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Transformation and Transition—From Butler to China

Erin O’Neil ’17

from Fall 2017

Blog Posted: July 2017

The day I received my acceptance letter to attend Butler University was one of the best days of my life, but I didn’t realize that Butler was my dream school until the last few days of my undergraduate career. It wasn’t until then that I was able to truly see the impact this institution has had on my life. When I walked across the stage and received my diploma, I was handed so much more than a degree—I was given the skills necessary to begin a new path, the support to carry me through, and the determination to use my education to create positive change. As I sit here reflecting on how in the world I ended up halfway around the globe just a month after graduation, I know it’s because of Butler.

Transitions are never easy, but mine was particularly difficult as I took on the challenge of settling into post-grad life in Shanghai, China. I’ve returned to work as a videographer for Collective Responsibility, the company with whom I interned last summer and continued working for remotely throughout my senior year. I’ll admit in the months leading up to the move I was terrified, and I continuously doubted my ability to move this far from home for six months. And it certainly hasn’t been easy; I don’t speak Chinese, so every mundane task is that much more difficult. I’ve never rented an apartment before—let alone in a foreign country—and the 12-hour time difference has strained communications with family and friends back home. Moving to Asia alone is perhaps one of the most intimidating experiences of my life. But I can easily say, after having lived here for just two months, it will certainly be one of the most rewarding.

During one of my first meetings with the founder of the company and my direct supervisor, Rich, he explained that the only way to make the most of my time here is to always have a camera in hand. He encouraged me to be courageous and confident in capturing Shanghai culture. He made a point of noting that the thing people seem to regret most is not having taken full advantage of this incredible city by the time they leave. Yet I felt very intimidated to capture a world I don’t understand and scared in particular of doing so alone.  Rich reminded me that people would either be okay with it or wave at me to stop; both results I wouldn’t know to be reality until I first got out there and tried.  I quickly realized that this opportunity has not only allowed me to explore Asia for six months and continue practicing my art, but that it will also help me become a more dauntless storyteller.

The world will not wait for me; it will continue flying by and either I have captured it, or I haven’t. During my undergraduate studies I spent my fair share of time walking around campus interviewing students, capturing footage of the beautiful Holcomb Gardens, and sitting in Fairbanks editing the night away. But walking out into the “real world” with a camera in hand and minimal knowledge of my surroundings is a whole lot scarier than trekking the woods behind Butler’s I-lot or setting up camp in the TV studio. I don’t know these streets like the back of my hand; I don’t know the inner workings of this city as I did the “Butler bubble.” But these breaches of our comfort zones are what make us stronger individuals and more developed and talented artists.

Shanghai is an amazing city: the diverse culture, the scenery, the constant bustle, and the international community that is steadily expanding. The people I run into from all over the world continuously surprise me. The diversity and personal testaments to the question, “Why China?” is always fascinating. Shanghai is particularly appealing to entrepreneurs, researchers, and small businesses owners, which means my network is rapidly expanding and I’m learning from professional in all different industries.

Two of the projects I’m most excited for are video series called “Entrepreneurs4Good,” and “Sustainability Ambassadors.” The former is a series of interviews in which entrepreneurs from differing industries in Asia share their stories of how they create positive change and inspire others by developing socially responsible enterprises. Sitting behind the camera, I learn about what motivates people, how they find their inspiration, and how they’ve overcome personal challenges. “Sustainability Ambassadors” is a similar concept that focuses on leaders specifically working in environmental sustainability. Both video series are an opportunity to learn from professionals and young entrepreneurs alike about how they strive for and determine success. As a recent graduate, these stories encourage me and facilitate personal growth as I reflect on my own goals and achievements.

Travel has been a passion since my first trip to Chile in high school. It was on that trip that I discovered how incredible it is to be able to connect with and learn from international communities despite language and cultural differences. Since then I’ve made another visit to Chile, traveled to France, studied abroad with the GALA program in Western Europe, and trekked to China on two separate occasions. Each adventure inspires me in different ways, and I continue to learn about myself in ways I couldn’t do within my comfort zone of the United States. But this trip in particular has already expanded my global and personal perspectives far beyond previous excursions. The silence in traveling alone is where I find the moments to reflect and to learn about myself and what motivates me as a storyteller.

Moving to another country certainly has its unique adversities and moments of frustration.  But so does starting a new job, taking on a challenging role at work, or even getting your first apartment. To anyone faced with the opportunity to travel the world and get paid to do what you love, the only advice I can give is to do it. Yes, it’s scary to uproot yourself from a familiar and comfortable lifestyle to start over in a very foreign place. Yes, it will force you to question yourself and adapt in a world you may not entirely understand. But if there’s anything I know for certain, it’s that it’s worth every strain and moment of adversity. It is in these moments that we become the strongest versions of ourselves and begin to recognize how our work can influence and contribute to positive change. To my fellow Bulldogs, never take your education nor your university for granted; it will help shape who you become and provide opportunities that will change your life. It sounds cheesy, but I promise, I would not be the person I am today without Butler, and I certainly wouldn’t be in China.

Follow my adventures at outcollectingstamps.wordpress.com

Pathways for Success

Monica Holb ’09

from Spring 2018

 

When Courtney (Campbell) Rousseau ’03, Butler University Internship and Career Services Career Advisor, meets with students in her office she is intent on providing tools to help them travel down paths that they may never have dreamed of. 

