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Eric Stark
PeopleCampus

Prestigious Fulbright Grant Awarded to Choral Director Eric Stark

BY Marc Allan MFA `18

PUBLISHED ON Apr 04 2019

When he was working on his doctorate in choral conducting, Eric Stark would come home to Indianapolis from Bloomington, have dinner, then drive to Butler University and sneak into one of the practice rooms in Lilly Hall to do his homework because he needed access to a piano.

"I would always think: If I could only get a job at a place like this," he says.

In 1996, he did, and since then his choral activities have taken him to Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center, and around the world. The next stop is Brazil, where he will be a Fulbright Scholar conducting and studying in residence during the first half of 2020 at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul in Porto Alegre, Brazil.

For Stark, Butler's Director of Choral Activities, it's another milestone in a career filled with them.

Over the years, he has conducted in the Oriental Art Center Concert Hall in Shanghai and the Forbidden City Concert Hall in Beijing. He has made conducting appearances in Greece, Italy, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, and Uruguay, and has led choirs on domestic tours in New York City, Boston, Atlanta, Chicago, New Orleans, Orlando, and Tampa.

When Madonna performed Like a Prayer at halftime of Super Bowl XLVI in Indianapolis, Stark directed a 200-person choir that included 22 members of the Butler Chorale.

"I'm astounded this is my life, this is my career, because you roll the dice on being a musician and you just never know what's going to happen," he says.

Stark plans to teach at Butler through the 2019 fall semester—he's still leading the popular Rejoice! holiday concerts—then leave for Brazil over winter break. The school year in Brazil starts in March, so he and his husband, Adriano Caldeira, who is Brazilian, will travel around the country in January and February to observe some music-making.

Stark will teach at Federal University from March through June. He will be teaching in Portuguese—some of which he already knows from studying the language for a couple of years ("I feel like I could lead a rehearsal right now in Portuguese"), and some of which he's going to learn this summer at the University of Coimbra in Portugal, thanks to a grant from Butler.

In addition to his work at Butler, Stark has been Artistic Director of the Indianapolis Symphonic Choir since 2002.

The Fulbright Program awards approximately 8,000 grants annually. Roughly 1,600 U.S. students, 4,000 foreign students, 1,200 U.S. scholars, and 900 visiting scholars receive awards, in addition to several hundred teachers and professionals.

Stark discovered his love for music growing up in Columbus, Indiana, where he was inspired by the music at First Presbyterian Church. He sang in church choirs for 12 years and took piano and organ lessons from the choir director, Ray Hass.

The church, he says, was his musical awakening.

"He was a great musician and a great organist, and I can remember even as a 7 or 8 year old how much I enjoyed hearing him play the organ," he says. "That tickled something in my head I had never been aware of before. From time to time, I take the Butler Chorale down there and we sing concerts at that church, which is always fun."

Stark earned his bachelor’s from Wabash College, and both his master’s and doctorate in choral conducting from Indiana University.

When a job opened at Butler, Henry Leck, Butler's longtime Director of Choral Activities, got Stark in to see then-Dean Michael Sells, who hired Stark on a one-year, part-time contract. That turned into a one-year appointment, and then a full-time hiring. In the interim, Stark also taught at Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne, and Christian Theological Seminary.

In 2014, he succeeded Leck as Butler's Director of Choral Activities.

“It’s no surprise to any of us in the Jordan College of the Arts that the significance of Eric’s work as a choral conductor and pedagogue has been recognized on an international level," says Lisa Brooks, Dean of Butler's Jordan College of the Arts. "The connections he will make while in South America will be invaluable to our students, and to the greater Indianapolis community.”

Stark says he's hopeful that his time in Brazil will lead to interesting partnerships and projects.Indianapolis has a sister city relationship with Campinas, Brazil, just outside Sao Paulo, and there is "a lot of multinational cross pollination between businesses here and there."

"There's positives on all sides of the equation, and that's what's so exciting for me about this—that possibility of sharing," he says. "Maybe I'll meet some undergraduate students in Brazil who study with me and might want to come to Butler for graduate studies. That's happened in the past. I'm certain that folks down there would love to do a concert date together with the Butler Chorale or the Symphonic Choir or both down the road. That's pretty exciting to think about."

Eric Stark
PeopleCampus

Prestigious Fulbright Grant Awarded to Choral Director Eric Stark

Butler's Director of Choral Activities will travel in early 2020 to Brazil as a Fulbright Scholar. 

Apr 04 2019 Read more
AcademicsCampusResearch

Scholarship Supports Student's Research of Refugees in Germany

BY Marc Allan MFA `18

PUBLISHED ON Apr 03 2019

On a Butler University Honors Program and Modern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures-sponsored “Bulldogs to Berlin” spring break trip in 2018, Addy McKown ’21 became fascinated by how the Germans had taken in 2 million Syrian and Turkish refugees, and how those refugees have integrated and assimilated.

“I saw neighborhoods that were devoted to thousands of people from Turkey and Syria and how the city swallows them up and lets German culture wash over them,” she says. “Yet their native cultures are still prevalent in their neighborhoods with their markets, with their restaurants and cafés, and how they garden. They let them adjust to their new life while retaining the fondness and heritage of their old life.”

Her observation became the impetus for her honors thesis, A Cross-Cultural Comparison of the Assimilation of Twenty-First Century Refugees in Modern Cultures. It also earned her the annual Bruce and Lucy Gerstein Holocaust Education Travel Fund, an endowed fund established by Indianapolis dermatologist and friend of the University Dr. David Gerstein. The Fund, named for Gerstein’s parents, supports travel and research related to the Holocaust.

