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Senior Josh Turner Performs on ABC's 'Good Morning America'

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PUBLISHED ON Jun 04 2014

Butler senior guitar major Josh Turner was home Monday, doing the dishes, when he received a call from a New York area code. The caller left a message: Would you be interested in being on Good Morning America?

He was.

BpXUEZtIYAAwoMaTurner appeared on national TV live from New York at 7:48 a.m. Thursday, part of a segment called “Open Mike” that devotes airtime to talent found online. The show labeled him an "online sensation," thanks to his version of Paul Simon's song “Graceland” on YouTube. Co-host Michael Strahan said Turner's version "sounds just like the original" and challenged Turner by playing parts of the original, stopping it, and having him pick up where Simon left off.

He handled the assignment with ease, as you can see here.

“I was incredibly stunned when they called,” Turner, whose video had come to the show’s attention through a post on the website Reddit, said Wednesday. “I never really interact with Reddit directly, but sometimes people who watch my videos post them to Reddit, where they’re seen by a lot more people. Somebody from the show must have seen it there.”

For a low-key performer who hopes one day to be a session musician—or maybe a sideman for a singer-songwriter—it was an extraordinary opportunity to be the front man for a day.

Turner, who was born in Indianapolis and lived in Cincinnati and North Carolina before coming to Butler, said music’s been part of his life since age 7 or 8 when he started playing piano. He’s been in choirs since age 9 (at Butler, he’s in the Butler Chorale and is musical director of the a cappella group Out of the Dawg House) and started playing guitar at 13.

In high school, he played guitar and some banjo in a three-piece bluegrass outfit called The Other Favorites, and he’s in a folk group now called Coyote Armada that’s made up mostly of recent Butler graduates.

Turner’s parents had lived in the Butler-Tarkington neighborhood and when he was looking at colleges, they knew he was looking for a mid-sized liberal arts school.

“I wound up looking at Butler and really liking it,” he said.

Turner said he had “no idea” what he hopes will come from Thursday’s appearance on national TV.

“I don’t know that I’ve fully addressed it mentally,” he said. “I’m sure it will lead to a bump in views and hopefully more opportunities down the road, but I’m not hoping this is going to launch my career. But it’ll be great to have more people aware of my music and seeing what I’m up to on YouTube.”

Incredibly, GMA was not his only offer. A few days before, he’d gotten a call from The Ellen DeGeneres Show. They’d also seen the “Graceland” video and were interested in having him on. But they couldn’t give a firm date, so they suggested he take the Good Morning America offer.

“I would have been stunned for one offer alone,” he said. “To get the two in the space of about four days is completely unprecedented.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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Luke Bunting '14 Earns Fulbright Teaching Assistantship

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PUBLISHED ON Jun 03 2014

Luke Bunting ’14 didn’t have enough time to study abroad during his years at Butler, but he’s making up for that in a big way: Beginning in July, he’ll spend 12½ months in South Korea as a Fulbright Foreign Language Teaching Assistant.

LukeBunting was notified in late May that he received the award, which will place him in either a suburban or rural setting. He’s Butler’s third Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship Award winner this year, which is a record number of winners for the University.

“I’m hoping to learn a lot about East Asian and Pacific relations, especially with North Korea, China, Japan, and South Korea continuing to play a larger and larger role on the world stage,” the Carmel, Indiana, native said. “Then, at the same time, the whole point of the Fulbright program is to help spread American culture and awareness of American culture, so I’m hoping to be a good ambassador for our country and expand the understanding of our culture.”

Bunting said he applied for the assistantship earlier this year after seeing a brochure for the program in Butler’s Center for High Achievement & Scholarly Engagement. He credits Director of Undergraduate Research and Prestigious Scholarships Rusty Jones and Assistant Professor of History Zachary Scarlett with guiding him through the process to apply for the prestigious award.

Bunting doesn’t speak Korean, “but that’s one of the advantages of this program—the South Korea program did not demand that its applicants already know the language,” he said. “When I get over there for the orientation, they’re putting me through a rigorous language course, along with all the others who were selected, and they’re giving us training on how to properly teach English to our students.”

At Butler, Bunting majored in political science, with a minor in history. He wants to go into government work when he finishes the Fulbright program, and he thinks a year in Korea will help his prospects.

“I think having more world knowledge and knowledge of another culture will be helpful,” he said. “I’d really like to get inside the culture to see a lot of different points I feel Americans in general don’t understand and take that knowledge with me to be able to work in policy in Washington, DC.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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Why Is It Funny? Professor Bungard Will Tell You

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PUBLISHED ON Jun 02 2014

The writer E.B. White famously said that explaining a joke is like dissecting a frog.

“You understand it better,” he said, “but the frog dies in the process.”

chrisbButler University Associate Professor of Classical Studies Chris Bungard thinks analysis of humor doesn’t have to be that way. He’s received a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant to develop a course called “Why Is It Funny” that will help students think about the role that comedy has played in the human experience from antiquity to the present day.

Bungard said the class will examine issues such as how laughter plays with our perceptions, the appeal of subversive humor, whether comedy is “a guy thing,” the role of laughter in civic discourse, and whether we can laugh at war.

The class will be more than laughter, of course. The goal of first-year seminar classes is to help students build foundations in critical reading, writing, and speaking. There’ll be papers to write, lots of readings, and a final project that will ask students to develop either a five-to-seven-minute stand-up routine in the style of a non-American comic tradition or to create a five-to-seven-minute period comedy piece using the tools of digital storytelling.

“As students delve deeply into these diverse materials, they will formulate for themselves theories of what underlies the attraction of comedy,” Bungard wrote in the proposal for creating the course. “We will ask ourselves: Is there such a thing as universal comedy? To what extent is comedy bound up in cultural norms? Is comedy inherently antagonistic? Or does the humor of comedy promote inclusive communities?”

The NEH gives grants to develop courses that promote the value of the humanities. The classes have to address an enduring question, such as: What’s the good life? What is justice? And the subject matter should look across the globe or across time—ideally, both. Bungard’s yearlong first-year seminar course, scheduled to debut in fall 2015, will take a wide view of comedy from ancient Athens and Rome, Renaissance Europe, the Middle East, Japan, Nigeria, South Africa, and modern America. It will intentionally make use of comedy from different genres, including plays, films, traditional fables, and comic strips.

In creating the class—and process that is still ongoing—Bungard said he has found himself asking questions like:

-Are comedy, humor, and “funny” the same thing?

-When we say something is funny, do we mean the same thing every time?

-Can we use humor to turn something terrible into something laughable and create a kind of power over the evil?

Even the question of whether dissecting a joke kills the humor led to other questions, such as: If that is the result, then why? What happened?

For the answers to those questions and others, you’ll have to take the class.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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Butler University’s First Live Bulldog Mascot, Blue I, Has Died

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PUBLISHED ON May 30 2014

Butler Blue I, the white English bulldog who served as Butler University’s first official live mascot, died this morning, Friday, May 30, 2014. She was 13 years old.