“I have to find what they are passionate about. I know it when I see it. When their faces light up … I know we are talking about something important to them,” Rousseau said.

The next four pages share incredible stories of students with vision and passion who are fulfilling their own dreams and doing it their own way. Rousseau knows exactly what it is like to follow your dreams—hers brought her right back to Butler.

Letting Passions Pave the Way

 

Career Advisor Courtney Rousseau ’03 is accustomed to students who are following a formula about what they should do with their careers. But those formulas can impede their innovation and dampen their passions. She and her Internship and Career Services (ICS) colleagues provide students traditional career services and the resources necessary to search for and secure internships, but they increasingly support students wandering beyond standard plans. 

More students are venturing out by obtaining unique internships or starting their own organizations. Rousseau pointed to trends such as social media connections, the popularity of “side hustles,” and professionals changing jobs more often as reasons why students are drawn to make their own way. 

She provides support to step away from a comfortable plan and helps validate students’ choices. “Butler students are very driven, very ambitious,” Rousseau said, which means many are looking to do something bold. Rousseau references the impressive but intimidating 97 percent placement rate after graduation and acknowledges the pressure: “Who doesn’t get freaked out? They wonder, ‘What if I am the three percent?’” Courtney Rousseau ’03 with student

Rousseau strategically supports students to take risks in their career planning by ensuring a favorable environment. “When you are planting flowers, to make them grow you have to plant them in space where they work. Sometimes we create a greenhouse to trick the plants to grow,” Rousseau said. The greenhouse she builds is made of students’ own strengths—strategic thinking, relationships, planning. From there, Rousseau guides students toward the best risks for them to take. “I never see anything as impossible. I think I probably prepare them, see the competition, and know the value of making connections and experiences,” Rousseau said. 

When students take the risk and it turns into a learning experience instead of the opportunity envisioned, Rousseau is quick to tell her own story. 

From graduating from Butler with a degree in French to teaching English in France, Rousseau found herself waiting tables and returning to Butler for career advice of her own. After a graduate program and a move to Oregon for a job that turned out to be a less than a perfect fit, Rousseau came back to Butler for her current role. She recognizes the non-linear path and ultimate success of her own risk tasking, as well as how students connect to the story. 

Rousseau hopes all students find their own way with their own passions. “I want students to know we are here. I don’t want people to be perfect. I prefer you come in with questions and fears. I want to take impossible situations and make it work, and make it something beautiful.” 

Weaving Old Threads into a New Company 

 

While in high school at Culver Military Academy, Aaron Marshall ’18 embraced self-expression beyond his uniform. He recorded hip-hop music in his dorm room with friends and wore thrifted clothing. His love for the music scene culture influenced his vintage style and would eventually influence his career path. 

Marshall came to Butler University for Recording Industry Studies. No other college offered the opportunity to turn his dorm room hobby into a major. Yet, Marshall’s studies were not contained to a library and the classroom. His interests spilled over into his life. His friends noticed, too. They came over to record music with Marshall, but after asking “Where’d you get that?” they might leave with a borrowed, one-of-a-kind, vintage sweater straight from Marshall’s closet. Aaron Marshall ’18

As he collected unique pieces in his thrifting trips with his family, he saw the market for selling finds to others and realized that maybe thrifting, not music, would be the passion to turn into a career. His business, Naptown Thrift, was born and grew by word of mouth. Marshall started an Instagram account that drew worldwide attention. With more stock and buyers, he moved the business to a large storage unit. But “storage unit” is an inaccurate description of what is ostensibly a store—racks of clothing for customers to browse on an appointment basis. 

“It doesn’t feel like work, so it is definitely something I can see myself doing in the long run. It’s become a passion of mine I didn’t know existed before coming to Butler,” Marshall said. With his family’s support, Marshall is looking ahead to opening a brick and mortar store after graduation. 

“My professors have been extremely supportive of me taking on my own endeavors,” Marshall said. His Recording Industry Studies Advisor Cutler Armstrong encourages him, even though he knows he won’t be going into music. 

The support comes from students as well. “People have genuinely wanted to see me succeed,” Marshall said. For example, in his Audio Capstone course, the class is helping record a commercial for Naptown Thrift, recognizing how they could complete their assignment and help Marshall at the same time. 

While ICS didn’t need to help Marshall figure out what to do with his life, Career Advisor Courtney Rousseau has assisted him in finding his way through the Career Planning Strategies course. “A lot of students are looking for jobs and internships. I love what I do already. The valuable thing in that course is Courtney helping me be more goal oriented. You have to have some sort of plan of what the next steps will be.” 

As Marshall graduates, he might be more likely to apply for building permits than jobs, but following his passion will be a solid step toward reaching his goals. 

A Runway from the Midwest to High Fashion 

 

Growing up in Tipp City, Ohio, the closest Meredith Coughlin ’18 got to the fashion world was glossy magazines. Reading the periodicals helped her learn about fashion, the editors, and what it would take to make it in the industry. 

Meredith Coughlin ’18But while Coughlin didn’t end up in fashion school, the Butler Human Communication and Organizational Leadership major used Internship and Career Services (ICS) to go after exactly what she wanted: A career in fashion. 

