makes me happier to be at Butler than knowing that people LOVE this place and put their whole selves into leaving this place better than they found it.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler Way is quite simply the high and unwavering expectations I hold myself and my peers too. I care about people because I know they care about me. Being a part of the Butler Way is being a part of something larger than yourself.

Student Life

Natalie Jacobs

She wants to bring The Butler Way to her classroom after she graduates.

Natalie Jacobs

Student Profile
AcademicsStudent Life

A Voyage to Irwin Library Yields Research Opportunities

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 17 2018

Only a couple of copies of the book Atlas to Cook’s Third Voyage, 1776-1780 (London, 1784) exist. Butler's Irwin Library owns one of them, and on a recent Thursday morning, sophomore Rachel Counts was looking at a map in the atlas, which details Capt. James Cook's three voyages to the South Seas.

She was putting together a proposal for a research project as part of the course "Close Encounters," a first-year seminar History Professor Paul Hanson teaches for History and Anthropology majors. Her topic was linguistics, and she was looking at the different spellings on Cook's map—Owyhee for what we now know as Hawaii, Niphon for Japan, Corea for Korea—as she and her classmates familiarized themselves with the kinds of primary-source materials that are available in the library's collection.

"Some of the books I was going to look at I found online," said Counts, who came to Butler from Powell, Ohio, outside Columbus. "But it's very different when you have a piece of history in your hands. You're living through that, rather than looking at a screen. It makes it more real—and, for me, more exciting."

The Cook Atlas is part of the William F. Charters South Seas Collection, which contains nearly 3,400 books and is one of the most extensive compilations the library owns. Sally Childs-Helton, Head of Special Collections, Rare Books, and University Archives, said that for a school its size, Butler has a large collection of materials that cannot be found elsewhere.

She said everything that comes into the library's archives must either reflect the history of the university or must be used for current teaching needs. The Charters collection, which was donated to the University in 1930, fits into that second classification.

Childs-Helton said students need to have access to materials like this that "haven't been spun, Photoshopped, or put into other contexts."

"Primary sources are the closest things we have to time travel," she said. "They have that power of immediacy to take you back to when a particular item was created. It's a very powerful experience to be sitting there, for example, with a copy of a letter that you know was written on a Civil War battlefield vs. that same letter being digitized and you're seeing it online or transcribed and printed in a book."

Childs-Helton said it's vitally important for students, especially at this point in their careers, to learn how to handle primary-source materials if they're going to do research. Her goal—and she works with classes in all six of Butler's colleges to accomplish it—is to teach them how to handle the materials carefully to preserve them for future scholars. (Special Collections follows best practices of conservation and preservation, protecting materials from light, temperature fluctuation, bugs, and theft/mishandling. "These materials are protected as well as they can be," Childs-Helton said.)

She also wants students to appreciate the potential these sources have to make their research the best it can be.

Hanson, who has written several books about French history, often uses primary sources for his research. He said that the nature of archival research has been a current topic for discussion among professional historians because it has been announced that the Barack Obama Presidential Library will be virtual—no stacks of documents and letters, but an entirely digital collection.

"You would have to look a long time to find a historian who would tell you they'd rather see a digital copy of something rather than hold a book in their hands," Hanson said.

That feeling was evident among his students too. Maggie Jones, a junior from Elwood, Indiana, had requested four books from the Charters collection, including one Charles Darwin wrote about his experiences on the second voyage of the HMS Beagle. She was looking through a book by George French Angas called Polynesia: a popular description of the physical features, inhabitants, natural history and productions of the islands of the Pacific for research on the environment of 19th century South America.

As a history and anthropology major, she's interested in how the natural environment of a place contributes to the lives of the people.

"While it's convenient to have information online, there's just something about actually having the book and knowing that this is actually part of history," she said. "That's really cool to me, knowing that they're a part of history."

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

 

 

AcademicsStudent Life

A Voyage to Irwin Library Yields Research Opportunities

Rare books collection gives students the chance to look at primary sources.

Apr 17 2018 Read more

Four Life Skills Students Learned From Women’s Self Defense

By Brittany Bluthardt '20

“No, get back!” a student in Butler’s Women’s Self Defense class shouts as she enters into a defensive stance. Each week, the women are taught valuable self-defense skills by Butler police officers. After a semester of jabs and kicks, the women engage in three realistic scenarios where they must defend themselves against the BUPD officers. The officers, covered in layers of protective gear, take on the full force of over 15 students as the women defend themselves with their new skills. Sophomores Ally Ledder and Allie Hopkins gained experience and personal confidence through the class’ experiential learning environment.

 

Strength

The women begin by learning a defensive stance -- the foundation of all moves. After mastering the first position, students begin to train and learn new skills that could actually protect themselves in the case of an emergency. The skills, often simple and swift, are repetitively practiced until the women react out of muscle memory.

“The skills I learned in this class will go beyond classroom education because they are things that become second nature, when practiced enough.” -- Allie H.

 

Power

Many of the moves are unnatural to the women, especially the specific finger grabs and strategic blocks. These small movements are extremely powerful, and the women learn their true strength against an attacker. One student, rising just under five feet tall, was able to defend herself against a 6-foot tall police officer. The women learned power is not defined by their size.

“Step outside of your comfort zone! You'll be surprised how powerful you will feel. Be loud and have a good time. Also, support each other - you're all in it together.” -- Ally L.

 

Confidence

The women practice shouting rather than screaming to intimidate and call for help. Round after round, the class shouts “No!” after initiating every move. Although it sounds silly, the class learned how important their voice can be in a serious situation. Combining their new skills and strong voice, the women had a newfound self-confidence.

“I went into the class nervous and unsure of whether or not I had the strength to defend myself. I left the class being proud of the bruises I left on Tony's [BUPD officer] arm and confident I could handle anything that came my way.” -- Allie H.

Support

Each class session, the women practice with each other before initiating any skills full-force. They encourage one another to complete the movements with accuracy and strength to their best ability. The police officers and other women work together to form a caring support system of comfort.

“The instructors made the class a lot of fun. They were funny, patient, and encouraging. You could tell that they care a lot about the students and their safety. There was never a dull moment.” -- Ally L.

Above all, Ally and Allie encourage other women to take Women’s Self Defence to gain confidence and real-life skills that will last after the semester ends.

“Take it, take it, take it! I tell everyone I know to take this class. I firmly believe every woman should. It will help you grow immensely in you self-confidence and give you the skills needed to defend and protect yourself, should you ever need to. Plus, the instructors are amazing and super fun to work with!” -- Allie H.

Student Life

Four Life Skills Students Learned From Women’s Self Defense

Butler University police officers teach women valuable life skills in a Physical Well Being course.

Katie Pfaff

Student Profile

Intended Major
Strategic Communication and Human and Organizational Leadership
Expected Grad Date
May 2019
Extracurricular Activities
Alpha Phi, Dance Marathon: Riley Relations Committee, Dawg Pound, Student Ministries
Hometown
Lewisville, IN
High School
Tri Jr. Sr. High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
Clowes Hall


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Ideally, work for a corporate Non-Profit, for fun have my own TV Talk Show

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

FYS: Food Hunger. This course allowed me to feel comfortable and connected with my peers from the start. We were able to build relationships with each other while growing during our first year at Butler. I was constantly challenged and inspired to think of resolutions to why we as a country struggle with food poverty. This course also prepared me to become a stronger student working on my writing, speaking, reading, and listening skills.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

The Butler Community is having a sense of unconditional support. This community challenges me to grow into the best version of myself every single day. My Butler community involves classmates in group projects, professors who invest in your personal life, friends who have developed into more like family, and peers that share the same common love of being a Bulldog.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

My Butler experience has been shaping me since the first day on campus to evolve into the best professional and citizen I can be. It has given me the opportunity to network and have real life experiences outside of the classroom to better shape my knowledge of the world. It has connected me to different individuals and provided educational and lifestyle opportunities to explore new things. After graduation, I will have felt prepared for the next step in my life with the help and guidance of my Butler experience.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

Every student that comes to Butler will experience a one of a kind Welcome Week adventure. This week is what laid the foundation for my overall expectations and experiences yet to come as a Bulldog. My favorite memory so far has been getting to return to that Welcome Week as a student orientation guide to welcome new students to the Butler Community. I'm excited to share why this place means so much to me, and the energy that is shared amongst this group of student orientation guides.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

When making my college decision I searched for a place that fostered the growth and individuality of students; a place where I would have a chance to establish my own path through college with connections to big opportunities and experiences. Most of all, I wanted a community that would support and build me in my endeavors. Butler exceeded my expectations and provided so much more. It's comforting to look around campus and always see a familiar face or helping hand no matter where you are.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

The thing that makes me most proud to be a Bulldog is the way individuals take ownership of their Butler experience throughout the longevity of their lives. You aren't just a Bulldog for four years, but truly for life. I'm constantly inspired by our alumni who encourage and pour back into this university and community. It makes me proud to see the way past and future Bulldogs embrace their connection to the university in everything they do.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler Way to me means putting someone else above yourself no matter the sacrifice. We put each other first, and are committed to growing and learning from our experiences. The Butler Way is a lifestyle built into our students to always look out for each other. Its an irreplaceable atmosphere that is something special and what truly makes Butler different.

Student Life

Katie Pfaff

Katie has felt the unconditional support of the Butler Community.

Katie Pfaff

Student Profile

SGA: Committed to Your Campus Experience

By Malachi White '20

Were you apart of your high school’s student government? Did you help plan dances, prom, student events or fundraisers? Have you ever wanted to be apart of something that was super cool and fulfilling? I ask these questions because that was me when I was in high school. Although I am not as active in student government as I used to be, I still reap many of the benefits of those involved in Student Government Association on Butler’s campus.

Butler University’s SGA is committed to improving your campus experience. They represent the student body and support over 150 student organizations on campus while addressing student concerns and providing engaging programming with the Butler community. SGA connects the students to the administration; building strong relationships with the faculty and staff addressing student concerns. Some of SGA’s functions include providing a free weekend shuttle service for students, offering grants for represented student organizations, and hosting exciting student events, like diversity programming, concerts, and philanthropy fundraisers.

Taylor Leslie is a senior international business major and a SGA Diversity and Inclusion Board member. She is a major advocate for the push to bring notable and different speakers to campus. “My experience with SGA has been great. I’ve been a member of the Diversity and Inclusion Board since my sophomore year,” Taylor said. “My roles within SGA have given me the opportunity from a student position to help make changes in the way that diversity and inclusion is perceived on campus.”

Another student involved in SGA is Chris Sanders. He is a junior psychology major, a co-chair for SGA’s Concerts Committee and a student assistant for the Office of Health and Education. His experiences have made working within SGA some of his best memories while on campus. “I didn’t know what I was really getting into when I joined, but if someone would have told me that my Butler experience would including meeting famous artists such as T-Pain, Kesha, and DNCE, I would not have believed them, but this is exactly what happened.” Chris said.

SGA can open several doors for students. Once apart of SGA team, new benefits and opportunities open up for everyone on campus in the Butler community.

“Other students should consider joining SGA because it gives you an opportunity to be a leader on this campus,” Taylor said. “You get a chance to influence and be apart of the change that is happening on campus. You’ll also make connections with many students and find a team of leaders that have similar passions as yourself.”

Not only is being apart of SGA an awesome opportunity, but it is an important part of campus life on campus. “I think SGA is very important to have on campus.” Chris said.“Without SGA, we wouldn’t be able to have great events such as BUDM, Butlerpalooza, or Spring Sports as all of these are all planned by different SGA committees. SGA pays a critical role in facilitating important relationships between all members of the Butler community.”

SGA Office
Student LifeCampus

SGA: Committed to Your Campus Experience

Were you apart of your high school’s student government? Did you help plan dances, prom, student events or fundraisers?

Meet the Class of 2022: Jack Kane

Jack Kane
Major: Accounting
Hometown: Arlington Heights, Illinois
High School: Rolling Meadows High School

 

"I'm looking forward to meeting new people and the new experiences, and all of the fun that comes with college and everything." 
 


 

Racing remote-controlled model airplanes has been part of Jack Kane's life for longer than he can remember. He was 2 months old the first time he attended a competition, and the hobby has taken him around the country (California, Colorado, Arizona, Florida) and the world (Australia, the Netherlands, England, Switzerland).

And now, it’s a hobby he hopes to continue in Indianapolis. Jack will be one of 1,357 first-year students in Butler’s Class of 2022, the University’s largest class ever.

"My dad's dad started doing this in the '60s and '70s," Jack said. "My grandpa was obsessed with it. Then my dad followed in his footsteps to be closer to his dad, and I followed to be closer to my dad too."

Jack and his dad fly Formula 1 and Quickee planes that are about 3 or 4 feet long and have a wingspan of roughly 6 feet. In competitions, they race against three other flyers at a time on a mile-long course. The first one to navigate around three pylons and get back quickest wins.

Winners take home trophies—there's no prize money—and in the past five years, since Jack's been an active participant with his dad, they've won about 20.

Jack said competitions are meant "to just enjoy yourself and have fun with your friends."

"But it's an adrenaline rush," he said. "These planes are going about 200 miles an hour around a mile course. It gets your heart pumping a little bit."

Jack said the biggest competition is held annually in Muncie, Indiana—and that, in part, is how he ended up applying to  Butler University. He would see Butler billboards on I-465 heading toward I-69 to Muncie, and that piqued his interest enough to investigate further. He liked what he found.

Like Jack, more than 25 percent  of this year’s class hails from Illinois. As an incoming Accounting major, he’ll be among the first Lacy School of Business students to enjoy the college’s new building. Set to open in August 2019, the new business facilities will feature a trading room, food service, and a rooftop deck.

When he's at Butler, Jack plans to try to continue racing planes.

"But," he said, "I'm putting school first."

Jack Kane
Welcome WeekStudent LifePeople

Meet the Class of 2022: Jack Kane

An native of Illinois, Jack has traveled the world racing remote-controlled airplanes.

Butler Student Media

By Shannon Rostin '18

In Butler's College of Communications, learning often extends beyond the classroom, into the real world...but that doesn't mean you have to leave campus. There are many on-campus media opportunities of which any student can be a part.

Here's a short list:

  1. The Butler Collegian

    The Collegian office is home to The Butler Collegian, Butler’s student run newspaper. The Collegian office runs like a real newsroom - always lively, chaotic  and on deadline. With a strong commitment to journalism, the Collegian informs, entertains and keeps students up to date on everything happening on and around campus. The Collegian publishes weekly in print and online.
  2. The Butler Beat and BU:30

    The Butler Beat is a weekly news and interview program featuring all things news and entertainment related on campus. It is hands on and student run and operated, providing students the opportunity to be involved at every level of news and entertainment production.  
    BU:30 is a weekly sports show anchored and produced by students. The show features stories and interviews with Butler’s NCAA Division One athletes and coaches.


 

IMG_0787.JPG

  1. ButlerSports.com

    Weekly student produced webcasts on all things Butler Sports, FREE! Students create content for updates, schedules, fan centers and more for Butler teams.

 

  1. IndyBlueRadio

    Butler’s very own, student run and produced campus radio station. The station can be streamed on any computer, and plays mainly college /adult alternative music in addition to student artists and programming. Students are encouraged to submit their own work and programs to be featured on air.
Running Camera

Butler Student Media

By Shannon Rostin '18
Arts & CultureStudent Life

Butler Theatre Presents 'The Little Prince'

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 05 2018

Butler Theatre closes its 2017–2018 season with The Little Prince, Antoine de Saint-Exupery's tale of love and loyalty, April 11-22 in the Lilly Hall Studio Theatre 168.

Show times are:

Wednesday, April 11, 7:00 PM (Preview)

Thursday, April 12, 7:00 PM (Preview)

Friday, April 13, 7:00 PM

Saturday, April 14, 7:00 PM

Sunday, April 15, 2:00 PM

Friday, April 20, 7:00 PM

Saturday, April 21, 7:00 PM

Sunday, April 22, 2:00 PM

Tickets are $5-$15. They are available online at ButlerArtsCenter.org or at the box office before each performance.

The Little Prince, a childhood favorite, is the story of a pilot stranded in the desert who meets an enigmatic young prince who has recently fallen from the sky. Audience members can let their imagination take flight in an adventure that celebrates fantasy and friendship.

The cast:

Aviator: Zane Franklin, Morgantown, Indiana

Lamplighter/Geographer/Businessman: Ryan Moskalick, Highland, Indiana

The Little Prince: Abby Glaws, Deerfield, Illinois

Snake/King: Mary Hensel, Indianapolis

Rose/Conceited man: Kitty Compton, Evansville, Indiana

Fox: Lexy Weixel, Columbus, Ohio

(In the photo: Zane Franklin and Abby Glaws)

 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan MFA '18
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

Arts & CultureStudent Life

Butler Theatre Presents 'The Little Prince'

The final show of the season runs April 11-22.

Apr 05 2018 Read more

Brittany Bluthardt

Student Profile

Intended Major
Journalism and Strategic Communication
Expected Grad Date
2020
Extracurricular Activities
The Odyssey Editor-in-Chief, The Butler Collegian Reporter, CHAARG VP Media, Alpha Chi Omega Member, Alpha Lambda Delta President
Hometown
Antioch, IL
High School
Antioch Community High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
Starbucks


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

A writer at a magazine or newspaper.

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

My favorite course at Butler University has been one of my first journalism courses, News Writing Print. The course introduced me to the basic principles of journalistic writing, ethics, and strategies. The class was extremely difficult, but I learned more about myself and my writing in the process. I cannot thank my professor enough for challenging me throughout my first semester. I'd attribute much of my writing success to that course.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

The Butler Community is extremely special and unlike any other group I've experienced before. My surrounding peers and professors truly challenge me to do my best work, and they care about my current and future success. My Butler Community is present in every classroom, extracurricular activity, and moment on campus. Our community's presence flows throughout campus, and I cannot choose one Butler Community to represent everyone.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

At Butler University, I have multiple leadership opportunities at my fingertips. I receive a well-rounded education by professors who truly care about your success. I know my Butler experience will lead me to be a stronger leader, professional, and person in the future.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

My favorite memory of my Butler experience so far was during Welcome Week as a first-year student. I felt extremely supported and comfortable in my decision to become a Bulldog. One of my favorite memories was meeting two of my closest friends in my FYS group. I know these relationships will continue long after I graduate.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

Some of the primary factors regarding my college decision included school size, location, and available opportunities. Butler University's small campus made the idea of moving away for college less intimidating, so I knew I would feel comfortable learning and growing here for four more years. Butler's location, in the heart of Indianapolis, allowed me to live and learn in a new culture. Most importantly, Butler's small school size and location opened up a multitude of opportunities for my success. I wouldn't be a small fish in a big sea, but rather a big fish in a school of other equally important people. I didn't want to feel like just a number, and Butler continues to empower me to lead and embark on new challenges.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

I am most proud to be a Bulldog because of the alumni before me. Even after a year at Butler, I saw the impact one school can have on their students. My role models graduated and continued a successful, passionate career in their studies. These people only motivate me to be a better Bulldog every day.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler Way is living a passionate life by positively impacting the people around you. On the most simplest level, the Butler Way is when you see someone wearing Butler gear miles away from campus and sharing a quick "Go Dawgs!" before continuing on your way. A few words can truly define the Butler Way.

Student Life

Brittany Bluthardt

She feels constantly challenged by the Butler community to pursue her future.

Brittany Bluthardt

Student Profile

Shannon Rostin

Student Profile

Intended Major
Strategic Communication and English Minor
Expected Grad Date
May 2018
Extracurricular Activities
Stand up comedy around the Indy area
Hometown
Crown Point, IN
High School
Crown Point High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
Hinkle Fieldhouse


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Ideally, working as a creative copywriter for an advertising agency.

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

Copywriting with Charlie Hopper, it let me explore my creative side and combine my passions to channel into my dream career.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

Being part of the Butler Community feels like home. It feels inspiring, empowering, like the voice in your head saying, "you can do anything!" Its knowing there are people who are on your side throughout the scary process of finding yourself. My Butler Community is my three roommates, who inspire me to be my best self, challenge me to do better and remind me that the journey of self discovery doesn't have to be done alone.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

The experiences I've had at Butler will shape my career.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

My favorite Butler memory would have to be Senior Homecoming with my friends.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

I wanted a campus experience. I loved that Butler immediately felt like home and a place I could see myself thriving. Something about Butler - from the tours, to the application process - felt more personal than other schools. I immediately recognized students were more than a number, and I recognized that I needed that in a university experience. Butler encouraged me to stand out as a student and a professional.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

Witnessing all of the good Bulldogs put into our community and the world. I am inspired constantly by the people around me and the support, diversity, encouragement and growth we share as a community. Bulldogs do incredible things, but above all we look out for each other. I haven't seen anything like that, anywhere else.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler Way to me is working hard, staying humble and using your unique perspective and experiences to uplift those around you.

Shannon Rostin

Student Profile

Grant Baker

Student Profile

Intended Major
Pre-Pharmacy
Expected Grad Date
2022
Extracurricular Activities
Intramurals, BSA, Kappa Psi Pharmaceutical Fraternity
Hometown
Brownsburg, IN
High School
Brownsburg High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
Hinkle Fieldhouse


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Inpatient Pharmacist

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

My First Year Seminar (FYS) course was my favorite so far. The people that I met in this class became some of the first friends I made when I arrived at Butler. This class helped to foster academic development throughout my first year. My professor genuinely cared about the success and growth of all in the class and invested his time into us to make us all better as writers, speakers, students, and people.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

The Butler Community helps breed close relationships, like a family. The Butler Community is a giant support system, always there to help each other in everything. Even something as simple as holding doors open for complete strangers, the Butler Community is always there for each other. My Butler community is made up of my friends, my roommates, my classmates, and my coworkers.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

My Butler experience will provide me a well-rounded education that I can carry into the pharmacy field. Through shadowing experiences, I will have gained invaluable hands-on experience in a pharmacy that I will use in my daily work. Also, I'll be able to carry all of the relationships and connections that Butler provided throughout the rest of my life.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

My favorite Butler experience was when the Butler beat #1 Villanova in January of 2017. Being an underdog going into the game and seeing the Butler Community rally around the team, the environment in Hinkle was electric. Growing up in Indiana, I have been a basketball fan my whole life. This game, with all of the nation watching, had lots of stakes involved. When we won, we came together on the court to celebrate our victory and show our Butler pride.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

The main things that attracted me to Butler are its size (small school feel, big school opportunities), strength of the pharmacy program, and the community of students here.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

What makes me proud to be a Bulldog is the character of the Butler community. Butler Bulldogs are selfless, hard-working, dedicated, and passionate. Bulldogs always strive to be the best they can be in all that they do.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler Way means putting others before yourself while striving to be the best that you can be in everything you do.