Blue I was born September 23, 2000, at Frank and Jeane King’s Kong King Kennel in Lizton, Indiana. She served as Butler University’s official mascot from 2000–2004, and then accompanied her human companion, Kelli Walker ’91, to Bellingham, Washington; Morris, Illinois; and Chicago.

"For over 13 years Blue lived an extraordinary life. Her noble heart stopped today; instead of feeling empty, my heart is twice as full for loving her,” said Walker.

The concept of “Butler Blue” existed for about a year before Blue I, as she was known, became an integral part of life at Butler University and beyond. Walker worked in Butler’s Office of Alumni and Parent Programs from 1998–2004; in 1999, Walker began exploring what a live mascot program would encompass.

Under the initially skeptical—and ultimately, supportive—leadership of William T. Farkas ’88, then Executive Director of Alumni and Development Programs, Walker gathered information from peer institutions (including Drake University, University of Georgia, and Yale University). Then-Butler President Gwen Fountain supported the initiative, and in fact insisted on including Blue I in her presidential portrait, which currently hangs in Robertson Hall.

Carving out a place in an academic institution for a live mascot program was a multi-faceted effort, including securing financial support from an anonymous alumni donor (to purchase the original dog; subsequent mascots have been donated generously by Kong King Kennel, which quickly became beloved members of the Butler family), food, and veterinary care (Dr. Kurt Phillips ‘92), as well as managing the complex logistics of the day-to-day life of a mascot.

 In fall 2000, Butler held a community-wide naming contest for the new mascot. While “Hinkle,” “Hampton,” and even “Buttercup” were popular vote-getters, “Butler Blue” was the top choice.

Butler Blue I made her inaugural appearance on the court of Hinkle Fieldhouse, carried in the arms of the costumed bulldog mascot (now known as “Hink”). In addition to attending men’s and women’s basketball games—where she rallied with the cheerleaders and the Dawg Pound before retiring to the bleachers to sleep—Blue I attended other collegiate sporting events and made regular visits to classrooms, residence halls, campus events, staff and faculty events, commencement, and even the annual Rejoice holiday concert, where she rode a sleigh across stage to the tune of “Blue Christmas.”

“Bulldog Fridays” drew great numbers of visitors to the Alumni Office in Robertson Hall.

Blue I traveled to the NCAA Tournament in 2003, where she famously was “sneaked into” a hotel under the cover of a Butler hooded sweatshirt and the Butler University Pep Band.

Blue I was almost all white with brown spotted ears. She maintained an ideal conformation her entire life and was not plagued by health problems typical of many bulldogs.

Blue I loved playing tug with her rope toy, lying in the grass at her grandparents’ home, eating carrots and apples, and sleeping under a blanket. In her later years she became close buddies with her two feline brothers. She appeared on stage in Chicago as “Rufus” in “Legally Blonde,” proving that, even at age 12, she still could take the stage and capture the hearts of an audience.

As the matriarch of a Butler Bulldog legacy, Blue I will rest in peace along side her successor, Butler Blue II (March 24, 2004–August 31, 2013), in a new Bulldog Memorial currently being erected on campus. The memorial—a gift of the Class of 2013 along with support from generous donors to the Campaign for Hinkle Fieldhouse and live mascot program­—will be dedicated at Butler’s Homecoming festivities in September of this year.

Current mascot duties are being assumed by Butler Blue III (December 23, 2011)—a red brindle English bulldog, also from Kong King Kennel—who took over for Blue II in spring 2013. For more information on Butler University’s live mascot program, visit ButlerBlue.com.

Those wishing to honor the life and service of Blue I may make a gift in her memory to the Bulldog Memorial. To do so, visit Butler's online giving site, select “Other” from the gift designation drop-down menu and enter “Bulldog Memorial” in the space provided. Additional information about the Bulldog Memorial is available at ButlerBlue.com. 

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Getting Into the Swing With Orangutans, COE Style

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PUBLISHED ON May 25 2014

In the coming years, elementary-school classes from all over Indiana will take field trips to the Indianapolis Zoo to see the orangutans in the Simon Skjodt International Orangutan Center, which opened May 24.

IMG_1063And when they head home, they’ll leave with lesson plans and activities created by Butler University College of Education students to further their knowledge and enjoyment of the experience.

They might study about deforestation and how it affects the apes. Or simulate living like an orangutan. Or play a game of Orangutan Twister.

“The lesson plans cover math, language arts, science, social studies, art, and lots of kinesthetic movement,” said Associate Professor Catherine Pangan, whose class of junior-year elementary education majors devised the activities. "This is all about students at the center of the learning and hands-on experiences, and that mirrors the philosophy in the College of Education—to get kids excited and curious and doing things that have a real-life impact. Their knowledge goes so much deeper, and they’ll want to know more later. It really promotes lifelong learning.”

Butler began to get involved with the orangutan exhibit in late 2013, when Michele Schilten, the Director of Education at Indianapolis Zoological Society, talked to Pangan about a potential collaboration. In April, Pangan’s students went to the zoo for an information session about orangutans. They researched background information about the apes and went through training with one of the zoo’s experts.

“They told us what they were thinking about and looking for,” Pangan said, “and our students designed lesson plans that are hands-on activities for the classroom that teachers can take back to the classroom either before or after they visit the exhibit.”

The Butler students broke into groups of two or three, and designed a dozen lessons suitable for elementary school students. A typical plan includes a week’s worth of activities, as well as spelling out learning objectives and explaining how the activities fit into Indiana’s academic standards. Students will be taught related vocabulary and do readings and assignments.

The zoo describes the new permanent exhibit, which is home to eight orangutans, as a place that serves as a vital education, research, and conservation center where dedicated staff and community members can work together to create a positive future for critically endangered orangutans in the wild.

For Butler’s elementary education students, it’s been a chance to show their creativity in making a visit to the zoo not only fun but educational.

“We are modeling ways that museums and schools can work together to debunk the concept of a one-shot experience field trip and instead do something with greater purpose and intention over time,” Pangan said. “It is a win-win for both the school community and community resource.”

 

 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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Lisa Brooks Named New Chair of the School of Music

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PUBLISHED ON May 23 2014

Professor of Violin Lisa Brooks, a Butler University faculty member since 1994, has been appointed Chair of the Butler University School of Music.

lisabrooks13In addition to Brooks’s work teaching violin at Butler, she is the principal second violinist of the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra. She is a regular substitute violinist and violist with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, and was a founding member of the Indianapolis Baroque Orchestra. Prior to coming to Butler, she taught at Baylor University, the University of Wisconsin at Eau Claire, Messiah College, and Dickinson College.

Brooks received both a bachelor's and master's degree in violin performance in four years from West Virginia University, where she was a student of Donald Portnoy. While completing her doctorate in violin performance from the State University of New York at Stony Brook, she studied with Joyce Robbins, and as a member of the Stony Brook graduate piano trio, coached extensively with Julius Levine and Gilbert Kalish.

