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CUE Farm Producing A Bumper Crop of Customers

BY Sarvary Koller '15

PUBLISHED ON Sep 10 2014

By Sarvary Koller '15

Senior Engineering major Alyssa Setnar rode her bike to the CUE farm stand on Thursday to pick up some fresh fruit.

“It’s a two-minute bike ride from my house, closer than any grocery store,” Setnar said. “It’s actually less expensive than the produce at the store, and I know where and how it was grown.”

 

Farm manager Tim Dorsey assists senior engineering major Alyssa Setnar, who bought raspberries and cantaloupe from the CUE farm stand.
Farm manager Tim Dorsey assists senior engineering major Alyssa Setnar, who bought raspberries and cantaloupe from the CUE farm stand.

 

Setnar is one of about 20-40 Butler University students, faculty and community members who come to the stand to purchase local organic produce grown at the CUE farm, a sustainable agriculture project created by the Butler Center for Urban Ecology.

The farm, located on campus by the intramural fields across from the Butler Prairie, was started in 2010 to promote student education and experience with organic farming practices and environmental awareness.

Each Thursday afternoon from early June to late October, the farm sells its produce to the Butler and neighboring communities. Farm Manager Tim Dorsey said the farm stand has come a long way since he took over in mid-2011.

“I used to feel like I didn’t know if we should even set these tables up,’” Dorsey said, “but now I’m really satisfied with the traffic we get. It’s a lot of students, too. I’d say almost 25 percent students.”

In addition to selling produce to the public, 18 community members receive packages of assorted produce through a Community-Supported Agriculture program that allows members of the community to invest in the local farm project.

They pay a stipend at the beginning of the summer for a season’s worth of produce.

“It’s a way the community can share in the risk and reward of small farming,” Dorsey said. “It was created to lessen the burden on farmers by providing working capital right at the beginning of the season.”

The CUE farm uses this capital to grow a variety of produce with the help of four student interns.

Julia Wilson, a junior double-majoring in Biology and Science, Technology and Society, joined as an intern in May and spent the summer planting seeds, harvesting produce, and pulling lots of weeds. She said her experience at the farm has given her an appreciation for small farming and the process of growing one’s own food.

“It’s a great thing to have here,” Wilson said. “If you’re a student, it’s right on campus, so that’s awesome. You can drive to the store and buy produce that comes from really far away, but this is all natural food that is grown right here.”farm2

The CUE farm offers a wide array of fruits and vegetables, from summer favorites like raspberries, tomatoes, and melons to hearty vegetables like swiss chard, broccoli, and asparagus. More obscure produce is also available, such as curly cress, salsify and kohlrabi.

Dorsey said he encourages all to come experience the offerings at the farm stand and support student education.

“We want to be a model for urban farming in Indy,” he said. “We really look to get students involved, and we are in the process of growing our programming. Anyone who shops here supports us in that.”

 

 

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An Honor Usually Reserved for Ivy Leaguers Goes to a Butler Alumna

BY Sarvary Koller '15

PUBLISHED ON Sep 09 2014

By Sarvary Koller '15

Marianne Richardson '14’s fascination with Latin America began at 12 when she visited Monterrey, Mexico, with her father, a doctor who makes service trips to that region.

At 15, she spent time interacting with the indigenous people of Guatemala and found herself mesmerized by the Mayan language Quechua.

BU picture“These people have a culture that I had never seen or heard about before,” Richardson said. “There is no other culture in the world like it.”

Trips to Peru and Cuba followed, and now Richardson will put her passion to work as the first Butler student to be selected for the prestigious Princeton in Latin America (PiLA) fellowship in Uruguay.

Richardson, who graduated in May with a degree in International Studies and Spanish, leaves on September 9 for Montevideo, the large metropolitan capital of Uruguay, which will be her home for the next 10-12 months. She will work in institutional development at a nonprofit education center for children and adolescents called Providencia.

Richardson said she is both shocked and grateful for the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

“I couldn’t believe it,” she said. “It was a huge relief knowing that someone wanted to invest in me—and with me in this particular region. It’s great to be recognized for all of the work I’ve put into knowing this country. It feels like a gift.”