Grant Baker
Student Life

Grant Baker

Grant knows he will be prepared for his career as a pharmacist because of everything he's learned.

Grant Baker

Grant Baker

Student Profile

A Career That's Off to the Races

By Elizabeth Duis '20

Name: Zach Horrall
Hometown: Vincennes, IN
Major(s): Journalism, Spanish minor
Anticipated Grad Date: Spring 2019
Career Goals: Become a NASCAR reporter; travel and cover motor sports

 

Maybe it’s the sound. Maybe it’s the crowd. Maybe it’s the speed. Maybe it’s all of the above. Zach Horrall loves racing and hopes to make a career of it. But his route to victory in the sport isn’t exactly what you’d expect.

Growing up only two hours south of Indianapolis, Zach Horrall watched countless NASCAR, stock, and Indy car races. Frequent trips to the city fueled Zach’s desire to become a part of the racing community. This passion quickly merged with his talent for writing, and he began to aspire towards sports journalism. When the time came to make a college decision, Zach knew exactly where he wanted to be.

“There are two major racing hubs: Charlotte, North Carolina and Indianapolis,” Zach explained. “From there, I felt like Butler was the best school in Indy.”

Zach describes Butler’s caring community as plainly evident from his first visit. Small details like someone going out of their way to hold a door or an advisor’s genuine interest in him contributed to Zach’s overall view of Butler as a place where he could succeed.

During Zach’s first and second years, Butler’s sports media program owned and operated a website. After convincing the director to let him write for the website, Zach handled all the racing coverage. Covering one race in particular would change the course of his career.

While covering the Brickyard 400 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in 2016, Zach ran into his sports journalism idol Marty Smith. Smith was a general assignment reporter for ESPN who was also covering the race. Zach promptly introduced himself and explained his passion for sports journalism. It was then that Smith pointed to IndyStar’s table of employees and prompted Zach to reach out.

Believing he had plenty of time, Zach continued his coverage of the race in the hopes of approaching IndyStar later in the day. At the conclusion of the race, Zach looked back to see the table packed up and the employees about to leave. Practically running so as not to miss the chance, Zach approached the group, introduced himself, and inquired about a writing position.

Two years later, Zach Horrall is about to celebrate his second anniversary at The Indianapolis Star. This same interest in racing has transformed into a sports writing internship at one of the largest news sources in the state. His involvement with IndyStar began in a sports clerk role covering high school sports and has grown into the coverage of major motor sporting events such as the 2017 U.S. Nationals and this past spring’s Indy 500. A few of his stories have also been picked up by USA Today.

Zach attributes much of his academic and professional development to journalism classes and his time with the Butler Collegian. This experience provided real-world exposure that allowed Zach to learn in a hands-on setting. He will use these real-world lessons to serve as the Digital Managing Editor for the Collegian this upcoming academic year.

Moving forward, this successful senior aspires to continue working in racing, specifically as a NASCAR reporter. Zach maintains that as long as he can remain part of the racing community, he will be content and excited to go to work.

“I’m a very optimistic, happy-go-lucky person, and I want to maintain that attitude. I know the only way for me to do that is to do something I love,” Zach explained. “I want to be a person who says ‘I don’t have to go to work, I get to go to work.’”

This enthusiasm springs from a desire to share live sports with people. Not everyone has the ability to see a race, and Zach’s aim is to make these quick getaways accessible for everyone. He believes that everyone deserves the getaway from everyday stresses that sports can provide.

“Even if it’s only for a two or three hour race, everyone deserves that break from time to time,” Zach shared. “Racing isn’t the most popular thing in the world, but I want to show people why I love it and why it’s so interesting.”

To aspiring writers, Zach would like them to realize that it is possible to pursue a passion. Though covering a NASCAR race might not often be associated with journalism, it’s important to know yourself and explore the variety of positions available.

“The way that I’ve lived my life is to never take ‘no’ for an answer and never be afraid. If I was afraid to talk to my idol Marty Smith, I wouldn’t be where I am right now,” Zach explained. “You have to take chances because if you don’t, you will never meet your full potential.”

Summer in IndyStudent LifePeople

A Career That's Off to the Races

Zach Horrall's route to victory in racing isn’t exactly what you’d expect.

A Career That's Off to the Races

By Elizabeth Duis '20
Study Abroad
AcademicsStudent Life

Study Abroad Program Among Best in Country

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jun 13 2018

Butler University's Study Abroad Program has been named one of the Top 30 in the country by the website bestvalueschools.org.

"Butler University students can choose from over 200 study abroad and exchange programs in over 60 countries," the website said. "Butler also works with the neighboring Institute for Study Abroad (IFSA) as a provider of study abroad programming for U.S. undergraduates. In addition to providing transcripts for all IFSA students, Butler University endorses all IFSA-taught courses."

Butler University offers over 200 study abroad programs in over 70 countries to meet the diverse needs of the student population. About 40 percent of Butler students study abroad at some point. Students are permitted to study abroad as early as the first semester of their sophomore year and as late as their senior year, if allowed by their College. Butler's Center for Global Education (CGE) provides study abroad advising and organizes pre-departure and re-entry sessions to help guide students through the study abroad process. The CGE maintains the List of Approved Programs, titled Where Can I Go? to research approved study abroad programs. All programs on the list meet Butler’s high standards for academic excellence.

Among the other schools in the Top 30 are Duke, Stanford, and Michigan State, as well as the BIG EAST's Georgetown and St. John's. To compile the list, the website said it used two surveys from the Princeton Review and U.S. News that surveyed hundreds of thousands of respondents including students, faculty, and administrators to find out what schools they believe have the best study abroad programs.

Media contact:
Marc Allan MFA '18
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Study Abroad
AcademicsStudent Life

Study Abroad Program Among Best in Country

Butler University's Study Abroad Program has been named one of the Top 30 in the country by the website bestvalueschools.org.

Jun 13 2018 Read more

Teaching Through Doing: 5 Questions for Arthur Hochman

By Shannon Rostin '18

Education professor Arthur Hochman, recipient of a Distinguished Faculty Award in 2015, inspires College of Education (COE) students through his shared passion of teaching, helping to shape future teachers with his unique approach to teaching and active role in student’s education. Hochman is somewhat of an icon in the College. His one-of-a-kind teaching and appreciation for his individual students is astounding and very apparent in all he does for COE. 

 

How would you describe elements of your teaching style? 

Connecting with students.  I want to teach to them and not at them, and that is predicated on knowing who they are, what matters to them, how they learn, etc.  Once you know students it changes everything.  I think of these relationships as ongoing.  I still feel connected to students from many, many years ago, and have continued to work with them.  They also provide a through-line for our college; for me; and for our current students. 

Teaching through doing.  You cannot learn how to swim via PowerPoint.  You have to feel the water, the uncertainty.  Through an educational lens, you need to experience what it means to be a professional, what it means to guide another, what it feels like to be the leader and the follower, and always in a real context (in our case educational contexts).  Crucial to this is being there with them in the context, and not merely sending them off into the community.

Helping others find the greatness in themselves.  The first part is to be able to see it in them, genuinely and in concrete terms.  This also involves seeing greatness in its many and varied forms, and not always in a single lane.  Knowing the answer is worth a lot, but then so is empathy, perseverance, overcoming, and so forth.  The second part is creating guided experiences so that they can find their own strength.  We might create a structured experience with 4th graders, for example, that still provides them with ample space to plan and implement in the classroom. This is like holding the bicycle at the beginning, but letting go, allowing them to feel and find their own momentum.  They see and know that they can and are peddling on their own weight.

Being in the moment.  There is the syllabus, there is the content, there are the objectives, there is the end in view; but in the meantime, there is right now. We might as well work to experience joy, create a culture of nurturance, find the greater good, and do meaningful work today.  To achieve this, I try to vary my instruction; team teach; teach new things, new courses; model; and most of all think about how to construct a learning environment that feels safe, communal, purposeful, connected, concrete, real, and successful.

 

What is the most rewarding part of teaching at Butler?

Getting to know the students; helping to them to find their own strength; working with colleagues (faculty, alums and educators in the field).  Being able to be student-centered at an institution that values this vision.

 

What makes a positive student / professor connection?

Knowing your students is the key.  You have to find and build in ways to know them beyond the syllabus.

 

What does COE do to set up students for a successful career in education?

 We provide the following elements in all of our programs:

A tremendous amount of guided experiences in the field. These experiences are at a wide variety of places, with a wide variety of contexts, students/clients.

A focus on conceptual learning.  Teaching specific skills, strategies, contexts, or technology limits the educator to the particular tools and ideas they happen to have and know.  Teaching them the meaning of tools or ideas; how they function, how to select or modify them- this enables a future educator to be able to use and guide others in tools and ideas that have not yet been invented.

Living our vision in our teaching and in who we are.

Being purposeful about how we think, what we say, and what we do as educators.  We practice this, we deconstruct it, we explore strategies for doing this.

Building and nurturing relationships, while they are here on campus and after they graduate.

 

What makes a great teacher?

Great teachers are authentic.  They are profoundly themselves.  In this way they provide a road map to identity for life and for learning. Great teachers think about how learning feels; they know their content; they know their students; they build relationships; they are intentional; they are empathetic; they teach conceptually (thinking and understanding beyond mere answers).

 

Hochman
Student Life

Teaching Through Doing: 5 Questions for Arthur Hochman

Education professor Arthur Hochman, recipient of a Distinguished Faculty Award in 2015, inspires COE students through his shared passion of teaching, helping to shape future teachers with his unique approach to teaching and active role in student’s education.

Matt Warren

Student Profile

Intended Major
Biology
Expected Grad Date
2020
Extracurricular Activities
Sophomore Class President, 2017 SGA Homecoming Chair, SGA Senate, Delta Tau Delta
Hometown
O'Fallon, IL
High School
O'Fallon Township High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
Anywhere Trip is stomping around!


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

A Lawyer in the Healthcare Field

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

I have loved my Biology 111 Class because it is priceless. The class is taught by three biology professors and they bring in a multitude of people in the workforce with biology degrees. It is here when I decided that maybe the medical field isn't for me and I may have a future in law. We also covered many new research techniques and the class really advanced us from the biology world we all learned in highschool to practical uses in college and beyond.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

The Butler Community is a place where I feel like I belong and all my work is appreciated. The students are your family and the faculty your guides. The goal of every student is teamwork and making sure we succeed as a class in all our dreams.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

I have become a lot more vocal simply because of all the experiences and opportunities that have been offered to me. I never knew I would be in a fraternity with lifelong friends, host events for over 4,000 students, and help lead the charge for change in our very own Butler Community.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

During Homecoming my first year, I was honored to be the only male student to take the floor at Hinkle for my Homecoming Team. Our Yell Like Hell performance was one to remember as I was clad in a white shirt surrounded by a sea of navy blue women from Kappa Alpha Theta. Little did I know after that performance the whole house would adopt me as their little brother earning the nickname "theta matt".

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

I was looking for an environment where I could have interactive learning. I am someone who wants to be able to ask questions in the middle of class and not have to wait to attend office hours. I also was looking for a place I could be over-involved in every student's experience, not wondering what to do, but what could I fit in my schedule!

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

I love it when I get the chance to talk to successful alumni that continue to come back to campus. Their eyes light up when I talk about the similar traditions they did back when they were in college and then the Butler Community comes full circle. When a Bulldog is successful we all feel it—and that has made all the difference.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler Way is how we live our lives to the fullest. I often joke on tours that Butler students don't sleep and this is 100% true. We are often planning or attending our next big event, providing services, or just having fun. Working hard and making sure to play is extremely important to a healthy college student.

Matt Warren
Student Life

Matt Warren

Matt found a place, in Butler, that fostered his need for interactive learning.

Matt Warren

Matt Warren

Student Profile
Donkey, Blue, Elephant
AcademicsStudent LifePeople

(Bull)Dog Days on the Campaign Trail

BY Sarah Bahr

PUBLISHED ON Oct 31 2018

What awaited Butler University sophomore Jon Gray-Smith inside the small, ramshackle house on a Saturday in Grant County in northeast Indiana this summer was less than inviting.

Maybe I should just skip this one, the Indiana Republican Party field intern mused before walking up the front porch steps.

But Gray-Smith knocked on the door, took a step back (no one wants to be accosted by a stranger, he says), and was greeted by. . .

A nearly nude older white man. Toting a shotgun. And wearing only a pair of white underpants.

While that’s his horror story, Gray-Smith says it’s not out of the ordinary for canvassers to work in less-than-ideal conditions.

Jon and Luke Messer
Jon Gray-Smith with Luke Messer

“People don’t always have a lot of clothes on when they answer the door,” he says. “And, in my experience, a ‘Beware of Dog’ sign is typically correct.”

The life of a political intern is hardly glamorous.They get chased by dogs. Confronted by half-dressed old men packing heat. Screamed at like they’re the second coming of Cruella de Vil. And most of the time, they do it for free.

But Butler students also intern with political campaigns in increasingly large numbers. At a time when the political stakes are at an all-time high, Butler students are dotting the state, serving in a variety of  roles with political parties. From answering phones, to crafting press releases, to knocking on doors, Butler students say it is not just the skills garnered in their political science classes that have helped, but also the skills from their journalism, business, and history classes, for example, that have prepared them for when they are thrown into the real-world political fire. Or even faced with a semi-clothed man at the door.

 

“A Dream Come True”

Knocking on 527 doors for 12 hours in Indiana’s blistering July heat isn’t most people’s idea of a good time.

But Gray-Smith, the Vice President of the Butler University College Republicans, says each interaction motivates him to seek out the next one.

“I’m talking to voters who sometimes have never talked to someone about an election in their whole life,” he says.

Gray-Smith says people are often surprised by his age.

“I had a lot of people tell me, ‘It’s so good to see a young person out here doing this,’” he says. ‘That keeps me going.’”

And, unlike at many political events, he enjoyed bipartisan support.

“I had so many people offer me bottles of water, Gatorade, Powerade, anything to help me stay cool,” he says. “They told me ‘Please keep doing this; there are lots of voters out there.’”

He won a $30 Visa gift card for contacting the most voters from 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM — an average of 48 per hour, with an hour for lunch.

But his margin of victory?

Just 13 people.

Passion fuels political interns from both major parties, who perform thankless tasks such as calling voters, knocking on strangers’ doors, editing video, and uploading press releases to campaign websites — most of the time for free.

Gray-Smith contacted just under 7,000 voters this summer soliciting support for Republican congressional candidates such as U.S. Rep. Trey Hollingsworth, U.S. Rep. Susan Brooks, and Mike Braun. From mid-February to May during his internship with U.S. Rep. Luke Messer’s U.S. Senate campaign, he called 17,000 voters.

Cecil with Susan Brooks
James Cecil with Susan Brooks

Door-knocking and phonebanking are hardly sexy selling points for students seeking political internships, but Butler Assistant Professor of Political Science Greg Shufeldt says Butler has “countless” students volunteering and interning for campaigns and political parties this semester.

Junior Rachel Spodek has been a field intern for Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly’s re-election campaign since May.

“I’m running phone banks and trying to get as many voters registered as possible,” she says.

Senior James Cecil, who is named after President James Madison, landed a congressional internship on the Hill this summer in Washington, D.C., with Indiana congresswoman Susan Brooks.

The president of the Butler University College Republicans researched bills, attended hearings, answered phone calls, and gave tours of the U.S. Capitol building. She’d previously completed an internship with the Indiana GOP and is currently interning with the Mike Braun campaign for U.S. Senate.

“I’m a huge history buff, so being able to walk the halls of the Capitol was a dream come true,” she says.

 

Once-in-a-Lifetime Opportunities

While most of their days are spent canvassing counties and calling constituents, some interns do enjoy the occasional once-in-a-lifetime experience.

Earlier this month, Cecil snapped a photo with George W. Bush, whom she got to meet at a fundraiser for Republican U.S. Senate candidate Mike Braun.

“He’s one of the funniest guys I’ve ever listened to,” she says.

Gray-Smith was left speechless after he had the chance to meet Vice President Mike Pence as part of his Indiana GOP internship last summer.

“I was able to meet the second most powerful person in America,” he says. “I could’ve never imagined that would happen when I came to Butler.”

 

A Butler Assist

A common thread runs through Cecil, Gray-Smith, and Spodek’s experiences — Butler’s Political Science department helped them land their first internship.

“I always knew I wanted to pursue politics, but I was more laid back my freshman and sophomore years,” Cecil says. “Then [Shufeldt] urged me to get involved in the Todd Young Senate campaign during the 2016 election cycle, which sparked my interest and led to my internship with the Republican Party.”

Shufeldt emphasizes campaign internships because they lead to future political internships and career opportunities.

“Interning on a campaign is a great opportunity to open professional doors,” he says. “It  is one of the most impactful ways we, as citizens, can shape the direction of our government.”

Shufeldt regularly invites Democratic and Republican Party and campaign representatives to speak to his students.

“Studying politics in a major metropolitan area and a state capital is a huge advantage for our students,” Shufeldt says. “I encourage them to take advantage of this as much as possible.”

And Gray-Smith says Butler’s Political Science students are well prepared when opportunities arise.

“The two journalism classes I took forced me to reach out to people and made me more comfortable interviewing strangers,” he says. “They really opened my eyes that I can’t turn to my friends for help every time.”

“The U.S. Politics class I took helped inform my basic knowledge of voting,” Spodek says.

Cecil says being a conservative among more liberal classmates has made her more comfortable defending her beliefs.

“I’m an outspoken conservative in a liberal environment,” she says. “But my beliefs are challenged, not changed.”

 

A Political Future

Cecil wants to pursue a career in political fundraising. Gray-Smith wants to one day run for state or national office. Spodek wants to go into public policy and is looking at law school.

They know that, whatever path they end up pursuing, their internships will have helped them get there.

“The connections I’ve made will propel me to the career I want,” Cecil says. “I definitely look forward to getting up in the morning and doing something I’m really passionate about.”

But, in the meantime, all three stress that one vote can turn the tide.

“This election is going to be really tight, not just for Donnelly, but for a lot of candidates,” Spodek says. “I know every bit of effort I put in will make a difference.”

Donkey, Blue, Elephant
AcademicsStudent LifePeople

(Bull)Dog Days on the Campaign Trail

Butler students also intern with political campaigns in increasingly large numbers.

Oct 31 2018 Read more

Ryan Cultice

Student Profile

Intended Major
Finance and Accounting
Expected Grad Date
2019
Extracurricular Activities
Student Government Association (SGA), Lacy School of Business Dean's Advisory Board, Butler University Student Ambassadors (BSA), Butler University Wall Street Trek
Hometown
Warsaw, IN
High School
Warsaw Community High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
Health and Recreation Complex (HRC)


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Wall Street Broker

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

FN347 (Investments) which is taught by Dr. Dolvin. Dr. Dolvin is an amazing teacher and does a wonderful job of translating highly technical concepts into a student level understanding. This class has helped me reaffirm that I want to start my career in finance rather than accounting.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

Being part of the Butler Community means having friends and faculty that have your back and are equally interested in your success as you are. My Butler Community has been my friend group.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

As a business major, my Butler experience has been full of wonderful networking opportunities. This will help me land a dream job after graduation.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

My favorite memory of my Butler experience so far has been during homecoming my first year on campus. It was amazing to see all the alumni come back to Butler.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

Study abroad experiences, Butler's highly regarded name in the Business world, the quality of the students and faculty, and Butler being number one in the nation for internships.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

Perhaps the thing that makes me most proud about being a Bulldog is the way friends and faculty help you succeed. Meaning, if you come to Butler, this is not a competitive or cut-throat culture—everyone here wants you to succeed!

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler way means being a support system to not only those closest to me, but anyone within the Butler community.

Ryan Cultice
Student Life

Ryan Cultice

Ryan reaffirmed his commitment to finance through the mentorship of a professor.

Ryan Cultice

Ryan Cultice

Student Profile

Breaking News: Student Journalists Pursue their Passion

By Morgan Skeries '20

StudioWhether you want to become a journalist, broadcaster, or simply have a knack for writing, Butler University provides opportunities to let you pursue your passion and helps you build the skills you’ll need for real professional experience after graduation. From the student-run newspaper, The Butler Collegian, to class-run broadcast shows such as “Press Pass” and “The Bark,” students are able to publish their own work and gain real-life experience before they enter the field.

First-year Bridget Early is a voice performance and political science major, but has always had a passion for writing. Between balancing her recitals and writing on the culture section for The Butler Collegian, she said the experiences and connections she has made has been worth it.

“I think it’s been a great way to interact with a bunch of different people on campus,” Bridget said. “I’ve enjoyed getting to know people in different organizations and the people in my section. It’s been a great environment.”

According to Bridget, writing for the school’s newspaper really helped her strengthen her writing and interviewing skills. Moreover, she was able to make more friendships outside of her major. Sophomore Jackson Borman also said working for The Butler Collegian, along with his internship at The Butler Newsroom, has helped him with time management. Jackson learned how to balance between his classes, his internship, and writing for The Collegian, while still enjoying his social life and doing other activities he loves.

Jackson, a strategic communications major, loves both of his positions and said the experiences he’s had are very positive. “There is something about doing the research and completing an article and having a polished finished product that I really enjoy,” Jackson said. “Also, researching for different stories allows me to learn a ton about the Butler community and about things or people that I never knew about before.”

Furthermore, broadcasting opportunities such as the ones sophomore Savannah Boettcher has pursued, allow her to do a story on whatever she wants and let her bring her own ideas to the table. If Savannah isn’t anchoring, she can be found interviewing or reporting. She even had the opportunity to interview Butler Basketball’s head coach LaVall Jordan.Studio

“Working for both ‘Press Play’ and ‘The Bark’ have helped me so much by giving me practical experience,” Boettcher said. “It helps me to work on facial expressions, hand gestures, and stuff that is minor now, but could be major one day.”

Any student who has the passion for writing, being on camera, or even just wants to experience what it’s like to work for a student-run news source has a multitude of platforms readily available to them right on Butler’s campus. Not only is the work fun, the "real-world" preparation ensures students gain not only the experience but the personal confidence it takes to be successful after graduation.

The Collegian
Student Life

Breaking News: Student Journalists Pursue their Passion

Whether you want to become a journalist, broadcaster, or simply have a knack for writing, Butler University provides opportunities to let you pursue your passion.