As an orchestral musician, she was associate concertmaster of the Waco Symphony and performed with the Brooklyn Philharmonic, Opera Company of Philadelphia, and Harrisburg and Reading Symphony Orchestras. She also has toured nationally with the Pennsylvania Ballet Company. She was an artist-fellow at the 1984 and 1985 Bach Aria festivals, and was a finalist in the 1981 A.S.T.A. National Solo Competition.

Dr. Brooks presents the pre-concert lectures for the Ensemble Music Society and is a member of the steering committee for the International Violin Competition of Indianapolis. In 2001, she was awarded a Creative Renewal Arts Fellowship by the Arts Council of Indianapolis, and in May 2013, she received the inaugural Distinguished Faculty Award for Service and Leadership from Butler.

She takes over for Dan Bolin, who had served as School of Music Chair since 2009.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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COE Professor Suneeta Kercood Selected for Fulbright Award

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PUBLISHED ON May 22 2014

Professor of Special Education Suneeta Kercood has been selected for the Fulbright-Nehru Academic and Professional Excellence Award. She will conduct research in India this summer and next under the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program.

Kercood, a Butler faculty member since 2001, said her research topic is “A Study of the Health Behaviors of Children and Adults with Disabilities, and the Sociocultural Factors That Influence Their Healthy Lifestyles.”

The purpose of her visit to India as a Fulbright scholar will be:

-To utilize surveys and interviews with parents and caregivers of individuals with disabilities and identify health behaviors, health challenges, and areas of health promotion interest. 

-To identify and analyze case studies of individuals with disabilities who consistently practice healthy behaviors, in spite of having disabilities, socio-economic, or environmental challenges. Healthy behaviors Kercood will study include practicing a nutritional diet, regular exercise, and routine health care evaluations.

-To develop components of a plan for creating ecologically based intervention programs for individuals with disabilities in consultation with stakeholders such as parents, caregivers, educators, and health professionals who work directly with individuals with disabilities.

India is the site of the largest Fulbright U.S. Scholar program worldwide, with more than 70 grants available each year.

In recommending Kercood for the Fulbright, Ena Shelley, Dean of the College of Education, wrote:

“Dr. Kercood’s proposal  … merges her research efforts of special education and public health. She has proposed to do her work in her homeland of India, which certainly aligns with the Butler University goal of being positive global citizens. I believe her research will have significance in both fields and will spur further research in the United States as well as abroad. As we see an increase in the population of developmental disabilities, we must further understand the relationship to nutrition and health behaviors.  Her research should be fertile ground for publications and presentations that bridge special education and health education.”

Kercood is the second College of Education Fulbright recipient for the 2013-2014 school year. Earlier this year, Emily Seibert ’14 received a Fulbright to teach English and American culture in Greece.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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Butler Student Researchers Headed to San Francisco

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PUBLISHED ON May 21 2014

Forty Butler students are taking their psychology research on the road to the Association for Psychological Science (APS) national convention May 22–25 in in San Francisco.

From left, Beth McGlone, Karina Hamamouche, and Emily Lauth with their poster for the Association for Psychological Science convention.
From left, Beth McGlone, Karina Hamamouche, and Emily Lauth with their poster for the Association for Psychological Science convention.

 

Accompanied by seven faculty members, the students will present posters at the conference, describing research they’ve conducted at Butler. They will also hear about cutting-edge science and rub elbows with leading psychology authors and scholars.

For the third consecutive year, Butler is among the top five schools in the number of students presenting posters during the conference, and the only private school in the 2014 top five. University faculty and students make up about 87 percent of the 4,500 expected attendees; representatives of government agencies, non-profits, and research institutes and businesses will also be on hand.

“Our students are special,” said Psychology Department Chair Robert Dale, “not only because they’re attending conferences, but they’re also presenting research they proposed and carried out with a faculty mentor. Most other APS presenters are graduate students or university faculty, so our undergraduates are getting experiences and attention they normally would only get as graduate students.”

Many of the Psychology faculty take students to national and regional conferences annually, and often use some of their research grant funds to help defer student expenses to attend conferences, Dale said. Butler’s Office of the Provost has paid some of the students’ travel costs for the APS conference.

APS will host 17 poster sessions in San Francisco, featuring an average of 130 posters each.

Faculty coach their students on their presentations, and guide them in creating the 4-foot-by-8-foot posters that detail their research methodology and findings.  But the mentors will let the students do the talking during the 90-minute poster sessions, when other conference goers look over the work and ask questions.

“The people who view your posters ask, ‘Did you test this? Did you think of that?’ ” said recent graduate Karina Hamamouche ’14 of Westfield, Indiana. “Their feedback helps enhance your studies.”

“The students come back from conferences with more confidence,” Dale said. “People have taken their research work seriously.”

Throughout her undergraduate years, Hamamouche researched memory with Professor Neil Bohannon. In San Francisco, she and sophomores Beth McGlone and Emily Lauth will present a poster on their study of cognitive psychology, memory, and social rejections.

At his first APS conference, senior Ian Katz of Buffalo Grove, Illinois, will present a poster on “The Ebb and Flow of Performance Feedback,” He and classmate Chris Thompson worked on the research with Assistant Professor Alison O’Malley ’04.

“A lot of people we read about will be there,” Katz said. “It’s a unique opportunity that will help my plans to go to graduate school.” As practice, Katz presented at the annual Butler Undergraduate Research conference in April. He was chosen to participate in more research during Butler Summer Institute 2014.

“Ian made some important suggestions and tweaks on the research, so we thought it would be appropriate for him to be second presenter with Chris,” said O’Malley.  Being encouraged to attend conferences is a way Butler recognizes students “who make the greatest effort,” she added.

At major conferences, Butler people get to hear presentations by experts who’ve written textbooks and other class sources, she said. “You get a bit of a leg up on the state of the science at conferences. I’ve had students bring me conference programs, so we could talk about issues presented in class.”

Hamamouche speaks with awe in her voice when she recalls a previous APS conference where she met Beth Loftus, a noted expert in human memory. O’Malley was a Butler senior when she attended the 2004 APS conference, and presented a poster on research she conducted with Professor, now Provost, Kate Morris. But, O’Malley’s conference highlight was an elevator ride she shared with Albert Bandura, a leading scholar on social learning and aggression.

“He was such a giant in my textbooks,” O’Malley said. “But he was actually small in physical stature, like I am. I said, ‘Hello, Dr. Bandura,’ and he was very kind.”

Since joining the psychology faculty, O’Malley said, she has noticed a shift in departmental thinking from her own student days. “We get more students involved in research earlier,” she said.

In recent years, close to two-thirds of all Butler psychology graduates have gone on to graduate or medical school. Presenting at major conferences as students offers them an advantage in applying to those programs, Dale said.

