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Dr. Stark Honored With Sagamore of the Wabash

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 16 2014

Eric Stark was in the middle of conducting the Indianapolis Symphonic Choir in a rendition of Benjamin Britten’s “War Requiem” Tuesday evening when State Rep. Dan Forestal and about 25 guests stepped onstage to deliver a surprise: Stark had been named a Sagamore of the Wabash, one of the State of Indiana’s highest individual awards.

“I almost always have something to say,” Stark, Butler’s Director of Choral Activities and the Symphonic Choir’s Artistic Director, said after receiving a standing ovation from the 200-member choir and guests. “But tonight I’m absolutely speechless. This will take a while to sink in. But I’m touched, and honored, and incredibly humbled.”

Eric Stark receives the Sagamore of the Wabash from State Rep. Dan Forestal.
Eric Stark receives the Sagamore of the Wabash from State Rep. Dan Forestal.

See a video of the surprise here.

Forestal (D-Indianapolis) delivered the award at Butler’s Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts, flanked by a contingent that included Stark’s mother, Sherry Stark, and stepfather, David Tiede; Stark’s brother Chris and sister-in-law Ann; and cousin Julie Moll and her husband, Tom.

“To say Dr. Eric Stark is deserving of this recognition is an understatement,” Forestal said. “The role he has played in enriching our community can be seen in many ways, but mostly in the lives of the people he has guided through the years. Through his great service, untold numbers have gained a greater appreciation of the power of music and have used that knowledge to entertain and enrich the lives of others.”

Stark, a Columbus, Indiana, native, began teaching at Butler in 1996 and is in his 12th season as Artistic Director of the Indianapolis Symphonic Choir. The Wabash College alumnus received his master’s and doctoral degrees from Indiana University Jacobs School of Music.

Stark also has four CD recordings to his name and multiple new music commissions. He has conducted at Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center, and Strathmore Music Center, as well as in Bolivia, Argentina, Brazil, throughout Europe, Asia, and the United States.

Michael Pettry MM ’06, executive director of the Symphonic Choir, took a conducting class from Stark while in graduate school.

“Eric is an incredible leader, and I’ll tell you why,” Pettry said. “You wouldn’t know that he’s leading. Anybody who’s been in his choir, or who’s been in a committee meeting—as exciting as those are—with Eric sees the quiet, hands-off sort of leadership that Eric exudes. He’s a true educator through and through.”

The Sagamore, bestowed by Gov. Mike Pence, is considered among the greatest honors to come from our state’s chief executive. It is a tribute given to those who have provided a valued service to Indiana and its people. Sagamore recipients include astronauts, presidents, ambassadors, artists, musicians, and ordinary citizens who have contributed greatly to the Hoosier heritage—including Stark’s maternal grandfather, businessman J. Kirby Risk, who received a Sagamore of the Wabash in 1969.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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Butler Names Three 'Women of Distinction'

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 10 2014

College of Education Associate Dean Debra Lecklider, Clowes Memorial Hall Executive Director Elise Kushigian, and senior Chemistry/Pre-Medicine student Brittany Moore have been named Butler University’s 2014 Women of Distinction.

The awards will be presented at the Women of Distinction reception on April 14 at 4:00 p.m. in the Efroymson Diversity Center, Atherton Union Room 004. The University community is invited to attend and congratulate the 2014 recipients.

Faculty, staff, and students nominate potential honorees. The person who nominated Lecklider described her as “energetic, intuitive, and a great communicator.”

deblecklider13

“Deb Lecklider is a woman of great integrity,” the nomination said. “She should be recognized as a Woman of Distinction because she has demonstrated her passion for assisting all University students, faculty, and staff. …. She is an inspiration to her students and colleagues. Deb constantly challenges her students and colleagues to think outside the box. She regards failures as teachable moments.”

 

 

 elise backstage-letterKushigian “has been a positive role model to her staff and the women of Butler University for 19 years, leading confidently at all times in a business that often requires long hours, quick decisions, and sometimes tough negotiations,” her nominator said, adding that she “is an eager mentor to the Clowes staff, soliciting ideas and offering opportunities while remaining hands-on in all areas of the venue operations. … Ms. Kushigian demands high standards, won’t take no for an answer, and hides behind her tough façade a heart of gold.”