Richardson decided to apply for the fellowship last summer after hearing about it from a friend while they were studying abroad in Cuba. She worked with Rusty Jones, Director of Undergraduate Research and Prestigious Scholarships, from Butler’s Center for High Achievement and Scholarly Engagement to craft a competitive application.

Richardson was offered the fellowship, and Jones said he could not be more thrilled for her.

“It’s going to lead to all sorts of great things for her,” Jones said. “She will be a part of an extensive network of PiLA scholars essentially forever, and if I were her, I’d put it first thing on my resume.”

According to Jones, most past PiLA fellowship recipients have come from prestigious institutions and Ivy League schools. He said he is excited about how this will impact Richardson and Butler.

“Winning this selective fellowship is fantastic because it speaks so highly of Marianne,” Jones said. “But it’s important to note that this is also an amazing thing for Butler. It shows that we are right up there.”

After a rigorous application and interview process, Richardson said she looks forward to finally embarking on her trip and speaking Spanish with the Uruguayans. Richardson is fluent in Spanish and conversational in Portuguese.

“I really can’t wait to be speaking Spanish all the time,” she said. “I’m so excited about the Spanish and interacting with the people there.”

She said she hopes to continue traveling the world when she finishes her fellowship and has an active application to serve as a member of the Peace Corps.

Jones said he looks forward to seeing what Richardson accomplishes in Uruguay and in the future.

“She’s a fantastic student and an amazing person,” Jones said. “I have no doubt she’ll be a big success.”

 

Campus

Butler University Listed Among the Best in the Nation for Undergraduate Education

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PUBLISHED ON Sep 09 2014

Butler University is among the top schools in the country when it comes to enriched undergraduate offerings that lead to student success, according to U.S.News & World Report.

In its “Best Colleges” edition, released today, U.S. News highlighted Butler as one of the nation’s finest in five categories: the first-year student experience, internships, study abroad, service learning, and undergraduate research/creative projects. Such areas of enriched offerings, said U.S. News, demonstrate that “some colleges and universities are much more determined than others to provide freshmen and all undergrads with the best possible educational experience.”

Butler was one of only three universities in the United States recognized in five or more categories, and was recognized in more categories than all other Indiana schools combined.

Butler President James M. Danko said this recognition of Butler’s focus on student success reflects its core academic mission. “This year’s edition of ‘Best Colleges’ highlights our commitment to the provision of outstanding undergraduate learning experiences—firmly rooted in the liberal arts—within a residential campus environment.”

Butler’s student activity rates underscore the power of the school’s educational approach: nearly all students participate in some form of internship, student teaching, clinical rotation, research, or service learning. And within 6 months of graduation, 96 percent of new alumni are employed, attending graduate school, or involved in a gap-year experience. “These rates are the result of our students’ hard work, the dedication of our faculty and staff to high standards of academic excellence and support for our students, and the unique experiential learning opportunities that both Butler and Indianapolis provide.”

For the sixth consecutive year, Butler was ranked No. 2 overall among Midwest schools, behind only Creighton University. Butler was also listed among the Midwest’s “best value schools,” and led the top-10 Midwest universities in several categories, including percent of freshmen in the top quarter of their high-school class (81 percent), percent of alumni who support the university through giving (23 percent), freshman retention rate (90 percent), and percent of applicants accepted to the university (66 percent).

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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COE Introduces Two New Directors

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PUBLISHED ON Sep 05 2014

Butler University’s College of Education has introduced Jill Jay as the new Director of the Experiential Program for Preparing School Principals (EPPSP) and Katie Russo as Director of Student Personnel Services and External Relations.

Jill Jay
Jill Jay

 

Jay comes to Butler from Mill Creek Community School Corporation in Clayton, Indiana, where she was Superintendent (2013-2014), Assistant Superintendent (2011-2013), Director of Student and Professional Learning (2010-2011) and Principal of Mill Creek East Elementary (2004-2010).

Since 2011, she has been an Adjunct Professor in EPPSP, an innovative and experience-based master's program that prepares its graduates for the many challenges facing school administrators. EPPSP provides hands-on opportunities for students to demonstrate proficiency and to practice leadership skills in their schools.

