Student Life | Butler Stories
Back

Latest In

Student Life

#LoveIndy: 6 Questions for Chris Gahl

By Shannon Rostin '18

Butler students find a home in Indianapolis as soon as they arrive on campus. Exploring Indy and all it has to offer helps to shape a student's experience from weekend adventures to finding their favorite hidden gems in the city. Butler Grad and Trustee Chris Gahl ’00 serves as Senior VP of Marketing and Communications for Visit Indy and shared some of the perks of living and studying in Indianapolis.

For more information on Indianapolis and everything happening throughout the city, check out Visit Indy

 

How do you think being located in Indianapolis affects Butler students or shapes their college experience?

The ability to score meaningful internships is one of many ways Indy helps shape—and benefits from—Butler students. This aligns with Butler’s “Indianapolis Community Requirement,” a core-curriculum ensuring students get out of the classroom and into the community to learn.  For instance, collegiate sports are governed in Indy at the NCAA, an organization that is constantly looking for talented marketing interns.  Pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly’s international headquarters are here, regularly employing Butler business interns.  

 

What are some highlights that Butler students have access to?

Each year, Indy host more than 1,000 major music concerts, sporting events, festivals, and cultural events, allowing Butler students the ability to soak in the sights and sounds, all within minutes of campus. 

 

What is something (or a few things) you would recommend students do in Indianapolis before they graduate?

You can kayak the White River, a hidden jewel running more than 300 miles, with portions adjacent to Butler’s campus.  During the summer, it’s fun to watch a concert at The Lawn, an amphitheater in downtown Indy.  I’ve seen The Avett Brothers, Arcade Fire, and The Black Keys.  

 

What attracts students and young professionals to Indy?

Students and young professionals continue to gravitate to Indy’s big city amenities with the affordability of a smaller city. Indy has arrived, much like Butler, onto the national stage as a vibrant world class city. Travel & Leisure named Indy one of only “50 Best Places in the World to Travel" in 2017, right next to Honolulu, Hawaii and Cape Town, South Africa. 

 

What are some ways students can feel at home in or apart of the Indianapolis community?

Part of our DNA in Indy is hosting major sporting events. As part of this, we are in constant need for volunteers to help roll out the red carpet and welcome international visitors to Indy. We are always seeking ambassadors to give city tours, greet professional athletes, and donate time to staff information desks.  Volunteering for major sporting events—like an NCAA Men’s Final Four—helps the community all while providing an incredible networking opportunity.  

 

What makes Indy home to you?

Indy’s residents genuinely care about each other.  We are quick to smile and eager in our desire to help.  Servant leadership can be seen and felt daily, there’s even a name for it, “Hoosier Hospitality.” 

Butler Student Media

By Shannon Rostin '18

In Butler's College of Communications, learning often extends beyond the classroom, into the real world...but that doesn't mean you have to leave campus. There are many on-campus media opportunities of which any student can be a part.

Here's a short list:

  1. The Butler Collegian

    The Collegian office is home to The Butler Collegian, Butler’s student run newspaper. The Collegian office runs like a real newsroom - always lively, chaotic  and on deadline. With a strong commitment to journalism, the Collegian informs, entertains and keeps students up to date on everything happening on and around campus. The Collegian publishes weekly in print and online.
  2. The Butler Beat and BU:30

    The Butler Beat is a weekly news and interview program featuring all things news and entertainment related on campus. It is hands on and student run and operated, providing students the opportunity to be involved at every level of news and entertainment production.  
    BU:30 is a weekly sports show anchored and produced by students. The show features stories and interviews with Butler’s NCAA Division One athletes and coaches.


 

IMG_0787.JPG

  1. ButlerSports.com

    Weekly student produced webcasts on all things Butler Sports, FREE! Students create content for updates, schedules, fan centers and more for Butler teams.