After a summer spent managing a boutique in Northern Michigan, Coughlin had experience with creating visual displays, directing photo shoots, executing a fashion show, buying products, and running social media. When she returned to campus in the fall, she was determined to reach her goal of working in fashion in New York City. 

She worked with ICS to improve her cover letter, but Career Advisor Courtney Rousseau, and Internship Advisor Scott Bridge, both knew Coughlin was venturing into uncharted territory for most Butler students. Coughlin was set on finding her internship on her own. “I knew what I desired was different,” she said. And sure enough, Coughlin, with ICS’s support and a great cover letter, earned an internship with Oprah Magazine in New York City. 

After that experience, Coughlin doubled down. In the fall semester of her junior year, she spent time studying fashion merchandising at The Westminster School of Fashion in London, a prestigious fashion program, through the Institute for Study Abroad-Butler. Then she completed another fashion internship on the East Coast with Vineyard Vines the next summer, all before her senior year. 

“I’ve always wanted real-life experiences,” Coughlin said. “Whenever I’m interning, I feel like I can see this is helping the store, this is helping the magazine, this is helping the company. I love to see the end result and accomplish my goals.” Coughlin’s story shows students they don’t have to wait until senior year to have hands-on learning experiences. 

The risks she took—moving to a place where she knew no one, building a career without a network in a new city—were tempered by the passion for the work. “I don’t follow the path. I seek out what I know I am passionate about. You don’t want to invest your time into something you aren’t passionate about,” Coughlin said. As she looks forward to graduation, Coughlin will certainly be able to design her own career to fit her passions. 

Making His Own Way

 

If you saw a resume for Anthony Murdock II ’17, it would show evidence of how he met with Career Advisor Courtney Rousseau at ICS about opportunities before he was even enrolled in classes. It would list internships with the Sagamore Institute and the City of Indianapolis. After graduation, the Political Science and Religion major is looking ahead to law school. A very traditional career path. 

And yet, Murdock is using creativity and innovation to create movements that didn’t exist before he stepped foot on campus, which has changed the way he sees his future. 

Anthony Murdock II ’17As an African American man and as a commuter, Murdock sometimes found himself in uncomfortable, outsider situations. He credits the challenge with giving him the opportunity to help advocate for other students. Butler ended up to be the perfect place for him to hone his leadership skills. 

“It put me in a place to say, ‘Are you going to let people you don’t know define who you are by the color of your skin and where you come from, or are you going to use this platform and opportunity of being marginalized to help yourself help other people?’ And that is what I decided I was going to do,” Murdock said. 

Murdock took that experience to heart and made a power move. With his fraternity brothers from Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc., they developed a new brand on campus. #PowerMovesOnly is a wave, a movement, and a shift in culture. The brand, fueled by hashtags and positive interactions with others, promotes success-oriented lifestyles and actions. “We were men who understood that it is one thing to do something for a moment and it is another to create sustainable change,” Murdock said of the beginning of the brand. “It was purely something we loved to do—see people benefit with great social meaning,” Murdock said. 

Murdock also founded Bust The B.U.B.B.L.E., a student movement that promotes the perspectives of students of color at predominantly white institutions through diversity education, cultural awareness, and action-oriented activism. 

Before his experience at Butler, Murdock thought he would take the traditional path: Practice law, run for office, become a political analyst. Yet his untraditional experience on campus, and skills in starting brands and organizations creating change, has brought him to another path. It still includes law school, but will veer in a different direction: Murdock will pursue sustainable social justice change in Indianapolis. 

His empowering messages and actions toward change isn’t only shaping students’ experiences at Butler, but allowing Murdock to define his own career path as well. 

AcademicsStudent Life

Pathways for Success

Stories of the way less traveled

by Monica Holb ’09

from Spring 2018

Read more
madison sauerteig

A Bulldog with a Soft Heart

Patricia Pickett ’82 APR

from Fall 2017

Children who are dealing with serious illnesses can experience a range of emotions, from scared to bored…Scared by unfamiliar surroundings and symptoms, bored by hours that drag by without their normal routine.

So, imagine how awesome it would be to have a smiling face peek into your room with the offer to play a game, create an art project, or just hang out and chat.

Meet Madison Sauerteig. The senior Psychology major from Cicero, Indiana, spends a dozen or so hours a month doing just that with patients at Riley Hospital for Children, ranging in age from infant to 18 years old. Her love of kids and thoughts of being a child life specialist prompted her to volunteer. While her career goals have shifted a bit—maybe the title “guidance counselor” is in her future—she has put in more than 150 hours to date.

The experience, which began as a volunteer opportunity that would translate well on her resume, blossomed into a passion that has spawned some valuable lessons, said Sauerteig.

“At first, I was a little scared to go into a patient’s room, but I’ve learned that it’s good to be that smiling face,” she said. “And I’ve also learned that not all kids have their parents—they have work, other children…things that take them away from Riley. Which makes what volunteers do even more important.”

Madison is a second-generation Bulldog, with parents Jeff ’87 and Wendy (Pfanstiel) ’89, also graduating from Butler University. The family attended numerous basketball games at Hinkle and other campus events when she was growing up. Madison says that familiarity—as well as its proximity to home and family—were major factors in her decision to attend. 

madison sauerteig
Student Life

A Bulldog with a Soft Heart

by Patricia Pickett ’82 APR

from Fall 2017

Read more

Beyond the Classroom

Patricia Pickett ’82 APR

from Spring 2018

While words like “innovation” and “entrepreneurship” are most often associated with the business world, they have also found their place nestled in Suite 200 of Atherton Union. 