Jay earned her doctorate in Education Leadership and Administration from Indiana State University, a Master of Science in Education Administration, EPPSP Group 22, from Butler, a Master of Arts in Elementary Education from Ball State University, and a Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education from Purdue University.

Russo was Assistant Director of Licensing with the Indiana Department of Education from August 2008-August 2014. From 1983 to 1988, she taught third grade at St. Luke Catholic School in Indianapolis. In 1988 to 2008, she was Assistant Principal at St. Luke Catholic School in Indianapolis.

Katie Russo

Russo earned her Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education, Master of Science in Elementary Education and completed the Educational Administration program from Butler.

As Director of Student Personnel Services and External Relations, Russo will oversee the clinical experiences in the college, including internships and student teaching, cultivate community and school partnerships and guide students through the testing, licensure and job placement process.

 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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Bulldogs Break Out of the Bubble and Into Indianapolis

BY Savary Koller

PUBLISHED ON Aug 26 2014

By Sarvary Koller

The temperature hovered around 90 degrees as freshmen Sidney Parrish and Julia Thomas pruned trees at Indianapolis’ Holliday Park. Parrish and Thomas volunteered at the park as a part of Bulldogs Into the Streets (BITS), an annual freshman orientation public-service program organized by Butler University’s Volunteer Center.

[caption id="attachment_20709" align="alignleft" width="290"]Sara Patel, left, an accounting major from Western Springs, Illinois, and Sidney Parrish, a pre-pharmacy major from Indianapolis, help prune trees at Holliday Park as part of BITS. Sara Patel, left, an accounting major from Western Springs, Illinois, and Sidney Parrish, a pre-pharmacy major from Indianapolis, help prune trees at Holliday Park as part of BITS.[/caption]

Gardening and cleaning up Holliday Park on a humid, summer day made for exhausting work, but the two said they loved the opportunity to venture out of the Butler bubble and make a difference in the surrounding Indianapolis community.

“It’s been a lot of fun,” Thomas, a business major from Bay Village, Ohio, said. “I’ve gotten to meet a lot of new people, and it helps involve us in Indianapolis. A lot of us aren’t from the area, so it’s helped to transition us to living here.”

“We’ve connected more as a group,” added Parrish, a pre-pharmacy major from Indianapolis, Indiana. “I came in today not knowing anybody, and now I’ve already made friends with new people in my class.”

Holliday Park Volunteer Coordinator Katie Neill said the 15 Butler volunteers transformed the park’s playground area by pulling weeds, raking mulch, trimming trees, and sweeping sidewalks. With a full-time park staff of four, Neill said she is grateful for the students’ hard work.

“Our playground does need help,” Neill said. “Every year, we try to have a project that shows the students that they’ve made a difference. We depend on volunteers for everything, and we love when the students come out and help keep the park looking nice for the community.”

Sam Thomas, Volunteer Center Events Coordinator and sophomore Political Science and Economics major, spent most of last semester and this summer being called “the BITS guy” as he worked with places like Holliday Park to coordinate volunteer projects for BITS participants.

About 545 volunteers donated their time to 19 agencies across the greater Indianapolis area this year, but Thomas said BITS is about more than just service work.

“The 1,500 hours of community service is awesome,” Thomas said, “but what BITS does is show freshmen that they can make a difference in their new home and community right off the bat during their first week on campus.”

Freshmen Moriah Riggs and Nicolina Cecere said they, too, appreciated their BITS experience at Joy’s House Adult Day Service in Broad Ripple as new Butler Bulldogs looking to get acclimated in Indianapolis.  

Riggs and Cecere spent time playing bingo and conversing with visitors to Joy’s House, an adult day service for community adults with physical and mental disabilities who are no longer able to stay at home safely.

[caption id="attachment_20710" align="alignright" width="400"]Butler volunteers visiting 19 agencies on Tuesday, including Butler volunteers visiting 19 agencies on Tuesday, including Chapel Glen Elementary School.[/caption]

“It’s nice to just talk to the people here,” Cecere, a sociology major from Minneapolis, Minnesota, said. “It’s cool because not only do we get to go out in Indianapolis, but we get to meet other people from our class and the community. I didn’t know any of these people before today.”

