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Clowes Hall plaza project rendering
Butler Beyond

Butler Receives $1M Grant from Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation for Modernization of Clowes Memorial Hall

BY Jennifer Gunnels

PUBLISHED ON Feb 26 2021

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind.—The Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation (AWCCF) has awarded Butler University a $1 million grant to support the modernization of Clowes Memorial Hall, the anchor performing arts venue of the Butler Arts & Events Center (BAEC). The grant will enable the BAEC to address contemporary safety and security concerns for patrons and performers while honoring the building’s original architectural integrity. The modernization project is part of a larger plan to enhance and remodel the exterior plaza of the venue, which was built in 1963.

While the original design for Clowes Memorial Hall envisioned the entrance of the building as a “temple of light” with a very open feel, allowing visitors to enter from all three sides of the lobby, current security measures have limited the use of exterior doors for guest entry. The redesigned entrance will honor the building’s original vision through a reimagined entry facade with a glass-enclosed marquee and second-level event space that will link the east and west sides of the second-level lobby. The new design will also remove the current existing wall between the box office and the lobby, allowing natural light to flow into the lobby and increasing the size of the lobby by 12 feet. The new entry will increase the number of metal detectors from four to 10, more than doubling the speed with which visitors can enter the building for major events and providing a vast improvement for visitor experience, particularly during inclement weather.
 

Clowes Hall plaza rendering


“I think the biggest complaints we have heard from visitors when they have come here in the past is how long it takes to get into the building, or that intermissions have been a pain to try to move through the lobby to get to the restrooms. Accessibility has also been a bit of an issue for some, and this redesign takes all of those concerns into consideration,” says Aaron Hurt, Executive Director of the BAEC. “Ease of getting into the building in a safe way and flow once you’re inside will all be vastly improved by this redesign, and I think that’s really going to improve the experience a lot for our guests.”

The new entryway is the first phase of a larger plan to redesign the entire exterior plaza of the venue to be more secure and functional. The new plaza will be paved with a small outdoor stage for hosting pre-show events, outdoor concerts, and student performances. The plaza will also include new concrete bollards—short, flat posts that will serve as both seating around the stage as well as a protective perimeter for the venue and guests gathered outside. The new paved plaza will provide a central rallying point for student events and an additional versatile gathering space for the community, enhancing student life on campus.

Although the COVID-19 pandemic has forced the BAEC to cancel all in-person performances and events for the time being, the unexpected extended closure along with the AWCCF grant will allow Butler to begin the planned renovations and upgrades during the coming months. Construction on the entryway project will begin May 1 and should be complete by the time students return to campus at the end of August. The University hopes to raise an additional $3.5 million to help fund the exterior plaza project in the coming months, as well, taking advantage of the window of time provided by the pandemic to complete the renovations in advance of an anticipated grand reopening when in-person performances are once again viable.

Clowes Hall plaza renderings“We’ve really tried to approach this with an attitude of, ‘How can we come out of this period of time as an even better venue for our patrons and performers?’ Our booking staff has still been working really hard while the venue has been closed, and we have lots of big names lined up for when we can re-open,” Hurt says. “We’re excited for the chance to welcome guests back to Clowes, and we feel confident they’re going to have an even better experience than the last time they were here.”

With the help of the AWCCF grant, Butler has now raised more than $196.4 million toward its $250 million goal for its Butler Beyond comprehensive fundraising campaign. One of the pillars of the Butler Beyond campaign is Community Partnerships, which highlights the University’s efforts to expand its impact beyond the current student body and beyond the borders of campus by contributing to the wellbeing of the broader Indianapolis community. Butler President Jim Danko says the AWCCF has been an extraordinary partner in supporting the arts education and cultural offerings provided by the BAEC, which are important aspects of the University’s role in the community.

“I am extremely grateful to the Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation for its support and partnership in preserving and enhancing Clowes Memorial Hall for future generations of students and community members,” Danko says. “As a result of the critical upgrades supported by this gift, Butler will continue in its leadership role, enriching the Central Indiana community through arts, culture, and entertainment.”

Clowes Memorial Hall serves more than 300,000 patrons annually through a variety of events and programs ranging from Butler University’s own The Nutcracker to national touring companies through Broadway Across America. With 2,148 seats and a rich history of hosting some of the world’s greatest talents and personalities, Clowes also serves as one of Central Indiana’s leading providers of arts education services, welcoming school corporations in more than 85 counties across the state and serving more than 35,000 student participants annually. Since 1991, more than one million students, teachers, and guests have attended education matinee performances at Clowes.

“Clowes Memorial Hall has a lot of significance in the Indianapolis community historically as a hub for arts and culture,” Hurt says. “We are constantly asking ourselves, ‘How do we make sure this flagship venue continues to be relevant for the community? How do we take it to the next level in terms of the value we can bring to our city?’ This project is an example of Butler’s commitment to being a place for everyone.”


Renderings by Browning Day


Media Contact:
Katie Grieze
Senior Content Manager
kgrieze@butler.edu
260-307-3403

Clowes Hall plaza project rendering
Butler Beyond

Butler Receives $1M Grant from Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation for Modernization of Clowes Memorial Hall

The project is part of a larger plan to enhance and remodel the venue's exterior plaza

Feb 26 2021 Read more

Live Mascot Team Aims to Unveil Trip’s Official Portrait on Butler’s Day of Giving

By Katie Grieze

FEBRUARY 24 UPDATE: We did it! Watch the unveiling of Trip's official portrait.



In 2001, Butler University Interim President Gwen Fountain decided to hold the school’s first live bulldog mascot, Butler Blue I, as she posed for her presidential portrait that now hangs in Atherton Union.

That was the start of a tradition. When Butler Blue II retired in 2013, his handler, Michael Kaltenmark, contacted local artist James Kelly of Mad Lab Studios to create a painting of the bulldog that resides in Robertson Hall.

Now it’s Blue III’s turn. Better known as ‘Trip,’ Butler’s third live mascot retired in the spring of 2020, and his official portrait has been painted by Anthony J. Padgett of Red Truck Productions. The Live Mascot Program just needs to raise $5,000 during Butler’s 2021 Day of Giving on February 24–25 for the painting—which currently hangs under a curtain in Robertson Hall—to be unveiled.

Leading up to the fundraising challenge, we touched base with Trip’s dad to learn more.

How would you describe the purpose of creating the mascot portraits?
Michael Kaltenmark: Just as is the case for our University Presidents, these official portraits of our live mascots both honor their service to Butler and preserve their likeness on canvas for the campus community to enjoy for generations to come.

How did you choose Anthony J. Padgett to be the artist for Trip’s painting?
MK: It was a case of Anthony choosing us! Anthony’s business partner in Red Truck Productions is Neal Stock, who has Butler ties. Knowing our history of capturing our live English bulldog mascots in oils and acrylics, Neal pursued the opportunity to have Anthony produce this piece. I was glad he did. Anthony’s work speaks for itself, and I was honored that he wanted to focus his talents on Trip. The fact that he’s local to the Indianapolis area, and that he wanted to pursue this project at a steep discount, made the partnership even better. I couldn’t be happier with how this all worked out.

What does the process of creating the portrait look like?
MK: Anthony and Neal came to campus to shoot some photography of Trip, as well as various landscapes for potential backgrounds. They also referenced photos we already had. After giving them some input, we left the creative vision to Anthony, and we didn’t see the portrait until it was nearly finished.

Why do you have a fundraising goal of $5,000 for this project?
MK: That covers everything, including the commission fee, materials, framing, etc. An original work of this size and scope would typically cost much more, but Anthony and Neal wanted to do this at a discount for Butler’s sake. Now we are inviting the Butler community and our fans to help us cover the cost. When they come to campus to see Trip’s portrait, they can take some satisfaction in knowing that they helped make it happen.

How can Butler community members watch the portrait unveiling?
MK: Under normal circumstances, we’d hold an unveiling event with Trip in attendance, much like we did with Blue II back in 2013. But given the health and safety protocols related to the pandemic, this unveiling will be all virtual. And if we meet our fundraising goal on Butler’s Day of Giving, we’ll do the unveiling live via social media that day!
 

To support this initiative and help us unveil Trip’s official portrait, you can make a gift to Butler’s Live Mascot program on February 24–25. To see other available Day of Giving challenges, click here.

Some call it giving back. We call it the Butler Way.
On Butler's 6th annual Day of Giving, we invite you to join us in celebrating the best of Butler by making a gift to support the areas of your choice. Our goal is to reach 1,500 gifts across the Butler community before 12:55 PM on February 25. Hitting our goal will unlock $50,000 in student scholarship support. Day of Giving is special because it brings together Bulldogs near and far to achieve a shared goal: putting a Butler education within reach of all who desire to pursue it. There’s strength in numbers, and your gift—of any size—will make a difference for Butler students. Thank you for supporting Butler University!

 

Media Contact:
Katie Grieze
Senior Content Manager
kgrieze@butler.edu
260-307-3403 (mobile)

Trip portrait teaser graphic
Campus

Live Mascot Team Aims to Unveil Trip’s Official Portrait on Butler’s Day of Giving

If the mascot fund raises $5,000 on February 24, the new painting of Butler Blue III will be revealed

Butler Theatre's 'Antigone,' fall 2020, photo by Zach Rosing
Experiential Learning

As COVID-19 Cancels Shows Across the Nation, Butler Theatre Stays on Stage

BY Katie Grieze

PUBLISHED ON Feb 18 2021

Antigone just learned her brother is dead, and the new king will prohibit the honor of a burial. A mask hides the fury on her face as she argues with her sister, shouting that they should bury their brother anyway, but Antigone’s head shakes and her fists pound the air as she paces quickly around the stage. She can’t breach the six feet of distance to confront her sister up close, but she conveys her passion by leaning forward and pointing as she speaks, taking small steps that drive her sister away.

Antigone, photo by Zach Rosing“We wore masks while performing, so we learned to take an emotion that would normally just be a frown on your face and express it with your whole body,” says senior Theatre major Sarah Ault, who played the role of Antigone in Butler University’s production last fall. “That’s a shift from how I would normally approach things, but it was useful to experience. It has been a ‘the-show-must-go-on’ situation.”

While most collegiate and professional theatre organizations have halted in-person performances during the pandemic, Butler’s program has stayed on stage. It took research, strict safety measures, and audience limits, but it was worth giving students the live learning opportunities they signed up for.