 

  1. IndyBlueRadio

    Butler’s very own, student run and produced campus radio station. The station can be streamed on any computer, and plays mainly college /adult alternative music in addition to student artists and programming. Students are encouraged to submit their own work and programs to be featured on air.
Running Camera

Butler Student Media

By Shannon Rostin '18

Butler Homecoming Traditions

By Brittany Bluthardt '20

The energy of Butler University’s campus during homecoming week is unlike any other. Students thrive in blue and white as they celebrate their Bulldog pride throughout the week, and alumni and families come to cheer on their favorite team in the Sellick Bowl. Along with many celebrations and events, Greek homecoming traditions go down in Butler history as some of the most exciting moments of the year. From extravagant lawn decorations to chariot races down Hampton Drive, members of the Greek community truly know how to share their school pride with the entire campus -- 

 

Snack Attack and Lawn Decorations

Before the start of homecoming week, Butler Greek organizations are teamed up with a residence hall to compete in a series of competitions, games, and events that showcase their school spirit. Late into Thursday night of the week, the entire campus comes to life as teams decorate their Greek house lawns according to the year’s theme. Every hour on the hour, SGA delivers a new snack food for the teams to replenish and re-energize before decorating into early Friday morning. 


Yell Like Hell 

After weeks of practice, the homecoming teams strut their stuff in front of hundreds of students at Yell Like Hell, an annual tradition celebrated by Butler students in Hinkle Fieldhouse. The team with the best bulldog spirit and representation of the year’s theme takes home a thrilling victory.


Chariot Race

Bright and early on the day of homecoming, members of Butler fraternities compete in a fast-paced chariot race down Hampton Drive. Other students line the street and cheer on their favorite team. The race is an annual tradition hosted by the brothers of Sigma Chi.


Bulldog Boulevard Tailgate

After a quick parade around campus, students head to Hinkle Fieldhouse to celebrate before the football game. Many Greek organizations, colleges, and clubs have a booth set up with food and games for current students and alumni to celebrate before the game. The Butler spirit team leads everyone into the stadium with one of many cheers -- B-U, T-L-E, R U A BULLDOG, HELL YEAH! 


Jungle Ball Soccer 

To kick off homecoming week, students played a energizing game of soccer with a huge, inflatable ball. The next-level soccer game took place at the Sellick Bowl, and students only hope this new game becomes an annual Butler tradition. 

Student Life

Butler Homecoming Traditions

Five traditions celebrated in a week leading up to the homecoming football game that students need to know about.

Butler Homecoming Traditions

By Brittany Bluthardt '20

Teaching Through Doing: 5 Questions for Arthur Hochman

By Shannon Rostin '18

Education professor Arthur Hochman, recipient of a Distinguished Faculty Award in 2015, inspires College of Education (COE) students through his shared passion of teaching, helping to shape future teachers with his unique approach to teaching and active role in student’s education. Hochman is somewhat of an icon in the College. His one-of-a-kind teaching and appreciation for his individual students is astounding and very apparent in all he does for COE. 

 

How would you describe elements of your teaching style? 

Connecting with students.  I want to teach to them and not at them, and that is predicated on knowing who they are, what matters to them, how they learn, etc.  Once you know students it changes everything.  I think of these relationships as ongoing.  I still feel connected to students from many, many years ago, and have continued to work with them.  They also provide a through-line for our college; for me; and for our current students. 

Teaching through doing.  You cannot learn how to swim via PowerPoint.  You have to feel the water, the uncertainty.  Through an educational lens, you need to experience what it means to be a professional, what it means to guide another, what it feels like to be the leader and the follower, and always in a real context (in our case educational contexts).  Crucial to this is being there with them in the context, and not merely sending them off into the community.

Helping others find the greatness in themselves.  The first part is to be able to see it in them, genuinely and in concrete terms.  This also involves seeing greatness in its many and varied forms, and not always in a single lane.  Knowing the answer is worth a lot, but then so is empathy, perseverance, overcoming, and so forth.  The second part is creating guided experiences so that they can find their own strength.  We might create a structured experience with 4th graders, for example, that still provides them with ample space to plan and implement in the classroom. This is like holding the bicycle at the beginning, but letting go, allowing them to feel and find their own momentum.  They see and know that they can and are peddling on their own weight.