GivingStudent Life

Freezing for a Good Cause

BY Peyton Thompson '20

PUBLISHED ON Jan 23 2018

If you see a polar bear on Butler’s campus, don’t be alarmed. In fact, be encouraged. Junior Butler Ambassadors for Special Olympics (BASO) co-chair Alyssa Del Priore dressed as the Polar Plunge polar bear mascot on Wednesday, January 17—better known as “super sign-up day”—to encourage her fellow students to take the Polar Plunge.

“We got over 400 people to sign up in one day,” Del Priore said. “I wanted to get as many people as possible, so I put on the polar bear suit and walked around campus. Although we got a bunch of people to sign up, we really encourage everyone to not only sign up but also fundraise and show up to the event!”

During Butler's ninth annual Polar Plunge, which will take place on February 10 at 9:00 AM outside the Health and Recreation Center, participants will jump into a pool of freezing water to benefit the Washington Township chapter of Special Olympics.

The goal is to raise $60,000 to help support sports training and athletic competition for more than 13,000 Special Olympics Indiana athletes. BASO is about 25 percent of the way toward that goal.

The Polar Plunge is now 16 years old. Most of the events take place on college campuses "because there is a big support system within campuses and it promotes inclusivity and raises money for a great cause,” Del Priore said.

But Butler's Polar Plunge is not only for Butler students.

“Anyone can participate," DelPriore said. "Students, faculty, members of the Butler/Indianapolis community, family members, friends, anyone and everyone as long as they are at least 15 years of age or a freshman in high school.”

Although jumping into the body of water will be the main attraction, there will also be various activities and games that will bring the Butler community and athletes of the Special Olympics together.

Alyssa’s Fundraising Tips

  1. Don't be afraid to ask. Most people will be willing to donate once they learn about the cause.
  2. Tell them why you are plunging
  3. Stress what Special Olympics means to you
  4. Tell them who it is for
  5. Speak up about your fundraising goal is so everyone can help you achieve it
  6. To sign up or donate, click the link below. https://www.firstgiving.com/soindiana/plunge-butler-2018

 

GivingStudent Life

Freezing for a Good Cause

The annual Polar Plunge takes place February 10.

Jan 23 2018 Read more
AcademicsStudent LifePeople

Butler Journal of Undergraduate Research Is Ready to Be Read

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 25 2018

An examination of an Indianapolis food cooperative's work to stem food insecurity, measurements of job satisfaction among those employed by intercollegiate sport organizations, and the underrepresentation of women in U.S. elected political offices are some of the topics covered in the fourth annual Butler Journal of Undergraduate Research (BJUR).

A full list of topics is below.

Volume 4 of the journal contains 12 student papers, including four from Butler students. Sixteen Butler faculty members in addition to the co-editors served as reviewers in selecting the best papers from among the various submissions for this issue.

Kenneth Colburn, Butler Sociology Professor and Co-Editor of the journal, said there have been more than 13,000 downloads of BJUR articles from many different institutions around the world.

"The academic exposure for Butler is very nice," he said. "Everyone knows about our basketball team, but we think it's important that a large audience also understands that Butler is a place for student scholarship."

BJUR was created to build on the success of Butler's Undergraduate Research Conference, which just completed its 30th year, and to complete the cycle—from doing the research to presenting the findings to publishing.

"We enjoy giving students this outlet," said Psychology Professor Tara Lineweaver, a Co-Editor of BJUR. "I have mentored four students who have submitted their honors theses to the journal, and I can say that each and every time they're thrilled to have their paper published in BJUR. It's a very good resume/CV builder for them. And it feels like the project is complete when you get to the stage of seeing it in publication."

Thus far, 19 of the 42 papers published have been written by Butler students. The journal also has published 23 papers authored by students from the University of Pittsburgh, Bellarmine University, Huntington University, Wabash College, Keene State, Columbia University, Hanover College (2), Midway College, Brandeis University, IU-Bloomington, University of Warwick (England), Cal Poly Pomona, DePauw University, University of Tennessee-Martin, University of Indianapolis, and Stanford University.

These are the papers and their authors from the fourth edition of BJUR:

PDF

A Community's Collective Courage: A Local Food Cooperative's Impact on Food Insecurity, Community and Economic Development, and Local Food Systems
Tabitha C. Barbour

PDF

Allopathic Medicine’s Influence on Indigenous Peoples in the Kumaon Region of India
Eliana M. Blum

PDF

Determinants of job satisfaction and dissatisfaction among practitioners employed in intercollegiate sport organizations
Ian Cooper, Chantel Heinsen, and Michael Diacin

PDF

Individualized Music Improves Social Interaction of Women, But Not Men, With Dementia
Emily Farrer and Diana Hilycord

PDF

Inferences on Criminality Based on Appearance
Hannah Johnson, Morgan Anderson, Hayley R. Westra, and Hayden Suter

PDF

A Blend of Absurdism and Humanism: Defending Kurt Vonnegut’s Place in the Secondary Setting
Krisandra R. Johnson

PDF

Do Black and White Americans Hold Different Views on Marijuana Legalization? Analyzing the Impact of “The War on Drugs” on Racialized Perceptions of Legalizing Marijuana
Benjamin S. Kaminoff

PDF

Miguel de Unamuno: The Relationship among Women, his Life, Spanish Society and El marqués de Lumbría
Tina Maric

PDF

Using Random Forests to Describe Equity in Higher Education: A Critical Quantitative Analysis of Utah’s Postsecondary Pipelines
Tyler McDaniel

PDF

Public Financing and the Underrepresentation of Women in United States Elected Political Offices
Libby P. Moyer

PDF

Holding on to Culture: The Effects of the 1837 Smallpox Epidemic on Mandan and Hidatsa
Jayne Reinhiller

PDF

The Reification of Hegemonic Masculinity via Heteronormativity, Sexual Objectification, and Masculine Performances in Tau Kappa Epsilon Recruitment Videos
Viki Tomanov

The first three volumes of BJUR (2015-2017) were funded through a Butler Innovation grant; this year’s journal was funded by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Going forward, funding will be provided in part by the following annual sponsors who have committed financial support: English; Biological Sciences; College of Communication; College of Education; College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; Creative Media and Journalism; Critical Communication and Media Studies; Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies; History and Anthropology; International Studies; Jordan College of Arts; Neuroscience; Philosophy, Religion & Classics; Physics and Astronomy; Political Science/Peace and Conflict Studies; Psychology; Science, Technology and Environmental Sciences; Sociology and Criminology; Strategic Communication; Founding Partner-Irwin Library.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan MFA '18
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

AcademicsStudent LifePeople

Butler Journal of Undergraduate Research Is Ready to Be Read

The fourth volume of the increasingly popular annual publication is now online.

Apr 25 2018 Read more
Student LifePeople

Five Butler Students Earn Prestigious Scholarships

BY

PUBLISHED ON May 30 2018

Five Butler students have been awarded prestigious scholarships—two to study in the United Kingdom, two to teach English abroad, and one to continue his education in math and physics.

Huang
Nick Huang

Nick Huang and Marissa Schoedel have received Fulbright U.S. Student Program awards for English Teaching Assistantships for the 2018-2019 academic year from the U.S. Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board. Huang ’18, a Business major from Geneva, Illinois, will be teaching English at the Macau Polytechnic Institute. Schoedel ’18, a German major from Crown Point, Indiana, will be teaching English in Saarland, Germany.

Madisyn Smith ’22, from Coatesville, Indiana, and Megan Waxman ’21, from Highland, Michigan, will participate in the Fulbright Summer Institute in the United Kingdom, one of the most prestigious and selective summer scholarship programs operating worldwide. They will study at the University of Exeter and the University of Strathclyde/Glasgow School of Art, respectively.

And Robert “Alex” Glickfield '19 has been named a Goldwater Scholar for the 2018-2019 academic year. Glickfield, a mathematics and physics major, is from Greentown, Indiana. His career goal is to earn a doctorate in mathematical physics and conduct theoretical physics research while teaching at a university. 

Schoedel
Marissa Schoedel

“I have been ecstatic with our applicants’ successes," said Dacia Charlesworth, Director of Undergraduate Research and Prestigious Scholarships, who assisted students in the application process. "For example, with only 60 Fulbright UK Summer placements available nationwide, I am particularly pleased that Butler University students have, on average, comprised almost 4 percent of the entire population for the past three years. And in terms of the Goldwater Scholarship, it’s amazing that we have had four consecutive years with either a Scholar or an Honorable Mention from Butler.”

Huang and Schoedel, both members of Butler University’s Honors Program, join over 1,900 U.S. citizens who will study, conduct research, and teach abroad for the 2018-2019 academic year through the Fulbright U.S. Student Program.

"I am looking forward to engaging with my students and the community in Saarland through the game nights I will be hosting as a part of my proposed community engagement project,” Schoedel said. “I am ecstatic to be able to share my American perspective with learners of English and gain insight into their learning experience."

*

Smith
Madisyn​ Smith

As a participant in the Fulbright UK Summer Institute, Smith, a Pharmacy major, will be one of four students to participate in the program “Issues in Climate Change” at the University of Exeter. She will learn about environmental change and its consequences through both field work and classroom learning with faculty from the University of Exeter’s Geography department, which is one of the most successful in the U.K. and ranked in the top 25 in the world.

“I am beyond thankful to have been selected to participate in the Fulbright UK Summer Institute at the University of Exeter. Southwest England is a perfect destination for a first-time study abroad trip, and I am excited to see what this area has to offer,” she said.

Waxman, who is earning dual degrees in Biomedical Engineering and Biology, was one of 10 students selected to participate in the joint Summer Institute hosted by the University of Strathclyde and Glasgow School of Art that focuses on Scottish Technology, Innovation, and Creativity. She will gain a unique perspective on the cultural and political forces that have shaped modern Scotland, with a strong emphasis on the nation’s role as a technological pioneer. 

“I'm looking forward to immersing myself in Scottish culture and being able to experience all the technology and creativity Scotland has to offer firsthand,” she said.

Waxman
Megan Waxman

Fulbright UK Summer Institutes cover all participant costs. In addition, Fulbright summer participants receive a distinctive support and cultural education program including visa processing, a comprehensive pre-departure orientation, enrichment opportunities in country, a reentry session, and opportunity to join our alumni networks.

*

Glickfield, as a Goldwater scholar, joins 210 undergraduate sophomores and juniors across the United States and was selected from a field of 1,280 applicants nominated for the award.

“Winning the Goldwater Scholarship is easily my proudest achievement thus far," he said. "As it is one of most prestigious STEM scholarships in the country, I feel as though I have a great chance at standing out when applying to graduate schools like Berkeley, UCLA, and University of Chicago.”

He thanked his mentors, professors and research advisors Gonzalo Ordoñez, John Herr, Prem Sharma, and Manuel Gadella as well as the Goldwater Campus Representative and Butler’s Director of Undergraduate Research and

Glickfield
Alex Glickfield

Prestigious Scholarship Dacia Charlesworth for her assistance throughout the application process.

Glickfield continues Butler’s recent success associated with the Goldwater scholarship: Caitlyn Foye ’18 was a 2017-2018 Goldwater Scholar, both Lauryn Campagnoli ’17 and Whitney Hart ’17 received honorable mentions in 2016, and Luke Gallion ’16 was named a Goldwater Scholar in 2015.

The Goldwater Scholarship is the preeminent undergraduate award of its type in these fields and covers the cost of tuition, fees, books, and room and board up to $7,500 per year for one or two years. 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan MFA '18
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

Student LifePeople

Five Butler Students Earn Prestigious Scholarships

Four receive Fulbright awards, one is Goldwater Scholar.

May 30 2018 Read more
AcademicsStudent LifePeople

Ten Butler Students Selected for Orr Fellowships

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 13 2018

Ten Butler students from the Class of 2018 have landed two-year jobs after graduation through the Orr Fellowship program, which recruits and evaluates candidates based on academic excellence, extracurricular involvement, and leadership qualities and matches them with local companies.

The students (and companies) are:

Claire Cox (Allegion)

Zach Bellavia (Ascend Indiana)

Cole Geitner (DemandJump)

Bailey Padgett (FirstPerson)

Benjamin Evans (hc1.com)

Eleanor McCandless (Innovatemap)

Sarah Thuet (OurHealth)

Hayley Brown (Probo Medical)

Mariam Saeedi (RocketBuild)

Kaitlyn Sawin (Vibenomics)

Some 1,100 students competed for 70 possible positions with 47 companies across central Indiana.

The Orr Fellowship facilitates in-depth interviews that connect local decision makers to top young professionals.

“What began as a simple idea – attract talented new graduates to central Indiana’s workforce and grow them into business leaders and entrepreneurs over the course of two years – has evolved into a program infusing the community with hundreds of entrepreneurial, high-achieving and civic-minded Orr Fellows and alumni,” said Karyn Smitson, Orr Fellowship Executive Director.

Named for the late Indiana Governor Robert D. Orr, the Orr Fellowship develops the next generation of business leaders and entrepreneurs in Indianapolis. The Fellowship is designed to create a foundation for career success and a talent pipeline for the Indy business community.

Since its inception in 2001, Orr Fellowship has placed nearly 400 Fellows with some of Indiana’s leading companies, and many Fellows have gone on to form their own companies.

 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

 

AcademicsStudent LifePeople

Ten Butler Students Selected for Orr Fellowships

These members of the Class of 2018 have two-year guaranteed jobs.

Feb 13 2018 Read more

Darby DeFord

Student Profile

Intended Major
Biology and Chemistry
Expected Grad Date
May 2019
Extracurricular Activities
Honors Program, Biology Club, Chemistry Club, Undergraduate Research, CHAARG, Butler Student Ambassador, Learning Resource Center Tutor, Pre-med Society, Alpha Phi Omega Service Fraternity
Hometown
Spencer, IN
High School
Owen Valley High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
My research lab


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Undecided (Top right now is Dermatologist)

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

My very first biology course, BI210, Genetics. This is the class that truly made me fall in love with biology and everyone within the department. I am now a lab assistant for BI210 and it is very nostalgic. I love the subject and the general camaraderie of this course.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

I believe that everyone on this campus is part of my Butler Community. Although there are many sub-communities (major, academic college, extracurricular, etc), I interact with others every day, and they are all pleasant interactions. Being a part of the Butler Community is like being a part of a lucky group of people who get to claim this campus. I feel very proud to contribute to it.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

Although I could talk about all the valuable knowledge I have gained within the classroom (which is totally valid), the connections I have made here have truly prepared me for life after graduation. Many faculty members have stuck their necks out for me when they didn't have to, and have taught me life and career lessons outside of the classroom. I'm grateful for everyone I have known here and all the experiences they have given me that have lead me to where I am now.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

I have kind of an obscure memory that stands out. I was very shy when I first came to campus, and probably around September of my first semester here I was walking back from class and I saw someone walking his dog. For whatever reason, the dog came up to me, so I leaned down to pet it. His owner said, "Oh, don't jump on her, Darby!" Of course, I was confused (because I definitely wasn't jumping on his dog). It turns out that the dog's name was Darby. Oddly enough, I honestly think that small coincidental experience helped me get acclimated with the campus and branch out to get to know people.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

I was always looking for a small school, and I wanted to have a lot of one-on-one time with my professors, as I knew I was going to be taking difficult classes like Organic Chemistry. I was also looking for a place where I would not just be a number, and where my professors would know my name. I wanted to form personal relationships with faculty, and I wanted to be treated like a colleague rather than an inferior. I found all of that on my visits, as faculty and staff were at my admitted student visits, and remembered me from those visits when I took their classes.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

I love the stories that people tell me about Butler when I tell them I go here. It seems like everyone has a good experience with Butler, whether it be a basketball game they attended, an event at Clowes, or just the movie Hoosiers. The Bulldogs have positive vibes everywhere, and I'm proud to be contributing to that history.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler Way is the way people treat one another on this campus and how much we all support one another. It is truly a community, and I feel the Butler vibes every time I walk around campus. The Butler Way is the way we take care of one another around here. The Butler Way is truly the character you have and what being a Bulldog shapes you to be.

Student Life

Darby DeFord

Darby met a dog and felt at home.

Darby DeFord

Student Profile

Claire Chahmirzadi

Student Profile

Intended Major
International Business and Marketing
Expected Grad Date
2019
Extracurricular Activities
Greek Life, Alpha Kappa Psi (Business Fraternity), SABL
Hometown
Batavia, IL
High School
Batavia High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
Hinkle Fieldhouse, no question


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

A corporate lawyer

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

My favorite class has been Introduction to Marketing with Professor Osland, because he is a wonderful teacher and I have learned my passion for marketing and added it as my second major.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

Being a Butler Bulldog means belonging to a lifelong community of people who care for you and lift you higher. My Butler community is all of my wonderful friends, my professors, my advisors, and even the smiley barista that gives me Starbucks; every one of these people makes being a Butler Bulldog the best decision I've ever made!

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

Having a Butler degree will help me show to future graduate programs and employers that I have an education that will take me above and beyond what is expected from an employee. Bulldogs give nothing but their all. A Butler degree is respected and I am privileged to have the ability to put that on my resume.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

My favorite memory on campus was my Homecoming experience this past Fall. Being able to see and reconnect with all of my friends that graduated and to get to hear about the wonderful things that they are doing was incredible. Getting to top that off with cheering for the Dawgs with all my best friends—it doesn't get much better than that.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

When deciding which university I was going to attend, it was important to me that I was not just going to be a number and that I would have the opportunity to make a difference. I chose Butler because during my second visit to campus, my advisors remembered my name and what I wanted to do when I graduated, all of my tour guides were extremely kind and helpful, and everywhere I went I saw a smiling face. I just felt like I could be my best self here.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

The aspect of Butler that makes me most proud to be a Bulldog is the camaraderie that we have here on campus. It is seldom that you will see a Butler student putting another Bulldog down. We are here to lift each other up to be the best that we all can possibly be. Every time that I take an exam or run that extra mile at the gym, there is always someone there to cheer me on, whether it is one of my friends or a complete stranger. Being a Butler Bulldog has made me want to be a better person.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler Way means that I will continue to strive to be my best self for the rest of my life, but that I will do it with humility and grace. It means that I will not put myself before others and that I will never forget where I came from and lead by giving back. Lastly, I will never forget to thank the people that made it possible for me to go to Butler University, which has enabled me to reach for the best version of myself to better the world around me.

Student Life

Claire Chahmirzadi

She came to Butler because she didn't want to be a number.

Claire Chahmirzadi

Student Profile
AcademicsStudent Life

Student-Researchers Get Their Day in the Spotlight

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 13 2018

Butler University student Jaquell Hamelin hypothesized that black students are less loyal to their schools than white students are, but he didn't know for sure. So, he decided to research the question, and on Friday, April 13, he presented his findings at Butler's 30th annual Undergraduate Research Conference (URC).

Hamelin told a packed classroom that he surveyed students from Butler and Purdue. He asked whether they would donate to their university after graduation, if they felt they had a positive relationship with, considered themselves loyal to, and would recommend their school.

Although the sample size was small, he said, the preliminary results confirmed what he expected: Of the 21 white respondents, 15 considered themselves loyal; of the 11 black respondents, three labeled themselves that way.

"Even though there are black and white college kids here and they're trying to achieve the same thing, the white students have more tools when they leave," he said. "These schools weren't built to support the needs of diverse student bodies."

Hamelin was among nearly 900 participants in the conference, which attracted students from 23 states who were presenting in 25 subject areas.

Courtney Hayes, a student from Eastern Kentucky University, presented her research on "Optimization of Camera Trapping Methods for Surveying Mesopredators in the Appalachian Foothills." To find out what kind of mid-sized, mid-level predators live in her region—meaning skunks, raccoons, possums, and more—she put out bait and installed cameras at 72 sites across 10 counties.

The hope, she said, was to measure biodiversity, which is an indicator of ecosystem health.

Hayes said being able to share her work at the URC was a nice experience.

"I've presented in Kentucky a lot and I've presented in Virginia, but it was interesting to come to Indiana, where there are no spotted skunks, to see how people want to hear about it," she said.

While science-related presentations accounted for slightly more than half of this year's URC presentations, the conference also included topics such as "The Relationship Between Social Media, Anxiety, and Depression," "Are the Highly Religious Better at Resisting Temptation?" and "Stress and Academic Outcomes in College Students."

Four teams of two from an IUPUI anthropology class presented their research on what happened to workers at the Carrier and Rexnord plants in Indianapolis who were laid off when their factories moved to Mexico. The students found that workers were bitter and blamed "greedy" management for valuing money over American jobs.

Jake Watson, one of the IUPUI students, said the goal of his and partner Corinne Baker's portion of the project was to give the laid-off workers a voice.

"We're undergrads," he said. "We're not trying to fix everything in the world. But we think that by drawing attention to this conversation and this process of deindustrialization, we can change the conversation in the future."

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan MFA '18
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

AcademicsStudent Life

Student-Researchers Get Their Day in the Spotlight

The Undergraduate Research Conference let nearly 900 participants show their work.

Apr 13 2018 Read more

Growing Community Connections

By Morgan Skeries '20

An Indianapolis Community Requirement, also known as an ICR, is a learning experience that integrates classroom knowledge with activities in the Indianapolis community. Students are required to take one course in any part of the university that involves active engagement with the Indianapolis community, and there are many classes that offer this.

Grace Bowling, junior strategic communications major, explains that an ICR helps students to learn more about Indianapolis and the way it is unique to other cities. “An Indianapolis community requirement is a way that Butler students can broaden their horizons and make themselves well rounded students,” Grace said. “It is a way that we can reach out to the community we live in and impact them on a deeper level.”

ICR’s are a great way to push Butler University students out of their comfort zones. Moreover, Grace said it was important to be apart of something that is bigger than herself. By fulfilling her ICR requirement in a science course, called “The World of Plants,” and by partnering with students at the Indianapolis School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, she found that she loved connecting with the students. She found that she really enjoyed the experience and being able to get involved into the community.

“A lot of what we did was very hands on,” Grace said. “For example, our ICR required a project that helped us connect with students from ISBVI. We made butterflies with them, planted plants in their personal butterfly garden, and explored the Indianapolis Zoo's Butterfly Garden.”

The experience really impacted her positively and showed her that doing something bigger than herself is always important to pursue. “I loved getting to know the community better and learning more about the place that I live in,” she said.

Want to learn more? Information all about ICRs can be found on Butler University’s Indianapolis community requirement page.

Green House
Student LifeCommunity

Growing Community Connections

Indianapolis Community Requirement’s are a great way to push Butler University students out of their comfort zones.