“Our priority is the educational and artistic development of our students,” says Diane Timmerman, Theatre Professor and Chair. “We’re just really excited and proud that we were able to make this happen, and that the students have grown so much as artists, even in this time.”

Butler Theatre’s fall 2020 productions included Shel Silverstein's Lafcadio at Shelton Auditorium, followed by a modern adaptation of Sophocles’ Antigone at the Schrott Center. The theatre season continues at Clowes Memorial Hall on February 26 with The Living, a play depicting the plague that hit London in the 17th century. In April, performances of Fleeting Full 2.0 by Samuel Beckett will wrap up the year.

Two key factors have allowed Butler to produce in-person shows, Timmerman says. First, they were willing to meet the high bar of safety standards needed to perform indoors, whereas some other theatres would rather wait until they can stage plays without social distancing, mask wearing, and other protocols. And because Butler’s program isn’t revenue-driven, they could afford to have a limited in-person audience alongside free livestreams—a rule that might not work for theatres where ticket sales cover production costs.

“Everyday going into rehearsal, I recognize that it is such a privilege,” says Ault, who will follow her time as Antigone with a new role in The Living. “I’m thankful for all the efforts that Butler and its Theatre program are putting in to make sure we can have the opportunity to perform. Because this is the bread and butter of our education.”
 

Butler Theatre's 'Lafcadio,' photo by Zach Rosing


Setting the Stage for Safety

Deborah Jo Barrett spent the summer researching.

As Production and Stage Manager for the Jordan College of the Arts, she set the rules for keeping performers safe from COVID-19. She started with guidelines from the city and state, plus the health standards in place at Butler, then added another layer of theatre-specific protocols based on recommendations and studies from production organizations across the country.

By the start of the fall semester, Barrett had compiled and shared a new pandemic handbook for the department and created a Stage Manager’s Handbook that included COVID-related guidelines. In addition to the basics we’ve all been following for nearly a year, these guidelines focused on cleaning protocols, air flow, and reduced cross contact.

During typical rehearsals and performances, several people touch the same props. Now that only one person can touch each item, directors have decreased overall prop usage. Actors also need to be in charge of their own costumes and makeup, without the assistance they’d normally have from crew members.

And with the amount of movement and vocal activity involved in theatre, the department took extra measures to maintain fresh air in rehearsal spaces. Accounting for room size, HVAC air exchange rates, and the number of people present, rehearsal groups need to take breaks or move to a different room about every 30 minutes to let spaces air out.

Surfaces are sanitized, temperatures are checked, and daily health surveys are filled out. As the virus evolves, so do the safety measures. Barrett says it’s tricky staging productions with everyone six feet apart, and they’ve needed to incorporate masks in ways that don’t distract from performances, but students have done a wonderful job sticking to the protocols.

“I think after the spring shutdown and the long summer, everyone was just so grateful to be back in-person,” Barrett says. “Everyone helped take care of everyone else. Of course, if we had to shut down again, we were ready to divert what we were working on into an online format. But because Butler is doing in-person classes, we feel it is important that as much as possible—and as safely as possible—we do live performances.”
 

On-The-Scene Learning

Kelly Schwantes, a senior Theatre major who served as stage manager for Lafcadio, is glad to be finishing her degree in-person.

“We are one of the only organizations in Indianapolis still producing,” Schwantes says. “And from the collegiate aspect, many universities had to do things like digital readings or radio plays. I don’t know if the magnitude of that hit every student, but it certainly hit me, and it reminded me how important it is to be grateful at a time like this that I can go to school and do what I came here to do.”

Schwantes says stage managing for the first time during a pandemic taught her that doing something new isn’t as scary as it may seem.

“In whatever role you’re in, you start small and work your way up,” she says. “I learned a lot of the skills I needed throughout my first three years at Butler. And I also work retail, so even with the added layer of COVID, I already had experience with maintaining safety standards. By the time we finished the first day of rehearsal, I knew we were going to make it through.”

While Butler Theatre’s fall productions were selected before COVID-19 hit, they still worked well with safety protocols. Antigone, for example, takes place during a plague, so masks fit the story. But for the spring semester, The Living—which is about the Great Plague of London—was chosen specifically for its current relevance.

And like the fall performances, the two this spring will be available via livestream. The program plans to continue livestreaming productions even after the pandemic to reach audiences who can’t make it to campus.

Ault’s family lives in Kansas, so she appreciates the new virtual viewing options.

“One positive thing about the way we are doing shows this year is that friends and family who have never seen me perform can now livestream the shows,” she says. “That has been a blessing in disguise.”
 

Photos by Zach Rosing
 

Media Contact:
Katie Grieze
Senior Content Manager
kgrieze@butler.edu
260-307-3403 (mobile)

Butler Theatre's 'Antigone,' fall 2020, photo by Zach Rosing
Experiential Learning

As COVID-19 Cancels Shows Across the Nation, Butler Theatre Stays on Stage

Strict safety measures allow students to keep rehearsing, performing, and learning together

Feb 18 2021 Read more

Butler Alum Focuses on Making Community Brighter, One Flower at a Time

By Hailey Radakovitz ’21

From February to April 2020, the number of active business owners in the United States plummeted 22 percent, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research, an indicator of the economic hardship brought about by COVID-19.

Businesses specializing in event services have been struck especially hard, as the pandemic has led to the cancellation of large gatherings. This has resulted in a major hit for small business owners as they fight to keep their passions alive and rely on community support.

Becky Ruby-WojtowiczLocated in Broad Ripple, Indianapolis, lilly lane is one of many businesses feeling the effects of the past year. A small floral shop that originally catered to weddings and other special events, lilly lane immediately began losing contracted events in mid-March as COVID-19 eliminated most of these gatherings for months to come. The shop started 2020 with plans to provide flowers for 60 weddings throughout the year, but that number quickly dwindled. Despite the challenge of remaining open and profitable, the shop is still finding ways to give back to the community.

Becky Ruby-Wojtowicz ’05, lilly lane’s owner, majored in Journalism and Arts Administration at Butler University. She began working with flowers during her first post-grad job as a Giving Manager at the Indianapolis Zoo, where she would occasionally create arrangements for donor events.

“Since we had a botanical garden on site, I would use its flowers to create centerpieces for some of our events,” she says. “I thought it was fun, and I wanted to do it on the side as a creative outlet.”

Then, in July 2008, a fellow Butler graduate reached out to Ruby-Wojtowicz with an emergency: Her wedding florist had suddenly canceled. With an eye for detail and some experience in florals, Ruby-Wojtowicz agreed to step in and help. The wedding was a success, and during the next few months, wedding floral requests from other Butler couples began pouring in. For more than a decade, a large portion of lilly lane’s floral arrangements have gone to weddings and other events for Butler alumni.

“Bulldogs love to support Bulldogs, and Bulldogs love to marry Bulldogs,” Ruby-Wojtowicz said with a laugh.

lilly lane flowers

As weddings were postponed throughout the last year, however, lilly lane’s business began to slow.

“We saw an immediate need for our doors to stay open,” Ruby-Wojtowicz says. “We knew business for events would come back eventually—we just didn’t know when.”

So, lilly lane adapted, drawing on its steadily-growing network of nearly 1,000 married couples and other past clients looking to support local businesses during the pandemic.

lilly lane flowersThe shop decided to shift the style of its arrangements to fit where many people now spend the most time—at home. These arrangements use seasonal blooms, featuring different combinations of colors and textures. This was the start of HOME, a program inviting lilly lane customers to order flower subscriptions that bring fresh-cut beauty to their doorsteps once or twice each month.

But lilly lane didn’t just stop at adapting business to survive the pandemic. Ruby-Wojtowicz also wanted to find a way to give back to the Indianapolis and Butler communities. After years of providing the University with flowers for events such as luncheons, receptions, and more, lilly lane recently ran a month-long special that donated a percentage of sales to the Butler Emergency Assistance Fund. The shop’s contributions to this fund will help cover the housing, living, and medical costs that students may face as a result of the pandemic throughout this academic year.

Despite the ongoing challenges brought on by COVID-19, one thing remains certain to Ruby-Wojtowicz: Going forward, lilly lane will continue to brighten lives one flower at a time.

lilly lane flowers
Alumni Success

Butler Alum Focuses on Making Community Brighter, One Flower at a Time

Becky Ruby-Wojtowicz ’05 has found a way to follow her passion while supporting the Butler and Indianapolis communities

Alicia Garza Talks with Students on the Power of Working Together for Change

By Katie Grieze

After the killings of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor in the spring of 2020, Butler University junior Annie Ventura wanted to address the anger she felt in a meaningful way.

“I was mad, sad, and disappointed about the acts of police brutality and the murders of people of color, particularly Black people,” says Ventura, an International Studies major with a minor in Criminology. “I knew that if I was mad, then there were millions of other people who were, too, because they were personally and directly affected by what was happening. It was a type of anger, disappointment, and sadness that I would never be able to fully understand. So, I wanted to do something that could serve as a beacon of hope and support.”

By early 2021, Ventura and other members of the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Board (DEIB) of Butler’s Student Government Association had organized for #BlackLivesMatter co-creator Alicia Garza to speak with the campus community during the University's Founder's Week. Ventura helped moderate the conversation on February 9, along with Butler senior and DEIB Director Roua Daas. Co-sponsors for the virtual event included the Black Student Union, the Hub for Black Affairs and Community Engagement, Bust The B.U.B.B.L.E., the Efroymson Diversity Center, and the Department of Race, Gender & Sexuality Studies.

In addition to helping launch #BlackLivesMatter, Garza founded the Black Futures Lab to help Black communities be more powerful in politics. She is the Strategy & Partnerships Director for the National Domestic Workers Alliance, the co-founder of Supermajority, and author of the book The Purpose of Power: How We Come Together When We Fall Apart—which was available free for Butler students leading up to the event.

During the discussion, Garza focused on her desire for more people to believe in their own power to create change, especially if they work together.

“The story that is told so often about #BlackLivesMatter is that we took a hashtag and turned it into a global movement,” she said. “But that’s not at all how change happens. Movements don’t originate from hashtags. They come from people who are sick and tired of being sick and tired—as [civil rights activist] Fannie Lou Hamer was known to say—and they join together to create a force that is bigger than themselves as individuals so that we can all access the world that we deserve.”