That is the office occupied by the Office of Student Affairs and its newly appointed Vice President Frank Ross III. 

Since joining Butler less than a year ago, Ross has diligently researched the University’s culture, digging deep into student life at Butler in what he calls “a listening tour” of students, faculty, and staff. 

“I’ve been a Vice President at two previous institutions, but I’d be naïve to think because I’ve done this job before, I have all the answers,” he said. “This is a great area of opportunity to expand on my background of integrative learning. Student Affairs exists to support a university’s core mission of academics. I believe we can achieve that in innovative, collaborative partnerships throughout campus.” 

Indeed, Butler’s Office of Student Affairs is defined on the Butler website as, “Striving to integrate educational experiences into a campus setting with opportunities, challenges, and services that promote a student’s development as a total person. Whether it’s helping you find your place, get involved, or feel your best, our staff is happy to enrich your Butler experience beyond the classroom.” 

To Ross, those collaborations are all about approaching the whole student and every student. 

“We talk about a transformative experience, and I want to make sure we are including all students in that experience,” he said, pointing to conversations as diverse as “Tell me about the day of a typical first-year dance major?” to “How are commuter students making connections on campus?” “It’s all about understanding the culture as a whole at Butler,” Ross said. 

While Ross may be a long way from rural Southern Indiana where he was raised, those lessons of “scrappiness” — as he calls it — are evident. He’s not afraid to walk a different path, literally, admitting his comfortable office isn’t his favorite place to get things done. 

“I don’t feel particularly productive holed up in here,” he said motioning to the tree-lined sidewalk outside his window. “I have office hours in other buildings so 

“If we aren’t willing to articulate our own failures and how we can do better next time, how can we expect students to do the same? You can’t take students somewhere you can’t take yourself.” 

I can get to better know students and faculty. I find having walking meetings is a great way to break down barriers and allow people to think openly.” 

If Ross has an entrepreneurial calling card per se, it’s his dedication to encouraging a free flow of ideas. He identifies with the importance of failure in innovation and believes its integral to the mission of his office to embrace it as well. He recounts a “get to know you” exercise he conducted with Student Affairs leaders early in his days at Butler that sounds like a page out of the Fast Company playbook. 

“I asked them to answer three questions: 1) What did you do well last year? 2) Tell me something from your personal life you’re proud of, and 3) What was something you didn’t do well last year that you would call a failure? Failure is an important part of learning, as it is an important part of entrepreneurship,” he said. “If we aren’t willing to articulate our own failures and how we can do better next time, how can we expect students to do the same? You can’t take students somewhere you can’t take yourself.” 

Ross believes it’s the responsibility of a Student Affairs professional to nurture the willingness to try resilience in the face of failure within a safe and encouraging environment. “Our profession is grounded in theory—we know when to push and when to pull. We want students to learn from their experiences,” he said. 

While he harkens to the roots of his profession being traced all the way to 1636 at the founding of Harvard, he points to the incredible possibilities in the future, Frank Ross with studentsparticularly as it pertains to the digital space. “Social media has provided a great way to enhance access to students and a way for them to reach out to us,” he said. “Parents are able to engage with us via Twitter or Facebook Messenger. There’s no longer that 8-to- 5 limitation of office hours. Our students’ schedules are different. Responsiveness to students means reaching them where they are … and a great use of technology.” 

As Ross learns more about the inner workings of Butler’s culture, he will be instituting new programs and practices based on his findings as well as past experiences. He has been active in numerous leadership roles with NASPA, the leading association for the Student Affairs profession, including serving on its Board of Directors. That involvement has given him a front seat to innovative practices at institutions of higher education throughout the country. 

“What’s important to me as a professional is a commitment to emerging best practices. It’s not always about reinventing the wheel,” he said. “It doesn’t have to be universities just like Butler—there are both large research institutions and community colleges that are doing some great things in Student Affairs.” 

What’s the entrepreneurial bottom line on innovation for Ross? “Innovation and creativity should be at the heart of what we do in Student Affairs. It isn’t just trying new things. You have to stop saying “no” and instead, give your team the space and encouragement to share their good ideas.” 

Student Life

Beyond the Classroom

Entrepreneurial Innovation Takes its Place in Student Affairs 

by Patricia Pickett ’82 APR

from Spring 2018

Read more
Arts & CultureStudent Life

Butler Theatre Presents 'The Little Prince'

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 05 2018

Butler Theatre closes its 2017–2018 season with The Little Prince, Antoine de Saint-Exupery's tale of love and loyalty, April 11-22 in the Lilly Hall Studio Theatre 168.

Show times are:

Wednesday, April 11, 7:00 PM (Preview)

Thursday, April 12, 7:00 PM (Preview)

Friday, April 13, 7:00 PM

Saturday, April 14, 7:00 PM

Sunday, April 15, 2:00 PM

Friday, April 20, 7:00 PM

Saturday, April 21, 7:00 PM

Sunday, April 22, 2:00 PM

Tickets are $5-$15. They are available online at ButlerArtsCenter.org or at the box office before each performance.