Green House

Growing Community Connections

By Morgan Skeries '20

Elaine Holmes

Student Profile

Intended Major
Healthcare and Business
Expected Grad Date
May 2019
Extracurricular Activities
Butler University Dance Marathon, Independent Student Council, Food Recovery Network
Hometown
Louisville, KY
High School
Atherton High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
Hinkle Fieldhouse


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Hospital Administrator

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

My favorite course was Healthcare Systems and Policy. It was so interesting to explore the nuances of the medical field, in relation to business and government. In addition, it was helpful to discuss what these details mean for future healthcare providers.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

Being a part of the Butler Community means being a part of the most caring, supportive, passionate group of people. I have found my Butler home through Butler University Dance Marathon, where I get to help create a community united around a common cause and passion. Being a part of this community means being a part of something bigger than yourself.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

The opportunities I have had both in and out of the classroom at Butler have given me invaluable experience that I will hold with me for the rest of my life. From gaining knowledge through hands-on experience in my courses to developing leadership skills through my extracurricular involvement, Butler has helped me grow professionally and personally.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

Last December, I drove back to campus during winter break to attend the Butler vs. Villanova game with my friend Sarah. The score was close throughout the entire game, but the Dawgs pulled out a win in the end. It was so thrilling to get to be a part of the excitement, and storm the court (sorry Big East), but even more fun was getting to help Sarah, who was in a boot at the time, down the bleachers to celebrate.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

Butler was a happy medium for me in many ways. It is close enough to home, but not too close, big enough that I am always meeting new people, but small enough that I always see people I know. In addition to being the happy medium, Butler gave me the options to participate in study abroad, undergraduate research, internships, or any combination of the three of those, and still graduate in 4 years, all while maintaining good grades, working on campus, and participating in extracurricular activities.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

I am proud to be a Bulldog because it is such a life-changing experience to get to be a part of a community that welcomes, encourages, and strengthens each other.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler Way means striving to better the world around us by being selfless, committed, and compassionate

Student Life

Elaine Holmes

Elaine helped create a community united around a common cause.

Elaine Holmes

Student Profile
archive
Student LifePeople

Senior Josh Turner Performs on ABC's 'Good Morning America'

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jun 04 2014

Butler senior guitar major Josh Turner was home Monday, doing the dishes, when he received a call from a New York area code. The caller left a message: Would you be interested in being on Good Morning America?

He was.

BpXUEZtIYAAwoMaTurner appeared on national TV live from New York at 7:48 a.m. Thursday, part of a segment called “Open Mike” that devotes airtime to talent found online. The show labeled him an "online sensation," thanks to his version of Paul Simon's song “Graceland” on YouTube. Co-host Michael Strahan said Turner's version "sounds just like the original" and challenged Turner by playing parts of the original, stopping it, and having him pick up where Simon left off.

He handled the assignment with ease, as you can see here.

“I was incredibly stunned when they called,” Turner, whose video had come to the show’s attention through a post on the website Reddit, said Wednesday. “I never really interact with Reddit directly, but sometimes people who watch my videos post them to Reddit, where they’re seen by a lot more people. Somebody from the show must have seen it there.”

For a low-key performer who hopes one day to be a session musician—or maybe a sideman for a singer-songwriter—it was an extraordinary opportunity to be the front man for a day.

Turner, who was born in Indianapolis and lived in Cincinnati and North Carolina before coming to Butler, said music’s been part of his life since age 7 or 8 when he started playing piano. He’s been in choirs since age 9 (at Butler, he’s in the Butler Chorale and is musical director of the a cappella group Out of the Dawg House) and started playing guitar at 13.

In high school, he played guitar and some banjo in a three-piece bluegrass outfit called The Other Favorites, and he’s in a folk group now called Coyote Armada that’s made up mostly of recent Butler graduates.

Turner’s parents had lived in the Butler-Tarkington neighborhood and when he was looking at colleges, they knew he was looking for a mid-sized liberal arts school.

“I wound up looking at Butler and really liking it,” he said.

Turner said he had “no idea” what he hopes will come from Thursday’s appearance on national TV.

“I don’t know that I’ve fully addressed it mentally,” he said. “I’m sure it will lead to a bump in views and hopefully more opportunities down the road, but I’m not hoping this is going to launch my career. But it’ll be great to have more people aware of my music and seeing what I’m up to on YouTube.”

Incredibly, GMA was not his only offer. A few days before, he’d gotten a call from The Ellen DeGeneres Show. They’d also seen the “Graceland” video and were interested in having him on. But they couldn’t give a firm date, so they suggested he take the Good Morning America offer.

“I would have been stunned for one offer alone,” he said. “To get the two in the space of about four days is completely unprecedented.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

Family Away From Home

By Brittany Bluthardt ’20

First-year student Alyssa Johnson wasn’t sure what to expect when she moved into Irvington House a few months ago. She was one of few students on campus as part of the Ambassadors of Change Pre-Welcome Week program. From one home to another, Alyssa was overwhelmed and nervous to begin her new journey at Butler University. She felt instantly more comfortable after she met her resident assistant, Murjanatu Mutuwa, for the first time.

“She was extremely energetic and helpful,” Alyssa says. “Now, she’s someone I can go to at any time for support.”

Resident assistants, RAs for short, are mentors for new students on Butler’s campus. RAs are fellow Butler students who help first and second year students while they are living in a residence hall. Murjanatu and other RAs plan programs and activities for their residents throughout the year. They also help to develop a respectful community while serving as a resource for students. RAs maintain an environment within residence halls for students to grow academically and socially while pursuing their first few years as a Bulldog.

Murjanatu knew she wanted to take on this role after her own experience as a resident in Schwitzer Hall. As a first-year student, Murjanatu quickly began helping others, from planning events to becoming the residence hall president. As she worked side by side with her own RA, she quickly determined she had the desire and the drive to be one too.

Three years later, Murjanatu is now a senior with a job lined up after graduation and many other responsibilities on her plate. Her biggest responsibility, perhaps, is caring for a group of fellow students as their RA.

She and her residents live in a small section of Irvington House, a place they proudly call “The Island.” The group is always together, whether they’re sitting in the hallway, chatting and doing homework together on school nights, or eating a family-style dinner at Atherton Union.

Murjanatu has created more than a community in her unit. She’s created a family.

*

Growing up in Cedar Lake, Indiana, Murjanatu was used to living with many people. When she was a teenager, her family adopted a little sister. Her parents also fostered many children in their home, some of them were even Murjanatu’s classmates at school. In her mind, everyone just became a new brother or sister.

“I’ve learned how to accept people who are very different from myself,” she says. “At the end of the day, a family is who you come home to - it’s where you feel yourself.”

With this early foundation of acceptance and caring, Murjantatu learned how to love people, even when it’s challenging. Because she’s just a few years older than her residents some things can be a bit difficult, but she’s learned how to support them and be an authority figure at the same time. Her residents reciprocate the same compassion. When Murjanatu had to go home after a sudden loss of a friend, her residents surprised her with a signed card and candy when she came back.

“When I go through things, people here are always there for me,” Murjanatu says. “People at Butler walk through challenging seasons with you.”

Although Murjanatu is in a new residence hall with new students, she doesn’t forget the friends she made in years past. She occasionally meets with her past residents to talk about their lives, grab a coffee, or unwind with a slumber party. Sophomore Julia Junker had Murjanatu as a resident assistant last year in Resco, and she remembers the support Murjanatu always gave her when she needed it the most.

“I don’t see her as often anymore, but when I do, she’s always excited to see me, and we’ll have long conversations together to catch up,” Julia says.

Another resident, Kennedy Broadwell, had Murjanatu as an RA last year in Resco. Kennedy said their hallway of residents took a while to get close with each other, but Murjanatu made sure to plan plenty of bonding events. If anything, their hall bonded over their love for Murjanatu and her funny personality.

“Murjana as an RA was a literal ray of sunshine walking down the hall,” Kennedy says. “She is probably one of the busiest people on campus, but she always made time to talk to her residents when we needed her.”

Now, Kennedy is a sophomore pursuing a major in sports media. Although she does not see Murjanatu as often as she wishes, when they do see each other, it is as if nothing has changed.

“Murj’ is just someone I know will always care about my well-being and will always be there to listen, whether she's my RA or not,” she says. “Now, somehow, we manage to pass each other every couple of days, and we always get so excited to see each other.”

*

On a late Sunday afternoon, Murjanatu opens boxes of pizza, sends a final reminder message to her friends, and anxiously waits for approximately 30 Butler University students to arrive at the Community Room in Fairview House. At this “family dinner,” as Murjanatu calls it, her Butler family, past and present, will get to meet each other.

Julia and Kennedy reunite with Murjanatu and meet Murjanatu’s new students from “The Island.” Other past residents FaceTime from off campus just to say “hi.”

“It was so fun to meet them and kind of compare stories from our first semester last year to their semester now,” Kennedy explains. “I could tell how much they already love Murjana and I wasn't surprised in the slightest. They are the luckiest kids on campus!”

With a semester and a half separating Murjanatu from graduation, she grows sadder when she thinks of leaving her residents. For four years she has worked to create a family at Butler. She has cared for students who in turn, have cared for her. While she’ll officially no longer be their RA come graduation, just like with a real family, the bonds will remain.

Cambria Khayat, a current resident of Murjanatu, aspires to be like her when she’s older.

“I look up to her so much,” Cambria says. “She’s where I want to be my senior year. I feel so blessed to have her as a friend and my RA.”

FamilyStudent Life

Family Away From Home

A resident assistant fosters community and creates a family for students on campus.

Family Away From Home

By Brittany Bluthardt ’20

#FTK: Butler University Dance Marathon

By Malachi White '20

BUDM#FTK, For The Kids, is a popular hashtag that is often taken out of context and used in a jokingly ironic way. However, at Butler #FTK is taken very seriously. We do care about the people we are serving in our community. One of the ways we show this is by hosting our annual Butler University Dance Marathon.

Dance Marathon is a multi-hour, multi-faceted event that blends dancing, games, crafts, food, and fun into one philanthropic experience. Students are on their feet the entire duration of the marathon as they stand for the kids at Riley. Funds for Dance Marathons are raised in a variety of ways. The main way funds are raised for Dance Marathons is through personal donations from friends, family, and the community either online or offline.

My friend Phil Faso, a sophomore at Butler, says he thoroughly enjoyed participating for his first time this year. “It personally impacted my life because I’ve done similar things before but not to such a great extent and it was very heartwarming.” Phil said. “It’s for an amazing cause and everyone should be aware of what we can do to help other people in need.”

Butler University Dance Marathon, or BUDM, is sponsored by Butler’s SGA. Their mission statement is “to engage the students of Butler University in striving to improve the quality of life for the children and families of Riley Hospital for Children.” This student-led organization works throughout the school year and summer to raise money to support cancer research performed at the hospital. Our money also helps the hospital continue its tradition of treating all patients, regardless of financial concerns.

Holding this organization close to her heart and platform, Annie Foster is a junior chemistry and Spanish double major, and has worked with BUDM since her first year on campus. “As soon as I joined, I knew this organization was about something bigger than I could ever imagine,” Annie said. “Supporting this organization means joining a movement to give hope back to the kids.” She started as a morale committee member during her first year. Her sophomore and junior years she worked on the executive board as Director of Fundraising. She will close her time at Butler as the Vice President of Finance. All students have the opportunity to be on the executive board by attending call out meetings, being actively annually, and showing commitment to the cause.

“From the start I knew I wanted to join the executive board and make a difference in this organization. BUDM has given my college experience meaning,” Annie said. “Being on a college campus comes with feeling of being in a bubble, secluded from the world around you. Getting involved in BUDM brings you out of that bubble and into the real world. It provides a new perspective, it teaches you about the power of hope, and it allows you to become apart of something larger than yourself.”BUDM

Inspired by the ability to make a change, Taylor Murray is a senior pharmacy major and served on the executive board of BUDM this past year. He realized that his impact on a family in need superseded monetary support for the cause. “I saw the joy and hope, especially, that support and simply dancing can bring to a child, or families face regardless of the amount of money raised that year,” Taylor said. “That was something that truly made me want to continue my involvement with the organization and the cause as a whole.”

As co-director of the morale committee Taylor says that “this committee meshed my love for dancing, with that of wanting to bring happiness and energy to those who may need it most.”

“Prospective students may not have had a Dance Marathon at their high school, and/or did not even know it was happening/what it is when they step foot onto Butler’s Campus,” Taylor said.  “From the outside, it may look like another organization at block party, but once you step out and begin to talk to those who have experienced it or been involved, one can realize it is more than an organization, it is a family.”

This year BUDM raised $301,576 for Riley Children’s Hospital and Butler celebrates being the second largest fundraising school in undergraduate schools with less than 12,000 students. Taylor tells his story and experience with BUDM by sharing how he has grown since his first year at Butler. He hopes that after he graduates he will be able to come back to people who have found their passions and act upon them to make their own Butler experiences special.

“From my experiences with BUDM, I have come to realize that I can be a leader, but a leader that doesn’t necessarily have to be the loudest or most successful in the room, but a leader who can lead by example and as one with the others,” Taylor said. “My advice to prospective students is if you do not know what you what in life, finding and driving toward your passion(s) will open up new avenues and opportunities you never would have thought existed.”

BUDM
Student LifeCampusCommunity

#FTK: Butler University Dance Marathon

#FTK, For The Kids, is a popular hashtag that is often taken out of context and used in a jokingly ironic way. However, at Butler #FTK is taken very seriously. 

Antiretrovirals and Intentionality

Emily Yarman ’17

“I’m too early. Typical,” I thought as I sat silently in my car, eagerly waiting for the day to begin. On the first day of my elective rotation, I arrived at the Damien Center in downtown Indianapolis fifteen minutes before the doors to the building were unlocked. I would spend the next month at Indiana’s largest AIDS service organization in their sister clinic, Damien Cares, seeing patients with HIV and AIDS. Although I love being early on my first day, this has led to a great deal of waiting in my car. As I sat there, the engine gently purring, I wondered what the month would hold. I quizzed myself on what I knew about HIV: the risk factors, the pathophysiology, the medications used to treat it and how they work. I stopped mentally drilling myself when I realized that I didn’t actually know much about the day-to-day life of a patient with HIV. I had studied the disease enough to pass the test, but I hadn’t had an opportunity to really get to know any patients with HIV.

I thought about the struggles patients with HIV in the US have had since the 1980s. I had learned about the social implications of HIV and I wondered what emotional hardships these patients had been through. I already knew that my month at the Damien Cares clinic would teach me a great deal about medical management of patients with HIV. I realized then, while sitting in my idling car, that it would also deepen my knowledge about how to care for a patient as a whole person.

My first patient was a gentleman in his early 50’s. He had been on ART (anti-retroviral therapy) for years and came to the office for a visit as an established patient. I followed my preceptor, Randall McDavid, NP, into the exam room and introduced myself. After a pretty uneventful follow-up visit, Randall and I sat down in his office. He turned to me and asked, “If you saw that man walking down the street, would you think he had HIV?” I quickly responded, “No, I wouldn’t.” This patient did not look like he was HIV-positive. Neither did my second patient. Or my third patient. As someone that recognizes the damage that stereotypes can cause, I’m always trying to purge myself of my presuppositions about people. As I saw more patients on that first day, I realized I had failed to do just that; I had unconsciously built up presuppositions about how an HIV-patient would look or act. I expected patients with HIV to appear much more sick than this gentleman had.

I was reminded on this rotation that by unconsciously pigeonholing a patient, I set myself up for failure as a provider. Even something as simple as having preconceived notions about what an HIV patient looks like can affect the way I practice medicine. There are certain risk factors that make a patient more likely to acquire the illness, but HIV still affects every sex, gender, age, race, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status. Embarking on the slippery slope of making assumptions about patients can lead to big mistakes in forming treatment and prevention plans for them. By making assumptions about patients, I also miss out on the opportunity to get to know and learn from them, which could benefit my future patients. It seems simple, but it is easy to overlook the fact that everyone suffers when providers make assumptions, especially in a patient population as diverse as the HIV community. There is no one face of HIV. This month, I have been learning to stop giving it one.

***

I held the diaphragm of my stethoscope over his left chest and heard the thunderous, rapid lub-dub of his heart. I finished my physical exam and told Randall that everything was within normal limits, except his heart, which was beating quickly. The patient shifted uncomfortably in his chair when we asked him questions about his sexual habits. He laughed nervously when we inquired about drug use. This was the typical behavior of a patient new to the clinic.

New patients with HIV experience a spectrum of emotions during that first visit, including fear and anxiety. Their anxieties include questions about what it means to have HIV, if they can afford the treatment, and ultimately, if it will kill them. They are nervous about if the people they meet at the clinic will judge or chide them. Their fear of being rebuked is legitimate; decades after HIV showed up in the US, it still carries a stigma and is very closeted. The medical and social concerns that a new HIV patient has culminate into a patient presentation like the one I described above: visibly restless and apprehensive about being honest with their provider.

An established patient with HIV, however, is a foil of a new patient with HIV. While new patients tend to be restless and apprehensive, many established patients are calm and relaxed. Long-time HIV-positive patients understand that if they are compliant with their medications, their life can be much like the life of a person that is HIV-negative. They are happy to see Randall and talk about their social and sexual histories with ease. The visit becomes less about HIV and more about friendly conversation and getting to know each other. During physical exam, their hearts beat at a regular rate again.

Some of this release of anxiety in patients is because of patient education about the disease and the effectiveness of HIV medications. HIV pharmacotherapy has progressed a great deal since the 1980s. Many patients with HIV take just one pill per day and have an undetectable blood viral load. Causes of death in the HIV population are increasingly due to chronic illness, like most of the US, and less due to immunological compromise because we diagnose and treat earlier. The average life expectancy of an HIV-positive patient is the same as an HIV-negative patient. When patients learn about these advances in our understanding and treatment of HIV, many of their fears are quelled. This, however, is only a part of the cause for calm in established patients.

The other, bigger, part of the relief of anxiety for established patients with HIV is the relationship that they build with their provider. The care that Randall provides his patients is non-judgmental. He talks comfortably about patient’s sexual habits and drug use without scolding them. I have watched patient’s anxiety melt away during office visits because of the relaxed demeanor. This allows the patient to be honest, which enables Randall to take better care of them. I have observed that this kind of therapeutic relationship is the key to success for patients at the clinic. The patients that are most healthy are patients that have built this kind of relationship with Randall. In the presence of empathetic medical care, the patient’s viral load and anxiety both drop. Randall always says “HIV is a relationships disease,” and he’s right. Because HIV is a physically and socially taxing disease, it is best treated with appropriate medical therapy and a caring heart.

***

Seeing established patients with HIV gives me so much hope during those initial patient visits at the clinic. As a future physician assistant, I have the opportunity to be part of what brings that hope to fruition. I can walk with patients on their journey to have an undetectable viral load and an unbroken spirit. This month, I have learned that even in in the face of a disease that used to be a death sentence, there is hope on the horizon through proper medical treatment and a truly therapeutic relationship. Serving patients in this way, however, is not simple. It requires a concerted effort on the part of the provider to be intentional about the medical and emotional care they offer. I have learned that part of that intentional care is to resist pigeonholing patients and to actively dismantle stereotypes that we create. I have learned that it means listening and responding in a way that creates a comfortable environment for the patient to be honest in, regardless of any social stigma involved. Truly treating a patient as a whole person requires all of these things and nothing less.

Emma Hall

Student Profile

Intended Major
Digital Media Production
Expected Grad Date
2021
Extracurricular Activities
CRU
Hometown
Pendleton, IN
High School
Pendleton Heights High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
Library


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Photographer

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

My FYS - It’s called Breaking Bad and we literally watch Breaking Bad and discuss the habits of criminals, while also looking at other works and aspects. It is amazing to have such a great class, that I know I will have again next semester.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

I feel like my Butler community is definitely my roommates. You know, roommates see you at your best and your worst, and they definitely are my support system.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

I feel like Butler is giving me so many opportunities to learn and expand my knowledge to so much more. I am so thankful that I chose this school.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

Definitely, sitting baseline at the Butler Basketball game and taking photos. That’s has always been a dream of mine and hopefully will be able to continue throughout the season.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

I knew I wanted to go to a smaller college and Butler was the perfect fit for me. Plus, it isn’t that far from home so I can see my family and friends more. I knew Butler would give me opportunities that other schools couldn’t provide.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

I am most proud of the community that Butler provides.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

It means to be supportive of everyone and everything. Everybody has a different story, and they need to be heard.

Student Life

Emma Hall

She realized her dream photographing Butler Basketball games.

Emma Hall

Student Profile

Bailey Severe

Student Profile

Intended Major
Biology
Expected Grad Date
2018
Extracurricular Activities
Greek Life, VP of Educational Programming on Panhellenic, volunteer at MLK youth center
Hometown
Highlands Ranch, CO
High School
Mountain Vista High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
Holcomb Gardens


What do you want to be when you grow up?

Genetic Counselor

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

My favorite course has been Advanced Applied Neuroscience with Dr. Lineweaver because of the setup of the class. The class is only thirteen students and the style is unique in the way that we have to read to prepare for class and discuss what we read. Then everyday there are quizzes rather than a combined test. We also have days with "fishbowl discussions" were we have to analyze primary articles and talk about them in groups of four in front of the whole class. This non-lecture style provides a fresher learning style where I feel that I have been able to retain information on a higher level.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

The Butler community is an inclusive and welcoming place where you always have someone to go to. There are several small communities within the overall Butler community that I belong to, including the Greek life community, student ambassador community, science and liberal arts community, as well as several others. There are so many different types of people from different backgrounds that provide a comforting community to be in.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

My Butler experience will provide me with self confidence, personal skills, and of course the knowledge I need to present myself to others in the future. Plus, for graduate school, Butler will provide me with the academic skills I need to be successful.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

My favorite Butler memory has been my first Butler basketball game. It was the first time I had been into Hinkle Fieldhouse and I was with all of my first-year friends. I was in the Dawg Pound and we had gotten a free t-shirt with the Butler logo on it. Every seat was sold out and the crowd roared continuously. During the game, I realized my phone was ringing. My Dad was calling to tell me he had seen me on TV cheering with my friends behind the basketball hoop. It was the first time that I recognized that Butler is such an passionate, tight-knit community with a big school feel.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

Honestly the primary factor in my college decision was the small-school feel and the comparison of professors between my top two schools. Both schools were small and had relatively small class sizes, but Butler overall had more genuine professors, better class choices, and every time I was on campus I felt like I fit in. Each time I was on campus I felt welcomed and like the students and faculty were excited to have me here. Plus, Trip (our live mascot) was a definite bonus.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

I am most proud to be a bulldog due to the dedication and motivation of my peers. Each and every person at Butler has a story to be shared, and everyone is accepting of each other.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler Way is having compassion for one another, while looking out for everyone even if you may not know them. Being a supportive community and creating a safe space for people of all backgrounds is important and a priority for Butler students.