Organizing is powerful, Garza explained, but there can also be things that stand in the way of success. She said social movements can be messy because the people who build them are messy, complicated individuals. Even within the same organization, members come from a variety of backgrounds and experiences. That’s why in building a movement, Garza said, it’s crucial to take an intersectional approach that doesn’t leave anyone behind.

“I love how Alicia tells her story and situates her own world view in an ever-shifting political and economic U.S. context, where there has been a constant backlash to any hard-fought progress that Black people gained decade after decade,” said Dr. Terri Jett, Professor of Political Science and Faculty Director of the Hub for Black Affairs and Community Engagement. “Her never-ending passion for staying in the midst of the struggle, and yet carving out a space for centering intersectional voices, has been remarkable because it allows for leaders to emerge who would have otherwise been silenced.”

Click here to view a recording of this event.

Alicia Garza
Campus

Alicia Garza Talks with Students on the Power of Working Together for Change

The #BlackLivesMatter co-creator spoke with the Butler community during a student-organized event on February 9

Spring Valley Farms eggs
Innovation

Butler Dining Launches New Sustainable Food Grant Program

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 09 2021

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind.—Butler University and its food service partner, Bon Appétit Management Company, are proud to announce the launch of the Food Enterprises Achieving Sustainability Together (FEAST) Fund, as part of their commitment to strengthening the local food system.

Butler students, campus groups, and departments—as well as food suppliers—can submit applications for sustainable food-related projects that will benefit the campus community.

“The FEAST Fund exemplifies Butler’s commitment to sustainability and student innovation,” said Dr. Frank E. Ross, Butler Vice President for Student Affairs. “Students will be empowered to take action and build an eco-friendlier campus that contributes to our collective health and well-being. As many face food insecurity amid the COVID-19 pandemic, we have a commitment to practice sustainable consumption and tackle food waste. The FEAST Fund will help us do just that.”

To inspire other applicants, the committee has launched its first project: an egg centrifuge that cracks eggs at very high speed, which will allow for eggs from Spring Valley Farms in Hagerstown, Indiana, to be used more widely at Butler.

Butler Dining already buys some local eggs, along with local produce, meat, cheese, and more from many local farms, ranches, and food artisans. But the University was previously buying precracked (aka, “liquid”) eggs from a national Certified Humane supplier, due to the impracticality of using whole eggs in a large-scale food service operation. The centrifuge was proposed by Bon Appétit chef Chad Melinger and researched with the leader of Local Farms Harvest, a farming co-op of which Spring Valley is a member. The machine allows Butler Dining to use more locally sourced eggs without the hassle of cracking them all by hand.

“Supporting our local Farm to Fork partners and fighting food waste are key parts of the Bon Appétit culture,” said Bon Appétit Regional Vice President Randy DeMers. “I’m looking forward to seeing what other innovative ideas from the Butler community we can support from the FEAST Fund.”

Bon Appétit Management Company is the first food service company to have made a commitment to local purchasing, launching its Farm to Fork program in 1999, and the first to switch to cage-free eggs companywide, starting in 2005. The FEAST Fund is open to the Butler community, as well as to existing Bon Appétit Farm to Fork suppliers. Application guidelines and deadlines can be found on the Butler Dining website.

 

Media Contact:
Mandy Rentschler
Butler Dining Marketing Manager
mrentschler@butler.edu

Spring Valley Farms eggs
Innovation

Butler Dining Launches New Sustainable Food Grant Program

Bon Appétit Management Company, working in partnership with a committee of Butler students and employees, will fund projects to increase the sustainability of the campus food system

Feb 09 2021 Read more
Butler University
Campus

Butler University and Ivy Tech Community College Announce Statewide Transfer Agreement

BY

PUBLISHED ON Feb 05 2021

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind.—Ivy Tech Community College and Butler University have partnered to create their first transfer agreement, making a seamless process for students to earn a bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education. This agreement also seeks to address Indiana’s teacher shortage by providing an affordable pathway.

Under the agreement, any Ivy Tech student that completes an Associate of Science in Elementary Education degree can directly transfer to Butler University’s Elementary Education program with junior standing.

“Ivy Tech is elated to announce this new partnership with Butler University, not only to create an affordable and seamless transfer experience, but to address the critical shortage of educators in our state,” said Dr. Sue Ellspermann, president of Ivy Tech.

Eligibility will require a 3.0 or higher cumulative grade point average and course grades of “C” or better. Additionally, students must also complete Butler University’s transfer application. Upon meeting these requirements, students may apply a minimum of 57 credit hours from their Ivy Tech associate degree toward requirements for Butler University’s Bachelor of Science degree in Education.

“Butler University is excited to open this door to a community and statewide partnership that not only will help address the teacher shortage, but will also increase access to Butler University and attainment of bachelor’s degrees in our state,” Dr. Brooke Kandel-Cisco, Dean of Butler’s College of Education, said. “We look forward to this being the first of many agreements with Ivy Tech Community College.”

Ivy Tech students interested in this opportunity can work with their academic advisor to confirm their academic plan meets all the requirements.

To maximize savings, students can take advantage of scholarship and grant opportunities at both institutions.

The agreement, which became effective December 10, 2020, remains in effect for two years. After two years, the institutions will review the agreement for renewal.

For more information about Ivy Tech’s education program, visit IvyTech.edu/education. For information about Butler University, visit Butler.edu.

 

About Ivy Tech Community College
Ivy Tech Community College is Indiana’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system, accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana and also serves thousands of students annually online. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering associate degree and short-term certificate programs, and trainings that align to the needs of the community. The College also offers courses and associate degree programs that seamlessly transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana, as well as out of state, for a more affordable route to a Bachelor’s degree.

About Butler University
Butler University is a nationally recognized comprehensive university encompassing six colleges: Arts, Business, Communication, Education, Liberal Arts & Sciences, and Pharmacy & Health Sciences. Approximately 4,600 undergraduate and 800 graduate students are enrolled at Butler, representing 45 states and 30 countries. More than 75 percent of Butler students will participate in some form of internship, and Butler students have had significant success after graduation, as demonstrated by the University’s 98 percent placement rate within six months of graduation. The University was recently listed as the No. 1 regional university in the Midwest, according to the U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges Rankings, in addition to being included in The Princeton Review’s annual “best colleges” guidebook.

 

Media Contacts:

Mark Apple
Butler University Interim Director of Strategic Communications
317-519-8592
mapple1@butler.edu

Tracey Allen
Ivy Tech Executive Director of Marketing and Communications                                         
317-459-5157                                    
tallen205@ivytech.edu                        

Butler University
Campus

Butler University and Ivy Tech Community College Announce Statewide Transfer Agreement

Institutions partner to create seamless Elementary Education pathway to reduce teacher shortage

Feb 05 2021 Read more

Q&A with Madi Dornseif, Blue IV’s Intern

When Madi Dornseif, a senior majoring in Strategic Communication, interviewed for her internship with Butler University’s Official Mascot, Butler Blue IV, it had to be rescheduled and held over Zoom. The tool was foreign to both Madi and the young mascot at the time, but not for long. She would soon learn that the dream internship she had just landed would need to adapt to the growing COVID-19 crisis.

Hear from Madi on how she was able to shift to being Blue’s intern in a new virtual and hybrid world.

Why did you apply to your internship?
I love the Butler Blue Live Mascot Program. When I was a senior in high school, I visited Butler three different times just to try to meet Trip! I always loved the fact that Butler had this program incorporated into its marketing efforts. It is actually one of the reasons I decided to go to Butler. As someone who was interested in going into marketing, I loved the uniqueness of the University’s marketing compared to other schools I had applied to.

During my junior year, when I received an email super early in the morning from College of Communication (CCOM) Internship Director Scott Bridge (just like every other CCOM student has) that listed this internship opportunity, it was a no brainer!

Describe your responsibilities as the official Live Mascot Program Intern.
In my current role, I have been able to hone my skills in generating content to gain new followers on social media platforms such as Tik Tok, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube. One of my unique skills in this position is graphic design, using Adobe Creative Cloud. A main task of mine is creating graphics, GIFs, and stickers to promote Butler Blue IV on social media and throughout the University. Last semester, I had the opportunity to work on Blue’s first birthday party and run the Butler Blue sticker store. Both of these projects were a lot of work but definitely rewarding.

Madi and BlueWhat is the most rewarding aspect of your internship?
Being able to feel like an actual employee. In my past internships, I only occasionally saw my work being put to use. As the Marketing Intern with the Butler Blue Mascot Program, I thought seeing my first graphic posted on Butler’s and Butler Blue’s social media channels was unbelievable. So many of my friends came up to me and told me how proud they were to see my work.

What have been the main things you've learned from this experience?
The main thing I have learned from this experience thus far is filming and editing vlogs. I have only had a small amount of experience when it comes to videography, and that was one of the main things I really wanted to learn before I enter the professional world. I have been able to film and edit a number of vlogs in this internship and have really seen my skills benefit from this experience.

Another thing that I have learned is that running a sticker store is a lot harder than it sounds!

Favorite memory/story/project?
A funny memory I have with Blue is that he insisted on sitting on my lap during a car ride. I feel like Blue and I have bonded, and we are buds now. I love getting to go see him and play with him. Work does not feel like work when Blue is around!

My favorite project was Blue’s first birthday party on October 30, 2020. There was so much preparation that went into his party—more than any one of my own! I was nervous that only a small number of students would want to take a picture with Blue. Oh, was I wrong. There was a line in front of Atherton Union before my boss, Evan Krauss, and I even arrived. When the time came to start Blue’s party, there were easily more than a few hundred students lined up all the way to the library just to see Blue on his special day.

Your internship is partially in-person and partially remote—how have you adapted to that?
I have adapted quite well to a hybrid internship. I will never forget when I got the email from Evan telling me my internship would be virtual. It broke my heart. I thought I would never get to work with Blue.

But it actually worked out a ton better than I thought it would! I get to work with Evan and Blue in-person about once or twice a week. And I think I am getting more work done in a timely manner at home than I would in the office. I don’t know how distracted I would be with having Blue in the office—I would just want to play with him all day!

Do you have plans for what you'll be doing next?
I am actually trying to figure that out right now. I am currently applying for jobs in Indianapolis and Nashville, Tennessee. I would love to continue working with social media and graphic design. My skills have improved so much in this internship, and I would love to continue doing similar tasks in my first job. My dream job would be working in marketing with the Nashville Predators, but working in sports is difficult to get into. I recently applied for an entry-level graphic design position, so fingers crossed!