Candace Preston, Joy’s House caregiver and Program Manager, said the house guests love the opportunity to meet and interact with the Butler students.

“They love seeing a set of different faces,” Preston said. “They see us Monday through Friday all day, and now they get to spend time with new people. Plus, it benefits the Butler students by showing them that old people aren’t scary or boring. We have some volunteers who come for a couple hours and then decide to come back.”

Thomas said the goal of BITS is to recruit freshman volunteers and encourage them to take advantage of future service opportunities in Indianapolis.

According to Thomas, the Volunteer Center will host a Volunteer Opportunities Fair on September 5 to provide an experience where students can discover new community volunteer options. The fair will include many of the agencies that hosted students during BITS this year.

“Hopefully we’ll get some BITS volunteers signed up for more service activities at the fair,” Thomas said. “This program is mutually beneficial for both students and service agencies in our community.”

 

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StoryCorps Editor Tells Freshmen: Learn From Those Around You

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PUBLISHED ON Aug 25 2014

Lizzie Jacobs remembers the story of that day in 1997 when she left her suburban Chicago home for Williams College in Massachusetts.

Lizzie Jacobs, outside Clowes Hall
Lizzie Jacobs, outside Clowes Hall

 

“Arthur, my teddy bear, had fallen out of the minivan—or possibly been pushed,” she said. “It was like a cord cutting. I think I was nervous, but I also was excited because I felt like everything was ahead of me and I was on my own. I actually wasn’t on my own—my sister went there—but I felt like I was on my own in all the good ways.”

So when Jacobs, the Co-Executive Producer, Animation and Senior Editor for Print at StoryCorps, got in front of Butler University’s Class of 2018 on Monday at Clowes Memorial Hall, she understood how they might be feeling.

Jacobs was at Butler to talk about Ties That Bind: Stories of Love and Gratitude from the First Ten Years of StoryCorps, this year’s common reading for the incoming class. Jennifer Griggs, Director of Butler’s Learning Resource Center, said the University chose Ties That Bind as the common read because “it really had an angle on diversity that matched our common values.”

“I believe this book is a perfect book for this time in your lives,” Jacobs told the 974 first-year students. “It’s a book about relationships—the surprising ways they begin and the myriad ways they change our lives for the better. And, yes, you’re all here to learn. You come here to learn and to prepare for the working world, and you’ll be in labs and music rooms and classrooms and library carrels.

“But all that time, if you’re smart, you’ll be focusing just as much on the people around you—your professors, of course, but also the staff in the dining hall and the dean’s office, the people maybe at the pizza joint, and, most of all, each other. The people sitting to the left and the right of you and that you’ll be surrounded by every day of your time here. Your freshman roommate, your lab mate, classmate, teammate. And years from now, you’ll remember and lean on the things you learned from each other as much as what you learned in class. And if you’re lucky, there’ll be two or three whose friendship will change your life forever.”

Jacobs said being part of StoryCorps, the national project to inspire people to record each other’s stories, has taught her to ask questions that get meaningful answers and encourage loved ones to be open and honest.

Too often, she said, we smooth things over and keep the conversation light. But StoryCorps, which over the past 10 years has recorded the stories of more than 50,000 people, shows that asking the right questions and encouraging others to talk helps us understand each other.

“People actually want to be asked about their lives,” Jacobs said. “When you ask them to share something about themselves, it tells them they’re important to you. So in these coming months and years, as you spend time together … try asking them about their grandparents. Or what their dreams are. Why did they come here? What are they proudest of? These are the big questions we encourage you to ask. And you might get some surprising answers. You might actually get to know one another.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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President Danko Delivers the State of the University

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PUBLISHED ON Aug 22 2014

Butler President James M. Danko on Friday outlined a vision of the University that includes new academic, housing, and parking facilities; development of strong leadership and engaged employees; and a safe and secure campus environment.