For her thesis, McKown is comparing how Germany and the United States are handling the current refugee crisis, and how the Holocaust left residual effects on Germany’s foreign policy and relief aid efforts.

McKown, a double major in Critical Communications and Media Studies and Human Communication and Organizational Leadership, is spending the spring 2019 semester at Humboldt University in Germany. She’s also traveled on weekends to Vienna, Prague, and Dresden to see how they're taking in refugees.

In Berlin, she’s visited Tempelhof Airport, where some refugees have been housed in hangars, and she’s planning to go back to talk to people living there.

McKown, who’s from New Castle, Indiana, says she chose Butler after visiting campus and meeting representatives of the study abroad and honors programs, and her future faculty advisor, Associate Professor of Communications Allison Harthcock.

“I immediately fell in love with the possibilities,” she says. “I love to travel. I was fortunate to have parents who exposed me to that from a young age. So hearing about all the study abroad opportunities was great. I came here and you feel like a family, but a family that's going to push you and not let you settle for mediocre. That was really important to me.”

Jason Lantzer, Assistant Director of the University Honors Program, describes McKown as “a wonderful student and a terrific representation of our Honors Program.” He’s taught her in a couple of classes and was one of the professors who led the first trip she took to Germany.

“The Gerstein Fund not only helped her achieve her goal of going back, but is helping to lay the groundwork for her planned honors thesis,” Lantzer says. “Having just returned from the second time of Bulldogs to Berlin, it was great to get to see Addy while we were in the city and see just how much she has grown in the year since she first arrived.”

McKown says she’s unsure of her plans after graduation—she might apply for a Fulbright Award, go to graduate school, or find a job. She’s interested in working within outreach programs, a liaison between the public and the organization.

“I want to be on the people side of things, whether that's organizing training, doing research sessions in groups to find out how to better market products or word our statements,” she says.

In the meantime, she plans to keep her options open and explore the world. She thinks others should do the same.

“It's OK to explore something that hasn't been explored yet,” she says. “To witness this refugee crisis firsthand, to see what such a crisis is doing to the world, you can get involved and step in in some sort of way, whether that just ends up educating yourself or if you come over here and start a thesis, if you join the Peace Corps. Whatever it is, I think it's just important to open your eyes up and see the world and see what you can do with it.”

 

AcademicsCampusResearch

Scholarship Supports Student's Research of Refugees in Germany

Addy McKown '21 has been awarded a scholarship from the Bruce and Lucy Gerstein Holocaust Education Travel Fund.

Apr 03 2019 Read more
Arts & Culture

The Addicted Brain with New York Times Best Selling Author David Sheff

BY Marc Allan MFA ’18

PUBLISHED ON Mar 27 2019

The numbers are staggering. Last year, 72,000 people died of drug overdoses, and in three years the death toll is projected to top 82,000. The estimated economic cost of addiction is $700 billion a year. Drugs are the No. 3 killer—and the No. 1 killer of our youth.

Davi Sheff and Lynne Zydowsky ’81 talk addiction at Clowes Memorial HallWith that in mind, David Sheff, the bestselling author of Beautiful Boy, and Butler University Board of Trustee Lynne Zydowsky ’81, a life sciences executive, sat down in front of more than 1,000 people at Clowes Memorial Hall on Tuesday, March 26, to talk about addiction, and what can be done to solve this epidemic. The event was presented in partnership between Butler University, Community Health Network, and the Richard M. Fairbanks Foundation with support from Lynne Zydowsky and WFYI.

“There is no way to spin what is happening in our communities because of the opioid crisis,” said Sheff, whose book was made into a movie starring Steve Carell and Timothée Chalamet. “But it is getting us to talk about this problem that we’ve kept hidden in the past and we’ve always been afraid to talk about, we’ve been ashamed to talk about it because of the stigma around addiction. So we’re talking about it now and because of that I have to feel that as bleak as everything is, there is some hope because we’re having conversations like we are having here tonight.”

Sheff’s book is subtitled A Father’s Journey Through His Son’s Addiction, and in it he writes about his son Nic, who started smoking pot at age 11, and eventually graduated to crystal meth. Sheff recounted how Nic would disappear for a day or two at a time. One time, Sheff had to call the local sheriff to ask if he’d seen Nic.

The sheriff said, “Have you called the morgue?”

The night Sheff was able to get his son into rehab, he remembers being able to finally sleep because for once he knew where his son was.

Nic went through rehab—and then relapsed—at least nine times over a 10-year period, Sheff said. It wasn’t until Nic had a psychiatric evaluation and was found to be bipolar and suffering from depression, that he got the medication he needed and began to make progress.

He’s now 36 and has been sober for nine years.

“It’s a miracle, but it also is appalling—and it’s appalling that it took 10 years,” Sheff said.

In an hour-long conversation with Zydowsky, Sheff emphasized the fact that addiction is a mental illness that should not be stigmatized. He said it is a brain disease that is about chemistry.

He also explained that the treatment system in this country needs major improvement.

There was a program that made Nic go outside in the middle of winter with a pair of scissors and cut the grass because he didn’t make his bed ‘the right way.’

“Some of the treatments make the addiction worse,” Sheff said. “As if that’s the way to treat someone who’s ill.”

Doctors should be trained to recognize signs of mental illness, he said. Sheff said if medical schools offer their students any training, it’s typically an hour or a half-day workshop. He said only 9 percent of pediatricians were able to identify a child with a drug problem.

“If there’s an overall message here,” Sheff said, “it’s that if you’re in the throes, don’t give up hope. It’s hard. Take care of yourself. Get support for yourself. And don’t give up over and over and over again. And there’s hope. There is hope for recovery, and I think that’s something we really need to know in the middle of this crisis.”