Madi and Blue
Experiential Learning

Q&A with Madi Dornseif, Blue IV’s Intern

As a marketing intern for Butler’s Live Mascot program, the Strategic Communication senior has gained experience in social media and graphic design—all while bonding with a famous bulldog

With Design Internship, Butler Student Goes Behind the Scenes of ‘Good Bones’

By Kennedy Broadwell ’21

If you’re an avid HGTV watcher, you might find yourself wondering what goes on behind the scenes to turn those fixer-uppers into beautiful homes. As the Graphic Design Intern for Two Chicks and a Hammer (the Indianapolis company behind HGTV’s Good Bones), Butler University senior Natalie Tate has had the chance to see the process up close.

When Tate found the internship while scrolling through an online job search platform, she applied immediately. Tate grew up watching HGTV and is a fan of Good Bones, so she was excited for the chance to contribute to a company so many people are familiar with.

Two Chicks & A Hammer mug with illustration by Natalie TateAt the internship, which Tate started in August 2020 and is continuing this spring, she focuses on using her artistic skills to develop new products and marketing campaigns for the company. On an average day at Tate’s virtual office, the Art + Design major attends up to three meetings with the graphic design team. She typically works on illustrations for marketing materials, such as flyers for the company’s Bates-Hendricks store, Two Chicks District Co. She has also helped design product spotlights for email campaigns, as well as created illustrations of several houses from Season 5 of Good Bones for a branded mug. Tate’s semester-long project—a set of illustrations including 12 of the company’s renovated homes—will be used for a new product launching soon.

Along with a major in Art + Design at Butler, Tate has minors in Marketing and Creative Media and Entertainment. She says her understanding of multiple disciplines helps her excel at her internship. She is able to apply what she has learned in her art courses—graphic design and illustration—as well as skills like web design and videography.

“Not only did I apply what I learned in my courses,” Tate says, “but I also applied the work ethic and positive attitude I’ve adopted through these courses. All of my art professors have encouraged me endlessly, and that made me push myself to do my best. This carried over into my internship when working with strict deadlines, creating multiple drafts of designs, and making sure my work is something I’m proud to put out into the world.”

In addition to earning meaningful experience in the field she plans to pursue after graduating, Tate has gained insight into the behind-the-scenes aspects of Good Bones.

Tate says she was surprised to find how small and personal the company is. She recalled a time when she connected with Karen Laine, one of the company’s founders and Good Bones co-star, while they hung up paintings together at the store. Tate says Karen is just as nice in real life as she is on TV.

illustration by Natalie TateBeyond illustration, Tate also helps out on photoshoots. One of her favorite memories happened during a shoot at the Indianapolis Artsgarden to promote a new line of sweatshirts.

“There were two people carrying the equipment, and the other graphic design intern and I had to carry about 20 sweatshirts between us,” she says. “We must have looked ridiculous wandering around the downtown mall with so many clothes in our arms that we could hardly see where we were going.”

For in-store shoots, Tate often helps hold products for close-up shots. If you look at the @twochicksdistrictco Instagram feed and see a hand or two, there’s a good chance it belongs to Tate!

Natalie Tate, Butler University Art + Design senior
Experiential Learning

With Design Internship, Butler Student Goes Behind the Scenes of ‘Good Bones’

Art + Design senior Natalie Tate helps develop new products and campaigns for Indy-based Two Chicks and a Hammer

Butler University
Butler Beyond

Inspired by Time at Butler, John Oberhelman Gives Back to Student-Athletes Through New Scholarship

BY Jennifer Gunnels

PUBLISHED ON Feb 01 2021

John Michael Oberhelman ’64, MS ’67 was a standout football player for Evansville Central High School when he first visited Butler University for a campus tour with his parents in the late 1950s. Legendary Butler Coach Tony Hinkle, who coached football, baseball, and men’s basketball at the time, drove the Oberhelman family around campus in his car that day. Hinkle made such an impression on the young student-athlete that Oberhelman chose to attend Butler to play football under Hinkle’s leadership despite initially receiving no scholarship money to attend.

“The fact that Coach Hinkle was willing to meet me personally on a weekend and give me a tour made a big impression—it made me feel special and that I was going to be a part of the team,” Oberhelman says. “In addition to our tour, I felt it was the right size school, the right distance from home, and I was struck by the beauty of the campus as well as the facilities.”

Tony Hinkle and John Michael Oberhelman
Tony Hinkle and John Oberhelman

During his first year, Oberhelman went on to make the football team at Butler and picked up a part-time job serving meals at the sorority and fraternity houses to help pay for tuition and living expenses. He eventually was offered a scholarship beginning his sophomore year, a gift he has never forgotten.

“Having the scholarship enabled me not to have to work during the football season. More meaningfully, it signaled to me that I was an important part of the team and worth the investment,” Oberhelman says.

Now retired, Oberhelman is paying that gift forward by establishing a new endowed scholarship for Butler student-athletes through an estate commitment. The John Michael Oberhelman ’64, MS ’67 Endowed Athletics Scholarship will exist in perpetuity at Butler, providing support for student-athletes in good academic standing. Thanks to the Oberhelman gift and others like it, Butler has now raised more than $45 million toward its $55 million scholarship goal for the Butler Beyond comprehensive fundraising campaign.

“Scholarships make an enormous long-term impact on the lives of the student-athletes who receive them, as demonstrated through John Oberhelman’s successful and meaningful career and his desire to offer this gift to future generations of Butler student-athletes,” says Vice President and Director of Athletics Barry Collier. “I am grateful for scholarship donors like John who are making the Butler Athletics experience available to future students through their generous gifts.”

During his football career at Butler, Oberhelman played on both offense and defense as center and linebacker. He continued to be deeply influenced by Hinkle’s mentorship, describing him as an honorable man who rarely raised his voice to motivate and who helped advise students on their career plans.

After graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Physical Education in 1964, Oberhelman was inspired to follow in Hinkle’s footsteps by becoming a teacher and coach. After earning his graduate degree in guidance and counseling from Butler, Oberhelman began his career as a teacher and coach at Tipton High School in Tipton, Indiana. He went on to become a college admissions director and later transitioned into human resources, eventually becoming the Senior Vice President of Human Resources at Citizens National Bank, which became part of Fifth Third Bank in Evansville.

Oberhelman has supported Butler Athletics throughout his adult life, and decided to concentrate his legacy giving on providing future student-athletes with the same opportunities that were made available to him through scholarship support. Oberhelman credits his experience at Butler, and particularly his experience as a student-athlete, with preparing him for his career and life. He says he and many of his Butler teammates have remained lifelong friends. The experience was one he is pleased to be able to offer to future students through the Oberhelman Scholarship.

“My parents established a scholarship at another university, and I continue to support it. Meeting those students, knowing their stories, and gaining an awareness of college costs for young people today informed my decision to be helpful,” Oberhelman says of his decision to establish a scholarship at Butler. “The student-athlete focus reflected my experience at Butler. Enabling a scholarship can allow a student to attend who may not normally be able to afford it.”

 

Student Access and Success
At the heart of Butler Beyond is a desire to increase student access and success, putting a Butler education within reach of all who desire to pursue it. With a focus on enhancing the overall student experience that is foundational to a Butler education, gifts to this pillar will grow student scholarships, elevate student support services, expand experiential learning opportunities, and more. Learn more, make a gift, and read other stories like this one at beyond.butler.edu.

Butler University
Butler Beyond

Inspired by Time at Butler, John Oberhelman Gives Back to Student-Athletes Through New Scholarship

The 1964 grad, who played football under the leadership of Coach Tony Hinkle, has supported Butler Athletics throughout his adult life

Feb 01 2021 Read more
Butler University
Campus

Butler University to Freeze Tuition for 2021-2022 Academic Year

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jan 28 2021

(INDIANAPOLIS, Ind.)—Butler University will not raise tuition during the 2021-2022 academic year, President James M. Danko announced today. The tuition freeze, as approved by Butler’s Board of Trustees, ensures that current and incoming students will remain at the tuition rate established for the current 2020-2021 academic year.

“Many of our current and incoming students and their families have been impacted financially by the pandemic, and it is my hope that, by freezing tuition, we can help ease their burden,” Danko said. “I am pleased that we can provide some stability to our students and their families during this very uncertain period.”

Raiidi Kaldani Thompson, mother of first-year Butler student Michael Thompson, sent an email to University administration when she learned about the tuition freeze.

“Receiving the news about Butler University’s tuition freeze made my morning! I'm speechless and utterly filled with gratitude,” Kaldani Thompson said. “I want to thank President Danko and the Board of Trustees for extending this generous gift to all of your students and their families! It truly embodies the caring spirit, and the sense of a close community that drew my son to join the Butler family.”

“The tuition freeze is so important as students and their families continue to face unimaginable hardships,” Maya Patel, a junior majoring in Strategic Communication, said. “We can take solace in the much needed economic stability for the next academic year, allowing us to focus on our academics and finding our new normal.”

Danko stated that Butler instituted significant budget adjustments when the pandemic started last March, and that those adjustments have proven beneficial in maintaining the University’s financial stability.

“The decision to freeze tuition for students and families is indicative of the confidence I have in Butler’s current position and long-term future,” Danko said. “I am deeply appreciative of our faculty and staff in particular, for their extraordinary work and personal sacrifices to carry out the University’s mission and support our students.”  

Butler started the spring 2021 semester on January 25, with the vast majority of students choosing to live on campus and receive instruction in the classroom. The University has invested heavily in improving health and safety efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19 on campus and upgrading academic technology to further enhance the learning environment.

For more information about Butler University, please visit www.butler.edu.

 

Media Contact:
Mark Apple
Director of Strategic Communications
mapple1@butler.edu
317-519-8592

Butler University
Campus

Butler University to Freeze Tuition for 2021-2022 Academic Year

Butler's Board of Trustees approved the tuition freeze to help ease the financial burden many students and families have faced during the pandemic

Jan 28 2021 Read more

The Center for Leadership Development Scholarship Helps Student Thrive

Meredith Sauter ’12

Even before starting his first day at Butler University, current first-year student Paul Ford was well-versed in what it would take to succeed in college. He knew time management would be key—prioritizing his work and balancing his schedule—but he was also prepared for other parts of the collegiate experience, like preparing for the costs involved with pursuing a degree.

This upfront knowledge is all thanks to his participation with The Center for Leadership Development (CLD), an Indianapolis nonprofit dedicated to fostering the advancement of minority youth in Central Indiana as future professional, business, and community leaders by providing experiences that encourage personal development and educational attainment.