Student Life

Bailey Severe

She loves being a part of community full of so many different kinds of people.

Bailey Severe

Student Profile

Dancing to the Beat of His Own Drum

In the eyes of Butler University Ballet Chair Larry Attaway, there likely won’t be another Jeremy Gruner in, well, forever.

“There’s never been another one like him before, at least in my time here,” says Attaway.

And that’s because Gruner, who is working on a Master of Music Composition, is also a sophomore-level non-degree student in Butler’s dance program. And Gruner is about to pull off a rare feat: He has written a 15-minute musical composition for this year’s Midwinter Dance Festival that he will also dance in.

The piece, titled Prophetstown, is about Tecumseh, the Native American Shawnee warrior and chief, and Tenskwatawa, his younger brother. Collaborating with Visiting Assistant Professor of Dance Fernando Carrillo, who choreographed the piece, Gruner wrote a composition he describes as "rhythmically consistent and drum-heavy, with distinctive fast and slow sections."

To get the music right, Carrillo says, he talked to Gruner about the style of music he likes and sent samples of music that inspire him to dance or choreograph.

"We talked about tempo, dynamic, and the structure of the dance piece," Carrillo says. "Jeremy, being a dancer, understood what I wanted and has delivered a great piece of music that has made my choreography flow with ease."

Carillo says he's worked with composers who have a background in dance, which helps the choreographer during collaborations. But, Carillo says, it was a very rare experience to have a composer like Gruner who will actually dance in the performance.

Gruner, who is originally from Mahomet, Illinois, was more of a musician—he plays trumpet—than a dancer when he came to Butler. He danced briefly in high school musical theater, and as an undergraduate at Illinois Wesleyan University he collaborated with a faculty member to create music for a dance she choreographed.

But when he started looking at graduate schools, he wanted one that had strong music and dance programs, and also supported collaboration between departments.

"Butler was by far the most pro-collaboration," Gruner says. "That's why I came here."

He started at Butler by concentrating in both music composition and trumpet performance. He also enrolled in a 7:30 AM dance class with Liberty Harris, who is the rehearsal director of the Indianapolis company Dance Kaleidoscope and teaches dance for non-major Butler students. That was his first true ballet class.

On the first day, he was "completely clueless." The terminology and steps were new to him. But he wanted to keep going, and Harris encouraged him.

"I don't know if it's because it was so much of a struggle, but when I would accomplish something—when I would get even a little step further—I would feel such a sense of satisfaction that I never really got out of playing trumpet," Gruner says. "So I started to work more on dance and less on trumpet."

Gruner dropped the trumpet after his first semester and prepared to audition for the dance program. He's now doing the full technique course rotation of an undergraduate sophomore dance major while he finishes his master's with Professor of Music Composition Michael Schelle.

In place of the traditional graduate thesis recital expected of Music Composition students, Gruner will present an hour-long dance show comprised of music he has written in collaboration with Butler Ballet faculty, alumni, and current student choreographers. He will present that performance at Butler's Schrott Center for the Arts on Saturday, March 30 at 7:30 PM.

Gruner says studying music and dance simultaneously, along with teaching and holding two part-time jobs, is a lot of work. But he's up to the challenge.

"Dancing to music is completely different than writing it,” Gruner says, “so it's been interesting to separate myself from Composer Jeremy when I’m trying to be Dancer Jeremy. With just about everything, I either go full force at it or I don't even bother."


You can see Gruner piece in Program A of the Dance Department’s Midwinter Dance Festival, February 13-17 at the Schrott Center for the Arts.  Tickets for all shows are $15 for adults, $10 for 55-and-older, and $7 for children. For tickets and information, visit the Butler Art's Center site.

Ramiro Huerta

Student Profile

Intended Major
Accounting & Finance
Expected Grad Date
December 2017
Extracurricular Activities
Student Orientation Coordinator
Hometown
Austin, TX
High School
James Bowie HS
Favorite Spot on Campus
Hinkle Fieldhouse


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Student Affairs Professional

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

My favorite course has been Applied Portfolio Management through my finance major, where each group is given different market sectors and has the task of recommending different stocks to invest in. This class not only has been a great learning experience, but it has been a lot of fun for me. I enjoy being able to search different companies and make a guess on whether it is a good investment or not.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

Being part of the Butler community is always one of the highlights of my day. I always see somebody that I know, and I never walk on campus without talking to one of my friends. My Butler community not only consists of my best friends, but also my professors, my advisors, and the administration staff I connect with every day.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

My Butler experience has shown me that hard work and dedication brings success. Bringing this mindset to every aspect of my life will result in my future successes.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

My favorite Butler memory was Target Takeover during Welcome Week 2017. As a regular favorite, our First-Year students and the orientation team took over Target late in the night and had a great time with fun games and a dance floor. Being an orientation coordinator that planned this event, seeing the students and the orientation team enjoy themselves was a great payout to the countless hours I put in.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

When I looked for a college, I wanted a school that was smaller in size and would invest in me as a person. In my only Butler visit, I knew that I would be taken care of here. Every student, professor, and faculty member that I talked to had an interest in my background and why I was visiting campus. They cared about why I was there and wanted to see me succeed.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

The people here at Butler makes me most proud to be a Bulldog. Everyone here cares about each other and we all put forth great effort in making sure we all succeed.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

To me, the Butler Way is never giving up, asking for help when you need it, and taking pride in what you do. Here at Butler, we all have an end goal, but how we get there is special. We care about ourselves, about others, and put our best foot forward when achieving our goals

Student Life

Ramiro Huerta

Ramiro enjoyed planning Welcome Week events for first-year students.

Ramiro Huerta

Student Profile

College and Greek Life—Be Who You Are

Krisy Force

#DeltOfTheWeek postSenior Andrew Thompson ’18, who is a brother in Delta Tau Delta and the chapter’s Director of Recruitment, believes a lot of students go to college with negative perceptions of what Greek life is about.

He’s one of several people working to change that.

Social media campaigns showcasing the real side of Butler’s Greek Life have caught on over the course of the last year, tackling the negative stigmas associated with fraternity and sorority life.

“Social media is an easy medium to get a glimpse into what Greek life is all about,” Thompson said. “Our campaigns can provide a window into what the chapter looks like to those who are on the outside.”

Thompson’s campaign, #DeltOfTheWeek, showcases individuals within the chapter each week doing amazing things like studying abroad or working at an internship. Similar campaigns include Sigma Nu’s #SNUOfTheWeek, Phi Delta Theta’s #PhidayFriday, and Beta Theta Pi’s Founding Father Spotlight.

Public Relations Chair for Sigma Nu Dave Mizsak ’20 said that he took a more comedic approach to the campaign by utilizing another fraternity’s photo that included a brother of Sigma Nu in the background. It's a way to “bring a different eye to the person of the week, put fun into it, and show people the real side of Sigma Nu.”#SNUOfTheWeek post

As for the sororities, most showcase their chapter by having the sisters utilize a hashtag on their individual accounts so that it can feed into the sorority's main Instagram or Facebook account. Hashtags include: Kappa Alpha Theta’s #ThetaThursday; Kappa Kappa Gamma’s #TravelTuesday, Delta Delta Delta’s #TDTuesday; Delta Gamma’s #WhyIWentDGWednesday; and Phi Beta Phi’s #UniquelyPiPhi and #PiPhiFriday.

Laiyla Grayson ’18, Director of Formal Recruitment for Alpha Phi, took their campaign one step further by creating a “Sisterhood of the Traveling Jacket” of sorts.  An oversized jean jacket that says: Alpha Phi Doesn’t Define Me, I Define Alpha Phi, travels from sister to sister every day, and members write one word describing what Alpha Phi means to them.

“When we were looking for recruitment ideas we were trying to think about the negative stereotypes that people use to define us, but we stopped and realized we weren’t going to let other people define Alpha Phi, and we also weren’t going to let Alpha Phi define us—which really ties into the whole Butler experience,” Grayson said.

Once a sister gets the jacket and writes one word, she then posts to social media with the hashtag #AlphaPhiToMe and shares the one word. Posts on #AlphaPhiToMe have included compassionate, bold, lady bosses, and even edgy.

Butler’s Greek life social media campaigns and Alpha Phi’s jacket project are ways to show students that college and Greek life are what you make it, and each fraternity and sorority will encourage you to be exactly who you are.#AlphaPhiToMe post

“There are so many different experiences you can make your own,” Grayson said. “You can be a part of something bigger than yourself—whether that’s Greek life, Alpha Phi, or Butler—but you’re still an individual and you still fit in to this bigger experience.”

archive
Student Life

Are You Ready for Some Paper Football?!

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 21 2014

Deep in the basement of Jordan Hall, Room 048 is a plain, run-of-the-mill conference room, home to ordinary staff meetings and brainstorming sessions.

But come Fridays at lunchtime, the room becomes tense with calculated finger flicks as a paper football soars across the table dividing two athletic enemies.

This is the Butler University Paper Football League.

paper football“I’m quite competitive,” said Elesia Yoon, Senior Instructional Designer in the Center for Academic Technology (CAT). “I try to channel inner relaxation, but I can’t help myself. I’m usually the one who starts the trash talking.”

“And I’m the kind of person that has to respond,” said Tim Thomas, Associate Director of CAT.

Their game is played with a small, triangularly folded paper, in which all edges are tucked in neatly to create an aerodynamic, dense kicking surface. Each player alternates flicking the paper football across the table to try to score a touchdown, which occurs when an edge of the paper football hangs slightly over the opponent’s end of the table.

Players receive an extra point for “kicking” the paper football through goalposts, made by the opponent’s outstretched index fingers and upright thumbs, after scoring a touchdown. The player with the most points at the end of the 10-minute game wins.

The traditional goal of a paper football game: to obliterate the opponent with precision and accuracy.

The Butler league goal of a paper football game: to relax (mostly) and have fun (usually) while meeting some cool new people (competition).

Thomas founded the league when he came to Butler less than two years ago as a way to form relationships among Butler staff and take a break from work. All Butler staff, faculty, and students are welcome to join the league for its 2014-2015 season.

“I think it’s a nice break from the day,” he said. “It takes you out of the work setting for a while, and it’s a great way to meet and connect with people other than in a meeting. In the course of these games, you get to learn about what people do.”

Butler’s finest paper football flickers from the Center for Academic Technology, Information Technology, Butler Libraries, and several other departments participated in the season last year, leading up to the finale football fans of all kinds are familiar with—the Super Bowl.

Players must participate in at least three games to qualify for the playoffs. The final two playoffs and Super Bowl are held in late January and include nothing short of what is expected from a typical NFL Super Bowl: dedicated fans, greasy food, nerve-racking nail biters, and, of course, entertainment.

Last year featured a moving impersonation of Enrico Pallazzo’s National Anthem by Josh Petrusa, Associate Dean for Collections and Digital Services of Irwin Library.

Sally Neal, Associate Dean for Instruction and User Services, stole the halftime show with a Hugh Jackman sing-along to Oklahoma’s “The Surrey with the Fringe on Top.” All the while, fans showed their support with cheers, boom sticks, the wave, and a special appearance by Super Fan in a wild, colored wig.

“It was a great turnout,” Yoon said. “Just the fan base was huge. We were cheering for somebody, and then they’d lose, and you’d quickly cross their name out and write the next player’s name to keep on cheering.”

Chad Miller, Senior Director of Technology Development, won gold last year after entering the playoffs as the lowest-seeded player. But he left with more than just pride and the fresh glow of victory. Miller took home a tall and picturesque trophy, complete with a golden paper football on top.

“It was kind of glorious,” Thomas said.

“It was very glorious,” Yoon replied.

Qahir Lahka

Student Profile

Intended Major
Philosophy and Psychology
Expected Grad Date
May 2019
Extracurricular Activities
CFV Scholar, Morton-Finney scholar, philosophy club
Hometown
Owatonna, MN
High School
Owatonna Senior High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
Holcomb Gardens and the spot behind the bell tower


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Professor/Consultant/Gregg Popovich

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

My favorite course has been my FYS course since it was a strong group that I knew for the entire course of my freshman year and even the fact that I got to know my professor so well. It just really showed me that philosophy is even more of an interesting topic than I thought and really gave me the confidence that I could study this in school and follow my academic passion. (it’s what made me wanna pick up the philosophy major)

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

I was very nervous coming from MN that I would lose some of that awesome charm and 'niceness' but after being on campus for a while I have learned that the community vibe can take place anywhere as long as the people are great! It’s like being part of a big friend group which is amazing everyone is looking out for everyone else. My Butler community is every single person I have met on campus so far.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

Hopefully by helping me land a job, and I have matured so much in school. Being away from home and staying busy with class and extra-curriculars have helped me mature so much as a person which I will take with me for the rest of my time.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

Playing Wiffle ball for an entire Saturday while listening to music and having a cookout later.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

Being far away from home, money, and a small campus near a big city. This school fit all the criteria and the fact that being on campus for the first time gave me butterflies in the stomach. (Fall is awesome.)

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

The basketball team, and the fact that I was in the MN airport waiting for my flight back home then I ran into my friend, my FYS professor, and a butler alumn all on the same flight! we all bonded and chatted for the entire time and it was the best flight I have ever taken.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

I don’t know what The Butler Way means.

Student Life

Qahir Lahka

He found comfort in the community feel of campus.

Qahir Lahka

Student Profile
daniel meyers

The Answers to Big Questions

Monica Holb ’09

from Fall 2017

When Director for the Center for Faith and Vocation (CFV) Daniel Meyers took part in the Efroymson Diversity Center of Butler University’s “Discussions in the DC” in 2016, he felt the event vocalized the sentiments surrounding interfaith issues percolating on campus. 

As the forward-looking panels spoke to identity components such as race, gender, religion, and spirituality, Meyers said the conversation sparked the idea of making religious identity part of diversity work. 

Students, particularly Salman Qureshi, agreed. Qureshi’s interest soon led him to become the CFV’s interfaith intern and drive the genesis of the Interfaith Council. 

The CFV’s Interfaith Council is comprised of 12 students of a variety of different faith traditions who host conversations and build relationships among one another. The council shares its traditions and stories with students of all backgrounds. 

Meeting that goal played out through a social media effort that asked Butler students to answer on Instagram: “What is interfaith?” The prompt came the day after the 2016 presidential election, when students were likely asking many questions as they witnessed the first transfer of Presidential power in their young adult lives. 

“It’s been valuable to have a group of students who know each other so well, who don’t all agree or share the same beliefs, so that when something happens in the world, we can ask them, ‘What do you think needs to be addressed?’” Meyers said. 

According to Meyers, as the nation and the culture change, Butler’s students have a resource ready to provide assistance when they may feel they need to respond to current events. 

The CFV, established by a Lilly Endowment grant, co-written by Butler University Professor Paul Valliere more than a decade ago, now hosts the Interfaith Council, but has always served as the navigation point for students on their journey through college. 

“The CFV is home to 13 student groups, supports interns, and hosts meetings in the Blue House seven days per week—from study night to meditation space, yoga and a ‘Big Questions,’ lunch series,” explained CFV Assistant Director Marguerite Stanciu.  

Among these activities, CFV facilitates students thinking about the questions the world is challenging them to answer—relating to society and to one’s self—in a supported space.  

This is partly done through the CFV’s longstanding program: The Butler University Seminar on Religion and Global Affairs. “It has always been about going around the globe and looking through the lens of different religious and cultural perspectives at subjects such as religion and global health. It is a rigorous academic environment designed to be accessible for the general public,” Stanciu said. 

The CFV, and the issues its programing may address, are transforming, but it continues to fulfill its mission. 

“The CFV is within Academic Affairs, which is important. It means that the underpinning of our mission is that we are part of the learning experience at the heart of the institution,” Meyers said. 

The vocational reflection that the CFV hopes results from its programming is expected to be a part of the academic journey. The many big questions posed help students with the most important ones: “What are you studying, and how is it going to make the difference that you want to make in the world?” Meyers said. 

 

daniel meyers
Student Life

The Answers to Big Questions

by Monica Holb ’09

from Fall 2017

Read more

Keeping the #ButlerBound Secret

Jeff Stanich ’16

For five years, the #ButlerBound program has delivered good news to prospective students around the country. With a personal touch, and a lot of drool, Blue III (a.k.a. Trip), Butler’s live mascot, surprises future (human) Bulldogs with their acceptance letters or scholarship announcements.

More often than not, such a big reveal is dependent upon the accepted students’ parents, who work behind the scenes with Butler to organize the surprise. We caught up with a few parents whose children had their acceptance letters paw-delivered by Trip to gain more insight on that moment and how their relationship with the university continued from there.

For Angela Buchman, she knows that getting the news directly from Trip could be one of the main factors in her son’s decision. Luke, now a high school senior, is still in the thick of his college-choosing process.

“If you saw Luke’s face, you saw how special that moment was, and how he’s continued to think about it,” she says. “In the last few years, he has really buckled down and worked hard at school, and Butler seemed to recognize that. It really vaulted Butler up his list.”

That’s right - Luke’s future as a bulldog is still up in the air. Some schools have his attention for the programs they offer, others because it’s where his friends will probably go. But no other school has pulled out the kind of stops that Butler has, which is exactly why the university does it.

As higher education becomes increasingly more competitive and the college decision becomes more pressure filled, Butler has a Trip up their sleeve.

Michael Kaltenmark, Butler's Director of Community and Government Relations and resident bulldog handler, makes anywhere from 40 to 100 admission visits with Trip each year. These visits demand lots of coordination and early mornings, but the payoff is worth it. Students who receive a personal visit from Kaltenmark and his loveable pooch are significantly more likely to attend Butler, and that’s what it’s all about.

And to be on the receiving end of such a visit is all the more memorable. Especially for Keelen Barlow.

“It was amazing - really, it was everything he could have hoped for,” says Keelen’s mother, Nicolette. “Given his backstory, and what Butler has always meant to him, it couldn’t have played out any more perfectly.”

Because even though no one in the Barlow family had ever attended Butler before Keelen started this fall, the university always held a special place in their lives.

After Keelen was born, Nicolette’s parents subscribed to season tickets for Butler basketball games and started to take him to every home game when he was only two. It’s how Keelen initially fell in love with Butler - and when his grandfather passed away, Nicolette believes going to the games became a way of keeping those memories alive.

“But even though he always wanted to be a student there, it wasn’t a sure thing given the costs,” she recalls. “That’s why Trip showing up at our door was so amazing. They didn't just come with an acceptance letter, it was also the first time we learned that Keelen had gotten the scholarship he needed to go.”

For Keelen, meeting Trip in a room full of his loved ones, including his grandma and fellow bulldog super-fan, all of his life seemed to be leading up to that moment. For Nicolette, it became one of many examples of how Butler often goes the extra mile to ensure its students feel a true sense of belonging on campus.

“It’s such a tight-knit community in so many regards, and I love knowing he’s not sitting in a lecture hall surrounded by 200 other students being taught by a T.A.,” she says. “Especially as a freshman, because all the changes are easy to get lost in. But when he came home for the first time he was a changed man. Definitely for the better.”

Angela is aware of those same obstacles that her son will face next year on campus as a freshman, wherever that might be.

“With everyone that Luke talks to at Butler, he can really tell how much they care about him as an individual already,” she says, “and I think that’s important to him. It’d be important to anyone. Butler’s people really are eager to help every student find their place there.”

So eager, in fact, that the Butler Bound visits become one of the hardest secrets to keep in town. For Angela, she couldn’t help but let it slip to the receptionist during one of Luke’s orthodontist visits.

With Keelen’s family, they all knew how significant this moment would be for him. And the more and more people were invited by his mother to witness it, Keelen started to know something was up. But even though he is a journalism major now and learning to chase leads, his instincts were a little off when guessing what everyone was so excited about.

“He thought I was pregnant!” Nicolette says. “Once I started telling him to be home on a certain day and time he got really suspicious, but he still didn’t expect the bulldog to be there on the front door. He was so shocked that I had to remind him to let them in.”

Because there, in his living room surrounded by family, dreams were coming true between two bulldogs. Nicolette used to fear that her son would get teased for wearing a Butler t-shirt every day growing up. But all those worries went away knowing her son would soon be right at home.

“Once he got his letter and that scholarship there was no way in hell I wasn’t going to let Butler happen for him,” Nicolette says. “He still pretended to look at other places just because they were on the table before. But his heart was already at Butler, where it still is now.”

AcademicsStudent Life

Keeping the #ButlerBound Secret

A big reveal is dependent upon the accepted students’ parents, who work with Butler to organize the surprise.

Building Balanced Bulldogs

by Jeff Stanich ’16

At Butler, fostering a student’s health and wellbeing goes way beyond the treadmill or a yoga mat.

Perhaps you’ve seen the BU | BeWell logo, which appears as a rainbow of principal pillars, across campus and online. Each of the eight components—Mind & Body, Career & Life Skills, Meaning & Purpose, Social, Environmental, Service & Community, Intellectual, and Diversity & Inclusion—are what the team behind BU | BeWell believe contribute to the complete and transformative experience that Butler University offers its students.

BU BeWell logoWhat happens outside of the classroom on a college campus is as critical as what happens inside to the future success of a student. Learning to navigate the challenges of adult life in a healthy way is fundamental to a fulfilled life after graduation. The tools and experiences critical to this essential process of “growing up” have always been available on Butler’s campus, but they have been scattered and, at times, perhaps disjointed. This year, with the launch of BU | BeWell, for the first time in the school’s history, all of the student resources available across campus have come together to make it more straightforward for students to make their time outside of the classroom as meaningful as it always has been inside of it.

“It’s a big deal,” says Vice President for Student Affairs Dr. Frank E. Ross. “Leading higher education associations NASPA and NIRSA have articulated the importance of wellbeing to student success, and a proactive, campus-wide approach to supporting the whole student. That is what we are doing at Butler with BU | BeWell.”

Ross is saying that not only as a fellow bulldog, but as a national leader in student affairs with more than two decades of experience. According to him, what Butler is doing outside of the classroom will be a leading example in higher education across the country.