The Little Prince, a childhood favorite, is the story of a pilot stranded in the desert who meets an enigmatic young prince who has recently fallen from the sky. Audience members can let their imagination take flight in an adventure that celebrates fantasy and friendship.

The cast:

Aviator: Zane Franklin, Morgantown, Indiana

Lamplighter/Geographer/Businessman: Ryan Moskalick, Highland, Indiana

The Little Prince: Abby Glaws, Deerfield, Illinois

Snake/King: Mary Hensel, Indianapolis

Rose/Conceited man: Kitty Compton, Evansville, Indiana

Fox: Lexy Weixel, Columbus, Ohio

(In the photo: Zane Franklin and Abby Glaws)

 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan MFA '18
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

Arts & CultureStudent Life

Butler Theatre Presents 'The Little Prince'

The final show of the season runs April 11-22.

Apr 05 2018 Read more
AcademicsStudent Life

Butler's Undergraduate Research Conference Turns 30

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 03 2018

After footing the bill to send two students to present papers at an undergraduate research conference in the south, Butler Biology Professor Jim Berry decided that the university needed to host its own event.

He founded the Butler Undergraduate Research Conference (URC) in 1989 "to encourage undergraduate students to become involved in research," he wrote in the program. "We believe that the best way to teach science is by actually doing science. Only through the actual process of asking questions and solving problems can one become experienced in the methods of science."

Today, Berry's creation is stronger than ever: On April 13, from 8:00 AM to 4:15 PM, Butler will welcome 896 participants from 23 states to present their work at the 30th annual URC.

Berry, now Professor Emeritus, will be recognized at the luncheon, and Major Matthew Riley '01 will deliver the keynote address. Riley is Department Chief at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, the Department of Defense’s lead laboratory for medical biological defense research. 

In its first year, the URC that Berry created included 171 participants in five disciplines—Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Engineering, and Social Science—all of whom were from Indiana. The next year, Music Professor Jim Briscoe ushered in Music and Arts.

This year's conference will feature presentations in 25 disciplines. Topics this year will be as varied as "Manufacturing: An Uncertain Future," "Beyond Godzilla: Reflections of National Identity in Japanese Horror Films," and "Can You Outsmart the ImPACT Test? A Study of Sandbagging on Baseline Concussion Assessments."

"Because of Jim Berry's hard work—and the hard work of other folks—we're now one of the largest undergraduate research conferences in the nation," said Dacia Charlesworth, Butler's Director of Undergraduate Research and Prestigious Scholarships.

Under Charlesworth's guidance, the URC has added research roundtables that allow students just embarking on their research projects to share their plans with experienced professionals and receive feedback and a competitive-paper division. This year, 28 students submitted competitive papers.

The Butler Collegian interviewed Berry about the URC in 1995. He described the conference then as "a district version of the big national conferences you always hear about. We’ve just brought it closer to home so that more students can take part.”

Charlesworth said that with 79 colleges and universities participating, the conference has expanded beyond what anyone expected.

"I'm happy we're continuing Jim’s mission," she said. "At the heart of it, we're still fulfilling his original intention: Helping students understand research by conducting research."

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan MFA '18
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

AcademicsStudent Life

Butler's Undergraduate Research Conference Turns 30

The URC has grown from 171 participants in 1989 to nearly 900 this year.

Apr 03 2018 Read more

SGA: Committed to Your Campus Experience

By Malachi White '20

Were you apart of your high school’s student government? Did you help plan dances, prom, student events or fundraisers? Have you ever wanted to be apart of something that was super cool and fulfilling? I ask these questions because that was me when I was in high school. Although I am not as active in student government as I used to be, I still reap many of the benefits of those involved in Student Government Association on Butler’s campus.

Butler University’s SGA is committed to improving your campus experience. They represent the student body and support over 150 student organizations on campus while addressing student concerns and providing engaging programming with the Butler community. SGA connects the students to the administration; building strong relationships with the faculty and staff addressing student concerns. Some of SGA’s functions include providing a free weekend shuttle service for students, offering grants for represented student organizations, and hosting exciting student events, like diversity programming, concerts, and philanthropy fundraisers.

Taylor Leslie is a senior international business major and a SGA Diversity and Inclusion Board member. She is a major advocate for the push to bring notable and different speakers to campus. “My experience with SGA has been great. I’ve been a member of the Diversity and Inclusion Board since my sophomore year,” Taylor said. “My roles within SGA have given me the opportunity from a student position to help make changes in the way that diversity and inclusion is perceived on campus.”

Another student involved in SGA is Chris Sanders. He is a junior psychology major, a co-chair for SGA’s Concerts Committee and a student assistant for the Office of Health and Education. His experiences have made working within SGA some of his best memories while on campus. “I didn’t know what I was really getting into when I joined, but if someone would have told me that my Butler experience would including meeting famous artists such as T-Pain, Kesha, and DNCE, I would not have believed them, but this is exactly what happened.” Chris said.

SGA can open several doors for students. Once apart of SGA team, new benefits and opportunities open up for everyone on campus in the Butler community.

“Other students should consider joining SGA because it gives you an opportunity to be a leader on this campus,” Taylor said. “You get a chance to influence and be apart of the change that is happening on campus. You’ll also make connections with many students and find a team of leaders that have similar passions as yourself.”