Ford has been involved with CLD since eighth grade, and up until he graduated high school, he participated in a series of programs that aim to prepare students for life in college. The programming culminated in Emerging Scholars, a one-day event where high school students and parents learn about scholarships and other financial aid and are given the opportunity to apply for the CLD scholarship award at a variety of partner colleges, including Butler.

Ford first heard about Butler through a college fair sponsored by CLD where he spoke to one of the University’s admission counselors. After learning more about Butler, he realized that it had everything he was looking for: a vibrant student life, academic programs he was interested in, top notch residence halls, study abroad opportunities, and engagement with alumni.

“Butler really invests in their students,” Ford says. “Because it’s a smaller school, you’re really known by everyone, and you’re able to be really involved. That’s different from a lot of other schools I was looking at.”

Ford knew that Butler was the college for him, and wanted to make sure that it made financial sense for him to attend. During the Emerging Scholars event, he applied for the CLD partner scholarship at Butler (and a handful of other schools), and once he learned he received the award at Butler—a full tuition scholarship for all four years of college—he was ecstatic to know he could make his dream a reality.

Ford is now a first year Entrepreneurship and Innovation major in the Lacy School of Business (LSB) and is involved in the Student Government Association where he serves as the LSB student senator and as a member of the Auditing Board. He’s also active in the Black Student Union, the LGBTQ+ Alliance, and the Efroymson Diversity Center. He knows he’ll continue to grow professionally over his next several years in college, and hopes to have an impact on others and give back to his community. And, once he graduates, he wants to work in the startup management industry, helping support minority-owned businesses withstand crises, such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

Admission

The Center for Leadership Development Scholarship Helps Student Thrive

The full-tuition scholarship is helping first-year student Paul Ford pursue his goal of working in the startup management industry

Dr. India Johnson
Innovation

Butler Professor’s Research Aims to Help More Black Women Join STEM

BY Katie Grieze

PUBLISHED ON Jan 22 2021

Dr. India Johnson, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Butler University, wants more Black women to pursue careers in STEM. But in order to feel like they belong in these fields, Johnson says, college students need to have role models.

“In the world of psychology, role models are individuals you feel similar to,” she explains. “If you don’t feel similar to the person, they can’t necessarily do much to make you feel like you belong in that environment.”

While Black women make up about 6.5 percent of the United States population, they hold only 2 percent of STEM jobs, according to the National Science Foundation (NSF). So, for the past three years, Johnson’s research has focused on learning more about which types of individuals serve as the most effective role models for encouraging Black women to join—and stay in—STEM professions.

In collaboration with Dr. Evava (Eva) Pietri, an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis, Johnson previously conducted research based on the dual identities of Black women in STEM: As both women and people of color, they represent two different groups who are often underrepresented in science and technology fields. So, the researchers asked, which of those identities matters most when it comes to connecting with role models?

They found that Black women viewed Black people (either men or women) as role models more than they viewed white women as role models. Now, with the support of a grant for more than $68,000 from the NSF, they are trying to understand why. They also hope to learn more about which factors might contribute to non-Black individuals serving as effective role models for helping college-aged Black women feel a sense of belonging.

Starting last September, one of three studies through this grant has focused on gender, comparing STEM fields that have significant gender disparity with those that don’t.

“We expect that when Black female college students are in a major where there is not a lot of contact with other women overall, that might heighten the extent to which they feel similar to white women scientists in that field,” Johnson says. “In those cases, white women might then serve as more effective role models.”

Johnson’s previous research suggests that the stronger connection Black women tend to feel with other Black persons may be due in part to the perception that those individuals have experienced a similar type of race-based adversity. Based on that idea, a separate study will examine whether Black women might also identify with people from other non-white races.

“In this study, we will be varying to what extent a Latino male scientist actually looks phenotypically Black—so the extent to which they have features that align with those of Black persons,” Johnson says. “Then, we will study to what extent that leads Black women to feel similar to that role model in encouraging their belonging and interest in STEM.”

A final study will focus again on gender, but this time looking less at overall identity and more at the experience of various types of adversity. The researchers expect that if Black women perceive white women as having experienced adversity specifically based on sexism, they’ll be more likely to feel similar to that role model.

Katie Tisdale
Katie Tisdale

Johnson hopes the research findings will help non-Black individuals better understand how they can serve as relatable role models to help recruit and retain Black women within STEM professions.

Katie Tisdale, a senior Psychology major and Johnson’s research assistant for this project, says this research has helped her understand how much race and gender identity can influence career choice.

“I am a Black woman, so this research focusing on Black women and what makes them feel like they belong—and what makes them feel valued in academic or organizational settings—is really interesting to me, just because of the personal nature of it,” says Tisdale, who hopes to pursue a career in counseling and work with underrepresented groups. “This experience has shown me that allyship actions, or just validating someone’s identity, is so crucial and important.”

 

Media Contact:
Katie Grieze
News Content Manager
kgrieze@butler.edu
260-307-3403

Dr. India Johnson
Innovation

Butler Professor’s Research Aims to Help More Black Women Join STEM

Supported by a $68K grant from the NSF, Psychology Assistant Professor Dr. India Johnson is studying the influence of race and gender on the effectiveness of role models

Jan 22 2021 Read more

Accounting Alum Works to Improve Diversity Within Firms Across the Nation

By Katie Grieze

Less than 9 percent of accounting professionals in the United States are Black, according to the National Association of Black Accountants, despite the fact that Black individuals make up nearly 14 percent of the population.

Since graduating from Butler University in 1996, Herschel Frierson has been working to change that.

When Frierson first joined Crowe LLP as a staff accountant right after graduation, he didn’t see anyone else at the Indianapolis office who looked like him. He struggled to find and build relationships with other people of color—until a colleague told him about the National Association of Black Accountants (NABA).

“Through NABA, I was able to connect with other people who look like me from other firms,” he says. “Once I met these individuals, I found out they were going through the same things I was going through. Some of them were at firms where there were only two or three people of color. It helped me feel like I wasn’t on an island by myself going through this.”

Throughout his career, Frierson has continued growing within NABA, a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing opportunities for Black professionals in fields such as accounting and finance. By 2020, he was named NABA’s Chairman of the board of directors. A few months later, Accounting Today included Frierson in its 2020 listing of the Top 100 Most Influential People in Accounting. And to wrap up the year, he was elected a Partner (effective April 1, 2021) at Crowe—achieving a dream he’d held since choosing the profession.

“You hate to have joy when there is so much pain going on,” he says about the wave of accomplishments. “But it has really been a year.”

Even so, Frierson can’t help but focus on all the work that still needs to be done.

“People have told me to just enjoy the moment,” he says. “I need to take that advice, and I’m trying to do it. But I also have a higher responsibility. What can I do better? What can I do more of?”

Throughout his nearly 25 years with NABA, Frierson has worked with companies in Indianapolis and across the nation to host speaker series, organize volunteer activities, and coordinate programming to help Black high school and college students learn more about accounting. At student conferences and professional conventions, he helps connect current and aspiring accountants with resources and opportunities.

“It’s my unpaid full-time job,” Frierson says. “It’s just important for me to be a voice for why representation matters, and to make sure NABA’s strategic vision is moving forward. I want to help more people get into the profession, and to make sure they succeed.”

That goal isn’t limited to Frierson’s role within NABA. At Crowe, he sits on the Inclusion Excellence Council, in addition to overseeing five business resource groups that support underrepresented communities within the firm. Now, as a Partner-elect, he looks forward to the chance to support and mentor even more people of color.

“I wanted a seat at the table. And now I’m at the table,” he says. “So I need to be a bigger voice. I need to represent well, and I need to give back to the community. So now it’s, ‘What am I going to do to get more people who look like me around the table?’ I can’t be quiet—I have to be louder.”

 

Media Contact:
Katie Grieze
News Content Manager
kgrieze@butler.edu
260-307-3403

Herschel Frierson '96
Alumni Success

Accounting Alum Works to Improve Diversity Within Firms Across the Nation

As a Partner-elect at Crowe and Chairman of the National Association of Black Accountants, Herschel Frierson ’96 is helping more people of color join the profession

Butler University
Innovation

Wipro Collaborates with Butler University to Offer Salesforce Course

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 17 2020

Indianapolis, USA and Bangalore, India—Wipro Limited, a leading global information technology, consulting, and business process services company, has announced that Appirio, a Wipro company, has partnered with Butler University to offer a Salesforce consulting preparatory college course. Located in Indianapolis, Indiana, Butler University is a nationally recognized institution with six academic colleges.

Through the course, which was first offered during the fall 2020 semester and will be offered again for the spring, students have the opportunity to learn the in-demand skills needed for customer relationship management (CRM). The free, non-credit courses, which are held online, also provide students an opportunity to achieve their initial Salesforce certifications. A Salesforce certification can be a differentiator when students seek jobs in the Salesforce ecosystem.

Although the content is from Salesforce, the courses are developed and taught by Appirio, which often provides similar educational support for its clients. After learning the basics of CRM—a process that helps companies organize their relationships and interactions with current and potential customers—students are introduced to Salesforce’s suite of products. 

Hari Raja, Global Head of Appirio Cloud Services, said, “With the dawn of digital natives, customer experience has become a top priority in organizations today. Through the CRM corporate training course, we will be helping the students of Butler University become future ready. We believe this to be a great initiative as it brings together two of the essential features of Appirio—our partnership with Salesforce and our commitment to Indiana.”

Gary Beaulieu, Career and Professional Success (CaPS) Senior Director at Butler University, said, “The goal of the course is for students to gain a Salesforce Administrator Certification, which is widely recognized in the industry. In the CaPS Office, we are always looking at ways to help provide our students with marketable skills in addition to their undergraduate degrees. Many organizations, including Appirio, are looking for the Salesforce Administrator Certification. We feel that knowledge or certification in Salesforce can be a determining factor for recruiting organizations hiring these students.”

The certification course is open to Butler students of all majors. Students who are interested in enrolling should contact the CaPS Office at career@butler.edu.

 

Salesforce and others are among the trademarks of salesforce.com, inc.