Being in the moment.  There is the syllabus, there is the content, there are the objectives, there is the end in view; but in the meantime, there is right now. We might as well work to experience joy, create a culture of nurturance, find the greater good, and do meaningful work today.  To achieve this, I try to vary my instruction; team teach; teach new things, new courses; model; and most of all think about how to construct a learning environment that feels safe, communal, purposeful, connected, concrete, real, and successful.

 

What is the most rewarding part of teaching at Butler?

Getting to know the students; helping to them to find their own strength; working with colleagues (faculty, alums and educators in the field).  Being able to be student-centered at an institution that values this vision.

 

What makes a positive student / professor connection?

Knowing your students is the key.  You have to find and build in ways to know them beyond the syllabus.

 

What does COE do to set up students for a successful career in education?

 We provide the following elements in all of our programs:

A tremendous amount of guided experiences in the field. These experiences are at a wide variety of places, with a wide variety of contexts, students/clients.

A focus on conceptual learning.  Teaching specific skills, strategies, contexts, or technology limits the educator to the particular tools and ideas they happen to have and know.  Teaching them the meaning of tools or ideas; how they function, how to select or modify them- this enables a future educator to be able to use and guide others in tools and ideas that have not yet been invented.

Living our vision in our teaching and in who we are.

Being purposeful about how we think, what we say, and what we do as educators.  We practice this, we deconstruct it, we explore strategies for doing this.

Building and nurturing relationships, while they are here on campus and after they graduate.

 

What makes a great teacher?

Great teachers are authentic.  They are profoundly themselves.  In this way they provide a road map to identity for life and for learning. Great teachers think about how learning feels; they know their content; they know their students; they build relationships; they are intentional; they are empathetic; they teach conceptually (thinking and understanding beyond mere answers).

 

Hochman
Student Life

Teaching Through Doing: 5 Questions for Arthur Hochman

Education professor Arthur Hochman, recipient of a Distinguished Faculty Award in 2015, inspires COE students through his shared passion of teaching, helping to shape future teachers with his unique approach to teaching and active role in student’s education.

Four Life Skills Students Learned From Women’s Self Defense

By Brittany Bluthardt '20

“No, get back!” a student in Butler’s Women’s Self Defense class shouts as she enters into a defensive stance. Each week, the women are taught valuable self-defense skills by Butler police officers. After a semester of jabs and kicks, the women engage in three realistic scenarios where they must defend themselves against the BUPD officers. The officers, covered in layers of protective gear, take on the full force of over 15 students as the women defend themselves with their new skills. Sophomores Ally Ledder and Allie Hopkins gained experience and personal confidence through the class’ experiential learning environment.

 

Strength

The women begin by learning a defensive stance -- the foundation of all moves. After mastering the first position, students begin to train and learn new skills that could actually protect themselves in the case of an emergency. The skills, often simple and swift, are repetitively practiced until the women react out of muscle memory.

“The skills I learned in this class will go beyond classroom education because they are things that become second nature, when practiced enough.” -- Allie H.

 

Power

Many of the moves are unnatural to the women, especially the specific finger grabs and strategic blocks. These small movements are extremely powerful, and the women learn their true strength against an attacker. One student, rising just under five feet tall, was able to defend herself against a 6-foot tall police officer. The women learned power is not defined by their size.

“Step outside of your comfort zone! You'll be surprised how powerful you will feel. Be loud and have a good time. Also, support each other - you're all in it together.” -- Ally L.

 

Confidence

The women practice shouting rather than screaming to intimidate and call for help. Round after round, the class shouts “No!” after initiating every move. Although it sounds silly, the class learned how important their voice can be in a serious situation. Combining their new skills and strong voice, the women had a newfound self-confidence.

“I went into the class nervous and unsure of whether or not I had the strength to defend myself. I left the class being proud of the bruises I left on Tony's [BUPD officer] arm and confident I could handle anything that came my way.” -- Allie H.

Support

Each class session, the women practice with each other before initiating any skills full-force. They encourage one another to complete the movements with accuracy and strength to their best ability. The police officers and other women work together to form a caring support system of comfort.