Arts & Culture

The Addicted Brain with New York Times Best Selling Author David Sheff

Sheff spoke to more than 1,000 people to talk about addiction and solutions to this epidemic.

Mar 27 2019 Read more
AcademicsResearch

Bracket Busted? Turns Out Your Politics May Be The Reason Why

BY Rachel Stern

PUBLISHED ON Mar 27 2019

It’s March. Time to tune in to endless hours of college hoops, fill out a bracket despite having not watched a minute of college basketball all season, and fire up the live stream at the office. This is the one place void of politics. Right?

Right?

Wrong. That’s according to new research from Butler University Assistant Professor of Entertainment Media and Journalism Ryan Rogers. Turns out, according to Rogers’ research, those who lean liberal politically fill out brackets differently than those who lean conservative. And those differences, according to his study, are magnified when decisions are made in groups of like-minded individuals.

“When we broke groups up by political ideology, and had them fill out brackets together over the Internet, even though the task was something seemingly mundane, we saw how certain traits and values became more salient, and then how conformity is even more prevalent when a group thinks similarly,” Rogers says. “This then led to consensus more readily during the decision-making process.”

In his study, 118 people were divided into small groups based on self-identified political ideology—conservative or liberal. Then together, over the Internet, each group filled out an NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament bracket.

The purpose was to see how groups of political liberals compared to political conservatives when it came to predicting winners in the tournament. The study also examined how political ideology influenced collective intelligence, or the ability of a group to perform a task and make decisions.

Rogers found that the results certainly differed based on political ideology.

Conservatives tended to go with the safe pick, while liberals went with more underdogs. Conservatives picked more upsets correctly, though, as they tended to pick the safer ones, such as a nine-seed over an eight-seed, while liberals picked riskier upsets, such as a 16-seed over a one-seed. Conservatives were more effective in picking first round wins, and liberals were more effective in correctly picking winners in later rounds.

In short, conservatives were more likely to predict a lower risk team, and tended to play it safe. If an expert picked a team, it was likely the conservative would go with the expert’s pick. Liberals tended to struggle in the early rounds, going with the risky upsets, but then performed better in the later rounds, as some of their risky choices paid off later.

When next March rolls around, he says, it might be a good idea to consider your own political leanings when filling out a bracket, and how that might impact the teams you pick.

“Traits inherent to these groups provided different strengths and weaknesses in their decision making,” Rogers says. “Broadly speaking, prior research and literature shows that conservatives are likely to be more risk averse, and liberals tend to be more optimistic, and more open to emotion.”

Filling out brackets confirmed that these groups have different cognitive dimensions consistent with these ideologies, Rogers says, and when interacting within like-minded groups on the Internet, those differences are only magnified.

“Look at websites today like the Huffington Post, Breitbart, The Blaze, Slate, these sites highlight the traits and values of the groups they represent,” Rogers says. “Basically, these sites reinforce traits and values, creating a feedback loop appealing to those who conform to those respective political ideologies already.”

So, when it comes to something as simple as filling out a bracket, or as important as discussing the issues of the day or reading the news, it might be beneficial to cultivate as many different perspectives as possible, Rogers says.

“Conformity in decision making is even more prevalent when a group shares traits, and as we see with this study, that even carries over to a bracket,” he says. “A mixed group might be most effective.”

AcademicsResearch

Bracket Busted? Turns Out Your Politics May Be The Reason Why

It might be a good idea to consider your own political leanings when filling out a bracket.

Mar 27 2019 Read more
AcademicsResearch

Bracket Busting in the Classroom

BY Marc Allan MFA ’18

PUBLISHED ON Mar 27 2019

If you believe the data, there will be no Cinderella winner of this year's NCAA men's and women's basketball tournaments.

Those are the findings of the students in Professor of Pharmacy Practice Chad Knoderer's Bracket Busting class, which focuses on how to use data analytics to make decisions. Knoderer, a Pediatric Pharmacist by training, has been teaching at Butler since 2008—typically in the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. But after using some sports-related statistics in his Pharmacy Statistics class and seeing the students' positive reaction to it, he created the Bracket Busting course for Butler's Core Curriculum.

Before the class considered college hoops, they turned to the pros. Early in the semester, the students looked at five years of NBA data to determine where the best places are to shoot from and what kind of shot a player should take (is a catch-and-shoot jumper better than a dribble-drive, pull-up jumper?).

The students were able to see trends over time and better understand why so many NBA teams rely on the three-point shot, as well as shots close to the hoop, from a value standpoint.

Just before spring break, the class turned their attention to March Madness. Knoderer had everyone  predict the top four seeds in each region of the men's bracket. But he gave them data only—no team names attached.

"They just had numbers associated with a team ID," he says. "So Team 956 could have been Duke. It could have been Gonzaga. They didn't necessarily know. They just knew performance data from the season. They knew the type of conference the team came from, but not the actual conference. They had to rank the team just as the selection committee would do."

When the students had ranked teams 1-16, he released the names of each school to go along with the data. Students then could adjust their brackets, if they chose to do so.

In the men’s tournament, most of Knoderer's students chose either Duke University or the University of North Carolina to win it all. (Knoderer picked Gonzaga, though he didn't make his choice strictly through analytics.)

In the women's tournament, the data pointed the students to Notre Dame or the University of Connecticut to cut down the net. (Knoderer picked Baylor, "but not too many were with me," he says.)

"They enjoyed the activity," he says. "A few of them said it was a lot more challenging than they thought—even when they knew which team was which."