Hamamouche, who begins graduate studies in developmental psychology at Boston College this fall, said her research and conference experiences definitely impressed those reviewing her application to the graduate program. They also came in handy during an internship she completed last summer at Johns Hopkins, during which she and other undergraduate interns were required to develop and present posters.

“I had made posters a bunch of times,” Hamamouche said. “The other interns hadn’t.”

“Butler faculty are very involved with their students,” Hamamouche said. Their efforts to get students to conferences, she added, show “how much our faculty care about us, how much they want us to learn.”

Media contact: Mary Ellen Stephenson
317-940-6944
mestephe@butler.edu

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Alumni Success

Ed Carpenter '03 Wins Indy 500 Pole for 2nd Straight Year

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PUBLISHED ON May 19 2014

By DAN GELSTON
AP Sports Writer

INDIANAPOLIS - Local driver Ed Carpenter has made himself at home on the Indianapolis 500 pole.

Ed Carpenter and Trip.
Ed Carpenter and Trip

 

The last of nine qualifiers to take the track, Carpenter bumped James Hinchcliffe from the top spot, posting a four-lap average of 231.067 mph to win the 500 pole for the second straight year.

"I felt that it was harder," Carpenter said. "It was just a different position because when I made my run last year, we didn't really have anything to lose. This year, being the last guy to go out, I think there was a little bit of pressure to not mess it up."

He didn't mess it up, not at all.

Carpenter's No. 20 Chevrolet was the car to beat all weekend, and the hometown favorite showed no signs of rust in his first IndyCar Series race of the season. He owns Ed Carpenter Racing and decided in November to run only on ovals, where he excels. He turned his car over to Mike Conway on road and street courses, and skipped the first four races of the season.

He knew he had the pole secured when he nailed the final two corners on the last lap.

"I could really just kind of enjoy it knowing that we were going to be on the pole for the second year," he said.

Hinchcliffe will start second after sustaining a concussion last weekend in the Grand Prix of Indianapolis. Will Power will join them on the front row.

Carpenter, the stepson of former speedway executive Tony George, was 10th in last year's Indy 500. He is 11th driver to earn consecutive 500 poles and the first since Castroneves in 2009-10.

"It's all about the race," the 33-year-old Carpenter said. "Hopefully, we can close the deal this year."

As a single-car team last year, Carpenter was unable to get help on data and much-needed setup information. He didn't want a repeat this May, so he hired Hildebrand to drive a second car at Indy for Ed Carpenter Racing. Hildebrand nearly won the Indy 500 as a rookie in 2011, but he crashed exiting the final turn and was passed for the win by the late Dan Wheldon.

"I wish we could have got him up on the front row with us, but the shootout's tough," Carpenter said. "The conditions were hard today, but having him go first today also helped me because we were able to make an adjustment."

Carpenter thrived in the first year of a new Indy 500 qualifying format. He posted the top qualifying speed Saturday when the fastest nine drivers advanced to Sunday's shootout for the pole.

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2013-2014: The School Year in Review

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PUBLISHED ON May 08 2014

 

 

During the 2013-2014 school year, Butler celebrated the creation of the Desmond Tutu Center, the 50th anniversaries of Clowes Hall and the Irwin Library, and more than $17 million in gifts to refurbish Hinkle Fieldhouse. Three students and one faculty member received prestigious Fulbright awards to study overseas. We said goodbye to two distinguished professors, George Geib and Robert Grechesky, who taught at Butler for 49 and 41 years, respectively. And we mourned longtime loyal mascot Blue II.

Here’s a look back.

August

Image 5-Butler welcomed 1,025 freshmen on move-in day Saturday, August 24. Butler’s class of 2017 continued the University’s track record of attracting high-quality, academically prepared students. The class included 16 Lilly Scholars and five National Merit/National Achievement Scholars. Students came from 32 states and 22 countries. Forty-three percent were from Indiana, and 57 percent were from out of state, the highest percentage of out-of-state students in Butler history.

-President James M. Danko introduced the Butler 2020 Vision, a bold and strategic course for the future of Butler designed to distinguish Butler as a school of choice for exceptional students and guide the institution to increased national prominence by the year 2020. The Vision document states:  Butler University will be an innovative leader in the creation and delivery of transformative student-centered learning experiences that prepare graduates to make a meaningful impact in the world.

 

-Mark Minner ’12 was selected as the radio play-by-play announcer for Butler men’s basketball.

-Butler University awarded $100,000 in Innovation Fund grants to faculty members and a student to support their ideas for creative, collaborative academic programs. A student-produced jazz CD, a video series on making financial decisions, and new Butler curricula focused on professional writing and critical listening were some of the projects to receive grants that ranged from $6,000 to $25,000.

-Some 557 students fanned out across Indianapolis to do volunteer work as part of Bulldogs Into the Streets. It was the biggest turnout in the program’s 19-year history.

Blue-II-Butler Blue II, the male English bulldog who served as Butler University’s live mascot from 2004–2013, died on August 31, due to complications from congestive heart failure. He was 9 years old.

 

September

Archbishop Desmond Tutu event at Clowes Memorial Hall September 12, 2013-Butler University and Christian Theological Seminary announced that they joined together to create The Desmond Tutu Center. The Center will focus on leadership development in social justice and reconciliation, international relationships, and interreligious and community bridge-building. The news was announced just prior to Archbishop Emeritus Tutu taking the stage at Clowes Memorial Hall to a full house of more than 2,100. South African cleric and anti-apartheid activist Allan Aubrey Boesak, a longtime friend of Archbishop Emeritus Tutu’s, was appointed as the Center’s first director. Boesak serves as the Desmond Tutu Chair for Peace, Global Justice, and Reconciliation Studies at Butler and CTS.

-Butler was granted reaccreditation by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association. Commission reviewers affirmed that Butler provides a high-quality education through faculty who are committed teachers focused on student-centered learning and through staff who provide support services that enable students to succeed.

-Butler astronomy faculty and students, who already have remote access to telescopes in Chile and Arizona, found out they would be able to view the stars from a telescope off the Canary Islands beginning in 2015. The Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy, of which Butler is a member, will add the telescope located near the coast of Morocco once it is fitted for remote access.

-The Irwin Library celebrated its 50th birthday with cake, a 1963 fashion show, and a photo exhibit.

-For the fourth consecutive year, Butler University was ranked the No. 1 “Up and Coming” school in the Midwest in U.S. News & World Report’s America’s Best Colleges. This ranking recognizes Butler’s efforts to make “the most promising and innovative changes in the areas of academics, faculty, student life, campus, or facilities.” Butler also ranked No. 2 overall among Midwest Regional Universities, marking its fifth year in this position and 25th year in the top 10 for this category.