Take it from Katie Pfaff, a senior who has been working closely with BU | BeWell’s collaborators. Since she’s only a few months away from graduation, she recognizes how much she could have benefitted had this framework been in place since her first year.

“While I got all the pieces I needed to have a well-rounded experience, I took a much curvier path to get there than what BU | BeWell will help Butler’s students pursue,” Pfaff says. “I know I’m only a short time away from a major transitional period after graduation. BUBeWell’s model is something I can look to while trying to make sure my life stays as balanced as it’s been on campus.”

That’s the key. BU | BeWell will not only help students make their time at Butler more fulfilling, but it will also guide those individuals toward healthy and meaningful lives beyond campus.

BU | BeWell has been a campus-wide, collective effort to organize. Two of its champions—Josh Downing, Director of Recreation & Wellness, and Beth Lohman, Associate Director of Fitness & Wellness—have spent the last few years applying national best practices in order to bring BU | BeWell to life. Now in its first year of rollout, their primary objective is raising awareness of its existence so that students know where many, if not all, of their questions will be answered.

Need help putting a résumé together? BU | BeWell will tell you where to go.

Need a tutor for that major exam coming up? BU | BeWell will help you find one on campus.

In need of a faith-based circle? Wondering when the next keynote speaker is coming? Want to get more involved in student government? BU | BeWell, BU | BeWell, BU | BeWell.

And this is only the beginning. While the framework is in place and the web portal has launched, in year two, software will be rolled out so that students can create a BU | BeWell profile to track their involvement and/or progress with the eight components of the BUBeWell umbrella. Even more, annual surveys will continue to be conducted to see how exactly BU | BeWell is meeting the needs of Butler’s students while also looking for ways to improve.

“That’s why we’re all so excited about this moving forward,” Downing says. “By enhancing what Butler already does so well, the potential for how exactly BU | BeWell will help our students is limitless.”

Student LifeCampus

Building Balanced Bulldogs

BU | BeWell is a campus-wide, collective effort to enhance the student experience outside the classroom.

Building Balanced Bulldogs

by Jeff Stanich ’16

Butler Summer Institute–Celebrating 25 Years

Sharon Alseth ’91

from Spring 2017

No classes, no employment, no interruptions—only research. That’s just the way they want it, the 30 students who are chosen to immerse themselves in the Butler Summer Institute (BSI), celebrating its 25th anniversary this year.

These are dedicated, self-directed Butler student researchers with a methodological background and a passion to pursue a significant question, every day for nine weeks. Students who apply need a recommendation from a faculty member, and an explanation of their project. BSI participants each get a $2,500 stipend and live and work on campus. Each student has his or her own faculty mentor and close bonds are formed, with the added support and encouragement of fellow student researchers.

“No topic is off limits,” said Dr. Dacia Charlesworth, Director of Undergraduate Research and Prestigious Scholarships at Butler. “It could be that a student found something interesting in the humanities, and they’re excited to take it to another level. One student analyzed Tweets about the violence in Ferguson, Missouri, and then the Orlando nightclub shootings happened and her project shifted focus. We had a history major who wants to be a dentist, study the effects of mercury tooth fillings. She uncovered an actual melodrama musical of mercury’s side effects.” Said Charlesworth, “These are great students who want to learn, and that makes our job easy.”

The BSI students have to show how they are advancing research in their field, and make a definite contribution to their discipline. There are “research recaps” at the end of each week, aided by presentation training so students can more confidently explain their work in basic terms to their audiences. In the end, students are required to produce work worthy of acceptance in a professional conference or publication, and they present their project at Butler’s Undergraduate Research Conference the following April. 

AcademicsStudent Life

Butler Summer Institute–Celebrating 25 Years

No classes, no employment, no interruptions—only research.

by Sharon Alseth ’91

from Spring 2017

Read more

Anna Claire Bradbury

Student Profile

Intended Major
Middle/Secondary Education and English
Expected Grad Date
2020
Extracurricular Activities
Butler University Marching Band, Butler University Basketball Band, Various volunteer projects in the city, Band service sorority (TBS)
Hometown
Lindenhurst, IL
High School
Lakes Community High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
Efroymson Center for Creative Writing


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

I want to be a teacher who works in third world countries.

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

My favorite course at Butler so far, is my FYS: Visiting Writers Series. Not only was the class itself amazing and my professor pushed me to think, write, and read differently, but the people are really what made this class so special to me. I loved that I was able to meet each member of my class through welcome week and then spend a whole school year together. On the last day of class, we shared our favorite memories and it was surreal that I had only met them nine months prior, but through our relationships built inside and outside of the class, it felt like I had known them forever. I also thoroughly enjoyed taking the Visiting Writers Series FYS, because I loved being able to read an author's work, discuss it with my classmates, and then have the opportunity to meet the author here at Butler and listen to their voice and purpose behind their stories.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

Being a part of the Butler Community is life changing. When I was looking for schools, marching band was a big factor for me because I knew I would find my family there and I have. I loved knowing that when I came to Butler I would already have friends here because we all dedicate our time to the same practice and love spending time with one another. I have also found community within my major, my core courses, and through working as a BSA.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

Butler is giving me the chance to have real world experiences, before being in the real world. As an education major, I have already been in about ten different classrooms learning about what it mean to be a teacher first hand. I know that these observations and tutoring experiences are letting me practice before being thrown into the fire on my own. I get the experience and practice that I need in order to be ready for the day I have my own classroom, even before I start student teaching.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

During Spring Break 2017, I was able to travel to New York with the basketball band for the Men's Big East Tournament. While I was there, a few friends and I decided to see a Broadway production. When we arrived at the theater, we were looking around for our other friends who had seats in different locations. As I was looking, I noticed that there was a young lady wearing a Butler shirt and next to that young lady was President Danko. I turned to my friend and we could not believe it. We were going to watch a Broadway show in New York with President Danko. Of course we were both wearing Butler gear and he noticed. He came over to speak with us and we ended up talking about the amazing Butler Community. I love knowing that we have students, factually, and even members of the board willing to travel miles to see our school participate in activities and give them the support they need.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

For me, my main factors in my college decision were: a school out of state, a marching band, smaller sized school, a college of education, a school that supports volunteering, study abroad programs, and students who enjoy their campus. I have all of that here at Butler and have received so much more than I could have expected. With my college decision, I wanted to go big or go home. I picked schools, like Butler, that almost no one from my high school was planning on going to. I wanted to do something that no one else was doing. I wanted to go out on my own and be independent. And I did just that. I came to Butler not knowing anyone on campus and I was quickly welcomed by every student here and I knew I could find my place here at Butler.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

I am so proud to be a Butler Bulldog because of the students. I truly believe that each student on campus is doing something amazing, whether it be through sports, internships, organizations, or their majors. Bulldogs are here to learn and take their education into their own hands. Bulldogs are here to pave new paths. Bulldogs are willing to go the extra mile and do what is right. Being a Bulldog truly means being a above a class above the rest.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler Way means taking care of others and yourself. Being at Butler means being apart of a team. Our students know that we need to depend on each other to succeed, but we also have to carry our own weight, even if that means venturing out own our own. The Butler Way promotes taking a look at yourself as an individual and were you excel and where you lack. Then it takes courage to share that with the community and find people on your team who can help you succeed.

Anna Claire Bradbury
Student Life

Anna Claire Bradbury

Anna Claire has so much classroom experience, she knows she'll be prepared to become a teacher before she graduates.

Anna Claire Bradbury

Anna Claire Bradbury

Student Profile
adam bantz

Involvement Has its Own Rewards

Krisy Force

from Fall 2017

You only have to spend a few minutes with Butler student Adam Bantz ’17to know that he is a go-getter. He’s immersed himself in many extracurricular activities including Butler’s Ambassadors of Change program, Student Government Association (SGA), Butler University Students Foundation (BUSF), and still finds time to work as a tour guide showing prospective Butler students just how amazing campus life truly is. He’s getting the most out of the Butler student experience, and he’s planning a career to make sure future college students do as well. 

Bantz is on the path to what he deems as a fulfilling future career in Student Affairs—a talking point that seems to have created a permanent smile on his face. 

But Student Affairs wasn’t always the plan. 

When Bantz switched his major from Pharmacy to Strategic Communication two years ago, his parents were worried that he was “giving up an opportunity.” His response: “It’s not an opportunity if you don’t find the outcome personally rewarding.” 

Bantz has always been the type to quickly get involved. His immersion in student groups on campus is what sparked what Adam refers to as the “typical Student Affairs epiphany.” He explained no student enters college knowing they want to go into Student Affairs, but involvement in out-of-classroom experiences can lead some students to the realization that they, like their mentors, can help create life changing experiences for future college students. In this regard, Adam clearly feels he “fell into Student Affairs.” 

“People don’t realize all of the intricate details of Student Affairs and all the work that goes into making the University function the way it does,” Bantz explained. “I think being a part of that in general, and providing the same level of experience I’ve had at Butler for future college students is really cool.”

Since his epiphany, Bantz has been interning in both University Events and the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs to gain more experience in his future career field. Even with a busy internship schedule, Bantz has found time to serve as the President for the Interfraternity Council, a member of SGA’s Marketing and Communication Board, and as a mentor for GEAR—Greek Educators, Advocates, and Resources.

Meg Haggerty, Associate Director in the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, and Bantz’s internship advisor, commented that he has been one of the most insightful and inquisitive students she’s worked with. Furthermore, Haggerty explained that Bantz is using his hands-on student affairs internship to bridge his social involvement on campus with his academic education to maximize his future career and post-graduate work opportunities. 

“All of Adam’s involvement has been, in some way, a touchstone or area of engagement in Student Affairs,” Haggerty said. “It only makes sense with all of his participation as an undergraduate that he would find passion and love for a career mentoring future students in a similar way.” 

Alex Jones

Student Profile

Intended Major
Political Science and Spanish
Expected Grad Date
Spring 2020
Extracurricular Activities
Greek Life, Honors Program, SGA
Hometown
Eldorado, IL
High School
Eldorado High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
The Reilly Room


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

A Professor

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

HN300: The Performance of Gender with Dr. Charlesworth. The class pushed me to think in new ways and tackle the very real yet incredibly fabricated concept of gender, and gave approaches to conduct similar interrogations for other constructs. It made me feel in charge of my own destiny in some very abstract way.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

Being part of the Butler Community is like never leaving home. Someone always has your back. Everyone from my Greek house and my closest friends to my professors and my classmates form my community.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

My Butler experience will help me because I never had my punches pulled. I am both supported and pushed, and can take comfort in knowing that my accomplishments are my own. I know I will be prepared to compete at any level after I leave here.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

Being an AOC Teambuilder has been my best memory so far. Getting to personally know first-year students and understanding their goals, motivations, and stories is something I will always be grateful for and never forget.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

I wanted somewhere that would give me a good platform for a variety of opportunities.  I was undecided when applying to schools and had no idea where I wanted to go in the future and I wasn’t comfortable locking myself in a particular path. Butler had the ability to prepare me for anything I wanted to do and to do so very well.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

The pride that students have in each other and our achievements makes me proud to be a Bulldog. Everyone supports everyone else, and it's hard to not be proud of that.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler Way is doing what you can where you can and always giving your best effort (whatever that might mean in the situation). It's knowing that people are there for you but also being there for yourself. It's something that is almost impossible to quantify, yet almost everyone understands.

Student Life

Alex Jones

Alex learned to tackle difficult subjects empowering him to take on more.

Alex Jones

Student Profile

Jordan Jazz: Small but Mighty Good

By Haley Stevenson '19

Jordan Jazz is a small ensemble of student jazz singers studying in Butler University’s School of Music. Led by Erin Benedict, the vocal ensemble performs along with a band of students from the jazz program consisting of piano, bass, drums, saxophone, and guitar.

Erin Benedict
Erin Benedict

A graduate of The Manhattan School of Music, Erin Benedict began teaching at Butler a couple of years ago. Outside of Butler, her forte is commercial performance: singing in movie soundtracks and television commercials. Like with any new job, she had doubts, but as soon as she met the students and the group she would be teaching, she knew she was in the right place. “I was approached several times to come here and teach jazz voice and do Jordan Jazz … I’m glad I said yes!”

Jordan Jazz is a unique ensemble because it is so small and close knit. Only eight students meet with Benedict once a week for two hours. Throughout the course of a semester the group gets to know each other very well. “They all set up a group chat and support one another … In a smaller school like Butler, it may be more common, but in a larger school, it’s very unlikely,” Benedict says.

As many music students will note, it can be a struggle to maintain the excitement they had when they first started out – creative passions sometimes become a bit of a job, and a demanding one at that. Jordan Jazz gives students the opportunity to perform in a professional setting, but under less pressure so they can freely express themselves. “I am studying classical music constantly, so I really like being able to come together in this small jazz group. The tight harmonies and intimate settings make it really special," says junior Rowan Squire-Willey.  

Benedict hopes that in the coming years, Jordan Jazz will be one of the elite ensembles at Butler: “I see it being six men and six women … a mixture of a cappella and with instruments. I would love to see some students write things, and I would like to take them out to perform in the community.” That vision may come true as soon as this coming spring, when Benedict is planning to start some community outreach.

If you’d like to see the ensemble’s first performance of the 2018-2019 school year, your chance is this Wednesday, November 28 at 7:30 p.m. in Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall. The performance is free, open to the public, and is sure to be night to remember.   

Jordan Jazz
Arts & CultureStudent Life

Jordan Jazz: Small but Mighty Good

Jordan Jazz, a small ensemble of student jazz singers, takes the stage Wednesday, November 28. 

Jordan Jazz

Jordan Jazz: Small but Mighty Good

By Haley Stevenson '19
GivingStudent Life

Dancing for a Good Cause

BY By Peyton Thompson '20

PUBLISHED ON Jan 31 2018

The 16th annual Butler University Dance Marathon takes place on Saturday, February 3, from noon to midnight in the Health and Recreation Center. For 12 hours, participants will dance, play basketball and other games, and eat, eat, and eat some more—all for a good cause.

The student-run fundraiser supports Riley Hospital for Children, in honor of Sarah Michelle Cohen, an honorary Dawg who died August 13, 2009, before she could attend Butler.

At the end of the evening, the organizers reveal the amount raised. Last year, BUDM raised $402,440.01 for Riley Hospital for Children.

“The Butler University Dance Marathon organization has not set a goal for the end of the night reveal," Dodson says, "because no matter what the number is, at the end of the day it is giving hope to all the Riley kids of the past, present, and future.”

We asked some of the organizers: What does BUDM mean to you?

Apparel Chair Bailee Dodson: “BUDM has been a huge impact in my life because it truly shows me what giving your whole heart look like. I have seen my committee members go above and beyond for a great cause and that truly keeps me going during the most stressful times. On 75k Day"—the day they try to raise $75,000—"I truly saw the magic of the Butler community, my family, and friends and I think that has been a huge impact on my life to see people I love go the extra mile FTK!”

Director of Dancer Relations Elaine Holmes: “BUDM is has helped me find a way to use my talents to further a cause about which I am passionate. Because of BUDM, I have found inspiration for my future in the healthcare field through our efforts for a world where all kids can join in the dancing.”

Co-director of Entertainment Sarah Thuet: “BUDM has made such a difference in not only my time at Butler but also my life as a whole. This organization transcends any limitation I’ve ever seen stop other fundraising organization. It’s such an inspiring, selfless and humble group of people who are just giving their all to help others. I truly am inspired and motivated by the BUDM committee every single day.”

All students, faculty, and staff at Butler University are welcome to participate. There is a $50 dancer minimum to join in.

This year's Dance marathon will include a plethora of fun activities and food for all the participants to enjoy. Dodson says there will be an electronic bull, a bounce house obstacle course, a three-on-three basketball tournament, a face painter, and a rave to the end the night before the final reveal.

"There is something new every hour,” she says.

  1. How to Get Involved
  2. Register at donate.rileykids.org/BUDM_2018
  3. Start fundraising
  4. Head to the HRC from noon to midnight, this Saturday, February 3.

 

 

GivingStudent Life

Dancing for a Good Cause

Butler University Dance Marathon will take place February 3.

Jan 31 2018 Read more

Nathan Sutaphong

Student Profile

Intended Major
Healthcare and Business
Expected Grad Date
May 2018
Extracurricular Activities
CRU, Out of the Dawg House
Hometown
Fort Wayne, IN
High School
Concordia Lutheran High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
Hinkle Fieldhouse


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

President of a hospital

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

Healthcare Economics has been my favorite course here at Butler. I am passionate about healthcare and how we define health in the United States. Healthcare Economics allowed me to get a bigger picture of how healthcare in this country works and why. I think it allowed me to see the many areas of improvement we, as a country, can make, and how I, as a healthcare professional, can make those impactful changes.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

The Butler Community to me is undefinable. While the "Butler Way" is defined for us in a frame on the wall, I personally believe that it is something indescribable. You can't tell someone what this community is—you have to show them. Through first hand experiences only can someone truly understand what is is like to be a Bulldog. Just a simple walk across campus will give you a glimpse into how different our culture is. We are kind, we are friendly, we are passionate, we are resilient, but most of all we are supportive.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

The most valuable thing I have learned from my Butler experience is how to care. I think my experience at Butler has gone much farther than the classroom. Not only have I learned a lot in the classroom, but I also learned how to be a better person.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

My favorite experience at Butler is easily the 2017 home win over Villanova inside Hinkle. That was true Hinkle magic. Experiencing the the Dawgs beat the odds, rushing the court, and an explosion of school spirit is all can ask for.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

Apart from finding a program that fit my interests, I wanted to find a school that had the right "feel." A feeling of community and growth was important for me to find. I wanted a friendly, open, and non-judgemental place to live for the next four years. I think Butler does a fantastic job of showing off those aspects every day. It was easy for me to see the true value in coming to Butler after just one visit. It was a place that was going to help me grow as a person, not just academically.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

What makes me most proud to be a Bulldog is being associated with innovation and change. From our foundation, Butler has been a hub of innovation. Coming from a place with a rich history for breaking ground in so many areas I am confident that I can also impact this world in a positive way.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

The Butler Way is indescribable. It isn't something that can be put into words, but rather is shown or experienced. It’s more than just a set of values. It is how we live our lives. It means being supportive and kind, but it also means having integrity, veracity, and grit.

Nathan Sutaphong
Student Life

Nathan Sutaphong

Nathan saw his career path laid out for him in the lessons he learned in his Healthcare Economics class.

Nathan Sutaphong

Nathan Sutaphong

Student Profile
archive
Student LifeCampus

Reducing Food Waste Is Their Goal. This Is Their Story.

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 29 2016

The Food Recovery Network is one of several sustainability efforts on campus.

By Hayley Ross '17

Making sure they don’t throw out the extra food on their plate is not enough for Bailey Armstrong ’16 and Olivia Carroll ’17. As executive members of Butler’s Food Recovery Network, their goal is bigger: eliminating food waste across campus.

“I look for opportunities to decrease waste wherever I go,” Armstrong said. “There are such easy ways to do it. If I am talking to a younger friend, I am always promoting the Food Recovery Network.”

Lauren Wathen, Olivia Carroll, and Bailey Armstrong are working to reduce food waste on campus
Lauren Wathen, Olivia Carroll, and Bailey Armstrong are working to reduce food waste on campus.

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Armstrong started the club in fall 2014 when her sister’s friend, who is one of the founders of the national program, told her to apply to create a chapter on Butler’s campus. After a couple of weekly calls with the program’s headquarters, she was able to make it official.

She said she went to Butler’s alternative block party ready to find others as passionate as she is.

“That’s where I met Olivia,” Armstrong said. “I also met Emily Guglielmo, who is now on our executive team as well.”

Guglielmo had transferred from the University of Michigan, which already had a Food Recovery Network chapter. Soon after, they met Lauren Wathen, current president, who joined them in making a four-person leadership team ready to conquer food sustainability and food waste prevention.

The Food Recovery Network’s efforts are just one part of the sustainability efforts on campus. Dining Services composts about 800 pounds of pre-consumer food waste—like the tops of peppers and apple cores—each week. This began in April 2015, thanks to an SGA grant.

In January 2015 they made their first recovery—taking all unused, untouched food that can’t be resold and donating it to the Julian Center, a center for women who have been domestically abused.

“We started at Hinkle after a basketball game,” Armstrong said. “We asked Dining Services, ‘If you think we are doing a good job at the games, can we do them in the dining halls?’ And now we have them twice a week at Atherton and at all home men’s basketball games.”

They have collected about 1,000 pounds of food in the past year.

“We view the amount of food we have recovered as an accomplishment, but also as a sign that there’s a lot more work to do to diminish food waste,” Armstrong said.

Each semester the network members meet with Dining Services’ head chef and the team that orders the food served at Atherton to discuss how much is being wasted.

“We just want to make them aware,” Carroll said. “They have been incredibly responsive.”

There are now 10 members of their executive team, although there are many more working these recoveries.

“The cool thing is that we have executive members that are really passionate, but also volunteers who can come for an hour or so,” Carroll said. “It’s great to have that balance that keeps the sustainability going.”

Other student organizations also pair with them weekly to do food recoveries. They said their goal is to make Butler students more aware.

“Awareness changes a society,” Carroll said. “Although we may not do this as a profession, Food Recovery has taught me a lot about the immense amount of food wasted in this country and the hunger in this country. We tend to focus abroad, but we have a huge problem in our own country.”

For more information on the organization and how to volunteer, visit the Butler Food Recovery Network Facebook page or contact Lauren Wathen at lwathen@butler.edu.

Student Life

Ryan Lovelace '14 Earns Buckley Fellowship in Political Journalism

BY

PUBLISHED ON May 07 2014

Graduating journalism major Ryan Lovelace ’14 has been awarded a William F. Buckley Fellowship in Political Journalism. As part of the fellowship, Lovelace will work in the editorial department of National Review magazine in New York for a year.

Headshot-2“I'm honored to become a William F. Buckley Jr. fellow, and intend to do my best to live up to the high standards associated with any position bearing his name,” Lovelace said. “I'm excited to continue learning about journalism at National Review and hope to contribute in any way that I can.”

Lovelace and Ian Tuttle from St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland, were chosen because of their passion for journalism and a steadfast commitment to conservative principles, the National Review Institute said in a news release.

Lovelace, a senior from North Aurora, Illinois, has served as managing editor of The Butler Collegian in 2013-2014. In early April, he won a national award from the organization Investigative Reporters & Editors for the story “A Center and Its Director,” about the University’s creation of the Desmond Tutu Center and its hiring of Allan Boesak to be the first director.