_BS25858-1In his fourth State of the University speech, Danko gave faculty and staff a view of 49th Street and Sunset Avenue that by 2016 will include:

-A 1,038-space parking facility with first-floor retail space, located behind Clowes Memorial Hall.

-A state-of-the-art, 640-bed housing facility located in the Irwin Library parking lot.

-A newly configured, beautified streetscape along Sunset Avenue.

In addition, Danko offered a first look at a new science building that is still in the planning stages.

“When we talk about Butler 2020, that’s the vision,” Danko said to an overflow crowd at the Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts. “We are moving ahead with this. It’s challenging work and challenging times, but we’re really confident, given the greatness of this University, that we’re going to succeed.”

Danko said that, in addition to investing in its facilities, Butler needs to invest in its leaders, faculty, and staff so they can help the University navigate the complexities of the current world of higher education.

“In order for us to do that, we must have people in place that are able to get us there,” he said, adding, “We’re the stewards of this University. We need to leave this a better place.”

Danko cited a long list of Butler’s achievements during the past year, including the growth of online classes (now nearing 50, up from zero two years ago), the renovations of Hinkle Fieldhouse and Clowes Hall, and the move to the BIG EAST conference. He said the University had a strong financial year in 2013–2014, with tuition, summer revenues, athletic revenues and the endowment up, and the discount rate down slightly.

He also talked about the need to prevent sexual violence on campus. Danko said Butler is part of a coalition with Indiana, Purdue, Ball State, and Notre Dame in the area of federal regulations pertaining to campus sexual assaults.

“We have to do everything we can to ensure that we’re providing the environment, that we’re providing the culture, that we’re providing everything needed to ensure students are being taken care of,” he said.

A Butler Presidential Commission on sexual assaults is focusing on assessment, education, and prevention.

Danko, who will address first-year students and their parents on Sunday, said part of his message will be: “We are going to do everything we can, but, the one thing we can’t do is—we can’t be in every building or every student housing unit where something might happen. [Students] have a responsibility, too. They need to help us by protecting each other.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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Campus

President Danko Delivers the State of the University

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 22 2014

Butler President James M. Danko on Friday outlined a vision of the University that includes new academic, housing, and parking facilities; development of strong leadership and engaged employees; and a safe and secure campus environment.

_BS25858-1In his fourth State of the University speech, Danko gave faculty and staff a view of 49th Street and Sunset Avenue that by 2016 will include:

-A 1,038-space parking facility with first-floor retail space, located behind Clowes Memorial Hall.

-A state-of-the-art, 640-bed housing facility located in the Irwin Library parking lot.

-A newly configured, beautified streetscape along Sunset Avenue.

In addition, Danko offered a first look at a new science building that is still in the planning stages.

“When we talk about Butler 2020, that’s the vision,” Danko said to an overflow crowd at the Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts. “We are moving ahead with this. It’s challenging work and challenging times, but we’re really confident, given the greatness of this University, that we’re going to succeed.”

Danko said that, in addition to investing in its facilities, Butler needs to invest in its leaders, faculty, and staff so they can help the University navigate the complexities of the current world of higher education.

“In order for us to do that, we must have people in place that are able to get us there,” he said, adding, “We’re the stewards of this University. We need to leave this a better place.”

Danko cited a long list of Butler’s achievements during the past year, including the growth of online classes (now nearing 50, up from zero two years ago), the renovations of Hinkle Fieldhouse and Clowes Hall, and the move to the BIG EAST conference. He said the University had a strong financial year in 2013–2014, with tuition, summer revenues, athletic revenues and the endowment up, and the discount rate down slightly.

He also talked about the need to prevent sexual violence on campus. Danko said Butler is part of a coalition with Indiana, Purdue, Ball State, and Notre Dame in the area of federal regulations pertaining to campus sexual assaults.

“We have to do everything we can to ensure that we’re providing the environment, that we’re providing the culture, that we’re providing everything needed to ensure students are being taken care of,” he said.

A Butler Presidential Commission on sexual assaults is focusing on assessment, education, and prevention.