 

 

B. Moore photo (2)Moore’s credits include serving as President of the Black Student Union, Vice President of the International Club, and a Diversity Ambassador for the Efroymson Diversity Center. She has volunteered at Riley Hospital for Children, serves as a Butler Early College Program mentor, and was a freshman mentor for three years. Her goal is medical school.

“Brittany Moore is a Woman of Distinction,” the person nominating her said. “Throughout her years at Butler, she has always placed the needs of others before herself. Brittany truly exemplifies the role of the servant-leader and scholar.”

 

The Butler University Woman of Distinction Award is presented annually. Each recipient is an outstanding leader who has shown commitment and dedication to improving the Butler community; reaches out to others while valuing herself; has created a vision and moves others toward that vision; has defined a clear role for herself in today’s changing environment; faces challenges head on and is decisive and persistent; carries herself with dignity and pride, but never with vanity; values the strides achieved by women and has worked to improve the environment for women; and is a serious woman who rules her life with energy, integrity, and love.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

 

 

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Clowes Hall Introduces Sensory-Enhanced Seating for the Hearing Impaired

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 09 2014

Beginning Friday, April 11, Clowes Memorial Hall will launch a first-of-its-kind project that enhances the concert performance experience through a system it has dubbed “audio sensory enhanced seating.” These seats are equipped with technology designed to convert audio into vibration to create physical sensation from sound.

clowesfullhouse0113 001The project started through an idea by Joshua Lingenfelter, Clowes Memorial Hall Director of Marketing, after an experience he had at the Clowes Box Office.

“We had a concert one evening, and the performer was also on a popular TV show at the time,” Lingenfelter said. “A man came to the window and wrote down on a piece of paper that he would like a refund. His wife stood behind him as they both communicated via sign language and written notes. Essentially, they were both fans of the performer being on TV, but even though the husband had great intentions, the wife couldn’t fathom attending a concert when they can’t hear.”

“That sparked an idea for me: What if we changed the way we perceived music by not only hearing it, but also feeling it. Would that have changed their minds about attending the concert? This wasn’t an entirely new concept. Think back to the stories of Beethoven chopping off the legs of his piano after losing his hearing in order to feel the vibrations and you can see where the idea comes from. If we aren’t able to hear it, can we feel it instead?”

Lingenfelter, who is also a percussionist, was familiar with a technology called the Buttkicker® sound enhancement system. The ButtKicker® brand low-frequency audio transducers were developed to solve a problem between a bass player and his drummer. They wanted to be able to feel the low end of the music without turning the stage monitors up so loud that it disturbed the rest of the band. A low-frequency audio transducer allows the user to feel powerful bass without excessive volume.

This week, Clowes will install eight systems into seats, which will be reviewed by members of the deaf and hard-of-hearing community during the weekend performance of Blue Man Group at no cost through a generous grant from The Broadway League.

In recent years, the ButtKicker® technology has been installed with commercial applications, bringing excitement and depth to theatres for hearing audiences. Current customers include Disney: Mission Space, Center of Science and Industry – Columbus, Ohio, and Kennedy Space Center. Lingenfelter imagined that if he could use that same technology in the seats of Clowes Memorial Hall, then this could create an option to have music be a valid evening of entertainment for those who had no ability to hear.

Before proceeding with program development for this project, each department at Clowes worked together to develop a test of the ButtKicker® system with a performance of West Side Story at Clowes Hall on June 9, 2013. Clowes invited audience members from the deaf and hard-of-hearing community to attend an ASL-interpreted performance and sit in a seat with the ButtKicker® unit. Invitations were extended to a member of the deaf community and his hearing family, teachers and students from the Indiana School for the Deaf (ISD) and ASL interpreters. This test allowed the patrons to feel the vibrations of the music in the show, enhancing their Broadway performance experience. Patron feedback was positive.

Clowes made initial calls to The Guitammer Company (owners of the Buttkicker technology) in May 2013 to investigate options to use the ButtKicker® at Clowes Hall with a specific focus on music productions. Ernie Yezzi, Clowes sound stagehand, spoke with Mark Luden, CEO and President of The Guitammer Company, to explore new potential uses for the equipment.

To date, the ButtKicker® has never been used in live musical theatre performances or to enhance the performance experience for deaf and hard-of-hearing audiences. This presents a unique opportunity for Clowes to pilot a program with potential national replication.

The education and marketing departments at Clowes plan to follow up with extensive research following the weekend to further develop the technology.