Not only is being apart of SGA an awesome opportunity, but it is an important part of campus life on campus. “I think SGA is very important to have on campus.” Chris said.“Without SGA, we wouldn’t be able to have great events such as BUDM, Butlerpalooza, or Spring Sports as all of these are all planned by different SGA committees. SGA pays a critical role in facilitating important relationships between all members of the Butler community.”

SGA Office
Student LifeCampus

SGA: Committed to Your Campus Experience

Were you apart of your high school’s student government? Did you help plan dances, prom, student events or fundraisers?

Breaking News: Student Journalists Pursue their Passion

By Morgan Skeries '20

StudioWhether you want to become a journalist, broadcaster, or simply have a knack for writing, Butler University provides opportunities to let you pursue your passion and helps you build the skills you’ll need for real professional experience after graduation. From the student-run newspaper, The Butler Collegian, to class-run broadcast shows such as “Press Pass” and “The Bark,” students are able to publish their own work and gain real-life experience before they enter the field.

First-year Bridget Early is a voice performance and political science major, but has always had a passion for writing. Between balancing her recitals and writing on the culture section for The Butler Collegian, she said the experiences and connections she has made has been worth it.

“I think it’s been a great way to interact with a bunch of different people on campus,” Bridget said. “I’ve enjoyed getting to know people in different organizations and the people in my section. It’s been a great environment.”

According to Bridget, writing for the school’s newspaper really helped her strengthen her writing and interviewing skills. Moreover, she was able to make more friendships outside of her major. Sophomore Jackson Borman also said working for The Butler Collegian, along with his internship at The Butler Newsroom, has helped him with time management. Jackson learned how to balance between his classes, his internship, and writing for The Collegian, while still enjoying his social life and doing other activities he loves.

Jackson, a strategic communications major, loves both of his positions and said the experiences he’s had are very positive. “There is something about doing the research and completing an article and having a polished finished product that I really enjoy,” Jackson said. “Also, researching for different stories allows me to learn a ton about the Butler community and about things or people that I never knew about before.”

Furthermore, broadcasting opportunities such as the ones sophomore Savannah Boettcher has pursued, allow her to do a story on whatever she wants and let her bring her own ideas to the table. If Savannah isn’t anchoring, she can be found interviewing or reporting. She even had the opportunity to interview Butler Basketball’s head coach LaVall Jordan.Studio

“Working for both ‘Press Play’ and ‘The Bark’ have helped me so much by giving me practical experience,” Boettcher said. “It helps me to work on facial expressions, hand gestures, and stuff that is minor now, but could be major one day.”

Any student who has the passion for writing, being on camera, or even just wants to experience what it’s like to work for a student-run news source has a multitude of platforms readily available to them right on Butler’s campus. Not only is the work fun, the "real-world" preparation ensures students gain not only the experience but the personal confidence it takes to be successful after graduation.

The Collegian
Student Life

Breaking News: Student Journalists Pursue their Passion

Whether you want to become a journalist, broadcaster, or simply have a knack for writing, Butler University provides opportunities to let you pursue your passion.

#FTK: Butler University Dance Marathon

By Malachi White '20

BUDM#FTK, For The Kids, is a popular hashtag that is often taken out of context and used in a jokingly ironic way. However, at Butler #FTK is taken very seriously. We do care about the people we are serving in our community. One of the ways we show this is by hosting our annual Butler University Dance Marathon.

Dance Marathon is a multi-hour, multi-faceted event that blends dancing, games, crafts, food, and fun into one philanthropic experience. Students are on their feet the entire duration of the marathon as they stand for the kids at Riley. Funds for Dance Marathons are raised in a variety of ways. The main way funds are raised for Dance Marathons is through personal donations from friends, family, and the community either online or offline.

My friend Phil Faso, a sophomore at Butler, says he thoroughly enjoyed participating for his first time this year. “It personally impacted my life because I’ve done similar things before but not to such a great extent and it was very heartwarming.” Phil said. “It’s for an amazing cause and everyone should be aware of what we can do to help other people in need.”

Butler University Dance Marathon, or BUDM, is sponsored by Butler’s SGA. Their mission statement is “to engage the students of Butler University in striving to improve the quality of life for the children and families of Riley Hospital for Children.” This student-led organization works throughout the school year and summer to raise money to support cancer research performed at the hospital. Our money also helps the hospital continue its tradition of treating all patients, regardless of financial concerns.

Holding this organization close to her heart and platform, Annie Foster is a junior chemistry and Spanish double major, and has worked with BUDM since her first year on campus. “As soon as I joined, I knew this organization was about something bigger than I could ever imagine,” Annie said. “Supporting this organization means joining a movement to give hope back to the kids.” She started as a morale committee member during her first year. Her sophomore and junior years she worked on the executive board as Director of Fundraising. She will close her time at Butler as the Vice President of Finance. All students have the opportunity to be on the executive board by attending call out meetings, being actively annually, and showing commitment to the cause.