“The instructors made the class a lot of fun. They were funny, patient, and encouraging. You could tell that they care a lot about the students and their safety. There was never a dull moment.” -- Ally L.

Above all, Ally and Allie encourage other women to take Women’s Self Defence to gain confidence and real-life skills that will last after the semester ends.

“Take it, take it, take it! I tell everyone I know to take this class. I firmly believe every woman should. It will help you grow immensely in you self-confidence and give you the skills needed to defend and protect yourself, should you ever need to. Plus, the instructors are amazing and super fun to work with!” -- Allie H.

Student Life

Four Life Skills Students Learned From Women’s Self Defense

Butler University police officers teach women valuable life skills in a Physical Well Being course.

Jimmy Lardin ’18

Student Profile

Major / Program: Political Science

 

Meet Jimmy Lardin. SGA president (2017–2018, after two years on Student Senate). Student Orientation Coordinator (promoted after two years as a Student Orientation Guide). Education Reflection Chair for Fall Alternative Break. Four minors (English, Ethics, Environmental Studies, and Peace and Conflict Studies). Campus tour guide.

And that’s just a partial list.

“Out of the three S’s—socialize, sleep, and study—I don’t sleep,” he said with a laugh.

Lardin expected to be active in college. Just not here. The Shelbyville, Indiana, native was “1,000 percent determined not to go to school in Indiana.”

But a friend who was a year ahead of him chose Butler and invited him to campus. Lardin sat in on a business class and, six minutes into the lecture, belched. Loudly. The professor made light of it and used that as a way to incorporate Lardin into the class and make him feel at ease. Afterward, the professor offered her email and phone number in case Lardin had questions about Butler.

Then at lunch in Atherton, Lardin’s friend’s friends told him how passionate they were about Butler. Others chimed in too.

“That’s what sold me,” he said. “People who had no idea who I was were still interested in sharing their love of the school with me.”

He’s seen that love up close in the years since. In summer 2016, Lardin was diagnosed with cancer. He went through surgeries, then chemotherapy.

“The feedback and support I got was outstanding—and far beyond what I could have ever imagined,” including from professors who reached out to express support and offer accommodations for missed classes. Lardin said the cancer is in remission.

“I’m thankful that happened on this campus versus a school where you’re considered more of a number,” he said. 

Lardin is now looking at public policy programs for graduate school, though he wants to work for a while first—ideally on environmental justice issues. In June, he went to India for a month through the School for International Training to work on a food security/climate change project and see if he wants to do international work. He does.

He said Butler has proved to be a great fit, giving him opportunities and satisfying his social nature.

“It’s small enough that I can’t walk from my house to my classes without running into two or three people who I know and love dearly,” he said, “but it’s large enough that I meet one or two new people every single day.”

 

 

 

 

Jimmy
CommencementStudent LifePeople

Jimmy Lardin ’18

Meet Jimmy Lardin. SGA president. Student Orientation coordinator. Education Reflection chair for Fall Alternative Break. Four minors. Campus tour guide.

Jimmy

Jimmy Lardin ’18

Student Profile

Lauren Boswell ’20

Student Profile

Major / Program: Elementary Education

Lauren Boswell says she found her calling in a program at her high school called Cadet Teacher, which takes college-bound students into elementary schools to give them a sense of what it’s like to be a teacher.

“In that class, we got to visit the College of Education here and I just fell in love with it,” she said. “I fell in love with the faculty and all the ideals of the program. That was the main reason I came here. And I’m a big basketball fan, so that’s always a plus.”

Boswell said one of the great lessons she’s learned in the College of Education is that in teaching, “it’s all about the kids and the importance of individualizing learning for each student. You need to look at each student and help them learn based on their ways of learning.”

In addition to her coursework, she’s continued her longtime involvement with Best Buddies, a program that matches volunteers with people who have intellectual and developmental disabilities. “I’ve always loved working with people with disabilities, helping them be the best they can be. And I feel like I’ve learned so much more from them than I could ever teach them. They always have such a positive outlook on life, and that’s something I try to emulate.”