“Those of us who can hear don’t think twice about going to a concert for an evening of entertainment,” Lingenfelter said. “For those who are deaf or hard of hearing, a concert may be of little to no interest. However, if we can convert the way our senses perceive music then we can serve all populations in our community.”

 

Media contact:
Josh Lingenfelter
jlingenf@butler.edu
317-940-6411

 

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Alex Still '14 Receives Fulbright French Government Teaching Award

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 09 2014

Alex Still graduates in May with a bachelor’s in dance pedagogy and French, along with a history minor. And she’ll be using all she learned when she heads to France this fall as recipient of the Fulbright French Government Teaching Award, sponsored by the French ministry of education.

142Still, who came to Butler from Williamsburg, Virginia, will leave for France in mid-September and spend the school year teaching English to French middle and high school students in the northern France city of Lille.

“It’s been awesome to be in the dance program,” said Still, Butler’s seventh Fulbright recipient in the last four years and the second this year, “but also to be able to have other interests and not be restricted to one major.  Because I got to do all of this, I feel like that’s why I get to go to the next level. Following the Butler Way has truly gotten me where I am today.”

As a dance pedagogy major, Still took dance classes and participated in Butler Ballet performances. But she also took classes in anatomy, education, psychology, and teaching analysis of dance technique. “Diverse coursework,” she said.

In October 2013, Still began the process of applying for the Fulbright, working with Rusty Jones of the Center for High Achievement and Scholarly Engagement. She received the good news on April 1. She is the third winner of this award in Butler's history, following Courtney Campbell (now Rousseau) in 2003 and Adam Weaver in 2011.

Fulbright applicants for France are considered for both the Fulbright award and a separate, equally prestigious, award (the French Government Teaching Award) from the French Ministry of Education. It’s customary for undergraduate students to be given more consideration for the French Government Teaching Award, whereas graduate students tend to receive the Fulbright.

For Still, the French Government Teaching Award means a return to France. She studied in Dijon the summer after her sophomore year and also has visited Paris on a vacation.

“I hope to stay over there for a few years at least,” she said.

All applicants for the Fulbright are required to propose a side project that they will do in addition to teaching English. Still proposed bringing the concept of the Butler Community Arts School to France by volunteering in a school that needs arts instruction. So as part of her time in Lille, she will not only teach English but dance as well.

“I want to share what I’ve learned through my dance education,” she said.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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1,600 Pounds of Trash, All Over the West Mall

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 08 2014

Two Dumpsters’ worth of trash will be spilled onto Butler University’s west mall April 17 at 11:00 a.m. so students in the Sustainability Practicum course can gauge the amount of food and recyclables in a portion of the University’s garbage.

Brian Foster, Environmental Manager for Covanta, Indianapolis's incinerator, explains the trash-burning process to Sustainability Practicum students.
Brian Foster, Environmental Manager for Covanta, Indianapolis's incinerator, explains the trash-burning process to Sustainability Practicum students.

 

Ray’s Trash Service, which hauled Butler’s garbage, will overturn the receptacles, dumping out approximately 1,600 pounds of refuse collected from Atherton Union and Ross Hall, sites of the University’s two largest student dining halls.

McKenzie Beverage, Butler’s Sustainability Coordinator and instructor for the Sustainability Practicum class, said the purpose of the exercise is to show the amounts of food that’s going to waste and recyclables that are ending up in the trash.

“Because this is an awareness campaign, having a big pile of trash outside is very eye-opening and attention-getting,” Beverage said.

Students will be tweeting their observations at #DawgsGoGreen14. The Twitter account name is @trashauditBU.

An anthropology class will take the recyclables removed from this load of trash and use them for an art project.

The trash audit is part of Earth Week events as well as a bigger initiative to raise awareness about waste and recycling among Butler students, faculty, staff, and visitors.

Other activities include:

-April 14-18: Food Waste Awareness in Dining Halls. Students from Beverage’s class will display pre-consumer food waste totals in the dining halls as an awareness tactic about food waste. Food waste accounts for 10 percent of landfill content in Indiana, a large source of greenhouse gas emissions. Butler Dining Services has reduced its pre-consumer food waste by 18 percent since April 2013, and continues to explore reduction tactics. 