After the NCAA unveiled the 2019 bracket, Knoderer assigned his students to predict the outcomes of the first-round games based on data alone. There, the students picked some upsets—"There's been some lean toward St. Mary's over Villanova, and Murray State-Marquette was a game of interest," he says—and learned the difference between choosing with their head versus their heart.

Jaret Rightley, a junior from New Palestine, Indiana, says the class, which combines his passions for statistics and sports, has been a great experience.

“It has changed the way I think about and watch sports, and it has been awesome to see the direct impact that the data actually plays in sports such as basketball and the NCAA tournament,” he says. “I look forward to going to this class each and every day, and I’m excited to see how this class evolves and the role analytics will continue to play in sports moving forward.”

Knoderer says he's also enjoying Bracket Busting, especially because he has an opportunity to teach students he doesn't normally interact with. Most of the students are from outside the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences.

And he plans to teach the course again this summer—this time using baseball.

AcademicsResearch

Bracket Busting in the Classroom

If you believe the data, there will be no Cinderella winner of this year's NCAA basketball tournaments.

Mar 27 2019 Read more
Arts & CultureCommunity

Blue Note: The Butler Youth Jazz Program

BY Marc Allan MFA ’18

PUBLISHED ON Mar 26 2019

Kent Hickey snaps his fingers—one, two, one, two, one, two, one, two. The drummer kicks in—CH-ch-ch, CH-ch-ch, along with the piano—doo-doo-dah-doo-doo.

"Good afternoon, everybody," the Butler University senior trumpet/jazz studies major tells the audience. "We're very excited to be here on a Sunday afternoon at the Jazz Kitchen."

Hickey introduces the five-piece band, and it launches into Charles Mingus' Nostalgia in Times Square, segueing into Henry Mancini's Days of Wine and Roses.

It's the final day in the spring session of the Butler Youth Jazz Program, and the musicians—students from local high schools and middle schools—are getting a chance to show what they've learned. They've been rehearsing for two hours every Sunday for eight weeks, and now they're finishing with a concert in front of  about 200 friends and family members.

"It's been a real pleasure working with these guys," Hickey says from the stage. He serves as a Teaching Fellow in the Butler Community Arts School, which administers the Youth Jazz Program, and has taught at summer jazz camps, as well as during the school year, for almost all of his time at Butler. "These guys are really special. They're really hard workers. They practice their parts and they're ready to play at every rehearsal. Great questions, really curious."

Hickey's band—the second of three that will perform—finishes with Duke Ellington's Caravan, then yields the stage to the program's 17-piece big band for three songs. The last of those is a version of Freddie Hubbard's Crisis.

*

The Butler Youth Jazz Program is Associate Professor of Music Matt Pivec's brainchild. Pivec brought the idea with him from California State University, Stanislaus, where he taught previously.

In California, he was responsible for everything in the program—attracting students, teaching, scheduling, and more. At Butler, he teamed up with the Butler Community Arts School (BCAS), which offers a variety of affordable arts instruction to anyone ages 5 and up, including adults. hat enables Pivec to recruit and teach.

"My job is easy," Pivec says after the concert. "You get great kids in a room with really good teachers and let them learn great music. Then, usually, good things happen."

The Youth Jazz Program yields numerous benefits. Butler's Jazz Studies program gets an early look at local talent, as well as the opportunity to recruit those students to Butler. The Butler students who serve as Teaching Fellows get to hone their teaching skills and work with older, more experienced teachers and professionals who are part of the program.

As for students in the program, they learn to play together and develop self-confidence. They meet other musicians they might never have met otherwise, and they get to raise their talent level. Pivec says he's seen several students arranging jam sessions and gigs on their own through the relationships they've made through the program.

"That's really special," he says. "That comes with working hard at something and getting better at it—and being recognized for it, too."

*

Mitchell Remington understands that. Remington, now a senior at North Central High School in Indianapolis, started in the Butler Youth Jazz Program when he was a sixth-grader.

"There's a really wide spectrum of skills in the program," he says, "so the learning curve gets pretty steep. But it's cool to have an environment outside of school. The teachers know where you're at and they respect it and they really help."

Mitchell's mother, Lynn, heard about the program from the band director at his middle school and thought it would be a good fit for her son. He was a little younger than students were supposed to be, but she contacted Pivec, who offered Mitchell an audition. He passed.

"It's become his passion," Lynn says. "He's in the jazz band in high school. This allows him so much more of an outlet for him to learn, collaborate with other musicians, and play with a group that's different from what he experiences at school."

"We've tried to encourage his friends to do it," adds Mitchell's dad, Grant. "Other people I know, if they have kids who are interested in jazz, we tell them, ‘you've gotta get down there and try it’. Because it really is a great program."

Mitchell says he's been able to parlay what he's learned through the program and the friendships he's made into gigs in the Indianapolis area.

"And all of them are with people I've met here—whether it's an instructor or a Butler student or another student I'm in a combo with," he says. "The networking piece of this has been huge for me."

And in the fall, Mitchell will be a first-year student at Butler.

Arts & CultureCommunity

Blue Note: The Butler Youth Jazz Program

Students are able to parlay what they learn through the program into gigs in the Indianapolis area.

Mar 26 2019 Read more

Ready for the Real World at Roche

by Kylie Stine ’21

 

 

On any summer day, walk down the halls of Roche Holding AG, a multi-faceted, international healthcare company, and you are likely to find a Butler Bulldog. Through developing a strong partnership with the University over the course of two decades, Roche has been able to build a talent pipeline straight from 46th Street and Sunset Boulevard to their North American headquarters on the northside of Indianapolis. Each year, Roche recruits more and more Butler students to its summer internship program and, in turn, employs an increasing number of alumni to fill its professional ranks.