-Professor Emeritus Jackson Wiley, the beloved longtime conductor of the Butler Symphony Orchestra, died September 3. He was 92. Wiley, who taught at Butler and conducted the Butler Symphony Orchestra from 1969 to 1991, had an enormous impact on music both at Butler and in Indianapolis. He founded and directed the Greater Indianapolis Youth Symphony, was Conductor and Music Director of the Indiana Opera Theater and Indianapolis Opera Company, was Music Director for Indianapolis Ballet Theatre, served as Director of the Philharmonic Orchestra of Indianapolis and the Athenaeum Orchestra, and was Guest Conductor for the Symphonic Praise Choir.

-The Center for Urban Ecology at Butler University was awarded a four-year, $2.9 million National Science Foundation grant to create sites along six Indianapolis waterways where arts and science will be used to educate the public about Indianapolis’s water system.

023-The University unveiled a Peace Pole—a 7-foot, octagonal, red cedar pole containing the words “May Peace Prevail on Earth” in 16 languages—in the grassy plaza between Starbucks and Jordan Hall.

-The College of Business (COB) secured the 47th position in the 2013 Bloomberg BusinessWeek ranking of 124 U.S. undergraduate business programs. Since its debut on the list three years ago, the College has climbed 16 spots (63rd in 2010, 58th in 2011, and 48th in 2012). The COB remains the only Indianapolis business school on the list.

-Butler University's part-time MBA program ranked 69th in U.S. News and World Report's Best Graduate Schools, 2013 Edition. This is the second consecutive year Butler has been on the list. Last year the school placed 105th.

-Butler University received two grants from the Indianapolis Foundation, a Central Indiana Community Foundation affiliate—$100,000 to support The Campaign for Hinkle Fieldhouse and $20,000 for the Butler Community Arts School. The money for the fieldhouse will be used to preserve and maintain the building’s historic structure inside and out, and make improvements that will benefit Butler student-athletes and spectators. The Butler Community Arts Schools provides free and low-cost music lessons and arts instruction to hundreds of Indianapolis schoolchildren each year. The majority of its grant funds will go to need-based scholarships for underserved youths.

-Poet and actress Maya Angelou returned to campus to speak as part of the Celebration of Diversity Distinguished Lecture Series. She was the series’ inaugural speaker in 1988.

October

clowesfullhouse0113 001-Clowes Memorial Hall of Butler University celebrated its 50th birthday with a week of special programming that included the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra returning to Clowes, its longtime home, for a concert.

-For the third consecutive year, the College of Business was included in U.S. News and World Report’s list of Best Business Schools. The College placed 141 out of 342 schools. The U.S. News Best Business Schools list is significant because rankings are based solely on peer assessments.

-Butler’s MBA program was one of 295 programs featured in the 2014 edition of The Princeton Review's "Best Business Schools” guidebook. This was the ninth year the program has been included in the book. This annual guide of top graduate business programs is based on data provided by the school and surveys of 20,300 business school students from the best AACSB-accredited MBA programs in the world.

-Bestselling author John Green headlined Butler University’s first Writers’ Harvest, a benefit for Second Helpings, in Clowes Memorial Hall.

-Butler University made Kiplinger Personal Finance’s list of the Best Values in Private Colleges for 2014. The list included 100 private universities from across the country. Butler ranked 61st overall—second in Indiana behind the University of Notre Dame.

-Butler University’s new 450-seat performance hall, the Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts, received LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environment Design) gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. The facility uses 55 percent less water and 22 percent less energy than a typical building its size because of construction measures.

-Butler University was named one of the Top 100 Social Media Colleges in the nation, according to the website StudentAdvisor.com. In ranking Butler 35th overall, the website wrote: “Butler's English bulldog mascots Butler Blue II and III rose to celebrity status through a social media campaign that gathered 13,000 followers! The cute, wrinkly faces of Bulldog nation toured the country along with the Final Four basketball team.”

-The Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation Inc. awarded $600,000 to Clowes Memorial Hall of Butler University for electrical infrastructure upgrades. The grant came on the heels of a $2 million gift from the Foundation that was used in summer 2013 to restore the inside of the hall. That work included adding all new seats and carpeting in the auditorium, acoustical enhancements, paint, and a new roof for the 2,200-seat hall.

November

Butler’s Center for Urban Ecology, the Indy Hunger Network, and the Indiana Healthy Weight Initiative received a $50,000 Indiana State Department of Agriculture grant that will double the buying power of food-stamp recipients who shop at farmers markets and simultaneously help small farmers. The program enabled anyone who receives food stamps to use “Fresh Bucks” to purchase items such as broccoli, sweet corn, green beans—most anything you’d find at a farmers market.

-A $120,000 grant received by The Indiana Partnership for Young Writers will help Butler’s College of Education create teacher training for early childhood education programs and develop additional programs that could benefit up to 1,500 local preschool and elementary students. The grant from the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust will also support new initiatives to mentor entry-level minority teachers, develop online literacy curricula, and showcase student writing, including work by IPS/Butler Laboratory School students.

December

0-Butler University conferred an honorary degree on Nadja Halilbegovich ’02 during the December 22 winter 2013 Commencement ceremony, recognizing her activism on behalf of children caught in the violence of war. About 150 students received their degrees.

-Butler University announced that it was joining fellow universities and leading Hoosier businesses in opposition to House Joint Resolution 6 and a proposed amendment to the Indiana State Constitution strictly defining marriage as between a man and a woman.

-The College of Education became the first college of education  in Indiana—and only the 22nd in the world—authorized to offer teacher certification courses in International Baccalaureate education for Primary Years (ages 3-12) and Middle Years (ages 11-16). COE will begin offering a sequence of four IB certificate courses in summer 2014, as an option for practicing teachers interested in IB-focused professional development.

-Butler University received a $999,952 grant from Lilly Endowment Inc. to create Butler Advance, a program focused on helping students—especially those in the liberal arts—further cultivate key attributes needed for professional success and the transition to careers in Indiana. The program will include collaborations with the Central Indiana business, non-profit, and higher education communities. It will involve summer and academic year components promoting integrated academic and career advising, exploration, experiential learning, and career preparation by emphasizing the applicability of liberal arts skills to employment in business, non-profit, and government environments.

-Butler junior Eshan Pua earned a Fulbright-Hays scholarship to study Chinese for eight months in China beginning in January.

-The Jordan College of the Arts named Professor of Music Eric Stark to the position of Director of Choral Activities. He officially took on the role in January, overseeing administration, planning, and strategy for the four choral groups that are faculty-led: the Butler Chorale; University Choir; Chamber Choir; and Jordan Jazz.

-The Center for Urban Ecology Farm at Butler University unveiled a new addition—a mobile classroom where visiting students can learn about the growing operations and participate in farm activities. The classroom is a former shipping container that was repurposed by Ball State University Professor of Architecture Tim Gray and his third-year students. They equipped the space, which is about the size of a large truck trailer, with movable tables and chairs made from recycled wood, an acrylic canopy for shade, and a rainwater-collection system.