Ultimately, Boswell hopes to be a third-grade teacher. “They’re just developing those personalities. They’re getting witty and kind of funny and they’ll understand some of your humor, so that’s my ideal grade. But anywhere from kindergarten to fourth grade, I’d be really happy.”

And she said Butler has proved to be the right place for her.

“There’s just something about when you step on this campus,” she said. “I feel like it has such a great atmosphere. Even when I came back after being away for the summer, I felt happy. I felt like I was home. Even though I only live 30 minutes away, there’s something about the people here. It was so easy to make friends. Everyone here is just so kind and so enthusiastic about life. I’m really happy that I’m here.”

 

 

 

Lauren
Student LifePeople

Lauren Boswell ’20

Boswell said one of the great lessons she’s learned in the College of Education is that in teaching, “it’s all about the kids and the importance of individualizing learning for each student."

Lauren

Lauren Boswell ’20

Student Profile

Derek Dekoning ’18

Student Profile

Major / Program: Risk Management/MIS

 

Derek DeKoning spent a lot of his free time this summer—10–15 hours a week, he estimates—helping to establish Butler’s new MJ Student-Run Insurance Company. The payback: By the time DeKoning graduates, he will have made four Butler-paid trips to Bermuda, where the company is licensed.

“You can’t complain about that,” he said with a smile.

DeKoning came to Butler from Atlanta, Georgia, as an Exploratory Business major. As he took classes, he began to select majors, starting with Management Information Systems. He knew something about risk management—his father is in reinsurance—so he had exposure to the industry. But it wasn’t until taking Professor Zach Finn’s class creating the “captive” insurance company, which insures University-owned properties such as the live mascot Trip and the Holcomb Observatory telescope, that he found his place.

“Insurance is a great industry to be in, and my experience at Butler has given me so much real-world experience, both through my internships and my experience with the captive, that it should be a big advantage for me,” he said.

Since coming to Butler, DeKoning interned at a suburban Atlanta software company called Concurrent and the cyber-insurance company INSUREtrust. In fall 2017, he interned at M.J. Schuetz Insurance Services Inc. in downtown Indianapolis. He also is an active member in the Phi Delta Theta fraternity and works a part-time job at Woodstock Country Club.

DeKoning said he’s still deciding what he wants to do after graduation—perhaps work for a brokerage or independent insurance agency, or maybe do something in captive management. “Within risk management and insurance there’s so many different career paths that you can take,” he said.

But overall, he said, “I’ve just been thrilled with the environment Butler has provided and the class sizes. The professors I’ve had have been really dedicated to what they’re doing. Butler was my top choice on my list of schools and I’m glad to have been able to come here and end up in the Program I’m in.”

 

 

 

Derek
Student LifePeople

Derek Dekoning ’18

Derek DeKoning spent a lot of his free time this summer—10–15 hours a week, he estimates—helping to establish Butler’s new MJ Student-Run Insurance Company.

Derek

Derek Dekoning ’18

Student Profile

Bettine Gibbs ’19

Student Profile

Bettine Gibbs said their “Butler moment” came at the beginning of her third year, during the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences’ White Coat Ceremony that marks students’ transition from the study of preclinical to clinical health science.

“It lets the students know that this is the time to be serious,” they said. “It’s not a game. You have people’s lives in your hands. Having all the faculty participate was really nice, and the speech the Dean gave was helpful in guiding me, having me think about which route I want to take and understanding that it’s not always going to be a straight line to where you want to go.”

Gibbs, who chose Butler because earning their PharmD degree would take six years here rather than eight at another school, has often traveled the road less taken. For starters, while Pharmacy is typically all-consuming for students, they found time to walk on to the track and field team for two years, competing in the BIG EAST outdoor championships at Villanova and indoor championships in New York. In addition, they have been an officer in the Black Student Union, where they have pushed for more diversity and inclusivity at Butler.