“Because we live in an ever-evolving world, a diverse skill set is crucial,” says Julie Schrader, Associate Director of Internship and Career Services and Butler alumna. “Employers [like Roche] love Butler students because they come into the workforce and hit the ground running. When they are finished with a task, instead of asking, ‘What now?’ they ask, ‘What more can I do?’ Instead of standing on the sidelines, they take initiative, provide input, and want to be heard.”

Senior Emily Flandermeyer ’19 is a prime example of this type of student. After attending a career fair last year, she applied for and was accepted to the Roche summer internship program. Although she is a psychology major, her position was in the communication department.

Flandermeyer began her position at Roche with previous internship experience working in psychology research and higher education. At Roche, she began working in bigger teams, thus collaborating with people with diverse backgrounds, degrees, and skill sets.

“My internship with Roche gave me the ability to gain diversity of experience,” Flandermeyer says. “As a Bulldog, Butler prepared me for the internship through its liberal arts curriculum structure. Butler makes it possible for me to major in psychology and earn a minor in both neuroscience and digital media production, so I take a variety of classes in three different departments. Because I am encouraged to pursue both my technical and creative interests, I have so much fluidity when it comes to the workforce.”

As a communication intern, Emily worked with project management, brand management, and video production. Roche also recruits interns in many other departments, from sales operation and training, marketing strategy and services, centralized diagnostics marketing, and conference and site planning.

And these real-world experiences can often pay off. Upon completing her internship, Flandermeyer was offered a full-time position at Roche which she will begin this July.

Community

Ready for the Real World at Roche

Roche recruits many Butler students to its summer internship program and employs an increasing number of alumni.

Giving

Founders Circle Donors Give More than $17m to Support New Business Building

BY Jennifer Gunnels

PUBLISHED ON Mar 14 2019

INDIANAPOLIS – Twelve donor families have made gifts of $1 million or more to Butler University since 2016 to support the construction of a new building for the Andre B. Lacy School of Business. The atrium of the new building, which was designed by CSO Architects, and is set to open in fall 2019, will be named the Founders Circle Atrium in honor of the group for their visionary investment in the future of Butler, and the lives of future generations of business students.

Enrollment in the School has grown 60 percent in the past five years, forcing half of business classes to be held outside of the school’s current home in the Holcomb Building. The new state-of-the-art business school facility, set just inside the entrance to campus near 46th Street and Sunset Avenue, will provide 110,000-square feet of new space and allow all business school classes and activities to take place within the same building. The facility will also provide space for collaboration with the business community, reflecting a culture of mutual learning where faculty, staff, and students will work alongside business community members as true partners. As a hub of collaboration, the Founders Circle Atrium will feature the Old National Bank Center for Closely Held Business, McGould Investment Room, and Innovation Commons.

“Our Founders Circle donors are visionaries who understand that a strong Butler business program is good for our students, good for our city, and good for the region,” says Steve Standifird, Dean of the Lacy School of Business. “These leaders are great friends to the Lacy School of Business and role models for our students in the way they conduct themselves in business and in life.”

The first among the Founders Circle donors were Andre and Julia Lacy, whose $25 million gift to name the School in 2016 paved the way for construction of the new facility. A portion of their transformational gift was designated to support the new building, and other donors quickly followed suit. Among the Founders Circle are six current or former members of Butler’s Board of Trustees, along with nine alumni of the Lacy School of Business.

“Sometimes buildings are just symbolic and not that much really happens inside that makes a difference. I think this building will be entirely different,” says Keith Faller, a Butler Trustee, alumnus, and Founders Circle donor. “Butler has lived up to the ‘real business’ mantra. They offer so many internship opportunities and business relationship opportunities to their students and it’s not just a one-way street. I think the Central Indiana and Indiana business communities have benefitted from this also.”

The School’s move out of the Holcomb Building into the new facility will free up space for Butler’s science programs to expand into the vacated space. As part of the University’s master plan, the Holcomb Building is set for renovation, expansion, and connection to Gallahue Hall as part of a major investment in the sciences in the coming years.

“Our Founders Circle donors led the way for a new building for the Andre B. Lacy School of Business through their generosity and commitment,” says Butler President James Danko. “We are extremely grateful for their leadership and investment in the future of Butler University.”

 

Andre B. Lacy School of Business Building
Founders Circle Atrium Donors

Keith MBA ’90 and Tina Burks
John ’62 and Judy Cooke
Rollie and Cheri Dick
Bill Dugan ’51
Keith ’71 MBA ’78 and Sarah Faller MBA ’90
Craig Fenneman ’71 and Mary Stover-Fenneman
Andrew Greenlee ’90
Andre and Julia Lacy and Family
Bobby and Jill Le Blanc
Kurt and Linda Mahrdt
Jatinder-Bir “Jay” ’87 and Roop Sandhu
Hershel B. Whitney ’52

 

About Butler University

An influx of philanthropic support has aided Butler University’s dramatic growth in recent years. Pursuant to the Butler 2020 Strategic Plan, the University and donor partners have invested in new campus facilities, academic programs, and co-curricular offerings. In the past five years, Butler has built the Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts, the Sunset Avenue parking garage including a streetscape beautification project and renovated Hinkle Fieldhouse. In addition, the University partnered with American Campus Communities to build the Fairview House and Irvington House residential communities. The Andre B. Lacy School of Business will open the doors to its new 110,000 square foot home in the fall of 2019, and fundraising is underway to complete a $93 million Science Complex expansion and renovation.