January

-Donors from across the country honored Bobby Plump, the hero of the 1954 “Milan Miracle,” by announcing a joint $50,000 gift in his name to Butler’s Campaign for Hinkle Fieldhouse. Butler President James M. Danko and Hoosiers screenwriter and producer Angelo Pizzo were on hand for the gift presentation in Hinkle, along with Plump's family, former Indiana Pacers coach Bob "Slick" Leonard, and Maris Valainis, the actor who played Jimmy Chitwood, the character in Hoosiers inspired by Plump.

Butler University's Hinkle Fieldhouse in winter January 3, 2014.-Butler University announced that it had raised more than $17.156 million to preserve and update its landmark arena, Hinkle Fieldhouse. Total gifts and pledges to The Campaign for Hinkle Fieldhouse surpassed the $16 million public fundraising goal announced at the campaign’s launch in November 2012.

-The College of Business announced that it would offer two new online certificate programs, one for professionals who want to make an immediate impact on their career and the second for experienced and emerging leaders who want to coach their employees to higher performance and engagement.

-Filmmaker Lee Daniels (The Butler, Precious, Monster’s Ball) spoke at Clowes Memorial Hall as part of the Celebration of Diversity Distinguished Lecture Series.

 

 

 

 

 

 

February

LauraBushspeech0214 034-Former First Lady Laura Bush spoke at Clowes Memorial Hall as part of the Celebration of Diversity Distinguished Lecture Series.

-The Martha Graham Dance Company did a residency at Clowes Memorial Hall, performing many educational events for both students and the general public in advance of its performance there.

-The College of Communication announced that it would offer new majors in Sports Media and Interactive Media beginning in the fall. The Sports Media major is designed for students interested in careers in sports information, production, or journalism/media. The Interactive Media program within CCOM’s Creative Media and Entertainment program will offer students an opportunity to learn about interactive media and to create and distribute content using multimedia tools.

-The Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra (ICO) and Butler University formalized a partnership designating the ICO as the professional Orchestra-in-Residence at Butler’s new Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts. For Butler students, faculty, and staff, the arrangement will bring a regular association with a professional orchestra. For the ICO, it will provide a performance venue that is suitable in size, acoustics, and location for the 34-member orchestra.

 March

 Steve Standifird-Stephen Standifird, Dean of the Schroeder School of Business at the University of Evansville, was announced as the new Dean of the College of Business, beginning June 1.

-Butler University's part-time MBA program ranked 72nd in U.S. News and World Report's Best Graduate Schools, 2015 Edition. This was the third consecutive year Butler has been on the list of the nation’s top 125 part-time MBA programs.

-Emily Seibert ’14 was chosen for a prestigious Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to live and work in Athens, Greece, for 10 months.

April

-College of Education Associate Dean Debra Lecklider, Clowes Memorial Hall Executive Director Elise Kushigian, and senior chemistry/Pre-Medicine student Brittany Moore were named Butler University’s 2014 Women of Distinction.

-The College of Business earned reaccreditation from AACSB International—The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. AACSB International is the longest serving global accrediting body for business schools that offer undergraduate, master's, and doctoral degrees in business and accounting. AACSB Accreditation is the hallmark of excellence in business education, and has been earned by less than 5 percent of the world's business programs.

-The College of Education announced a new minor in Recreation and Sports Studies that’s designed to prepare Butler students interested in health, physical activity, recreation, and sports to lead programs in and outside of school settings. The minor will be offered beginning in fall semester 2014.

-Butler University’s 26th annual Undergraduate Research Conference was its biggest ever, with nearly 1,000 students and their mentoring faculty from 20 states coming to campus for a daylong event showcasing oral and poster presentations on topics as diverse as molecular biology and 17th-century opera.

Alex Still
Alex Still '14

 

-Alex Still ’14 will head to France this fall as recipient of the Fulbright French Government Teaching Award, sponsored by the French ministry of education.

-The Butler Collegian won 11 awards at the Indiana Collegiate Press Association's annual conference Saturday at IUPUI, celebrating the best of Indiana's collegiate newspapers, news magazines, literary magazines, yearbooks, online publications, and advertising.

-Butler University partnered with Austin, Texas-based American Campus Communities (ACC) to build a 500-bed dormitory tentatively scheduled to open in 2016. By agreeing to a long-term partnership with ACC, Butler will be able to maintain the financial flexibility needed to invest in new academic buildings.

-Butler announced plans to work with the city of Indianapolis to upgrade the Sunset Avenue streetscape, improving safety and sustainability, and transforming the entrance to the University. The project will include landscaped medians, bike lanes, sidewalk improvements, new street lighting, and signage. The city is funding half of $3 million project.

May

Geib

-Professor of History George Geib retired after 49 years at Butler.

Bob Grechesky

-The Butler University Wind Ensemble paid tribute to retiring Director of Bands Robert Grechesky with a concert at Clowes Memorial Hall. Grechesky spent 41 years teaching music at Butler.

-Suneeta Kercood, Professor of Special Education, received a Fulbright-Nehru Academic and Professional Excellence Award to study in India. Her work will revolve around “A Study of the Health Behaviors of Children and Adults with Disabilities, and the Sociocultural Factors that Influence their Healthy Lifestyles.”

-Rear Admiral Elaine C. Wagner ’76 and former Butler men’s basketball coach Brad Stevens received honorary doctorates at Butler University’s spring commencement ceremony. More than 900 students received their diplomas.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

Ryan Lovelace '14 Earns Buckley Fellowship in Political Journalism

BY

PUBLISHED ON May 07 2014

Graduating journalism major Ryan Lovelace ’14 has been awarded a William F. Buckley Fellowship in Political Journalism. As part of the fellowship, Lovelace will work in the editorial department of National Review magazine in New York for a year.

Headshot-2“I'm honored to become a William F. Buckley Jr. fellow, and intend to do my best to live up to the high standards associated with any position bearing his name,” Lovelace said. “I'm excited to continue learning about journalism at National Review and hope to contribute in any way that I can.”

Lovelace and Ian Tuttle from St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland, were chosen because of their passion for journalism and a steadfast commitment to conservative principles, the National Review Institute said in a news release.

Lovelace, a senior from North Aurora, Illinois, has served as managing editor of The Butler Collegian in 2013-2014. In early April, he won a national award from the organization Investigative Reporters & Editors for the story “A Center and Its Director,” about the University’s creation of the Desmond Tutu Center and its hiring of Allan Boesak to be the first director.

In a three-month investigation, Lovelace used South African court records, documents from Wikileaks, and interviews with sources in South Africa to document Boesak’s history. The former freedom fighter had been convicted of misusing donations made to his foundation.

“Ryan has a journalist’s gut and curiosity that drive him to pursue stories few other reporters are telling,” said Loni McKown, faculty adviser to the Collegian and professional practice faculty member in the Eugene S. Pulliam School of Journalism in the College of Communication. “He has a bright future as a national political reporter.”

National Review roving correspondent Kevin D. Williamson will serve as onsite mentor for the fellows, offering editorial feedback, guidance, and support in weekly reviews and hosting them in monthly lunches with leading conservative thinkers and journalists.