Then, because they had an internship over summer 2017—at Eli Lilly and Company, in the Bioproduct Research and Development sector—they spent the fall 2017 semester finishing her Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences at IU Health Methodist Hospital. They worked a full eight-hour day each Saturday or Sunday alongside pharmacists and physicians, making medication recommendations. (Their classmates completed their IPPE’s in larger blocks of time.)

And finally, while most of their classmates tend toward clinical pharmacy, Gibbs has decided they want to be a pharmaceutical scientist. Their goal is to either work for a company like Lilly, become a tenure-track professor at a research institution where they would have her own lab, or teach at a liberal arts college like Butler.

Gibbs said professors at Butler have backed her decisions.

“Finding a home in the Pharmaceutical Sciences Department has been the best thing about Butler,” they said. “I found support there when I didn’t want to go the traditional clinical route. I was able to find support in the Pharmaceutical Sciences Department as well as the Chemistry Department—and even some professors in Political Science and History and Anthropology helped me have ideas about what route I would like to go. It taught me that you don’t have to stay in one place in this University. You can go to different colleges and people will help you out.”

 

 

 

Bettine Gibbs
Student LifePeople

Bettine Gibbs ’19

Gibbs, who chose Butler for a PharmD degree has often traveled the road less taken.

Bettine Gibbs

Bettine Gibbs ’19

Student Profile

Darius Hickman ’21

Student Profile

 

Major / Program: Dance Performance

 

It’s fall semester 2017, and first-year student Darius Hickman is getting his first impressions of Butler.

“I love it so far,” he said. “The thing I love the most is the people. I didn’t realize the people were going to be so nice. I really enjoy the people here—as well as my classes; I love all my classes—but the people, I really enjoy. I love meeting new people every day. So that’s been great.”

The Dance Performance major and Education minor said he didn’t know what to expect from Butler. In fact, for a long time, he planned to join a professional ballet company after high school rather than attend college. But his mother pointed out that dancers get injured and he should have an education to fall back on.

So he went to a college fair in Boca Raton, took a class with Butler Dance Professor Marek Cholewa, “and I fell in love with everything about it.”

Hickman came to Butler a bit of a celebrity—this summer, he was a contestant on the Fox network series So You Think You Can Dance, where he finished in the top 100. He also learned a few things about himself during that process: He’s persistent and resilient (the day he auditioned, he spent six hours in line and another four waiting once he got inside), and celebrity makes him a little uncomfortable.

Rather than shoot for superstardom on television, he said, he’s excited to experience personal growth over the next four years. “I’m excited to see where I will be in 2021 and see how I’ve changed. Because change is good, I think.”

He plans to spend the next four years preparing to be in a professional ballet company.

“I think I’ll definitely be ready by then, especially by being here,” he said. “I know they’re going to take care of me and make sure I’m ready when that time comes.”

Darius Hickman
Student LifePeople

Darius Hickman ’21

The Dance Performance major and Education minor said he didn’t know what to expect from Butler.

Darius Hickman

Darius Hickman ’21

Student Profile

Chelsea Groves ’20

Student Profile

Major / Program: Sports Media

Chelsea Groves is the poster child for the importance of paying attention, showing up, and doing your best work.

In early September of her first year at Butler, she and the other Sports Media majors received an email from Creative Media and Entertainment Professor Christine Taylor asking them to contribute to the Bulldog Blitz, a weekly show spotlighting Butler sports. Groves jumped at the chance. She set up an interview with Volleyball Coach Sharon Clark, “and it just started to expand through that.”

Her work on the Blitz, which aired during halftime of games that aired on butlersports.com, led to work with Butler Athletics, where she reported stories about Butler Baseball, the men’s and women’s golf teams, and several other sports.

“I put myself out there and responded to that email,” she said. “It was a big deal for me.”

Now in her sophomore year, “I just want to get better,” she said. “I want to be my absolute best and watch myself grow in other areas. I want to be better in the broadcast area and be prominent and be known for doing a great job.”

Groves came to Butler from Walkerton, Indiana, where her dad was the high school varsity football coach and also coached eighth-grade boy’s basketball. She remembers bringing her stuffed animals and American Girl doll to games when she was little and learning to keep score as she got older.