Danko, who will address first-year students and their parents on Sunday, said part of his message will be: “We are going to do everything we can, but, the one thing we can’t do is—we can’t be in every building or every student housing unit where something might happen. [Students] have a responsibility, too. They need to help us by protecting each other.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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Butler Welcomes the Class of 2018

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PUBLISHED ON Aug 20 2014

Butler University will welcome 974 first-year students on move-in day Saturday, August 23. Classes begin Wednesday, August 27.

Butler University's move in day August 24, 2013Butler’s class of 2018 continues the University’s track record of attracting high-quality, academically prepared students. Here’s a look at some numbers.

- Average GPA, 3.52.

- Average ACT, 27.

- Average SAT, 1190 (without writing), 1750 (with writing).

- 11 Lilly Scholars.

- 3 National Merit Semifinalists.

- 1 National Achievement Semifinalist.

The Class of 2018 comes from 37 states and six countries. Forty-six percent are from Indiana, and 54 percent are from out of state. Approximately 22 percent of the class comes from nearby Illinois.

In addition to being the most geographically diverse, this year’s incoming class is also the most ethnically diverse, with minority students representing 14.7 percent of the class.

Butler’s largest area of study for new students is pre-pharmacy (123), followed by exploratory business (121), exploratory studies (or undecided, 78), and biology.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

 

 

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The Illustrated History of Butler University

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PUBLISHED ON Aug 20 2014

Picture this: the illustrated history of Butler University. The campuses, the buildings, the people who made the history. The clothes, the activities, the classes, the games.

Artist Jon Edwards, and his drawing of Tony Hinkle.
Artist Jon Edwards, and his drawing of Tony Hinkle.

 

That’s what Indianapolis artist Jon Edwards has been drawing for the better part of a year. And when the Hinkle Fieldhouse renovations are complete in October, his work—which he’s drawn across 10 canvases that are 28 inches high and a total of 120 feet in length—will cover the walls of the newly remodeled Wildman Room.

“I went through the Drift one by one by one and looked at page after page and picked out what I thought would be interesting to look at,” Edwards said, standing a couple of miles east of campus at Blice Edwards studio, the business he and partner Chris Blice founded in 1993. “They didn’t want to just focus on sports. They wanted to focus on campus life. So I wanted to pull all kinds of material.”

He did. Starting with a picture of the proposed home of North Western Christian University (only a portion of which was built), Edwards’s illustrations capture the eras and the major moments. Everything is labeled, so that everyone looking at the murals will know what they’re looking at, even if they don’t know Ovid Butler from Tony Hinkle.

Butler and Hinkle are both represented, of course, as are boldfaced Butler names like Catherine Merrill and Arthur Jordan. The University’s moves to Irvington in 1875 and Fairview in 1928 are illustrated. There’s a cartoon from 1923 showing the University as a young man leaving home with a young woman labeled “Fairview.” His mom—representing the Irvington campus—says, “Well my boy, if you’re determined to leave the old home, I’m glad you picked such a nice girl.” (All the original artists will be credited by name, “because I hope somebody does that for me someday,” Edwards said.)NWCU

The construction of Jordan Hall and Hinkle Fieldhouse are depicted. So is Butler’s awareness of the rights of women and minorities, which is shown in a picture from 1913 featuring a black graduate. And of course basketball and football get plenty of attention.

When Blice Edwards did the mural in the Johnson Boardroom in Robertson Hall, they painted directly on the walls. For the Wildman Room, the technique Edwards is using is called marouflage, which means painted on canvas and hung on the wall. When the murals are done, he and others will coat the walls in the room with wallpaper glue and unroll the canvases.

Edwards said he hopes people who see his work “will be enlightened in Butler history and learn a little bit about the lives and the stories of those people who made Butler University what it is today.”

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

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Irwin Library Introduces Several Changes This Fall

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PUBLISHED ON Aug 19 2014

The Irwin Library faculty and staff will hold an open house on Tuesday, August 26, from 2:00 to 5:30 p.m. to show off several changes in the facility this fall, including added study space, collaborative workstations, and a new catalog that allows a worldwide search for materials.