 

About Wipro Limited
Wipro Limited (NYSE: WIT, BSE: 507685, NSE: WIPRO) is a leading global information technology, consulting, and business process services company. We harness the power of cognitive computing, hyper-automation, robotics, cloud, analytics and emerging technologies to help our clients adapt to the digital world and make them successful. A company recognized globally for its comprehensive portfolio of services, strong commitment to sustainability, and good corporate citizenship, we have over 180,000 dedicated employees serving clients across six continents. Together, we discover ideas and connect the dots to build a better and a bold new future. 

 

About Butler University
Butler University is a nationally recognized comprehensive university encompassing six colleges: Arts, Business, Communication, Education, Liberal Arts & Sciences, and Pharmacy & Health Sciences. Approximately 4,600 undergraduate and 800 graduate students are enrolled at Butler, representing 45 states and 30 countries. More than 75 percent of Butler students will participate in some form of internship, and Butler students have had significant success after graduation, as demonstrated by the University’s 98 percent placement rate within six months of graduation. The University was recently listed as the No. 1 regional university in the Midwest, according to the U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges Rankings, in addition to being included in The Princeton Review’s annual “best colleges” guidebook.

 

Media Contact:
Shraboni Banerjee
Wipro Limited
Shraboni.banerjee@wipro.com

 

Wipro Forward-looking and Cautionary Statements
The forward-looking statements contained herein represent Wipro’s beliefs regarding future events, many of which are by their nature, inherently uncertain and outside Wipro’s control. Such statements include, but are not limited to, statements regarding Wipro’s growth prospects, its future financial operating results, and its plans, expectations and intentions. Wipro cautions readers that the forward-looking statements contained herein are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from the results anticipated by such statements. Such risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, risks and uncertainties regarding fluctuations in our earnings, revenue and profits, our ability to generate and manage growth, complete proposed corporate actions, intense competition in IT services, our ability to maintain our cost advantage, wage increases in India, our ability to attract and retain highly skilled professionals, time and cost overruns on fixed-price, fixed-time frame contracts, client concentration, restrictions on immigration, our ability to manage our international operations, reduced demand for technology in our key focus areas, disruptions in telecommunication networks, our ability to successfully complete and integrate potential acquisitions, liability for damages on our service contracts, the success of the companies in which we make strategic investments, withdrawal of fiscal governmental incentives, political instability, war, legal restrictions on raising capital or acquiring companies outside India, unauthorized use of our intellectual property and general economic conditions affecting our business and industry. The conditions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic could decrease technology spending, adversely affect demand for our products, affect the rate of customer spending and could adversely affect our customers’ ability or willingness to purchase our offerings, delay prospective customers’ purchasing decisions, adversely impact our ability to provide on-site consulting services and our inability to deliver our customers or delay the provisioning of our offerings, all of which could adversely affect our future sales, operating results and overall financial performance. Our operations may also be negatively affected by a range of external factors related to the COVID-19 pandemic that are not within our control.

Additional risks that could affect our future operating results are more fully described in our filings with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission, including, but not limited to, Annual Reports on Form 20-F. These filings are available at www.sec.gov. We may, from time to time, make additional written and oral forward-looking statements, including statements contained in the company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission and our reports to shareholders. We do not undertake to update any forward-looking statement that may be made from time to time by us or on our behalf.​

Butler University
Innovation

Wipro Collaborates with Butler University to Offer Salesforce Course

The free course, developed and taught by Appirio (a Wipro company), covers the fundamentals of customer relationship management

Dec 17 2020 Read more
Butler University 2020
Campus

Year in Review: Top Stories of 2020

BY Katie Grieze

PUBLISHED ON Dec 16 2020

When everything changed 10 months ago, Butler University adapted. Our students, faculty, and staff found ways to replace vanished opportunities with new ones, continue caring for one another, and focus on the things that matter most—all while making sacrifices to keep our campus safe.

This year, Bulldogs also committed to helping others. From the Pharmacy students who made hand sanitizer for hospitals and other Indianapolis organizations; to the faculty member who helped parents and educators provide emotional support for children; to the graduate whose art helped people across the nation understand an invisible virus; we demonstrated the Butler Way.

And still, we celebrated. We kicked off 2020 by meeting Butler Blue IV, whose puppy photos have filled our social media feeds and invited us to smile even in some of this year’s hardest moments. We named new deans, launched our Hub for Black Affairs and Community Engagement, and welcomed our third-largest class of first-year students. Through a difficult season that may continue for months to come, we have found ways to be joyful together.

Here’s a look back at Butler’s top stories of 2020.

 

WE ADAPTED:

Butler Faculty Put Students First in Switch to Online Learning
When the coronavirus pandemic forced the cancellation of in-person classes last spring, faculty made the best of a difficult situation.

With Summer Internships Canceled, Business School Finds New Opportunities for Students
Butler's Lacy School of Business created about 20 last-minute internship positions built on remote, project-based work.

In Switch to eLearning, Butler Student-Teacher Finds What Matters Most
Patrick Conway developed new online content for seventh-graders at Zionsville West Middle School.

Butler Offers Free Online Course About COVID-19 to Incoming Students
The class helped students connect with the Butler community while reflecting on the effects of a global crisis.

Caring for Mental Health During COVID-19
Three Butler experts explain the pandemic’s psychological impacts and offer advice for staying well.

What Does an Online Music Class Look Like?
Dr. Brian Weidner of Butler's Jordan College of the Arts explains how he met the challenge of holding remote music education courses.

Pool Noodles Provide Social Distancing Guide for Physical Education Classes
The College of Education’s Dr. Fritz Ettl found ways to keep teaching hands-on, sport-specific skills this fall.

Butler Team Preserves, Improves Access to Artifacts through 3D Digital Replicas
While this grant-funded project began well before the pandemic, the researchers found low-cost ways to scan and share physical artworks in an online world—a method that’s especially useful when viewing art in-person isn’t possible.


WE HELPED:

How to Care for Children’s Minds During COVID-19
The College of Education's Dr. Lori Desautels offers guidance for educators and parents as the pandemic causes uncertainty, isolation, and restraint. To learn more about how Desautels teaches students about their brains, check out our pre-pandemic story How Neuroscience Helps Kids Heal From Trauma.

Butler, Old National Partner to Support Businesses Owned by Underrepresented Groups
The Old National Bank Center for Business Excellence—a partnership between Butler University and Old National Bank—is waiving membership fees for companies owned by people of color, women, LGBTQ+ individuals, veterans, and individuals with disabilities.

Butler Pharmacy Prof Receives $1.39M NIH Grant to Support Cancer Research
Dr. Chioniso Patience Masamha is studying an oncogene commonly linked to Mantle Cell Lymphoma and other types of cancer.

Pharmacy Students to Fill Indy’s Prescription for Hand Sanitizer
A trio of graduate students made 50 liters of sanitizer for donation to community programs and facilities.

Butler Theatre Gives Health Professionals SWAG
Theatre faculty and staff joined the Indy-based Safer With a Gown project, using their skills to help produce gowns for healthcare workers.

Grad Students from Butler's College of Education Create Guide to Help Schools Reopen
Cohort members from the Experiential Program for Preparing School Principals (EPPSP) released Blueprint 2020: A Guidebook for School Leaders Moving Forward.

Butler Grad Helps Americans See Coronavirus Up Close
At the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Austin Athman ’09 is part of a team that captures images of microscopic diseases.

This Team of Alumni Helped Butler Go Remote
Four grads in the Center for Academic Technology knew that strong relationships would be key to online learning.

 

WE CELEBRATED:

Butler Blue IV, next live mascot for Butler, revealed, ready to report to work
In January, the 12-week-old English Bulldog was set to take the reins as Butler’s fourth live mascot. Butler Blue III (AKA Trip) retired in May.

Butler Ranked No.1 in Midwest for Third Straight Year by U.S. News & World Report
The University also ranked among top universities in three national categories.

Butler Welcomes Third-Largest Class Ever Despite COVID-19 Challenges
More than 1,125 first-year students logged on for their first day of classes on August 24.

Butler University Launches a Hub for Black Affairs and Community Engagement
With leadership from Dr. Terri Jett as Faculty Director, the Hub will serve as an institutional command center to address systemic racism and Black oppression.

Butler Receives $2.5 Million Grant from Lilly Endowment Inc. to Fund New Butler Beyond Transformation Lab
The Transformation Lab will serve as a hub of resources, expertise, and activity to accelerate the development of future-oriented education models.

Kandel-Cisco Named New College of Education Dean
Dr. Brooke Kandel-Cisco was Interim Dean since May 2019 before filling the position permanently this past March.

Hilary Buttrick Named Interim Dean of the Lacy School of Business
Dr. Buttrick served as an Associate Dean in the Lacy School of Business (LSB) before being named Interim Dean on June 9.

Loyal Donors and New Strategic Direction Help Butler Thrive Through Unprecedented Year
Total giving during the 2019-2020 fiscal year included $16.6 million toward scholarships and $28.5 million toward the Butler Beyond campaign.

 

Media Contact:
Katie Grieze
News Content Manager
kgrieze@butler.edu
260-307-3403

Butler University 2020
Campus

Year in Review: Top Stories of 2020

In 2020, Butler adapted to new challenges, helped our community, and found ways to celebrate

Dec 16 2020 Read more
Music in My Head
Experiential Learning

Two Butler Students Team Up to Publish Children’s Book

BY Katie Grieze

PUBLISHED ON Dec 15 2020

Jen Mulzer’s son thinks in colors, songs, and stories.

When it’s time to go to bed, he can’t keep his eyes closed—he’s too excited about the adventures he might take in his dreams. And when it’s time to sit still at school, all he wants to do is dance. His body is full of motion, and his mind is full of music, but that can be frustrating when parents or teachers tell him “now is not the time.”

Jen Mulzer
Jen Mulzer

Mulzer, a student in Butler University’s MFA in Creative Writing program, wants her son and other children who experience ADHD or similar conditions to know there is nothing wrong with how they process information or move in the world. No matter how frustrating things are right now, she wants to say, just hang in there.

“I wanted to address that even though you might be in a situation where you feel frustrated, or like you’re not part of the group, or you can’t keep up, or maybe something’s not interesting to you—whatever the situation is, it’s temporary and it will pass,” Mulzer says. “And someday, you’ll have that moment when things just click, and all the things you struggled with will add up and make sense.”

That’s the key message of Music in My Head, a new children’s book written by Mulzer and illustrated by Abey Akinseye, a Butler junior majoring in Psychology and Sociology with a minor in Art. Published early last month, the book follows the story of a young boy—inspired by Mulzer’s son—whose “body dances all the time, especially when it’s time to sleep.” Alongside the text, Akinseye’s artwork vividly illustrates each of the character’s imaginary adventures, from leading a circus to flying to the moon.