In a three-month investigation, Lovelace used South African court records, documents from Wikileaks, and interviews with sources in South Africa to document Boesak’s history. The former freedom fighter had been convicted of misusing donations made to his foundation.

“Ryan has a journalist’s gut and curiosity that drive him to pursue stories few other reporters are telling,” said Loni McKown, faculty adviser to the Collegian and professional practice faculty member in the Eugene S. Pulliam School of Journalism in the College of Communication. “He has a bright future as a national political reporter.”

National Review roving correspondent Kevin D. Williamson will serve as onsite mentor for the fellows, offering editorial feedback, guidance, and support in weekly reviews and hosting them in monthly lunches with leading conservative thinkers and journalists.

The Buckley Fellowship is named for William F. Buckley Jr., who nurtured two generations of conservative journalists. His legacy includes scores of conservative editors and writers. The first Buckley Fellow, Robert Costa, is currently a national political reporter for The Washington Post.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

8 Ways for Students to BeWell at BU

by Katie Pfaff ’19

Katie Pfaff ’19 is a senior studying Strategic Communication and Communication & Organizational Leadership. This semester she is an intern for Butler’s BU | BeWell program.


 

BUBeWell provides a platform for students to explore wellness within their collegiate experience. Each student is able to take a personal journey to discovering what areas they need support in to grow, learn, and be the best versions of themselves. The eight dimensions below take a holistic and transformative approach to obtaining overall wellness. This highlights a few of the many pieces that help foster the BUBeWell experience.

 

Mind & Body

Looking for an exciting way to enhance your physical health at Butler? Why not stop by the Health and Recreation Complex and attend one of the many fitness classes offered? Group fitness has a wide variety of activities ranging from cardio to meditation that can accommodate any student’s schedule. This is the ideal opportunity for a seasoned workout junkie or first-timer to explore and improve their personal health.

 

Career & Life Skills

College is a place for students to dive deep into the many different career paths available to them. Internship and Career Services develops students into young professionals by offering creative and innovative ways to help prepare them for the future. Students can get connected with the different Career Communities to learn more about certain industries and network with other peers/professionals who share similar interests. Conversations about future careers don’t have to happen alone; let Internship and Career Services guide students to many different resources available.

 

Intellectual Wellness

Learning isn’t something that is limited to just inside the classroom. Intellectual growth can be fostered through interactive experiences and the engagement of new ideas. Faculty and staff provide a valuable amount of insight and knowledge to students through academic advising. Students can take advantage of one-on-one mentorship that can provide clarity on ways to obtain academic success.

 

Diversity & Inclusion

Exposure to a variety of different backgrounds and experiences provides students with the ability to build appreciation and understanding for culture. Butler strives to cultivate resources to support one’s journey to discovering their own identity and how they differ from others. The Efroymson Diversity center is an open space and community for students to come together as they to share and discover. It houses a multitude of organizations and programming for individuals of all kinds. Stop by and see how you can get involved!

 

Environmental Wellness

The first steps in building a more sustainable world can start right here on campus. Whether you choose to be an advocate, educator, or protector of the environment, resources are available to assist you in that journey. The Center for Urban Ecology Farm provides students with a sustainable agriculture project located on campus. Get hands-on experience within the farm or take advantage of the many ways to support by visiting the on-site farm stand!

 

Service & Community

What better way to bring students and community members together than through acts of service? The Volunteer Center located on campus provides a starting point to conversations regarding service. However, students can take part in an even more unique experience through the alternative fall/spring break trips. Consider skipping a week of vacation and instead donating time to others. The most valuable part of all is the sense of community formed amongst those involved!

 

Meaning & Purpose

Butler provides students with a wide variety of resources in support of the ability to reflect on one’s values and beliefs. This exploration can be done through interaction with student-led organizations supported by the Center for Faith and Vocation. However, Butler has now recently established designated “Reflection, Meditation, and Prayer spaces” across campus. This serves as an open and quiet environment for all students in the heart of campus.

 

Social Wellness

Building connections and relationships with others is an important part of the student experience. Some students may find these interactions through traditional environments like classroom settings, residence halls, or athletic teams. Reaching outside traditional boundaries, the student government association provides dynamic programming to engage students in new ways. Each semester, late night programming is designed to provide a healthy environment for students to cultivate meaningful relationships together in a social atmosphere.

 

These are just eight examples of the many ways students can tap into discovering and fostering their inner wellness. BUBeWell is designed to be the bridge that closes the gaps in a student’s journey preventing them from living a balanced life. Butler provides students many robust opportunities to develop, both inside and outside of the classroom, through each of the eight dimensions of the BUBeWell model.

Suits or Sails?

Cindy Conover Dashnaw

from Spring 2017

Wet or dry shoes? Shorts or a sport coat? Sunshine or fluorescent lights? Mosquitos or … well, fewer mosquitos? 

You may not think of these things when considering an internship, yet they do become part of your reality. Just ask Butler interns Tyler Hudgens and Keiffer Williams. 

Tyler Hudgens ’17 

Manufacturing and Quality Science Intern, Eli Lilly and Company Tyler Hudgens

Tyler Hudgens chose dry shoes and fluorescent lights when he took an internship with Eli Lilly and Company, a global pharmaceutical company headquartered in Indianapolis. He’s happy with his decision—so happy, in fact, that when the company offered him a job upon graduation, he accepted with alacrity. 

Hudgens is in this spot because he availed himself of a Butler opportunity and attended a Woods lecture. He walked in as a pre-med student who was questioning his career choice. He walked out realizing bioengineering was what he’d been looking for. 

“I’d volunteered in hospitals and found it wasn’t for me. I was more interested in the science behind healthcare,” Hudgens said. “So when I heard a heart tissue bioengineer speak and learned what they did, I switched.” 

His internship at Lilly has confirmed his decision.

“I’ve gained strong problem-solving and strategic-thinking skills,” Hudgens said. “I was able to incorporate engineering and scientific concepts to solve real-world issues in pharmaceuticals while I was gaining knowledge about manufacturing processes within the medical industry.” 

Keiffer Williams ’16 Keiffer Williams

(Former) Intern, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Oceans Research and Butler Summer Institute 

Applying to grad schools 

Keiffer Williams, on the other hand, opted for shorts and wet shoes. As an intern in the fish biology lab of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama and at Oceans Research in South Africa, Williams indulged his passion for ocean ecology and conservation. 

“I’ve enjoyed the ocean since an early age, especially sharks, and I nurtured that interest all through high school,” Williams said. “I was searching for ways to have a more limited experience to decide if marine science was something I wanted to do when I found Oceans Research.” 

He dove with dolphins and sharks (focusing on Great Whites) in the six-week program, coming to understand the significant effect humans can have on a species—even in the name of conservation. 

In Panama at STRI, working under the direction of visiting scientist Dr. Michele Pierotti, he explored the evolution of visual ecology among marine fish sister species native to the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. The Smithsonian experience instilled in him a keen understanding of the opportunities that come with a higher-level degree. 

Williams also participated in the Butler Summer Institute on plant hormones research. Now, he’ll spend the next two years applying to graduate school. 

The former Boy Scout is also keen to be a better conservation advocate. 

“In today’s world, there’s a large disconnect between scientists in the trenches of data and the lay person. It’s essential for people to be able to understand what we’re doing and what it means to the environment,” he said. 

AcademicsStudent Life

Suits or Sails?

Wet or dry shoes? Shorts or a sport coat? Sunshine or fluorescent lights? Mosquitos or … well, fewer mosquitos? 

by Cindy Conover Dashnaw

from Spring 2017

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Lambda Chi Alpha to Return to Butler This Fall
Student LifeCampus

Lambda Chi Alpha to Return to Butler This Fall

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 16 2019

INDIANAPOLIS—Lambda Chi Alpha will return to Butler University’s campus this fall.

The fraternity will begin recruiting sophomores, juniors, and seniors in the fall, and then will participate in formal recruitment in January 2020.

“We are excited to rejoin the Butler community and are optimistic we will be a real asset to campus,” Lambda Chi Alpha’s international Director of Communications Tad Lichtenauer said. “Recruiting the right young men who are focused on academics, giving back, extracurriculars, and who understand the importance of leadership and service are what we are pushing.”

The international headquarters of Lambda Chi Alpha suspended the Butler chapter in January 2017 after a conduct review.

Lambda Chi Alpha will move to the former Tau Kappa Epsilon property in January 2021—they plan to tear down the existing house and build a new one. The former Lambda Chi Alpha house, located on Sunset Avenue, was sold to Butler by the fraternity’s housing corporation. The University has no plans for the property at this time.

“Butler emphasizes the holistic well-being of all students through BU Be Well,” said Butler’s Vice President for Student Affairs Frank E. Ross, III. “This was a perfect opportunity to bring back a fraternity that was a part of Butler’s community, while also underscoring our commitment to the high standards of academic and social integrity that we expect for all Greek organizations.”

"We are glad to hear they will be returning this semester," Interfraternity Council President and Butler senior Luke Rihm said. "We look forward to supporting Lambda Chi's founding class through this process."

Moving Lambda Chi Alpha into the former Tau Kappa Epsilon property will create synergy by being adjacent to other chapter houses located along Hampton Drive, Ross said.

“There continues to be significant student interest in Greek life at Butler, and fraternities and sororities contribute greatly to our robust student life,” he said. “I look forward to the positive contributions Lambda Chi Alpha will make to our campus community going forward.”

 

Media Contact:

Rachel Stern

Director of Strategic Communications

rstern@butler.edu

914-815-5656 (cell)

Lambda Chi Alpha to Return to Butler This Fall
Student LifeCampus

Lambda Chi Alpha to Return to Butler This Fall

Fraternity to start recruiting members in the fall, move to former Tau Kappa Epsilon property in January 2021

Aug 16 2019 Read more
jimbagnoli

The Game of Life

Krisy Force

from Fall 2017

Alumnus Jim Bagnoli ’75 remembers his entrance into the “real world” didn’t really hit him until his first day on the job. He had important responsibilities, and people and a company depending on him. Bagnoli says working a job is not like going to college.

“I was starting all over making new friends, establishing relationships, and building my reputation,” he said. “Along with a paycheck, there were bills and rent to pay. I had not been planning responsibly for my career and financial future.”

Looking back, Bagnoli wishes a college program or an event could have bestowed a little real life experience on him. This is why, as a member of the Butler Alumni Association Board, he was excited to partner with Butler’s Student Government Association’s Student Initiatives Board, the Young Alumni Board, and Butler’s Academic Affairs staff to offer Butler juniors and seniors a taste of the real world through an event called The Game of Life.

The event, which was loosely based off of the popular board game, Life, had students enter the room with a chosen profession after they graduated. They were then given a salary. Students moved from table to table where they dealt with a variety of circumstances, like the price of life insurance, eating out, student loan programs, and at Bagnoli’s table, the cost of renting a one-bedroom apartment in various parts of the country. 

“It was really interesting to watch their expression,” Bagnoli said, laughing. One student, Logan Schwering ’18, commented most students, including himself, were surprised to discover how the average cost of all the expenses students have after graduation slowly chip away at a salary. 

“Seeing how it all came together and started chipping away from your salary was eye-opening,” Schwering said.

Although the program, and the actual Life board game, don’t exactly mirror the real world, both incorporated a few hysterical similarities. 

“It was just a good, thought-provoking experience for students to realize they’ll have to put a budget together, and make lifestyle changes,” Bagnoli explained.

After going through the life tables, students attended a panel discussion with Bagnoli and four other alumni. Later on, students were able to ask questions and mingle with alumni, allowing them to “learn from one another,” Bagnoli said. 

“To have alumni who are so dedicated to giving back not only financially, but with their wealth of knowledge, is what sets  Butler apart from other institutions,” Schwering said. 

Schwering elaborated that he felt extremely fortunate to have the opportunity to interact with alumni with varying skillsets and life experiences. He urges future students to take advantage of programs about life after graduation, adding “graduation may seem far away, but the years go by quickly.”

jimbagnoli
Student Life

The Game of Life

by Krisy Force

from Fall 2017

Read more

5 Questions for Kate Richards '18

By Shannon Rostin '18

Butler’s American Sign Language Club (ASL) engages students and the community by promoting appreciation for American Sign Language. In addition to improving ASL skills, the group offers events open to the public. Senior Kate Richards, a Communication Sciences and Disorders major, is president of ASL and shared her experience in both ASL and the CSD major. 


What are your career goals or post grad goals?

After getting my MA in Speech-Language Pathology, I would be happy working in any speech-language pathology (SLP) setting, but my dream is to be an SLP with children. I hope my future  career involves working with kids in a children’s hospital, outpatient clinic, or a hearing or a deaf school, especially if I could use my American Sign Language skills.


What is ASL?

American Sign Language (ASL) is a form of manual sign language used predominantly by people that are deaf and members of the deaf community of the United States.


How does ASL relate to the CSD major? How does the club relate to the butler or Indy community?

The CSD major centers around active and successful communication, and ASL is a true manifestation of that. ASL is a thriving language that is surrounded by a community and culture, especially here in Indianapolis. In Indy, there is a vibrant deaf community with the Indiana School for the Deaf nearby. This, along with other community events, allows the club and Butler students to partner with ISD to participate in events, volunteer, and get together with members of the deaf community


What inspired you to study CSD?

Ever since I was young, I knew I wanted to work in a service industry and with children. I have always been really interested in medicine and anatomy. For a long time, I thought I would study pre-med and become a pediatrician. Then I stumbled upon the SLP career and realized it was the perfect marriage of medical and communications. This is when I realized it was the perfect major and career path for me.

 

For more information on ASL, visit https://www.butler.edu/communication-disorders/student-resources 

ASL Butler
Student LifePeople

5 Questions for Kate Richards '18

Senior Kate Richards, a Communication Sciences and Disorders major, is president of Butler's American Sign Language club. She answers 5 questions about her experiences at Butler. 

ASL Butler

5 Questions for Kate Richards '18

By Shannon Rostin '18

Butler Homecoming Traditions

By Brittany Bluthardt '20

The energy of Butler University’s campus during homecoming week is unlike any other. Students thrive in blue and white as they celebrate their Bulldog pride throughout the week, and alumni and families come to cheer on their favorite team in the Sellick Bowl. Along with many celebrations and events, Greek homecoming traditions go down in Butler history as some of the most exciting moments of the year. From extravagant lawn decorations to chariot races down Hampton Drive, members of the Greek community truly know how to share their school pride with the entire campus -- 

 

Snack Attack and Lawn Decorations

Before the start of homecoming week, Butler Greek organizations are teamed up with a residence hall to compete in a series of competitions, games, and events that showcase their school spirit. Late into Thursday night of the week, the entire campus comes to life as teams decorate their Greek house lawns according to the year’s theme. Every hour on the hour, SGA delivers a new snack food for the teams to replenish and re-energize before decorating into early Friday morning. 


Yell Like Hell 

After weeks of practice, the homecoming teams strut their stuff in front of hundreds of students at Yell Like Hell, an annual tradition celebrated by Butler students in Hinkle Fieldhouse. The team with the best bulldog spirit and representation of the year’s theme takes home a thrilling victory.


Chariot Race

Bright and early on the day of homecoming, members of Butler fraternities compete in a fast-paced chariot race down Hampton Drive. Other students line the street and cheer on their favorite team. The race is an annual tradition hosted by the brothers of Sigma Chi.


Bulldog Boulevard Tailgate

After a quick parade around campus, students head to Hinkle Fieldhouse to celebrate before the football game. Many Greek organizations, colleges, and clubs have a booth set up with food and games for current students and alumni to celebrate before the game. The Butler spirit team leads everyone into the stadium with one of many cheers -- B-U, T-L-E, R U A BULLDOG, HELL YEAH! 


Jungle Ball Soccer 

To kick off homecoming week, students played a energizing game of soccer with a huge, inflatable ball. The next-level soccer game took place at the Sellick Bowl, and students only hope this new game becomes an annual Butler tradition. 

Student Life

Butler Homecoming Traditions

Five traditions celebrated in a week leading up to the homecoming football game that students need to know about.

Butler Homecoming Traditions

By Brittany Bluthardt '20
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Student LifePeople

Video is Their Business (And Their Business is Good)

BY

PUBLISHED ON Mar 10 2016

They’re not even finished with college yet, but already Joshua Gaal and Tim Valentine are successfully building up Train 918, the video production, marketing, and branding company they founded as sophomores and will run after graduation.

Timothy Valentine and Joshua Gaal show their cameras to children in Kenya.

For 10 days in February, the Butler seniors were in Kenya, making promotional videos for a company called Roots Coconut Oil. Their job: show the process of harvesting coconut oil and explain Roots’ focus on providing good wages, clean water initiatives, and more for the Kenyan people. The results will be posted on rootscoconutoil.com this summer.

“Being able to go to Kenya and not be in class for seven days—I’m sure it doesn’t make the professors happy, but they were very understanding,” said Valentine, a Digital Media Production major and Marketing minor from Cincinnati, Ohio.

Gaal and Valentine said the experience was extraordinary. They shot footage on the island of Pate, about 300 miles from the capital city of Nairobi. They didn’t have a lot of downtime, but they managed to see giraffes, a pack of lions, and lush scenery.

Gaal, an Art + Design major and Digital Media Production minor from Whiting, Indiana, said one of the challenges he enjoyed was meeting the children on the island and gaining their trust.

kenya 4“You take a photo and then you show them, and they all swarm you and they hug you and they want you to look in their camera and they want you to take more photos,” he said. “I think that moment of trust between you and a kid from your town was probably my favorite moment.”

Valentine and Gaal got the job with Roots through a Butler connection—senior Riley Supple, an intern with the coconut oil company, recommended them. He had good reason to: Junior year, Valentine and Gaal worked on an admission video for Butler Marketing that has served as a calling card to attract future business.

The positive reaction to that effort led them to create Train 918, which they named for a train car they rode in as sophomores during a College of Communication trip to Germany.

They followed the admission video this semester with a video for the Butler University Police Department showing the best practices to follow if there’s an active shooter on campus.kenya 1

After graduation, Train918 will move into the Speak Easy, a warehouse in Broad Ripple that calls itself “a place for Indy’s entrepreneurial community to call home.”

“I think it’s really cool that Butler University has allowed Josh and me to become who we are and do what we do,” Valentine said. “We’re called Train918, but a lot of our ties are right here with Butler and it’s pretty cool that a university of this size takes care of its students this way.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

Student Life

Delta Gammas Wrote to Ellen DeGeneres -- And You Won't Believe What Happened Next!

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 12 2015

Ellen salutes Butler's Delta Gammas. Photo by Michael Rozman/Warner Bros.The girls of Butler’s Delta Gamma sorority wrote to TV talk-show host Ellen DeGeneres to tell her how they get together at 3:00 p.m. weekdays to watch her show.

On Thursday, January 8, DeGeneres answered their email, surprising them with a Skype phone call and a multitude of prizes.

The show aired Monday, January 12. See the segment here and read more about it here.

 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Discovering Myself while Discovering the World

by Jackson Borman ’20

I was weaving through cars on Calle de la Princesa in a taxi driven by a middle aged man to whom I was terrified to try to speak Spanish, especially over the noise of traffic and the shuffle of latin pop and AC/DC on the radio. Thirty minutes earlier, armed with only my suitcase and my limited knowledge of the Spanish language, I had arrived in Madrid - the city that I would call home for the next four months.

Jackson Borman abroadOnce inside the taxi, I was greeted by the driver with, what I would later learn to be the blunt, but typical Spanish command, “Dime chico.” (“Tell me, kid.”) I scrambled for the piece of paper in my pocket that had my host family’s address and gave it to him. For the next 20 minutes we sat in what would have been silence if it were not for the radio, him driving and me looking out the window so as to avoid eye contact. The lyrics of “Back in Black” pouring through the speakers were unexpected, but somehow comforting. We pulled up to my apartment and he helped me unload my bags onto the street. I handed him the 30 euros for the flat rate airport taxi fare, and he was on his way. I had successfully arrived without ever muttering a word of Spanish.

My journey to Spain actually started after attending a Butler Center for Global Education introductory meeting. I signed up to study abroad with an open mind. I knew that I wanted to go to Madrid. I saw it not only as one of the world’s leading cities, but also as a gateway to exploring the rest of Europe. I was excited to travel, to experience different cultures, languages and ways of living, and I hoped that I would come out of the semester as a more worldly version of myself.

While abroad I had the opportunity to see some of the most beautiful cities I have ever been to, the most diverse and unique cultures I have ever witnessed, as well as world renowned art, architecture, festivals, and legendary landforms. But, perhaps the aspect of studying abroad that I am most thankful for is the personal growth I experienced during my time in Europe.

Madrid

When I first arrived in Madrid I had no idea how to get from one place to another. Having always lived in suburban areas, I was reliant on cars to move around. Living in the city was a big change for me, and learning how to navigate the metro and exploring the city was an interesting and worthwhile challenge.

My campus in Madrid was made up of students from across the globe. In the classroom we learned about art, communication theory, history, and language in classes taught by professors from Madrid, London, Boston, and Valencia. Students from the United States, Mexico, Egypt, Montenegro, and a variety of other countries helped me learn concepts for myself, but with a global point of view that I would not have achieved here in the United States.

I lived with a host mom who only spoke Spanish. My roommate was from San Diego and only spoke English. At times it was challenging to communicate with my host mom, and it was even more difficult to translate between her and my roomate. Despite these difficulties, I survived, and because of these difficulties, my communication and Spanish skills increased tenfold.

Travel

While abroad I was able to check many cities off of my bucket list. I took weekend trips to Italy, Germany, France, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Portugal, and multiple cities in different parts of Spain. Planning these travels forced me to be organized, to plan ahead, to take care of my schoolwork during the week, and to think logistically about timing and cost.

In countries outside of Spain it was often more challenging to communicate. I went to multiple places where I did not have any background knowledge of the national language. At some point my problem-solving skills kicked in, and luckily, I still was able to navigate and enjoy my experience.

On a trip to Portugal, some new friends from Madrid and I stepped into a taxi expecting to be able to speak to the driver in either English or Spanish, or some combination, but he spoke only Portuguese. Thanks to some quick thinking and the power of google maps, we were able to show him exactly where we wanted to be dropped off.

In an elevator in Paris, I accidentally bumped into the emergency call button with my backpack and tried to assure the dispatcher over the intercom that everything was alright by saying “accident” which is the same in French as it is in English. However, they stayed on the line, as I realized that accident can also be translated as “problem,” or “trouble.” After some back and forth in heavily accented English, we were on the same page and continued on our way.