 

Associate Dean of the Libraries Sally Neal shows Butler student Michael Boyd the new Information Commons desk.
Associate Dean of the Libraries Sally Neal shows Butler sophomore Michael Boyd the new Information Commons desk.

 

Dean of the Libraries Julie Miller said the updates are part of the changing role of the academic library. Where libraries used to be largely about the circulation of books and periodicals, they are increasingly becoming a place for collaboration. 

“A big part of what librarians are doing now is helping faculty and students to navigate the changing information landscape,” she said. “Especially in the area of how to evaluate the information that’s out there to see whether it’s the information you need. Does it meet the criteria for being useful information? And, if you’re not finding the useful information, how to be better at searching for it. And also how to contribute to the information landscape in an ethical way.”

Among the changes in Irwin Library:

-The former circulation desk area is being turned into study space. The circulation desk will be merged with the information commons desk, where students can get research assistance. The desk has moved to the northeast side of the first floor.

-Several additions will be made to the computer area on the first floor, including two media workstations that have video and audio editing capability and two collaborative workstations. The latter have large, flat-panel monitors that let users attach different devices and work together on files projected on the monitor. “It’s wonderful for people who like to co-author because it gives you a nice way to look at what you’re working on together,” Miller said.

-The library has switched to a new management system called WorldCat Discovery that gives anyone searching the Butler catalog access to WorldCat’s worldwide library holdings. (For additional information, consult the WorldCat Discovery LibGuide.)

-The music reference collection, previously on the first floor, has moved to the second floor, and Music Librarian Sheri Stormes has moved to Irwin Library, room 130, in the southeast quadrant of the first floor.

-Laura Menard has joined the library faculty as Health Sciences Librarian serving the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. She will provide health sciences information literacy instruction and deliver health sciences information through the latest technologies. She will also work with the Science, Technology, and Society program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Communication Sciences and Disorders majors in the College of Communication.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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Clowes Hall Receives National Honor from Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

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PUBLISHED ON Jul 31 2014

Clowes Memorial Hall of Butler University received the 2014 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards Gold Key for Excellence in the Field on Friday, June 6, at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

The Scholastic Awards, which are presented by the Alliance for Young Artists and Writers, selected Clowes Memorial Hall for this honor for its dedication to young people, perseverance through challenges, and expansion of the program to reach 1,000 more participants than previously reached. Clowes Memorial Hall was also celebrated for going above and beyond the basic program requirements to provide additional opportunities for creative teenagers in the Central and Southern Indiana Art & Writing Region.

Clowes Memorial Hall serves as the Scholastic Awards Regional Affiliate presenting the Central and Southern Indiana Region of The Awards and is one of 115 affiliates across the nation. The 56 counties in this region have increased submissions since Clowes began the partnership with the Alliance five years ago. In 2014, Clowes boasted an impressive 2,337 submissions in art and writing, thanks largely to the development and implementation of innovative outreach efforts such as publishing a 400-page anthology available on Amazon.com that features regional award-winning writing. Additionally, Clowes developed the ART.WRITE.NOW Regional Exhibition, an art and writing exhibition of selected 2013 regional award winning works.

In a letter informing Clowes of its selection for the award, Alliance for Young Artist & Writers Executive Director Virginia McEnerney thanked Clowes Memorial Hall for its support of Clowes Education Manager Cassandra Pixey in her role as Affiliate Advisory Council Chair and as an Alliance board member. “The creativity and intelligence she brought to the Council and the board cannot be overstated.”

McEnerney continued, “It is clear that Clowes Memorial Hall of Butler University values deeply the students and educators it serves. Congratulations…for your continued commitment to recognizing the originality and voice of Indiana’s creative teens.”

The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards was founded in 1923. Since that time, the awards have grown to become the longest-running and most prestigious recognition program for creative teens in the United States while maintaining the nation’s largest source of scholarships for young artists and writers. Past winners include such noteworthy artists as Andy Warhol, Sylvia Plath, Truman Capote, Richard Avedon, Robert Redford, Joyce Carol Oates, Stephen King, and John Updike.

Media contact:
Joshua Lingenfelter
jlingenf@butler.edu
317-940-6411

 

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