After drafting the story last year, Mulzer reached out to Butler’s Department of Art to find an illustrator. She knew she wanted to work with a fellow student, so she shared a summary of the project and began accepting portfolios.

Intrigued by the story, Akinseye applied.

Abey Akinseye
Abey Akinseye

“I think what interested me the most was how much I related to the story myself,” he says. “Sometimes I have trouble sleeping because I’m always thinking of these adventures in my head, and I even stay up at night painting or drawing because these ideas are always there, and I’m afraid to lose them.”

Mulzer chose Akinseye’s portfolio as her favorite from the bunch for his ability to capture facial expressions and personality. When they met in person to go over details, she could see his passion for the story. Akinseye told her about how art served as a form of therapy for him, and how he wanted to use his art to help others (with the goal of pursuing a PhD in art therapy). When Mulzer left the meeting, she thought, “Oh my gosh, he was meant to do this.”

They have worked mostly independently for the past year, with Mulzer providing brief descriptions for the illustrations and Akinseye producing artworks that were even better than what she’d imagined.

“I wanted to challenge myself,” Akinseye says. “I didn’t want any of the images to be the same, and I wanted each page to stand out and be its own independent story.”

He is grateful for Butler Adjunct Art Instructor Jingo de la Rosa, who encouraged Akinseye to get his art out into the world.

“He also taught me to carry a small sketchbook around to just draw down ideas, which became very helpful for this project,” Akinseye says. “And he is an illustrator, so his insight was very helpful.”

On the writing side, Mulzer was grateful to have the opportunity to read her own writing out loud to other students in the MFA in Creative Writing program.

“When you need to read something out loud, all the sudden you are changing the language, or you are changing some of the structure because you are getting tripped up on things,” she explains. “That really helped me. I had already written the story for Music in My Head, but then I had to go back to it and revise. And that’s extra important for children’s books, which are meant to be read out loud.”

Music in My HeadWhen they were almost finished, Mulzer reached out to a children’s book publisher in Indianapolis to ask how she might go about getting the book onto store shelves. They directed her to Wish Publishing, an independent publisher that works mostly with new authors and artists. After providing some guidance for the process of finalizing the book, Wish published Music in My Head in November 2020.

Mulzer says the best review so far has come from her son, who is now 9.

“I gave the finished book to him, thinking that we would sit down and I would read it,” she recalls. “But he immediately said, ‘I can read it to you.’ He started reading it, and he actually gave me edits, because he knew right away: ‘This is me, and this is my dog.’ I loved that it was his little mind all over again. He was super excited. He loved the story, but then he’s also critiquing it, and that’s totally him.”

For Akinseye, the experience helped him learn about how ADHD and similar conditions are typically portrayed. He wants to help children understand that there’s nothing wrong with being themselves.

“I hope this book shows ADHD in a different way,” he says. “A more relatable way.”

 

Media Contact:
Katie Grieze
News Content Manager
kgrieze@butler.edu
260-307-3403

Music in My Head
Experiential Learning

Two Butler Students Team Up to Publish Children’s Book

Written by MFA student Jen Mulzer and illustrated by junior Abey Akinseye, Music in My Head celebrates children’s creativity

Dec 15 2020 Read more
Butler University physical education class, playing soccer with pool noodles
Experiential Learning

Pool Noodles Provide Social Distancing Guide for Physical Education Classes

BY Kennedy Broadwell ’21

PUBLISHED ON Dec 08 2020

Fall collegiate sports were canceled. Professional teams joined “bubbles” to ensure athletes’ safety during a global pandemic. But what would happen for Butler University students whose classes involved hands-on physical activity?

Since 2018, Assistant Professor of Education Dr. Fritz Ettl has been teaching physical education courses for future teachers, coaches, health education professionals, and recreation professionals (among others). The students learn sport-specific skills, and courses include tournaments in which students design all aspects of their own league and physically compete against one another while also fulfilling supportive roles such as coach, referee, and statistician. But with the need for social distancing this fall, contact sports wouldn’t be so easy.

Ettl says his first concern going into the semester was how he would teach physical activity virtually during the first two weeks, when Butler temporarily moved classes online.

“We had to start with the cognitive aspects of soccer, like rules of the game, key sport-specific vocabulary, and some tactical concepts,” Ettl says. “I used images and video to help bring it to life, since our opportunities to physically experience everything would be delayed. I really just had to commit to a couple of ways of trying to make it work. I had to learn to trust myself and my students that once it all started, we could make it meaningful by communicating with one another and being flexible.”

Once classes were back in person, Ettl adapted his soccer and basketball courses to be COVID-friendly by adding pool noodles into game play situations. He came up with the idea based on a Buzzfeed article about a restaurant that encouraged social distancing by having guests wear hats with pool noodles sticking out from all sides.

Butler physical education class, playing basketball with pool noodlesEttl remembers thinking, “You know what? I can’t make a bunch of pool noodle hats, but I can order a bunch of pool noodles, and we’ll figure out how to use that.”

The pool noodles were used to keep the students six feet apart from one another. In soccer, they were also used to knock at the ball on defense instead of putting one’s body in the way of the shot or pass.

Ettl says carrying the noodles did make the game awkward and changed how the class experienced soccer. However, there were positives. Students had to think more about space, which helped them improve their skills, including being more accurate with passing or creating more space in order to receive a pass without it getting deflected by a noodle.

Adaptations also had to be made when the class went indoors for basketball. The noodles were used to knock at passes or shots, and to box out or screen other players from a distance. To remove the need for close proximity to other players, Ettl also made basketball a possessions-based game. Teams were given five possessions, and scoring was based on how many points they could get in their allotted possessions. This eliminated the need for rebounding and the physical contact that inherently happens after someone shoots.

“It's not an ideal or a traditional way of experiencing basketball,” Ettl says, “but since the noodles are so large in a small space, it made people more aware of certain aspects of skills like dribbling and passing. I also saw students having to make quick decisions to shoot when they were open, since the long noodles helped defenders close down the space to shoot faster.  I liked that this encouraged students to not only keep the ball moving with quick passes, but also to shoot without hesitating. There were some interesting opportunities to learn by having that added challenge.”

Butler University physical education class, playing soccer with pool noodles
Experiential Learning

Pool Noodles Provide Social Distancing Guide for Physical Education Classes

COE’s Dr. Fritz Ettl found ways to keep teaching hands-on, sport-specific skills this fall

Dec 08 2020 Read more
Esports Camps
Student-Centered

Nerd Street Gamers Partners with Butler University to Host Virtual Esports Winter Camps

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 07 2020

PHILADELPHIA & INDIANAPOLIS (December 7, 2020)—Nerd Street Gamers, the national network of esports facilities and events dedicated to powering competitive opportunities for gamers, and Butler University have partnered to host virtual esports winter camps. With sessions from December 14 through January 8, Camp Localhost gives gamers ages 10-18 the opportunity to participate in a week-long online esports camp focusing on a variety of video games, including Overwatch, Rocket League, and Fortnite. These boot camps will be held through Discord, where campers will be virtually overseen by a coach, who will run games, drills, and matches throughout the duration of the week.

Camp Localhost coaches will provide a structured environment for participants to learn about the fundamentals of competitive gaming, map and game strategy, team dynamics, and effective communication skills. In addition to improving their gaming abilities, campers will take away various skills throughout the sessions that they can apply to other aspects of their lives, including teamwork, communication, and the ability to stay calm under pressure. Nerd Street Gamers is providing the logistics for the clinics, including professional instructors and camp programming. Butler Esports will also provide coaches, along with communications and recruitment of players.

“After a successful series of summer camps with Butler University, we are thrilled to continue our partnership with them into the winter,” said Nerd Street Gamers CEO and Founder John Fazio. “In an ever-changing environment, we are proud to offer safe and competitive virtual opportunities for amatuer gamers. Our partnership with Butler University allows us to engage and connect aspiring players in an online esports camp, while fostering relationships with a prominent collegiate esports league.”

Since 2017, Butler University’s Butler Esports group has been competing in intercollegiate esports, including in the BIG EAST Conference. Its administration brings this experience to Camp Localhost to empower students to truly become ingrained in the games. Every session will allow campers to scrimmage, practice their skills, and then evaluate their performance with structured, individualized feedback from instructors. The camps will also include daily seminars from industry experts, professional players, and more.

“Esports continue to thrive during the pandemic,” said Butler University’s Director of Esports and Gaming Technology Eric Kammeyer. “This partnership with Nerd Street Gamers allows us to integrate coaching and mentorship opportunities from our passionate collegiate esports players while fostering the next generation of gamers who are aspiring to play at the next level. We are excited to build on the foundations created during the esports camps this past summer to deliver an elevated experience for the participants.”

 

When:

  • December 14–18, 2020: Rocket League, Ages 15-18
  • December 14–18, 2020: Fortnite, Ages 10-14
  • January 4–8, 2021: Overwatch, Ages 15-18
  • January 4–8, 2021: Fortnite, Ages 10-14

 

Cost: $60

 

To register for Camp Localhost presented by Butler Esports, visit nerdstgamers.com/butler.

 

About Nerd Street Gamers
Nerd Street Gamers is a national network of esports facilities and events dedicated to powering competitive opportunities for gamers. The company promotes greater access to the esports industry, laying a national framework for esports talent development and high-quality gaming tournaments. NSG has received backing from Five Below, Comcast, SeventySix Capital, Elevate Ventures, and angel investor George Miller.

For more information, follow @nerdstgamers on Twitter or visit nerdstgamers.com.

About Butler University
Butler University is a nationally recognized comprehensive university encompassing six colleges: Arts, Business, Communication, Education, Liberal Arts & Sciences, and Pharmacy & Health Sciences. Approximately 4,600 undergraduate and 800 graduate students are enrolled at Butler, representing 45 states and 30 countries. More than 75 percent of Butler students will participate in some form of internship, and Butler students have had significant success after graduation, as demonstrated by the University’s 98 percent placement rate within six months of graduation. The University was recently listed as the No. 1 regional university in the Midwest, according to U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges Rankings, in addition to being included in The Princeton Review’s annual “best colleges” guidebook.