Jackson in ParisIt was moments like these when I learned to think on my feet and roll with whatever unexpected events took place. Canceled flights and trains needed to be rescheduled so that I could be back in Madrid on time for class; sudden weather changes meant some trips needed to be rescheduled or altered.

When you hear stories of students studying abroad, you may think they sound fun, often times they are filled with blow-off classes, endless happiness, and a seemingly perfect life. In my experience, these were just stereotypes and exaggerations.

There were hard times, times when it was difficult to communicate, times when classes were challenging, times when I missed home. However, through those experiences, I was able to grow as an individual, become more confident in myself, and learn more in a semester than I ever have before. On that first day in Madrid, I was anxious, uncertain, and questioning my decision, but by the end of my study and travels, I had transformed. That anxious chico sitting quietly in the taxi was nowhere to be found.

AcademicsStudent Life

Discovering Myself while Discovering the World

Jackson Borman's semester in Spain taught him to be more self-suficient.

archive
Student Life

Butler Students Take the Polar Plunge for Charity

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 15 2016

Together, they raised more than $47,000 for Special Olympics Indiana.

By Evie Schultz '16

The thermometer read 12 degrees on Saturday morning, February 13, but that didn’t stop hundreds of Butler students from jumping in an ice-cold pool.

“It’s cold but totally worth it,” John Lacheta ’19 said as he toweled off.

Senior Jake Michalski takes the Polar Plunge.Students weren’t just subjecting themselves to freezing water for fun. Each year, students take the plunge to raise money for Special Olympics Indiana. The event takes place each year outside the HRC.

“The whole campus comes together for this event,” Nikki Micelli ’18 said. “As a freshman that blew me away.”

The numbers are staggering. This year’s 17th annual Plunge benefits more than 11,000 Special Olympians in Indiana. Students had to raise at least $50 individually to jump, and together they raised more than $47,000.

Taylor VanArsdel ’16 took the plunge for the third time this year and encouraged her friends and sorority sisters to jump too.

“It’s so cool to see Butler students rally behind an organization,” she said. “I love knowing I raised money for Special Olympics.”

Fraternities, sororities and other campus groups coordinated themed costumes for an extra splash. Alpha Chi Omega’s costume theme this year was donuts--each participant wore an inflatable donut around his or her waist.

Participants wore costumes of all kinds. Some wore Speedos or bathing suits. Others were a little more outrageous, like a banana costume or “groutfits.”

Even though it was “the coldest year yet,” according to VanArsdel, seeing students have some fun and come together for Special Olympics is heartwarming.

And for many students, meeting Special Olympians makes the whole experience worth bearing the freezing temperatures.

“I’ve gotten into conversations with Special Olympians, and each of them has taught me something,” she said. “They’re so inspiring, so I want to give back to them.”

past and present wall

Living Communities: Lifetime Connections

Patricia Snyder Pickett ’82 APR

from Fall 2017

While new and updated residence halls and greek housing abound on the Butler campus, life insude those buildings has evolved as well. 

While most of us headed off to college armed with a laundry basket full of good wishes, a couple of posters, and hope for the best, the Class of 2020 entered Butler University with a more solid approach to making lasting friendships and soaking in the post-secondary experience.

That solid approach—Themed Living Communities (TLC)—came as a natural extension of the University’s existing residence hall programming combined with the prospect of new residence halls (Fairview House) entering the picture. 

“We had previously used a ‘wellness model’ for residence hall programs,” said Karla Cunningham, Director of Residence Life. “We wanted to explore new and interesting concepts for Butler students.” A group representing Butler subsequently attended the Association of College and University Housing Officers–International (ACUHO-I) conference where the concept of Butler’s TLC began to gel. 

The process took about 18 months of study and development, according to Anne Flaherty, Dean of Student Life. “We made the decision to move in this direction with our new residence halls which are larger than our previous living communities. We were concerned about students really finding ‘community’ within these residence halls.”

A survey of high school junior and incoming students, Residence Assistants (RAs) and current students helped develop themes, said Flaherty, and guided them away from the “Living Learning Communities” model based on academic interests and majors. “Our students wanted a more holistic approach,” she explained, “and because of our research, the size of schools, and design of buildings,
we wanted it to be ‘all in’ and make it mandatory for all first-year students
to participate.”     

The Class of 2020—the largest first-year class ever to arrive at Butler at 1,255 strong—chose from 16 living communities, ranging from Faith and Spirituality to Creativity and Leadership based themes. Ideally, each theme would occupy a floor of a residence hall and activities were planned and facilitated by RAs with support of a Faculty-in-Residence (FIR), fulltime Butler faculty members who live in an apartment within the Residential College, Ross Hall, and Fairview House. Each theme was branded with its own shield, and students were encouraged to show their TLC pride around campus with stickers, t-shirts, etc.

“My overall take-away is that it was a success,” said Flaherty. “We’ve received positive feedback from both RAs and students. Not everything worked, we learned some lessons and are looking forward to next year.” Among those tweaks, the theme offerings have narrowed from 16 to the 12 most popular and the TLC must fill an entire floor. 

CJ Koch ’19 is a Chemistry and Mathematics major from Newburg, Oregon. His interest in being a RA intensified once he learned about the TLC concept. He interviewed for the New to Indy TLC and was awarded the position at the Residential College (ResCo). He arrived on campus two weeks prior to classes starting to train for his responsibilities and work on a plan of activities.

For Koch, the experience was nothing less than amazing and made him seem a bit wiser than one would associate with a 20-year old. “It gave me the opportunity to help people through issues, the logistics of  ‘where do I go’ that most of us go through when we first get to campus. Seeing them grow throughout the year has been really rewarding.”

His challenges with his New to Indy TLC had little to do with his charges and more to do with logistics of getting a group of college students around Indianapolis. He credits his Faculty-in-Residence, Erin Garriott, with getting bus passes, Blue Indy cars, etc., to move students around the Circle City from duck pin bowling in Fountain Square to team building at the Escape Room.

Colton Junod ’18 is a Pre-Med Biology major and a perfect RA for the Future Healthcare Professionals TLC. “My first-year experience was shaped by friendships and mentoring and I wanted to be able to provide that to others,” he said.
“I can empathize with them going through the Anatomy and Chemistry classes and help them if they ask.” Much of his group’s programming has focused on health, whether that be financial health, mental health, etc. 

“It’s been a unique position and increased my creativity,” said Junod. “Being able to identify what others like and work through those logistics is something I know I’ll use the rest of my life.”

Katie Keller ’20 was familiar with the Butler campus when she arrived last fall. Her grandparents had regularly brought her to attend The Nutcracker ballet during the holidays and she found the small campus close to her home in Greenfield a perfect fit. While she didn’t fully understand the concept of the TLC when she prioritized her choices, she has found it to be a positive experience. 

“I chose the Future Healthcare Professionals for my TLC because I’m a Health Sciences major,” she said. “It’s been great to have this group to work through adapting studying style from high school to college. It’s helped us get past that barrier that can be very difficult. Probably most important, it’s realizing that everyone you meet can contribute to you, and you can contribute to them.” 

After the First Year…What’s Next?

After completing their first year at Butler, students have other living options to consider, said Cunningham. “We offer special programming—Year Two at BU—that really targets their academic and post-college aspirations,” she explained. “Are they looking to study abroad? Changing majors? There’s lots of programming around those topics during the second year.”

Housing contracts are usually returned by early March. Those who will be sophomores will select or be assigned to Fairview House or select apartment options (unless they are living in their approved Greek house). Those who will be juniors, and any seniors who contract to stay on campus, will select or be assigned to apartments. Greek houses have their own contracts and assignment practices with each house handling their own contracts and assignments.

Since the early 1990s, Butler students interested in living in fraternities and sororities have participated in deferred recruitment (formerly known as rush). This process takes place the second semester of the student’s first year so that they may move into Greek housing their sophomore year. And that may be the only year they will live in the house, according to Becky Druetzler, Director of Greek Life.

“The biggest change we have seen is the increase in recruitment,” said Druetzler. “There is a substantial increase in chapter size while most of the houses have remained the same size. With the exception of those in leadership positions, the fraternity and sorority houses are mostly occupied by sophomores and some juniors.” There are currently seven sorority houses and 5 fraternity houses; around 35 percent of undergraduates participate in the Greek system.

That puts a little bit of a challenge on those trying to build bonds with their Greek brothers and sisters. “It’s a different dynamic when everyone isn’t under the same roof,” said Druetzler. “It starts with the chapter. They’re planning activities so those who aren’t in the house physically feel included. But it also calls on a lot of ‘adulting’ skills like negotiating and coordinating with a large group of people.” 

Like much of the population and a majority of their generation, Butler’s Greek population can stay in constant communication via social media. “Our students rely on social media and its ability to communicate well with everyone, regardless if members are across campus or across the world on an internship or study abroad opportunity.”

So, What's a TLC?

Butler University’s Themed Living Community (TLC) consists of students who share similar interests or hobbies. Incoming first-year students choose and rank six themes from a dozen offerings, including:

Eight Before You Graduate–Artistic and cultural opportunities while completing the Butler Cultural Requirement (BCR).

Balanced Bulldogs–Students take advantage of all that Butler and the Indianapolis community offer. 

BU Be Well–Students embrace the ability to develop and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

BU Leads–Students explore the many facets of leadership and meet movers and shakers within Butler and in the Indianapolis community. 

BU Scholars–Designed for first-year students interested in honors or those students eager to dig into their classes.

Butler Advance–Students connect with inspiring community partners in fun and serious settings on and off campus, developing a stronger sense of self and building a bridge from Butler to fulfilling careers and lives.

Creativity Reimagined–Students experience hands-on creativity by exploring local art museums and centers while learning new skills.

Exploratory Studies–Students navigate the
pathway of choosing a major with other students going through the same process.

Future Healthcare Professionals–Students discover opportunities to help them succeed at becoming a healthcare professional.

Go Global!–For students wanting to study abroad while at Butler, an opportunity to explore cultures around the world through food and arts.

New to Indy–Specifically designed for students not from Central Indiana, an opportunity to discover all Indianapolis offers through the eyes of those who live here and love it! 

The Bulldog Way–Students have the opportunity to show their school spirit by participating in Butler traditions and cultural and athletic events.

For those who can’t decide, a “No TLC Preference” is offered, though incoming students still need to rank a total of five TLCs to process their housing contract.

past and present wall
Student Life

Living Communities: Lifetime Connections

by Patricia Snyder Pickett ’82 APR

from Fall 2017

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AcademicsStudent Life

Good Practice, And An Even Better Public Service

BY

PUBLISHED ON Mar 01 2016

The big kids (Physician Assistant students from Butler) needed experience dealing with young patients. The little kids (kindergarten and first-grade students at the IPS/Butler Lab School) needed to have their eyes, ears, and teeth checked.

It was, as Associate Professor Jennifer Zorn put it, “a win-win situation, to get experience for our students but also provide a nice service.”

Bri Henke, Jordan Kirkegaard, and Abby Gallett teach Lab School students about how much toothpaste to put on a toothbrush.

And so, on February 23, 74 PA students and 5 PA program faculty visited the elementary school a few miles south of Butler to administer exams and teach them about good dental hygiene while having a little fun, too.

Before the exams, the PA students fanned out to classrooms to work with the Lab School students in small groups. In one classroom, Butler PA students Briana Henke of Sycamore, Illinois; Jordan Kirkegaard of Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and Abigail Gallett of Phoenix, Arizona, sat on the floor with eight Lab Schoolers to coach them on how to take care of their teeth.

They started with the basics—what causes cavities and which sugary foods to avoid—and moved on to showing them how much toothpaste to use and the proper way to brush and floss. A giant set of teeth, an oversized toothbrush, and a rope of floss made it fun and funny for the kids.

Then they closed with a song (to the tune of “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star”):

Here’s my toothpaste, here’s my brush.
I won’t hurry, I won’t rush.
Working hard to keep teeth clean,
Front and back and in between.
When I brush for quite a while,
I will have a happy smile.

Sing that about four times while brushing—taking roughly two minutes—and brush at least twice a day, the Butler students advised.

Emily Williams checks a Lab School student's ear for excessive wax.

Then the Lab School kids had a few things they wanted to know before they went to another room to have the PA students check their eyes, ears, and teeth. Like: “What do your gums do, and why are they called gums?” And: “Why do you have baby teeth?” And: “What are you going to have for dinner tonight?”

“It’s definitely different from what we normally do,” Kirkegaard said. “We mostly see adults in the classroom setting. But this was good practice for us for our clinical rotations and fun for them.”

This is the second year Butler PA students have gone to the Lab School to examine the youngest students. Last year, they noted a number of students with plaque buildup—and they also discovered a student who had vision problems. The child’s teacher said the student has been doing much better in school after being diagnosed and getting glasses.

“You do a lot of screenings that turn up normal,” Zorn said, “to get one that makes an impact.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

meg haggerty

Meg Haggerty moved around frequently as a kid.

Being the daughter of an Air Force officer meant Haggerty and the rest of her family didn’t stay in one place for too long. It also meant that, at a very young age, she learned how to quickly build relationships and fully immerse herself into a community—two traits that have allowed her to make lifelong friends in every place she’s lived. 

“Meg is a true inspiration,” Addie Barret ’17 said of Haggerty, who is the Staff Advisor for Barret’s sorority, Alpha Chi Omega—the same one Haggerty was a member of when she attended Butler as an undergraduate. 

From co-advising the Student Government Association’s (SGA) Marketing and Communications Board, and coordinating student events, like Winter and Spring Commencement and the Top 100 Most Outstanding Student Recognition Program, to working with interns, Haggerty makes it her mission to be a mentor to Butler students like her mentors were to her. She makes herself available 24/7 and she tells students, “Any aspect of your life you want to invite me into, I’ll invite you into mine as well.”

“She is there for students in every aspect: academic, personal, and professional,” Barret continued. “She is always asking questions about others and wanting to know how we are doing. Every memory I have of her consists of that same incredible attitude.” 

Levester Johnson, Vice President for Student Affairs for Illinois State University, worked with Haggerty closely as Butler’s former Vice President for Student Affairs. He also knew Haggerty during her undergraduate years and explained that she is Butler through and through—epitomizing Butler via its mission and values. 

“Meg has a youthful flair about herself when she advises,” he said. “She doesn’t see her job as a nine-to-five and she understands the importance of working with students hand-in-hand to achieve their dreams.” 

Johnson believes it’s Haggerty’s quality of going the extra mile that separates her from other administrative professionals. While interviewing Haggerty, this characteristic was revealed when she commented, “just say yes.” She added that if people are willing to say yes and step outside their comfort zones, they will have opportunities they never could have imagined. 

When she graduated from Butler in 2004, Haggerty’s next opportunity was at Florida State University (FSU) where she would earn a Master of Science in Higher Education Student Affairs. While attending FSU, and prior to coming back to Butler, she worked in the FSU College of Education coordinating programming and events for her master’s cohort. She remembers feeling the graduate assistantship was not what she pictured herself doing long term. 

“My passion, and my love, was still working with undergraduate students,” Haggerty explained. She looked for positions at various universities, but Haggerty says her “heart yearned for Butler.”

With a stroke of luck and good timing, Haggerty’s mentor and friend, Caroline Huck-Watson, reached out to her about a position in Butler’s Programs for Leadership and Service Education (PuLSE) Office. As an undergraduate, Haggerty had met Huck-Watson through the Ambassadors of Change (AOC) Program as a team builder and as a student staff member of the Volunteer Center. Huck-Watson had been an influence in her life at Butler and a significant inspiration to pursue Higher Education Student Affairs as a profession. By summer of 2006, Haggerty was back at Butler as an Assistant Director co-coordinating Welcome Week and Orientation programs as well as advising the Program Board of SGA with committees like films, the speaker’s bureau, Out and About in Indy, and events like Homecoming and Spring Sports Spectacular. 

Since then, Haggerty has been a key player in student event programming for Butler. She has an innate ability to connect with each student she meets, and because of that, over the past 10 years she’s been able to build some amazing relationships with students—meeting them during their first or second year, and staying in touch with them during life’s biggest milestones like marriage and children. To her, it’s amazing that she gets to create and be a part of those relationships. 

These relationships are shown through students like Emma Edick ’17, who remembers meeting Haggerty her first year on campus for a class project. 

“Meg has been such a large part of my Butler experience,” Edick said. “She pays attention to what students on campus are doing, what they are working on, and what they are excited about.”

Edick continued by explaining that even if the two of them pass by one another at Starbucks, Haggerty always puts her work aside to sincerely ask the question: “How are you?” 

“I never expected I would be here as a student and as a staff member for as long as I have, but it’s because of the people. People are the most important part of the work that I do—and I don’t think I could have done the work that I’ve done without the people in my life.” 

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AcademicsStudent Life

Hahn, Pingel Named Most Outstanding Students

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 28 2016

Rachel Hahn ’16, a Spanish and Communication Sciences and Disorders double-major from Zionsville, Indiana, and Chad Pingel ’16, a Finance and Marketing double-major from Des Moines, Iowa, have been selected as Butler University’s Most Outstanding Female and Male students, respectively.

Butler University student Rachel Hahn March 26, 2015.Hahn has a 4.0 grade-point average and achieved seven different academic honors, including being named the Top Student in Communication Sciences and Disorders in 2013, 2014, and 2015. Her activities include participation in Student Government Association (SGA), Fall Alternative Break, and three years as a Resident Assistant. Twice, she was named Most Outstanding Resident Assistant.

Hahn also was selected as Butler’s student Woman of Distinction for 2016.

After graduation, Hahn plans to pursue a Master’s in Speech Language Pathology at Purdue University.

“Rachel is that rare student who seems to be the complete package of what we seek as the ideal student to enter our field and certainly to represent Butler University,” Ann Bilodeau, Clinical Faculty, Director of the Butler Speech and Language Clinic Communication Sciences and Disorders, wrote in recommending Hahn. “I have watched with joy as she continues to grow in her skills each semester and continue to be impressed by her maturity in decision making and her sincere dedication to her own educational development.”

Pingel finishes his Butler career with a 3.92 grade-point average. He earned more than a dozen academic honors, including multiple academic Butler University College of Business student Chad Pingel November 19, 2015.scholarships. He served as President of SGA in 2014-2015, was Director of Academic Affairs for SGA’s Student Initiatives Board, and has worked in the Office of Admissions since 2013. He is an active member of the Delta Tau Delta fraternity.

“Chad utilized a calm, quiet, and collaborative approach to increase campus awareness of Student Government Association, to focus on areas critical to student retention, including awareness and appreciation of diversity, and to develop an organizational commitment to service and volunteerism,” Vice President for Student Affairs Levester Johnson wrote in his recommendation letter.

After graduation, Pingel will work for Google. He will work in People Operations on data analytics, recruiting, and learning & development.

The Outstanding Student Recognition Program seeks those who give unselfishly of themselves, who are highly regarded by the entire university community, and who, as future alumni, may take satisfaction in their contribution and service to Butler University. Some of the criteria that are evaluated include outstanding character, scholarship, engaged citizenship, leadership, and commitment to fostering diversity.

The 2016 Top 100 Students are:

Tori Adachi   Senior   Art + Design Glen Ellyn IL
Carly Allen   Senior   Middle Secondary Education Columbus OH
Matthew Arkenberg   Senior   Chemistry Milan IN
Holly Aviles   Senior   Biology Hobart IN
Tabitha Barbour   Junior   English Language Clarksville TN
Shelby Beutel   Senior   Professional Pharmacy Washington IL
Morgan Blake   Senior   Chemistry Mooresville IN
Alexandra Bode   Senior   Speech Language Pathology Geneva IL
Emily Bohn   Senior   Theatre Carmel IN
Megan Borries   Junior   Pharmacy Antioch IL
Aaron Brenner   Senior   Chemistry Sterling IL
Matthew Brooks   Senior   Strategic Communication LaGrange Park IL
Emily Brown   Senior   Chemistry Saint Charles MO
Jacob Brown   Senior   Pharmacy Brownstown IN
Lindsay Byers   Senior   Strategic Communication Bloomington IL
Lauryn Campagnoli   Junior   Biology Elkhart IN
Mary Cerajewski   Junior   Marketing Fort Wayne IN
Sarah Clary   Junior   Elementary Education Angola IN
Connor Coatney   Senior   Biology Fremont IN
Ashley Dale   Senior   Physics New Palestine IN
Cara Donovan   Senior   Speech Language Pathology Indianapolis IN
Kailey Eaton   Junior   Strategic Communication Fishers IN
Emma Edick   Junior   Digital Media Production Columbus OH
David Ediger   Senior   Biology Naperville IL
Alan Eidelman   Junior   Accounting Saint Louis MO
Sara Erb   Senior   Music Performance New Paris IN
Daniel Evans   Senior   Psychology Muskego WI
Katherine Evans   Senior   Chemistry Westfield IN
Emily Farrer   Junior   Music Lexington KY
Bethany Feitshans   Senior   Professional Pharmacy Tipp City OH
Colleen Frank   Senior   Psychology Cary IL
Luke Gallion   Senior   Chemistry Brownstown IN
Hayley Gearheart   Junior   English Language Hartford City IN
Hana Goodman   Senior   Speech Language Pathology Woodstock IL
Paige Haefer   Junior   Human Communication & Organizational Leadership Madison WI
Rachel Hahn   Senior   Speech Language Pathology Zionsville IN
Whitney Hart   Junior   Chemistry La Porte IN
Rebecca Hilton   Senior   Pharmacy Indianapolis IN
Courtney Hittepole   Senior   Psychology Troy OH
Sean Horan   Senior   Economics Dayton OH
Madison Horth   Senior   Psychology Zionsville IN
Chandler Howell   Junior   Pharmacy Centerville IN
Tyler Hudgens   Senior   Biology Elgin IL
Connor Hummel   Senior   Pharmacy Crystal Lake IL
Leesa Jing   Junior   Arts Administration Evansville IN
Nicole Johnson   Senior   Finance Maryville IL
Chase Keirn   Senior   Health Sciences Collinsville IL
Amber Kline   Senior   Biology Fishers IN
Ashley Kline   Senior   Biology Fishers IN
Kelsey Lange   Senior   Health Sciences Ferdinand IN
Kendra Lucas   Senior   Pharmacy Franklin IN
Hannah Martin   Senior   Arts Administration Winfield IL
Scarlet Martin   Senior   Actuarial Sciences Louisville KY
Rachel McFarland   Senior   Pharmacy El Paso IL
Monica McKary   Senior   Biology Carmel