Butler University is a nationally recognized comprehensive university encompassing six colleges: Arts, Business, Communication, Education, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Pharmacy & Health Sciences. Approximately 4,500 undergraduate and 541 graduate students are enrolled at Butler, representing 46 states and 39 countries. Ninety-five percent of Butler students will participate in some form of internship, student teaching, clinical rotation, research, or service learning by the time they graduate. Butler students have had significant success after graduation as demonstrated by the University’s 97% placement rate within six months of graduation. The University was recently listed as the No. 1 regional university in the Midwest, according to U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges Rankings, in addition to being included in The Princeton Review’s annual “best colleges” guidebook.

 

  


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Giving

Founders Circle Donors Give More than $17m to Support New Business Building

The new facility will allow all business school classes and activities to be in the same place.

Mar 14 2019 Read more
Academics

Physician Assistant Program Among Best in Nation According to US News & World Report

BY Marc Allan MFA ’18

PUBLISHED ON Mar 14 2019

Butler University's Physician Assistant program continues to climb in the national rankings, moving up to 37th in the U.S. News & World Report ratings of the Best Physician Assistant Programs.

Since 2013, Butler's program—the longest-accredited program in the state of Indiana—has moved up 60 places in the rankings. The most recent report, released in 2015, had Butler ranked 40th.

"These rankings are based on reputation, a survey of other leaders in the PA field," says Butler College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Dean Robert Soltis. "The fact that we've gone from 97th in 2013, to 70th in 2014, to 40th in 2015, to now 37th is really impressive."

PAs have many of the same responsibilities as doctors and work in collaboration with a physician or surgeon. A PA can diagnose a patient, order tests and procedures, and prescribe treatments.

Soltis attributed the boost in reputation to faculty members becoming more visible among their peers and colleagues.

"They're publishing, they're making more appearances at national meetings," he says. "Professor Jennifer Snyder's been President of the PA Education Association. So some is just the visibility—you get your reputation from people seeing who you are and what you do."

The Physician Assistant program also has a 99 percent pass rate on the PA certification examination over the past 5 years, a 100 percent job-placement rate within six months of graduation over the past three years, and a championship in the Indiana Academy of PA Student Challenge Bowl for three of the past four years.

As the profession has increased in popularity in the past few years, Butler's PA program has grown. In 2016, the program switched from three years to two years, and the class grew from 50 to 75.

Soltis says the PA ranking is another reflection of the many happenings in the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. Earlier this year, Butler moved up to fourth in the nation for the highest passing rates for Pharmacy students taking the North American Pharmacist Licensure Examination.

"We've got good things happening in our programs in both pharmacy and PA," he says.

Academics

Physician Assistant Program Among Best in Nation According to US News & World Report

As the profession has increased in popularity in the past few years, Butler's PA program has grown.

Mar 14 2019 Read more
Community

Caring for Our Community at the Community Outreach Pharmacy

BY Marc Allan MFA ’18

PUBLISHED ON Mar 13 2019

The man’s blood pressure is 160/88, which is one reason Butler University Pharmacy student Michael Grim is sitting beside him on a folding chair, explaining why it’s important for the man to take his medicine and an 81-milligram aspirin as prescribed.

Grim sits with the man for a few minutes to make sure he understands. When he’s sure the man does, Grim hands over a bag containing his prescription.

It’s a scene that will play itself out a few dozen times on this particular Saturday, when Grim and five of his Pharmacy classmates are volunteering at the Butler University Community Outreach Pharmacy (BUCOP) on the eastside of Indianapolis.

From 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM on Saturdays, BUCOP volunteers are an integral part of the IU Student Outreach Clinic, which provides care for underserved people who live in the area near the Neighborhood Fellowship Church, 3102 East 10th Street.

Here, inside the church, Butler Pharmacy students join University of Indianapolis students studying Physical Therapy, and IU students training in medicine, dentistry, occupational therapy, social work, ophthalmology, law, and other areas, to get practical experiences in the field.

In 2018, 217 Butler Pharmacy volunteers filled 3,275 prescriptions for 1,047 patients—some were repeat visitors to the Community Outreach Pharmacy. Mostly it's preventative medicine—for diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and acute sicknesses like strep throat.

BUCOP spent over $9,500 on medications and medical supplies. It also works with partners like CVS, which donated vials, and Walgreens, which donated flu shots.

"We’ve had some patients who are so happy with the students that they cried in gratitude," says Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice Kacey Carroll '12, who serves as BUCOP faculty advisor. "I think that’s meaningful for the students to see their impact. Some come just to  say 'hi' and 'thank you.' One patient didn’t understand what high blood pressure meant. Our student spent an hour with her to explain. No one had done anything like that with the patient before. Though it took a long time, it was time well worth it."

*

On this particular Saturday, there are no tears—just grateful patients. Grim and Kate Gordon, another P2 Pharmacy student, are the managers today. Their job is overseeing the operation and working with patients to explain their medicines.

"It's really cool being with all these other areas of practice," Grim says. "We communicate with the medical team all the time."

To their left is Alyssa Mason. She's training to be a manager, so she's watching what Gordon is doing. At the tables behind them, Tyler Kennedy is reading the prescriptions, instructions, and dosages written by the doctor so she can make the label. Rachel Robb is recording prescriptions in the database and printing their labels to pass on to fillers so they can fill them. And Lauren Schmidt is filling prescriptions and giving them to the pharmacist to check.

The pharmacist today is Bradley Carqueville Pharm.D. '17, who's in his second year of residency with Community Health Network, specializing in ambulatory care. Carqueville had volunteered at the clinic when he was a student; now he's the licensing professional, double-checking what the students are doing.

"I let the students run the show," he says. "They're supposed to do all the counseling, they do all the filling, and the documenting. I'm just here making sure everything is right, but I'm supposed to be in the background."