-April 16: Jim Poyser from Earth Charter IN will host the “Ain’t Too Late Show” at 7:00 p.m. in Pharmacy Building Room 150. Collection bins will be provided to help support the Movers for Moms initiative.

-April 19: Student Government Association’s Green Ops will coordinate a White River clean-up in cooperation with the Health and Recreation Center, Friends of the White River, Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, and the International School of Indianapolis. From 9:00 a.m. to noon, Butler students will clean up litter via canoe along the river between Rocky Ripple and the International School. 

-April 22-28: Move-Out Recycling Competition for Butler Seniors. Seniors preparing to move out of their houses can contribute unwanted but recyclable items for free, diverting those cast-off materials from landfills.

In February and March, Butler participated in RecycleMania, an eight-week national competition between universities to promote waste reduction and recycling. In late March, a student group from the Sustainability Practicum class created a Greek house competition to help RecycleMania efforts. They collected 1,250 pounds of recyclables from seven Greek houses in a two-week period.

Beverage said Butler also is involved in a number of long-range environmental efforts, including:

-Submission of the University’s sustainability and climate action plan, part of the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment that President James M. Danko signed in 2012.

- The student-run initiative Butler Biodiesel has made its first batch of biodiesel fuel from waste cooking oils generated on campus with new equipment funded by the Butler Innovation Fund. The group plans to give the biodiesel away on a first-come, first-served basis this summer.   

-Butler College of Business Real Business Experience students have started a recycling company called Green U to service Greek houses and Butler senior houses at a subsidized rate.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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Dr. Grechesky Goes Out on a High Note

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 07 2014

Forty-one years, seven presidents, six deans, countless performances. That’s the line on Bob Grechesky’s career at Butler, which ends this spring when he retires as director of bands.

bobgrechesky11Grechesky joined the faculty in 1973, when Lilly Hall was barely a decade old, and Gallahue Hall and the Holcomb Building had yet to be built. One of his professors at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, former Butler Marching Band Director Michael Leckrone, had taught at Butler and told him about the job, which consisted of conducting the marching band and jazz band.

“I didn’t think I’d stay longer than a few years,” said Grechesky, sitting in a Lilly Hall office filled with memories and mementos of his decades at Butler, including probably 100 bobbleheads. “But it’s been a very good place to be.”

Growing up in Salem, New Jersey, near the Delaware border, Grechesky planned to become a lawyer or a psychologist. In high school in the early 1960s, he was a “crappy” trombone player. One summer he went to a summer music camp at Glassboro State College (now Rowan University) and found himself relegated to the last chair. “It was embarrassing,” he said.

The next year, the Beatles made their first appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show,” and suddenly everyone wanted to be in a rock band—including a friend down the street who played euphonium. Grechesky asked to borrow the horn, which he describes as “a tuba with a thyroid condition.” That next summer, he earned euphonium first chair at the summer camp.

“I wasn’t ready to play that stuff, but there I was,” he said. “So I practiced eight hours a day. The camp was a three-week camp, and, by the time I got done, I was pretty good. I stuck with it. There’s a lot to be said for perseverance. Showing up is the majority of it. Show up, do the work, work hard at it.”

He went on to study at Rutgers University as an undergraduate and earn his doctorate at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. He taught in New Jersey and Wisconsin high schools, and at Madison Area Technical College while in grad school. But Butler was his first—and, it turns out, last—full-time university teaching job.

“I got to a place in my career where this [Butler] was very satisfying,” he said. “And Indianapolis is a great town. We sort of grew up with the town. And this is a great place to raise a family. This is a good school with great students and faculty, and I’ve always been able to fulfill my professional artistic needs here as far as making music and doing music.”

Butler Composer-in-Residence Michael Schelle said Grechesky has been a phenomenal asset for Butler as a professor, performer, and colleague.

“For 40 years, he has been ‘Radio Free Butler’—by far, the most flag-waving chamber of commerce representative for the University I have ever known here, or anywhere else,” Schelle said. “He put his heart and soul into the school and the young musicians, 24/7.”

But now Grechesky and his wife, Adrienne, a music teacher in Indianapolis Public Schools for the past 41 years, will be moving to Marietta, Georgia, to be near their daughter, son-in-law, and two granddaughters.

Grechesky expects to do a lot of chauffeuring. He also plans to play in the Cobb County Wind Ensemble and work on a critical addition to a composition called “A Chant from the Great Plains,” which won the first National Band Association composition contest in the 1920s but has since been lost through time.