The Buckley Fellowship is named for William F. Buckley Jr., who nurtured two generations of conservative journalists. His legacy includes scores of conservative editors and writers. The first Buckley Fellow, Robert Costa, is currently a national political reporter for The Washington Post.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

Butler Honors Six Alumni at Recognition Dinner

BY

PUBLISHED ON May 05 2014

Six Butler University alumni, including a professor emeritus, were honored May 3 at the annual Alumni Recognition Dinner for extraordinary professional achievement and service to the University and their communities.

 

Ed Carpenter ’03, Christina Fugate ’04, Chris Miskel ’96, Nicole Miskel ’98, Jay Love ’76, Eldon Palmer ’50, Winstan “Bud” Sellick ’44, Fabiola Crain, Clarence Crain ’73, Roger Boop ’62 MS ’65, President James M. Danko
Ed Carpenter ’03, Christina Fugate ’04, Chris Miskel ’96, Nicole Miskel ’98, Jay Love ’76, Eldon Palmer ’50, Winstan “Bud” Sellick ’44, Fabiola Crain, Clarence Crain ’73, Roger Boop ’62 MS ’65, President James M. Danko

 

 

Awards and honorees were:

-The Butler Medal: Winstan “Bud” Sellick ’44

-The Butler Service Medal: Dr. Roger W. Boop ’62 MS ’65

-The Robert Todd Duncan Alumni Achievement Award: Jay Love ’76

-The Katharine Merrill Graydon Alumni Service Award: Eldon Palmer ’50

-The Hilton Ultimus Brown Alumni Achievement Award: Ed Carpenter ’03

-The Joseph Irwin Sweeney Alumni Service Award: Christina Fugate ’04

The evening also included two awards presented by the Ovid Butler Society. Clarence ’73 and Fabiola Crain received the Ovid Butler Society Mortar Award. The recipients of the Ovid Butler Society Foundation Award were Chris ’96 and Nicole ’98 Miskel.

This year’s awards ceremony was held in Clowes Memorial Hall. More about the recipients and the awards follows:

The Butler Medal
Winstan “Bud” Sellick ’44

The Butler Medal is the highest honor conferred by the Butler University Alumni Association. It recognizes individuals for a lifetime of distinguished service to either Butler University or their local community while at the same time achieving a distinguished career in their chosen profession and attaining a regional or preferably a national reputation.

This year’s recipient, Bud Sellick of Indianapolis, began a successful career as an insurance agent in 1947, and continued in that profession for several decades until his retirement. He served as President and Owner of Bud Sellick Insurance agency and the Blessing-Sellick Insurance agency.

As a student, Sellick was involved with the band, Kappa Kappa Psi band honorary, and Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He earned a degree in economics.

He was married to Butler graduate Jacqueline Blomberg Sellick’44 until her death in 2012. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English and was a member of Alpha Chi Omega.

Consistent donors to Butler since 1979, the Sellicks endowed three scholarships: the Winstan R. Sellick, Jacqueline Sellick, and Herman W. Blomberg Scholarship; the Sellick, Deming, and Schular Business Scholarship; and the Winstan R. Sellick and Jacqueline B. Sellick Business Scholarship. They also made gifts to the Butler Fund and several athletic funds.

Sellick served in the U.S. Marine Corps in Japan during World War II and as a major in the Marine Forces Reserve during the Korean War. He was a charter member of Woodland Country Club and active in Kiwanis and the American Legion.

The Butler Service Medal
Dr. Roger W. Boop ’62 MS ’65

The Butler Service Medal recognizes emeriti faculty or retired faculty or staff for a lifetime of distinguished service to either Butler University or their local community while at the same time achieving a distinguished career in their chosen profession and attaining a regional or preferably a national reputation. It is further understood that all recipients will have had in the course of their lifetime a profound influence on the future course of Butler University.           

Roger Boop was a Butler University College of Education (COE) faculty member from 1968–2012, specializing in educational foundations and middle school teacher education. He served for several years as Associate Dean of the College and two terms as Interim Dean. He was an effective, respected teacher and supervisor for a multitude of students in COE’s Middle/Secondary program.

Roger received his bachelor’s degree in secondary education and a master’s degree in educational administration from Butler. He also holds a doctorate in educational administration and foundations of education from Ball State University.

He is the author of Fulfilling the Charter: The Story of Education at Butler University and More… written to mark the College of Education’s 75th anniversary.

A driving force in the early years of the Indiana Middle Level Education Association (IMLEA), he was the association’s Executive Secretary for more than a decade. He also served for over a decade as treasurer of Phi Delta Kappa, international education society as well as many years of involvement in Kappa Delta Pi, the international education honorary. He is a member of the Board of Visitors for the College of Education and has continued to serve (since 1980) as platform marshal for University commencements and other ceremonious events.

Roger worked on several University-wide initiatives which included assisting Butler secure grants totaling nearly $1 million in funding that focused upon middle-level education in Indiana and faculty development.

The Robert Todd Duncan Alumni Achievement Award
Jay Love ’76

The Robert Todd Duncan Alumni Achievement Award is presented to an alumna or alumnus whose class graduated at least 15 years prior to the presentation of the award. It recognizes personal and/or professional achievement which brings honor and distinction to the University and individual attainment and/or contributions for the betterment of society.

Jay Love is CEO and Co-founder of Bloomerang, an Indianapolis-based software firm specializing in technology tools for fundraising and communication. Bloomerang is the fourth technology business he has helped found and lead over the past three decades, serving thousands of clients in the non-profit and philanthropy sectors.

Previously, Jay was Co-founder and CEO (for 10 years) of eTapestry, and President and CEO (for 14 years) of Master Software Corporation.

He was a founding member of TechPoint Foundation, NPower Indiana, and the Association of Fundraising Professional (AFP) Business Member Council. He chairs the AFP Ethics Committee, and is an active volunteer/leader with the AFP National Board, the School of Philanthropy at IU, Gleaners Food Bank, United Methodist Foundation of Indiana, TechPoint Foundation for Youth, and the Fundraising Effectiveness Project.

Jay and his wife, Christie, co-chaired the Indianapolis YMCA 2011 capital campaign. They have three children and three granddaughters. Jay holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Butler.

The Katharine Merrill Graydon Alumni Service Award
Eldon Palmer ’50

The Katharine Merrill Graydon Alumni Service Award is presented to an alumna or alumnus whose class graduated at least 15 years prior to the presentation of the award. It recognizes a long-term commitment of outstanding service to the University.

After working many different jobs to pay for his education, Eldon Palmer earned an education degree from Butler. Palmer taught school in Jamestown, Indiana, and then started selling used cars. He opened a Dodge dealership in 1956, and branched into the sales and service of Dodge and Kenworth trucks in 1965. His Kenworth dealership now encompasses sales, service, and leasing operations in Indiana, Ohio, and Kentucky.