If the students have questions, they can ask Carqueville or the two Medication Therapy Consultants in the next room. Today, that's Chandler Howell and Nichole Barnard, both of whom are set to graduate in May.

"It's rewarding to be here, knowing that it's a great thing for the community," Howell says. "It's also rewarding to work with the medical team. You have so many opportunities to work with so many professions so closely. It gives you more experience working with the entire team, and I think it helps seeing what the other professions are doing, their thought processes."

"Rewarding" is a word that comes up often in conversations with the student volunteers. Grim tells the story of a patient on oxygen who was out of the inhalers he needed to breathe. He helped him fill out the paperwork to get the man what he needed.

"For me, what's most rewarding are the educational aspects—being able to talk to the patients after we fill the medications and counsel them on specific things," Gordon says. "For example, one time a lady picked up a medication for her cholesterol. I started asking her questions about it and she was like, 'I don't know why I have to have a cholesterol medication. Everybody has cholesterol.' I was able to explain that there's bad and good cholesterol, and this medication helps lower her bad cholesterol. It's rewarding to build connections with the patients."

*

The IU Student Outreach Clinic, which celebrated its 10th anniversary on February 14, was founded by Indiana University Dr. Javier Sevilla M.D., who wanted to create a free, student-led clinic in a neighborhood that desperately needed doctors. According to the clinic's website, among the 15,000 homes in the area, half live at or below the poverty level and report unmet health needs due to cost, lack of transportation, lack of a primary care provider, or unemployment.

At first, the clinic provided only medical care. The student-doctors would write prescriptions and church leaders would reach into their pockets and do the best they could to help the patients. Within a couple of months, Sevilla invited Butler's College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences to participate.

"Once that happened," says Sevilla, "there was a cascade of other partners who were waiting. Butler has been key to making this clinic the largest, most vibrant student-run clinic in the nation."

Jim Strietelmeier, the church elder who oversees the clinic, says Butler "has gone far and above what anyone would have expected."

"When I speak to the pharmacists," Strietelmeier says, "I tell them what Martin Luther King Jr. said: 'Everyone can be great because everyone can serve.' Pharmacists are by far the servants of the crowd. They take instruction and then give what's necessary."

*

Kacey Carroll was a Butler Pharmacy student when BUCOP started and has been the advisor since joining the Butler faculty in August 2017.

She remembers realizing as a student that there are so many barriers to healthcare — "unintended barriers," she says, "but it doesn’t mean that any person is any less deserving of receiving healthcare."

"If there’s anything I can do with the knowledge that I’ve gained to help people improve their life and improve their health, I want to do that. So it helped instill in me a need and a want to reach out to the community and use this skill that I have to give back."

What she often hears from students who volunteer through BUCOP is about how much they appreciate experiencing the practical application of what they learned in class. The common refrain is: "We talked about this in class, but once I did it, I see that it matters and it made a difference."

As Javier Sevilla says: "It is a beautiful, beautiful service learning opportunity for all of us."

Community

Caring for Our Community at the Community Outreach Pharmacy

Here, Butler Pharmacy students get practical experiences in the field.  

Mar 13 2019 Read more
Academics

Eleven Butler Students Selected for Elite Orr Fellowships

BY Marc Allan MFA ’18

PUBLISHED ON Mar 12 2019

In his three years as Butler University's starting quarterback, Will Marty '18 learned lessons that transcended the football field. He discovered that the ability to communicate with all different kinds of people is vital. You can't sweep issues under the rug. You've got to be upfront with people. And you have to be able to achieve in high-pressure situations.

"It's the same thing in the business world," says Marty, who graduated in December with a degree in finance and marketing. "You've got to make quick decisions. You've got to be able to communicate with people directly. And you can't be afraid to go forward."

Marty is seeing the parallels between football and business play out in his post-graduation role as an Orr Fellow. As part of the two-year fellowship, he's working as a growth analyst for Greenlight Guru, a downtown Indianapolis company that makes quality-management software for medical devices.

The Orr Fellowship program guarantees participants a two-year position at an Indianapolis host company as well as executive mentorship and training in areas like growing a strong network, entrepreneurial law, and personal finance.

With a 5 percent acceptance rate, the Orr Fellowship program is extremely selective. This year, 1,259 graduates from 48 states applied. The program accepted 68 from 19 universities. Of those 68, 11 were Butler graduates—more than any other school. (The full list of Butler students accepted is below.)These students will not only receive guaranteed job placement for their first two years out of undergrad, they will also receive executive mentorship, and participate in a unique curriculum intended to develop business and professional acumen in the real world. These combined factors fast-track students from college to career success as young professionals.

Marty, who threw for 5,550 yards and 30 touchdowns in three years, thinks teamwork is why Butler has been so successful in placing Orr Fellows.

"What Butler teaches you is how important your role is within teams," he says. "I'm doing such a small part of the bigger picture here at Greenlight, but I also see how valuable my little part is. I think Butler stresses collaborative work, communication, and overall group dynamics to bring out the best in the entire organization. The Lacy School of Business did a great job of that as well."

Jen Agnew, Director of Programming and Engagement for the Orr Fellowship, says Butler graduates have been successful in applying to the program in part because they make a commitment to the arduous two-month recruiting process. Orr Fellow alumni from Butler also do a great job of recruiting qualified candidates, she says.

In the end, "there's a real understanding and buy-in from the Butler students about what we're doing and what we're achieving in the Indianapolis community," Agnew says. "I think Butler students are interested in serving their community beyond their four years at Butler and finding unique opportunities that are going to help the Indianapolis community grow. I think that Orr does that."