“From the start I knew I wanted to join the executive board and make a difference in this organization. BUDM has given my college experience meaning,” Annie said. “Being on a college campus comes with feeling of being in a bubble, secluded from the world around you. Getting involved in BUDM brings you out of that bubble and into the real world. It provides a new perspective, it teaches you about the power of hope, and it allows you to become apart of something larger than yourself.”BUDM

Inspired by the ability to make a change, Taylor Murray is a senior pharmacy major and served on the executive board of BUDM this past year. He realized that his impact on a family in need superseded monetary support for the cause. “I saw the joy and hope, especially, that support and simply dancing can bring to a child, or families face regardless of the amount of money raised that year,” Taylor said. “That was something that truly made me want to continue my involvement with the organization and the cause as a whole.”

As co-director of the morale committee Taylor says that “this committee meshed my love for dancing, with that of wanting to bring happiness and energy to those who may need it most.”

“Prospective students may not have had a Dance Marathon at their high school, and/or did not even know it was happening/what it is when they step foot onto Butler’s Campus,” Taylor said.  “From the outside, it may look like another organization at block party, but once you step out and begin to talk to those who have experienced it or been involved, one can realize it is more than an organization, it is a family.”

This year BUDM raised $301,576 for Riley Children’s Hospital and Butler celebrates being the second largest fundraising school in undergraduate schools with less than 12,000 students. Taylor tells his story and experience with BUDM by sharing how he has grown since his first year at Butler. He hopes that after he graduates he will be able to come back to people who have found their passions and act upon them to make their own Butler experiences special.

“From my experiences with BUDM, I have come to realize that I can be a leader, but a leader that doesn’t necessarily have to be the loudest or most successful in the room, but a leader who can lead by example and as one with the others,” Taylor said. “My advice to prospective students is if you do not know what you what in life, finding and driving toward your passion(s) will open up new avenues and opportunities you never would have thought existed.”

BUDM
Student LifeCampusCommunity

#FTK: Butler University Dance Marathon

#FTK, For The Kids, is a popular hashtag that is often taken out of context and used in a jokingly ironic way. However, at Butler #FTK is taken very seriously. 

California Girl to Butler Bulldog

By Morgan Skeries '20

When I tell people I'm from California, their response is usually the same. "Wow, why would you ever want to come here?" It is a valid question. Out of all the schools I applied to and visited, why Butler University? Before I answer that, let me walk you through my college application process.
 

Morgan at BeachI knew I wanted to go away for college because I wanted the ability to live on my own away from home. I was looking at schools all over the Midwest and East coast, and I knew I wanted to attend a small, liberal arts school. I was extremely interested in having small class sizes that would emphasize my learning and for my professors to know me on a first-name basis. It was important for me to have these connections with my classmates and my professors, so I would always have help if I needed it.

My college counselor at the time was helping me apply to schools that she thought would be a great fit for me, academically and socially. After doing some research, I found that Butler checked off many boxes on my list, including an impressive school for communication degrees, as I knew I wanted to study journalism. I sent in my application not thinking much of it. In the fall, I received a letter saying I was accepted to Butler University.

As soon as I stepped onto campus, something clicked. My college counselor was right, Butler did have everything I was looking for. Butler had a beautiful campus, small class sizes, and a college-town feel with a city only 15 minutes away. I remember thinking to myself, "I could really picture myself going here."


Although the weather was something I had to get used to, I am making amazing friends, and my professors are genuinely interested in my academic success. I am a member of a sorority and on the Student Government Association. As a journalism major, it is really beneficial that I live in a major city that has a variety of media sources available to me. I do not think I would have had the same opportunities at another school if I had not gone to Butler.


Although I miss my home in sunny California, I could not be happier with my college choice. I'm proud I get to yell, "Go Dawgs!" and be a part of a supportive community of people like me.

Morgan
Student Life

California Girl to Butler Bulldog

Although I miss my home in sunny California, I could not be happier with my college choice.

Morgan

California Girl to Butler Bulldog

By Morgan Skeries '20
AcademicsStudent Life

Archaeology Mobile Lab Brings History to Life

BY Jackson Borman '20

PUBLISHED ON Mar 27 2018

When you walk into Dr. Lynne Kvapil’s office in Jordan Hall, you'll likely see a binder full of ancient Greek and Roman coins, a ceramic bowl or two, and stacks and stacks of other artifacts and replicas. And she will gladly show you any of them.

Kvapil is an Assistant Professor of Classics at Butler, as well as a practicing archaeologist. These items are all a part of the Ancient Mediterranean Cultures and Archaeology Mobile Lab, of which Kvapil is a director, along with Associate Professor of Classics, Chris Bungard.

“We have a bunch of stuff, and the goal is for students to get their hands on things,” Kvapil said. “Short term, we want to get these materials in more classes at Butler. I think the long term is to get them into the Indianapolis area, to really create a network of people in the Indianapolis area who want to see these resources coming in and out.”

The lab’s extensive collection is made up of materials that are relevant to the ancient world, specifically Greece and Rome, but there are some items that branch out around the Mediterranean as well, such as reproductions of Egyptian papyrus.

The lab operates as a collection, through which items can be loaned out to classrooms at Butler or kindergarten-through-high school classrooms in the Indianapolis area. Kvapil said that the primary purpose of the lab is to provide a way of learning that is different from a traditional classroom, but also to provide materials for possible research opportunities.

The lab started in fall 2015, financed by a Butler Innovation Fund grant, but they had only a year to spend the money. Most of the first year was shopping around to see what materials were out there for purchase.

Since the shopping has been completed, Kvapil said that the majority of the work to be done with the lab is regarding what to do about their loan policy.