What he’ll miss most about Butler, he said, are the students. He’s proud of the number of students who’ve gone on to successful careers in music, including Bob Wood ’74 (trumpet in the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra), Steve Eggleston ’74 (professor of music at Illinois Wesleyan University), and Matt Henry ’96 (colonel and conductor in U.S. Air Force band).

“Some of my best friends are former students,” he said. “Over the years, you establish those relationships. That’s the thing. That’s the bond.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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Collegian Takes Home 11 ICPA Awards

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 07 2014

The Butler Collegian won 11 awards at the Indiana Collegiate Press Association's annual conference Saturday at IUPUI, celebrating the best of Indiana's collegiate newspapers, news magazines, literary magazines, yearbooks, online publications and advertising.

Cartoonist Audrey Meyer, news editor Marais Jacon-Duffy, managing editor Ryan Lovelace, sports reporter Joe Hasenstab and assistant sports editor Matthew VanTryon display the Collegian's awards.
Cartoonist Audrey Meyer, news editor Marais Jacon-Duffy, managing editor Ryan Lovelace, sports reporter Joe Hasenstab and assistant sports editor Matthew VanTryon display the Collegian's awards.

Sophomore Mallory Duncan, who is assistant editor of the Arts, Etc. section, received first place for best entertainment feature story, "A Glorious Adventure Awaits," about science fiction/fantasy writer and Butler senior Stefan LeBlanc. The judge called the story "a great student profile."

Sophomore Audrey Meyer won first place for best editorial cartoon for "Parking Ticket." The judge wrote: "Made us laugh. Clearly and quickly gets the idea across, with a great facial expression. The cartoonist has a very bright future in cartooning."

Audrey Meyer ICPA CartoonThe Collegian won first place for best special issue on March 20, 2013, with the lead stories, "Butler Joining the Big East" and "Back in the Big Dance." It was published the week after spring break (when a newspaper is not normally published), put together under deadline by six students: Jill McCarter '13, Colin Likas, Marissa Johnson '13, Austin Monteith, Lauren Stark and Madison Chartier. The judge wrote: "Great way to capitalize on big sports news by centering an issue around it."

The Collegian also received first and second place for best sports page: "Cycling Team Keeps Rolling," from Oct. 16, 2013, by Taylor Meador '13, Austin Monteith, Kyle Beery and Ben Sieck, and "Official Reaction," from March 6, 2013, by Johnson and Monteith.

Other second place awards:

--Best non-deadline news story, "Packing Up and Moving On," March 6, 2013, by McCarter, Likas and Johnson.

--Best single issue, March 6, 2013.

--Best front page, October 16, 2013, "Red Ink."

Third place awards:

--Maggie Monson, best opinion column, for "You Don't Have to Look Sick to Feel Sick."

--Best overall design.

In addition to those awards, The Collegian placed third for best Division II Newspaper of the Year. Winners this year were The Shield at the University of Southern Indiana, and The Reflector at the University of Indianapolis, respectively. The Collegian had won the category the past two consecutive years.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822 

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Elaine Wagner, Brad Stevens to Be Honored at Spring Commencement

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 04 2014

Rear Admiral Elaine C. Wagner ’76 and former Butler men’s basketball coach Brad Stevens will receive honorary doctorates at Butler University’s commencement ceremony May 10 in the Butler Bowl. More than 800 students are expected to receive their diplomas.

Winter CommencementRear Admiral Wagner is Commander, Navy Medicine East and Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Virginia. She grew up in southern Indiana and attended Butler and Indiana University School of Dentistry (D.D.S., 1980). She completed her pediatric dentistry residency at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis in 1982.

She was commissioned and reported to Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, 29 Palms, California, in December 1983. In the years since, she has headed military dental departments and programs in Washington, DC; San Diego; Maryland; Florida; South Carolina; New England; and Virginia, as well as Okinawa, Japan, and the Philippines. Wagner served as Chief of the Navy Dental Corps from 2010 to 2013. Her military decorations and awards include the Legion of Merit with two gold stars, Meritorious Service Medal with three gold stars, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal with three gold stars, and Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal with two gold stars.

In his six years as the men’s basketball head coach at Butler, Brad Stevens led the Bulldogs to two NCAA® Division I national championship games, four Horizon League regular season championships, three league tournament titles, and five trips to postseason tournament play. Most of the members of the Class of 2014 were first-year students during the second Final Four®  run, and share memories of this achievement.