Orr Fellowships are open to students from across all majors—not just business. Carly McCarthy '18 majored in Science, Technology, and Society at Butler and started her fellowship in January with Greenlight Guru. The Galesburg, Illinois, native is now working in product marketing.

McCarthy heard about the program from several friends who were business majors and wondered if there was a place for her. Everyone she talked to at Butler encouraged her to apply.

"They showed me that Orr was made for a diverse group of people with diverse educational background," she says.

Meanwhile, she says she felt ready and confident, thanks to Butler, which helped her develop the interpersonal skills and receive the interdisciplinary education needed to relate to people in different ways.

At Greenlight, McCarthy says, she gets to work with experienced professionals in healthcare, which is the field in which she ultimately wants to work.

"So working here has enabled me to learn other skills that will be applicable in my other education and career endeavors," she says. "And in my role here as a product developer and product marketer, I get to learn about a company and how a company works, rather than taking one position."

That's the kind of experience Kendall Povilaitis '19 is hoping for. Povilaitis, a Creative Writing major and Digital Media Production minor, will be working for Covideo, a video email communications company based in Broad Ripple.

Povilaitis heard about the Orr Fellowship through friends she had worked with in Ambassadors of Change, the Butler program that welcomes new students to campus. They were in the Orr program and encouraged her to apply.

"Our community looks out for one another," she says. "And I think when you have students who were part of Butler, they know what Butler students offer. We are reaching out to our own."

At Covideo, she’ll be working in several departments over the two years—sales, marketing, video—to see the business from all sides.

She says all the things she learned at Butler helped her land the fellowship.

"I think the experiential learning really showed through," she says. "I’ve had the internships and the real experiences—at The Children’s Museum, in Butler’s Marketing and Communications Department, and other places. I think that gave me more confidence going in: I’ve done this before, and I know I can take on a real job and be different than somebody else."

 

Class of 2019 Butler Orr Fellows:

  • Addyson Aiman, The Heritage Group
  • Alex Adams, Torchlite
  • Carly McCarthy, Greenlight Guru*
  • Kendall Povilaitis, Covideo
  • Lyndsey Isenhower, Apex Benefits
  • Olivia Schwan, Lessonly
  • Rachel Schafer, Sigstr
  • Sarah Burkhart, OneCause
  • Sarah Forhan, IU Health
  • Tanner Cline, enVista
  • Will Marty, Greenlight Guru*

*December graduate

 

 

Academics

Eleven Butler Students Selected for Elite Orr Fellowships

Teamwork is why Butler has been so successful in placing Orr Fellows.

Mar 12 2019 Read more
Arts & Culture

Quilt Show Enhances Visual Arts at Clowes

BY Marc Allan MFA ’18

PUBLISHED ON Mar 11 2019

Karen Dietz Colglazier ‘70, MA ‘74, attended the Butler University Alumni Creates art shows that were part of Homecoming from 2010 to 2012, and thought: It’s too bad her artform—quilting—couldn’t be part of the event. But at that time, there wasn’t a way to display quilts in Clowes Memorial Hall without risk of damage.

Now there is.

Hanging QuiltThanks to a gift from Colglazier and her husband, Bud, Clowes Hall Stage Tech John Lucas had the resources to devise a rigging system that will enable quilts, and other large visual art pieces, to be displayed against what previously had been blank walls.

The hanging system Lucas created, which is similar to the mechanism used to adjust Venetian blinds, can raise and lower artwork up to a height of 20 feet. There will be 10 systems placed throughout Clowes Hall, creating a potential 2,400 square feet of additional wall space for art.

“These innovative hanging systems enable us to display antique, as well as contemporary, art quilts out of reach, but still be fully viewed by visitors to Clowes,” Colglazier says.

Clowes Hall visitors will get their first look at the rigging system and how it functions March 19-June 7 at Imagine the Possibilities: An Exhibition of Quilts, a free, three-part exhibition that includes quilts and quilt-inspired fine art from Indiana based artists, showcasing many quilts from private collections.

The exhibition begins with Antique, Vintage and Traditional Quilts (March 19-April 12), followed by Transitional Quilts (April 16-May 10), and Contemporary Art Quilts and Fiber Art (May 14-June 7). Each exhibition will have a featured quilt that is representative of the genre being exhibited.

Quilt HangingMany of the quilts that will be displayed are more than 100 years old, and include styles such as Baltimore Album and crazy quilts--”all different genres of beautiful quilts,” Colglazier says.

The idea of a high rail hanging system grew out of the shared vision of Colglazier and Clowes Hall Community Relations Manager James Cramer, who were trying to determine how to hang quilts in Clowes in a way that made them inaccessible, but still viewable. Colglazier says Butler First Lady Bethanie Danko, who will have a quilt in the third exhibition, described the new hanging system as being “transformative for the visual arts at Clowes Hall.”

“This isn’t just a quilt exhibition,” Colglazier says. “This is the beginning of imagining the possibilities of the potential for the future of the visual arts and art education at Clowes.”

Cramer says Lucas’s invention “is expanding what we can do and how we can serve our visual arts community.” He says he generally agrees with Evans Woollen, the architect who designed Clowes Hall, who said that “the architecture was the art and the people were what brought the life to the building.”

“However," Cramer says, "what we are doing now is not so much covering walls but giving our patrons, young and old, an enhanced experience when they come to Clowes Hall.”

 

The exhibit is open to the public Monday through Friday from 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

 

Media Contact:
Marc Allan
News Manager
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Arts & Culture

Quilt Show Enhances Visual Arts at Clowes

This is the beginning of the future of the visual arts and art education at Clowes.

Mar 11 2019 Read more

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