Although retired, Palmer still has an active interest in the businesses he developed which include Pebblebrook Golf Course in Noblesville, Indiana¬––the site of an annual golf outing for Butler athletics.

He is a Trustee Emeritus of Butler University and an Indiana Sagamore of the Wabash. He and his wife, Elaine, were the recipients of the 2008 Ovid Butler Society Mortar Award. The first President of Crime Stoppers of Indiana, he provided important leadership and backing to the Marion County Motorcycle Drill team, Wheeler Boys and Girls Club, and the 100 Club, which helps families of fallen Indianapolis Police Department officers. He has been a member of the Optimist and Exchange clubs of Indianapolis, Millersville Masonic Lodge, and Murat Shrine Club, attaining the Scottish Rite 33rd degree. 

Eldon and Elaine Palmer have been married 63 years. They have four children, 13 grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren.

The Hilton Ultimus Brown Alumni Achievement Award
Ed Carpenter ’03

The Hilton Ultimus Brown Alumni Achievement Award is presented to an alumna or alumnus whose class graduated less than 15 years prior to the presentation of the award. It recognizes personal and/or professional accomplishment which brings honor and distinction to the University and individual attainment and/or contributions for the betterment of society.

Ed Carpenter is the 2013 Indianapolis 500 pole winner. He owns and drives for Ed Carpenter Racing, which he started in 2012. He will be behind the wheel of the No. 20 Fuzzy’s Ultra Premium Vodka Chevrolet for six IndyCar Series oval-track events this year, and he will direct driver Mike Conway in 12 road and street races. Conway recently won the Long Beach Grand Prix.

A two-time IndyCar Series winner and the series’ current only driver/owner, Carpenter began competing and winning national quarter-midget races at age eight. He moved on to the USAC National Midget Car, Silver Crown, and Sprint Car series, and Indy Lights Series.

Carpenter received a marketing degree from Butler in 2003, the same year he earned his first IndyCar race start. Since then, he has earned two series wins, two poles, and several top-10 and top five finishes. Last year, he placed fifth in final IndyCar oval points standings.

Ed and his wife, Heather, have three children: Makenna (age 6), Ryder (age 4), and Cruz (age 1).

The Joseph Irwin Sweeney Alumni Service Award
Christina Laun Fugate ’04

The Joseph Irwin Sweeney Alumni Service Award is presented to an alumna or alumnus whose class graduated less than 15 years prior to the presentation of the award. It recognizes a significant commitment of outstanding service to the University. The recipient must have provided affirmative service to the University to assist in perpetuating the University as a great educational and cultural institution.

Christina Fugate is an Attorney at Ice Miller LLP in the firm’s Litigation Group, where she concentrates her practice on real estate, securities, product liability, franchise, and competitive business litigation. Fugate has been recognized as a Super Lawyers “Rising Star” for the past three consecutive years.

She is admitted to practice law in the state of Indiana and in the U.S. District Courts for the Northern and Southern Districts of Indiana. She is a member of the American Bar Association, Indianapolis Bar Association, and IndyCREW, an affiliate of the national CREW (Commercial Real Estate Women) Network.

In 2004, Fugate graduated magna cum laude from Butler with a bachelor’s degree in finance. While at Butler, Christina was a three-time first-team “All-Horizon League” tennis player and former number one singles player for the Bulldogs. In 2007, she earned her juris doctorate, cum laude, from Indiana University School of Law Indianapolis, where she was an editor for the Indiana International and Comparative Law Review.

The current Vice President and incoming President of the Butler Central Indiana Alumni Chapter, Christina served on the University’s Young Alumni Board of Directors (2009–2012), including terms as President and Vice President. Christina is also President of the Hamilton County Community Tennis Association.

Christina is married to Craig Fugate and they have a two-year old son, Dylan.

Ovid Butler Society Foundation Award
Chris Miskel ’96 and Nicole Miskel ’98

Chris is Vice President of Plasma Strategy for Global BioTherapeutics, Baxter Healthcare Corporation in Deerfield, Illinois. Baxter’s BioScience business unit provides life-saving and life-sustaining specialty therapies for patients with rare, chronic conditions.

While earning a bachelor’s degree in accounting at Butler, Chris played basketball and earned the Horizon League Coleman Medal of Honor for 1996. He completed an MBA from Harvard Business School in 2000.

He is a current member of the College of Business Board of Visitors and past member of the Butler Alumni Association Board (2003–2007).

Nicole earned a bachelor’s degree in pharmacy from Butler, and is a member of the American Pharmacists Association. She is employed as an Advisor in Clinical Development Innovation for Eli Lilly and Company. She is also a past member of the Alumni Association board (2009–2010).

The Miskels have supported Butler with gifts to the Butler Fund, Blue Team, Alumni Scholarship, the College of Business, and the Campaign for Hinkle Fieldhouse. Chris and Nicole are also supporters of United Way and the Baxter Political Action Committee.

The Miskels enjoy family time with their children Sage (age 6) and Mace (age 4), and are expecting a baby boy this summer. They love to travel and closely follow Butler basketball. Chris also is a fan of The Ohio State University football and basketball teams.

Ovid Butler Society Mortar Award
Clarence Crain ’73 and Fabiola V. Crain

Butler Trustee Emeritus and civic leader Clarence Crain has been a Program Director in the Education Division of Lilly Endowment Inc. since 2006. His previous career with General Motors Corp spanned 30 years, including two five-year stints as Area Manager in the Indianapolis and Marion pressrooms, helping direct plant operations of 2,500 and 1,700 employees, respectively. 

Clarence graduated from Shortridge High School, where he was a member of the All-Star Indiana High School basketball team. He played basketball at Butler, earning Most Valuable Player recognition and initiation to the Athletic Hall of Fame in 2004. A Butler Trustee from 2000 to 2006, he was a charter member of the Minority Alumni Council and served on the Alumni Association board and College of Business Board of Visitors.

He has held several offices with 100 Black Men of Indianapolis and continues as a team mentor; the group named him their 1999 “Man of the Year.” He received honors from the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP), the Center for Leadership Development for Business Achievement (General Motors), and the Butler Medal (Butler University).  He has served on boards for Maple Crest Civic Association (President); Public Works, Indianapolis City-County Council; and United Way Community Service Council. Clarence was a high school basketball official for 19 years and officiated in the 1993 state finals.

Fabiola Crain is a retired speech and language pathologist with over 35 years of experience in education, most of it with the Wayne Township School Corporation. A native of Nashville, Tennessee, she graduated from Tennessee State University in 1976 and is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority.

Clarence introduced Fabiola to the “Butler Way” in 1999. She shares his passion for Butler, through philanthropy and sitting behind the bench at Butler Bulldog basketball games. She enjoys traveling, horticulture, and collecting Christmas decorations.

The Crains have three children and one grandchild. They are active members of Mount Carmel Baptist Church.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

 

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