Last July, the Boston Celtics hired Stevens to be their head coach. “We didn’t have a formal opportunity to thank Brad or celebrate the many contributions he made to the Butler community,” Butler President James M. Danko said. “So for us, this will be that chance. Brad was a dedicated member of the Butler community for more than a dozen years, and still maintains close ties to the University. It is wholly appropriate that we honor him at Commencement with his first Butler degree.”

Stevens’s career is well documented. He left a position as a marketing associate at Eli Lilly and Company in Indianapolis to pursue a career in basketball coaching. He served in a volunteer capacity in Butler’s basketball office during summer 2000, before eventually gaining a full-time administrative position under Thad Matta. He joined the Butler staff in 2000-2001 as Coordinator of Basketball Operations, handling a variety of administrative duties. He was offered a full-time assistant coaching position by then-Coach Todd Lickliter for the 2001-2002 season.

Media contact: Marc Allan
Office Phone 317-940-9822
Cell Phone 317-501-7999
Email mallan@butler.edu

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Emily Seibert '14 Earns Fulbright Teaching Assistantship

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PUBLISHED ON Apr 02 2014

Emily Seibert ’14 received her best 22nd birthday present the day before her actual March 27 birthday: She was chosen for a prestigious Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to live and work in Athens, Greece, for 10 months.

DSC_0372She’ll leave in September and be one of a dozen Americans in the Fulbright program who will teach English and American culture to students at the elementary, middle and high school levels.

“I was very surprised and very honored,” said Seibert, the sixth Fulbright recipient from Butler in the past four years. “I didn’t fully know how to react because I never expected it to become a reality.”

Seibert, an elementary education major from Valparaiso, Indiana, said she had planned to start the job-search process in Indianapolis for a teaching position at the elementary-school level. Then she saw a notice in the Butler Connection—the daily email that goes to students, faculty, and staff—about applying for a Fulbright.

“It put together three of the passions I’ve enhanced at Butler; my love for teaching and my love for kids, my passion for serving others and my new-found love of experiencing different cultures found through my study abroad experience,” she said.

She talked to Rusty Jones, Interim Associate Director of Butler’s Center for High Achievement and Scholarly Engagement, and he helped her start the application process and edit her essays. Jones also organized a Fulbright campus committee interview and wrote her institutional endorsement.

The opportunity to participate in the program in Greece thrilled her because it has no requirement that participants speak a foreign language fluently (Seibert doesn’t) and because she’ll be there with other Fulbright recipients, working collaboratively.

Seibert said she still plans to teach—most likely in Indianapolis—when her Fulbright ends in July 2015. But for now, she’s looking forward to “experiencing education in the world, seeing all the different aspects of what education looks like across the globe. This is a great opportunity to see a different side of education and to bring what I’ve learned at Butler to another part of the world.”

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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26th Annual Undergraduate Research Conference Will Be the Biggest Yet

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PUBLISHED ON Mar 31 2014

Butler University’s 26th annual Undergraduate Research Conference will be its biggest ever, with nearly 1,000 students and their mentoring faculty from 20 states coming to campus April 11 for a daylong event showcasing oral and poster presentations on topics as diverse as molecular biology and 17th-century opera.

014Admission is open to the public, although advanced registration is encouraged. For more information, call 317-940-9581.

Rusty Jones, Interim Associate Director of Butler’s Center for High Achievement and Scholarly Engagement, said nearly two-thirds of the students presenting their research will be from outside Butler, with some coming from as far away as Massachusetts, Florida, and California.

This year’s conference is more than 20 percent bigger than any previous year’s—with nearly 600 presentations scheduled. Jones expects the event to continue to grow.

“This is a unique opportunity for undergraduate students to show off their work,” he said. “We’re one of the only places doing something like this. The quality is absolutely first rate.

“It’s harder and harder to get into grad school. High-achieving students are doing everything they can to make themselves strong candidates, and participation in this event can really bolster their applications and help prepare them for graduate-level work.”

The Undergraduate Research Conference (URC) is open to all fields of study. This year’s theme is “Cultivating urcregisterIntellectual Growth,” and, in keeping with the theme of “cultivation,” McKenzie Beverage, Butler’s sustainability coordinator, will showcase environmental awareness projects on Butler’s campus. That includes tours of the campus farm and LEED gold-certified Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts and the Pharmacy Building addition, as well as a glimpse of a new initiative to operate campus vehicles using student-produced biodiesel fuel.