“We are still trying to figure out things like what do we do if we loan out a cup and someone trashes it, how do we replace that and what is our legal policy there,” Kvapil said. “These are some nitty-gritty things that take some time to hash out.”

Because the lab has accumulated so many artifacts and other materials, there is always more work to be done. Kvapil employs two student-interns every year to help with the organization and curation of the lab.

“The interns really make this place run,” Kvapil said. “We want to always spotlight Butler students and what they are doing. I think it is really important to make sure that the people that work with us get some publicity.”

Wendy Vencel '20 has been an intern with the lab for the last two years. She is also the president of the Classics Club. Besides working to help keep the lab running smoothly, Vencel has been trying to use the lab to help plan events with the Classics Club as well.

“We are really trying to work with it to engage with the lab because it really is the perfect opportunity, at least in the Butler community,” Vencel said.

This year, the interns started a WordPress blog that contains an electronic flipbook of all of the materials that the lab has in stock, as well as an Instagram page with photos of items. Audrey Crippin, a P3 Pharmacy major, made the flipbook. They set up a pop-up museum in the on-campus Starbucks during Dawg Days, where Butler-bound students could experience a mock archaeological dig, in an attempt to showcase some of what the Classics Department has to offer.

Vencel said that experiences like the mock dig are important to her because similar experiences made her first years at Butler memorable.

“What got me into classics was when Dr. Kvapil came and talked to an Anthropology class that I was in, and I was like, ‘Oh my gosh there is an archaeologist here,’” Vencel said. “It was super cool and I didn’t know Butler had that to offer. During my sophomore year, I took Kvapil’s Greek art and myth class and I’ve been here ever since.”

Kvapil said that the best way for students to get involved with the lab is by applying to be an intern for next year, or by joining the Classics Club. Another option is simply by taking classes that can make use of the lab.

“People are really shy about being interested in that kind of thing," Kvapil said, "but we also promote them to take classes, not just in the Classics Department, but there are a lot of classes in the History and Anthropology Department, as well as Philosophy and Religion, that are involved with this kind of idea that the past can be alive through things.”

 

 

 

AcademicsStudent Life

Archaeology Mobile Lab Brings History to Life

Faculty and students work together to curate a collection of artifacts and replicas.

Mar 27 2018 Read more
AcademicsStudent Life

'The Mall' Lets First-Year Students Publish

BY Peyton Thompson '20

PUBLISHED ON Mar 22 2018

First-year class president Elizabeth Bishop is a Marketing and Strategic Communications double-major who has always had a passion for writing.

So when Jim Keating, the instructor in her First-Year Seminar (FYS) course Utopian Experience, and some of her friends encouraged her to submit her writing to The Mall, she said she would.

The Mall is a journal dedicated to showcasing exemplary FYS work. First-year students can submit a piece of literary analysis and criticism, a creative writing piece, or a personal essay. Bishop said she will be submitting an analysis of alienation in literature and why it is so common among characters.

"I'm so excited to have the opportunity to have my work published in The Mall," Bishop said. "I've really enjoyed my FYS and I feel as though it has definitely helped me develop as a writer. I think it's wonderful that Butler is giving us this opportunity and I'm highly anticipating reading everyone's entries!”

The Mall, now in its fifth year, was created by Adjunct Professor Nicholas Reading, with a push from English Professor Susan Neville.

"She sparked the idea of publishing student’s work, and just needed someone to take initiative and do it,” Reading said.

He said students are not required to have a certain grade on their work to submit. It is also possible to submit multiple papers, and in some cases, be published twice.

The most recent edition of The Mall was 201 pages, with all different kinds of pieces submitted by students. In all, 34 papers were published.

Reading said The Mall serves three primary goals:

-To present to the Butler community the FYS program and increase awareness about the program and the work that is produced in FYS courses.

-To build an FYS learning resource for instructors so that they will have the opportunity to use published essays as learning tools in the classrooms and to provide models of exemplary FYS writing to new students.

-To empower first-year students and give their voices and opinions a forum to be heard.

The Mall is edited by FYS students. Throughout the process, students exercise the peer-review and collaborative learning skills practiced in their FYS courses. Similarly, the journal provides a forum for students to be published and have an opportunity to showcase their work.

“Our purpose is to empower students in their writing," Reading said. "That is the end goal. To understand that the written word will always be an integral and indispensable facet of our existence. To understand that as writers, we have the opportunity to participate in larger discussions that work to elevate us all. To own that voice, and use it passionately and responsibly, can be an exhilarating feeling. And we try to showcase the results of that journey.”

Goals of FYS

  • To reflect on significant questions about yourself, your community, and your world.
  • To develop the capacity to read and think critically.
  • To develop the capacity to write clear and persuasive expository and argumentative essays with an emphasis on thesis formation and development.
  • To gain an understanding of basic principles of oral communication as they apply to classroom discussion.
  • To understand the liberal arts as a vital and evolving tradition and to see yourself as agents within that tradition.
  • To develop capacities for careful and open reflection on questions of values and norms.
  • To develop the ability to carry out research for the purpose of inquiry and to support claims.

                                                         

 

 

 

AcademicsStudent Life

'The Mall' Lets First-Year Students Publish

The journal is dedicated to showcasing exemplary FYS work.

Mar 22 2018 Read more

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