“I had one of the rosters, I got a pen from my grandma’s purse, and I would put a tally mark next to all the people who scored,” she said. “I just became enthralled with it. My dad was a big reason why I fell into sports.”

Her plan now is to develop her skills in school and ultimately become either a sideline reporter or analyst for men’s college basketball or baseball.

She said Butler is making her better.

“So many people around me—basically everyone—pushes you to be your absolute best all the time,” she said. “They critique me, tell me what to do—and what to do better—and I listen to them because they know what they’re doing and I trust them and I want to step up my game all the time. Butler is an amazing place, and I’m so glad I’m here.”

 

 

 

 

Chelsea Groves
Student LifePeople

Chelsea Groves ’20

Chelsea Groves is the poster child for the importance of paying attention, showing up, and doing your best work.

Chelsea Groves

Chelsea Groves ’20

Student Profile

Kate Holtz

Student Profile

Intended Major
Risk Management and Insurance and Finance
Expected Grad Date
May 2019
Extracurricular Activities
Butler University Student Foundation, Delta Gamma - Alpha Tau Chapter, Butler University Dance Marathon, Butler Student Ambassador
Hometown
Godfrey, IL
High School
Marquette Catholic High School
Favorite Spot on Campus
The conference room on the second floor of Fairbanks


 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

The Risk Manager of a company in the healthcare industry!

What's been your favorite course at Butler so far and why?

My favorite course at Butler was Business Statistics with Josh Owens. The subject material was very interesting to me and Professor Owens was able to apply every concept in the course to real-life applications and experiences. The ability for Butler professors, specifically in my experience with the Lacy School of Business, to share personal real-world experiences has been invaluable to my academic experience.

What is it like to be a part of the Butler Community? Who is your Butler Community?

To me, the best way to describe Butler is as a Community. Everyone looks out for one another; everyone is friendly and approachable; all students and faculty truly want to help whomever they can. My Butler Community grows more and more each year as I take more classes, join different organizations, meet with students based on similar interests or career paths. However, I think the most notable part about Butler is that my Butler Community includes everyone at Butler - even those individuals I do not know well or at all.

How will your Butler experience help you after graduation?

I am already able to see how my Butler experience will able to help me after graduation! From a career perspective, Butler opens an unbelievable amount of doors in terms of job opportunities and network connections. I also know my ability to join a multitude of extracurricular activities and obtain multiple leadership opportunities on campus will help me in terms of personal development and "people skills" far after I graduate.

What's your favorite memory of your Butler experience, so far?

This is such a hard one! The amazing memories at Butler are too many to even count at this point. I would say one of my favorites is always homecoming - I love seeing all the alumni come back to a place they still hold so close in their hearts. All the reunions, memories, and pure happiness of being back on campus create an infectious happy atmosphere for all present.

What were your primary factors in making your college decision?

From the beginning of my college decision process, I focused on size, the presence of a good business school, and extracurricular opportunities. To be completely honest, however, I ended up choosing Butler based solely on a feeling I had while being on campus. There was just something about this place that made me never want to leave - it sounds incredibly cheesy, but that was exactly how I felt. I felt comfortable, at home, and surrounded by so many genuine and friendly people. I am thankful every day I acted on that feeling, because I now get to experience that sense of comfort every single day.

What makes you most proud to be a Bulldog?

It makes me incredibly proud to be a Bulldog watching my peers and their accomplishments. There are so many people worthy of extreme recognition on this campus. From planning campus-wide events, scoring prestigious internships or job offers, to winning in athletics - Butler is full of some extremely talented students. They all make me proud.

What does the Butler Way mean to you?

Personally, the Butler Way simply embodies the mindset of Butler students. At Butler, students are motivated, talented but humble, they put others first, and never expect anything in return. Students at Butler are simply a different breed, and that is something that I am incredibly proud to be a part of.

Kate Holtz
Student Life

Kate Holtz

Kate finds pride in the accomlishments of her peers and how it reflects on the Butler Community.

Kate Holtz

Kate Holtz

Student Profile

Pages