Information about the presentations at the URC can be found at www.butler.edu/urc.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
(317) 940-9822

 

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Stephen Standifird Named New College of Business Dean

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PUBLISHED ON Mar 21 2014

Stephen Standifird, Dean of the Schroeder School of Business at the University of Evansville, will become the Dean of Butler University’s College of Business beginning June 1.

Standifird_PhotoAt Butler, he will take over the University’s third-largest college, with approximately 900 undergraduate and 200 graduate students. Butler’s College of Business was ranked 47th in the 2013 Bloomberg BusinessWeek ranking of 124 U.S. undergraduate business programs, and U.S. News and World Report ranked the College 141 out of 342 schools in 2013. Butler University’s part-time MBA program is currently ranked 57th by Bloomberg BusinessWeek and 72nd by U.S. News and World Report’s Best Graduate Schools.

"I am impressed by what the Butler College of Business has been able to accomplish in recent years,” said Standifird. “Butler University and the College of Business specifically are leaders in higher education innovation. I am thrilled with the opportunity to lead the ongoing advancements of the College."

At Evansville, Standifird was responsible for all aspects of the Schroeder School of Business, including leading the school’s faculty, assuring continued accreditation, and providing oversight of the school’s Institute for Global Enterprise and Institute for Banking and Finance. Standifird also led the revamping of the school’s assurance of learning program and the introduction of a variety of new international offerings including the “Global Virtual Classroom.”

He created a $1.2 million endowment for career services, with commitments to bring the endowment to $2 million. Under his watch, student placement and their starting salaries increased by 24 percent and 14 percent, respectively. Standifird also led the creation of a $100,000 microfinance fund for minority- and women-owned businesses, which is operated by students and in partnership with Old National Bank.

Prior to his time at the University of Evansville, Standifird held positions at the University of San Diego’s School of Business. As Associate Dean from 2009–2011, he helped increase enrollment of the school’s six master of science programs by roughly 34 percent over a two-year period. During his time as Director of Undergraduate Programs from 2006–2009, he created a comprehensive assurance of learning program and positioned the program for its first-ever ranking by Bloomberg BusinessWeek in 2009.

Standifird earned his bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Purdue University, his MBA from Northwestern University, and his doctorate in organizational studies from the University of Oregon.

“Steve has the precise combination of experience and expertise to become the next leader of the Butler College of Business,” Provost Kathryn Morris said. “I am very pleased that he will be joining the leadership team at Butler.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
(317) 940-9822

 

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Jordan College of the Arts Bestows Its First Legend Awards

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PUBLISHED ON Mar 19 2014

 

 

Poet and musician Mari Evans, jazz vocalist Everett Greene, and attorney and arts advocate Fay H. Williams received the Jordan College of the Arts’s inaugural Legend Awards during ceremonies March 18 at Butler University’s Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts.

Congressman Andre Carson (left) and Dean Ronald Caltabiano (right) with the first Legend Award winners, Fay Williams, Everett Greene, and Mari Evans.
Congressman Andre Carson (left) and Dean Ronald Caltabiano (right) with the first Legend Award winners, Fay Williams, Everett Greene, and Mari Evans. (Photo by Mark Lee, 2014) (c)
 

 

 

“Jordan College of the Arts (JCA) created the Legend Awards to honor individuals whose legendary work has had a deep and lasting impact on the artistic and social fabric of Indianapolis,” Dean Ronald Caltabiano said. “They aim to especially recognize the work of members of minority communities.”

In accepting their awards, Evans read a recent poem, Greene sang with his long time accompanist, and actress/storyteller Deborah Asante took the stage in a dramatic reading of one of Mari Evans best-known works, "I Am a Black Woman."

Congressman Andre Carson, honorary chair, welcomed the attendees and stayed throughout the event, which more than 150 people attended.

Prior to the awards presentation, Caltabiano announced the launch of an Audience Development Task Force to be chaired by Williams. Composed of community members and representatives from the across Butler (including JCA faculty and staff and members of the JCA Board of Visitors), the task force will work through the next year, with goal of making recommendations to the dean on expanding JCA audience diversity in areas including age, ethnicity, and religion.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

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