Esports Camps
Student-Centered

Nerd Street Gamers Partners with Butler University to Host Virtual Esports Winter Camps

Week-long camps will be held online from December 14 through January 8

Dec 07 2020 Read more

Q&A with Frank Felice, Music Prof and Classical Composer

By Katie Grieze

Last year, Butler University Associate Professor of Music Frank Felice decided it was time he put together a new CD. The composer had written several songs for both string instruments and voice, accumulating a diverse array of one-off chamber music pieces. After writing just a few more new compositions, the CD’s track list was ready to go.

By the summer, Felice had teamed up with local musicians to make recordings for each of the songs. By the fall, he was working on post-production. The finished album, Reflections and Whimsies: Chamber Music for Strings and Voice, hit the market in February 2020.

We all know what happened next. The COVID-19 pandemic struck two weeks later, closing event stages and delaying shipments all across the nation. Like many others in the music world, Felice had to cancel performances and just stay home. Still, he’s finding ways to move on to new projects and stay creative in a difficult year.

We touched base with Felice to learn more about his recent album, his experience as a musician during COVID-19, and why he became a composer in the first place.

How does this CD compare to your previous work?
This is actually a good representative slice of my music. It’s eclectic: everything from something that’s humorous or tongue in cheek and might be a little theatrical or bizarre, up to something very straightforward. Some of the music on here is sacred, and some of it is very secular. Some of it is something you could very easily hear on an elevator, and some of it will make you go, “What did I just listen to? That sounded like a weird acid jazz piece from a 1950s nightclub.”

How did you decide which musicians would perform the recordings of these compositions?
One of the pieces I wrote for my wife, so I wanted to have her sing it. A couple other pieces are also performed by the people I originally wrote them for, like one for Butler’s own David Murray. The other musicians were people I knew and admired. For example, I was very happy to get The Indianapolis Quartet on this disc.

How did COVID-19 affect the release of your CD?
Everything just stopped. People could still stream the music through platforms like Spotify, but the physical disc was difficult to purchase for a while due to COVID-related delays. Now, it’s sold out on Amazon, and they won’t get new ones in very quickly just because of COVID. There were also five or six performances of these pieces that had to be canceled. That’s just been the story for classical musicians during the pandemic.

Do you have any alternative plans moving forward?
I haven’t made new plans for the album myself, but I’ve had a few people request to perform the music virtually.

I’ve been at kind of a loss since COVID happened. So much of what I like about this kind of classical music is the interaction and socialization, where you can make music with friends and colleagues and for an audience. That has been very tough to lose. I’ve been playing some jazz on back porches, but that will go away soon with the weather changing.

So, I’ve been moving to a couple different projects. One of those is electronic-based, where I can do a recording and put that out virtually. I’ve also done some research in recent months about possibly writing some brass quintets, or doing a really ultra-difficult virtuosic piano solo. In some ways, I’ve just been nesting in my studio, saying, “Alright, I have to make music for me and just put it out.” I can’t rely on going and doing this with a group, or for a particular audience.

You mentioned you prefer working with smaller groups of musicians. Why?
I love the intimacy of it. I love the fact that you can put four singers together and perform that in a recital hall, but you can also do that in someone’s living room. That collaborative intimacy is a marvelous thing. And as a composer, I can really get to know the performers I’m working with. That’s tougher to do with a large ensemble or a symphony.

Why did you first get involved with composing?
I first started composing in high school for the rock band I was part of. While we loved getting together and playing music we all knew and loved, we also liked just sitting and playing. Pretty soon, we started coming up with new melodies and lyrics, and then putting them all together. That process became really quite fun.

When I went off to college, I was attracted to classical music through soundtracks by composers like John Williams. In music classes, I found myself loving the interaction of how music is all put together. During my practice times, I grew to like writing music as much as I liked practicing my instrument.

I love to create. I love to cook, write poetry, and paint. Tomorrow when I rake my leaves, I’ll probably make shapes instead of going in straight lines. I think all humans have that creativity in us to one extent or another, and I think I just got a double dose.

Frank Felice, Butler University
Campus

Q&A with Frank Felice, Music Prof and Classical Composer

After releasing a new CD two weeks before pandemic shutdowns hit Indiana, Felice is finding new ways to stay creative

Bulldogs Adapt: COE Student Ready to Take on Teaching

By Catalina Gallegos ’21

Fall 2020 College of Education graduate Grace Dittoe is excited to apply what she’s learned through being a student during a pandemic to her career in the classroom.

VIDEO PRODUCED BY: Catalina Gallegos ’21, Journalism major, Digital Media Production Minor

Grace Dittoe
Student-Centered

Bulldogs Adapt: COE Student Ready to Take on Teaching

Fall 2020 College of Education graduate Grace Dittoe is excited to apply what she’s learned through being a student during a pandemic to her career in the classroom

Catching up with Jimmy Lafakis ’19

By Maddy Kline ’21

Jimmy Lafakis is in eighth grade.

He is on his way back to Northwest Indiana from New Orleans, where he and his mother Kathy had just watched Butler defeat Wisconsin in the 2011 NCAA tournament. Spirits were high, even though Jimmy couldn’t stay to watch the Bulldogs take on Florida—he had to be back at school on Monday.

The two decided on the next best thing: stopping at Butler to catch the game. Jimmy and his mother stood in the Reilly Room and stared, transfixed, as Butler defeated Florida 74-71, propelling them to the Final Four.

“Oh my gosh, they won,” Kathy says. “All the kids on campus went outside to celebrate, and I took a picture of Jimmy celebrating as a middle schooler with all these college kids. He was so elated. He just had a love for Butler from back then.”

That moment was the first time Butler felt like home to Jimmy.

 

***

 

Jimmy is a first-year student at Butler.

It is fall of 2015, and he is finally enrolled at the university he had been cheering on since middle school.

“My parents did not go to Butler,” Jimmy says. “I wanted to go somewhere and write my own story and, you know, do my own thing. And I'm glad I did.”

It didn’t take long for Jimmy to write that story on campus.

Scott Bridge, College of Communication Lecturer and Internship Director, recalls his first impressions of Jimmy, who was his student and advisee.

“He’s one of the kindest, most sincere people I have ever met,” Bridge says. “And he continued that way through all four years. His attitude was one that I learned from because I thought, ‘Gosh, so many of us need to probably be a little bit more like Jimmy Lafakis’.”

Jimmy truly found his footing when he joined the sports section of The Collegian, which he describes as the foundation of his entire Butler experience. Jimmy was assigned to cover women’s volleyball, but it was nearly impossible to miss him on the sidelines of any sporting event—his eyes staring through his camera lens to capture a fleeting moment in the game.

“One of the things you notice about Jimmy after you get to know him for a little while is that you will rarely see Jimmy without his camera,” Bridge said. “And I know he was very valued over in the Athletics department…because he was a fixture over there at Hinkle for all four years, and he took so many photos in so many different sports. Everybody—from the coaches, to the staff, to the athletes—everyone knew Jimmy.”

The estimated hundreds of thousands of photos that Jimmy took during his four years at Butler never felt like work to him. He had a voracious appetite for sports—football, basketball, soccer—Jimmy wasn’t picky. He just loved what he did.

“I was just happy to be out there covering, writing, taking photos, whatever the case may have been,” Jimmy says. “That’s one thing I've taken with me into my jobs. There are a lot of things, especially right now, in the world that we can't really control. The one thing I can control is my attitude. I can control my effort. And I can control my work ethic.”

 

***

 

Jimmy is a senior at Butler.

It is the spring of 2019, he is graduating with a major in journalism and a minor in strategic communication, and he has to make a decision.

One thing to understand about Jimmy is that he loves Indiana. He grew up in Indiana, he went to school in Indiana, and his circle of family and friends reside in Indiana.

Now he is receiving a job offer to be a sports reporter at the Minot Daily News in Minot, North Dakota—a city that is only about an hour south of the Canadian border. But Jimmy always likes to write his own story, so he took the position. His first day landed on July 15, 2019—his birthday.

“Just try something new and see what that has to offer,” Jimmy says. “Yes, it gets really cold, but the place is beautiful. They call it the Peace Garden State for a reason. I learned so much about myself, about the work I could do. It was my first experience in, you know, in the real world.”

The “real world” of North Dakota yielded some drastically different stories than Jimmy was used to covering. In just his second week on the job, he was covering the rodeo, working out how to report on bull riding and horse races when he was used to collegiate basketball. 

Jimmy’s retelling of his time in North Dakota is interspersed with chuckles and awe, as he recounts his coverage of a high school wrestling tournament in Fargo—a familiar enough sport, but something he had not written about in the past four years at Butler.

“It was one of the most challenging experiences of my life because it was three days of non-stop action,” Jimmy says. “You're literally being thrown in the fire. And I look back on those couple days fondly, because you know what? I got through it. I'm just like, man, if I got through that wrestling tournament, I could get through a lot of things.”

Jimmy continued covering high school and Class B sports in Minot until this past September, when Indiana called him home.

In the hopes of being closer to family and friends, Jimmy parted ways with the student athletes, athletic directors, editors, and community that had welcomed him for 14 months. He traveled 18 hours to Jasper, Indiana, where he now works as a sports reporter for the Dubois County Herald.

Jimmy is certainly in his happy place, covering whatever high school sports are currently in season.

 

 

***

 

Jimmy is in his “Kobe year,” as he and his parents like to say.

He is 24 years old—the number sported by the late NBA star Kobe Bryant—and he is still learning.

“Just in what's basically been a year and a half, I have grown so much it's unbelievable,” Jimmy says. “I've learned a lot about myself…And I know I'm young and I still have a lot to learn. But I'm figuring it out.”

Jimmy’s attitude toward learning is an apt indicator of his personality. His mother describes him as a “student of life,” but also a teacher.

“I've learned a lot from him,” Kathy says. “He teaches me every day. And, you know, that's all a parent wants to do is to see their child succeed and do what they love to do. So, as a parent, I'm just thrilled for him.”

For now, Jimmy plans to keep his ever-present watch at the sidelines of any game he can attend, camera poised, mind racing with stats and adrenaline pumping at the institution that is Indiana high school sports.

If one thing is certain, his mind always returns to Butler.

“I hope I've inspired somebody,” Jimmy says. “I hope somebody out there at Butler looks to me and says, ‘You know what? Jimmy is setting a good example,’ because there are so many people who set an example when I got there…I mean, it's been fun, man. I just have gratitude in my entire life.”

Keep up with Jimmy and his work on Twitter.

Jimmy Lafakis
Alumni Success

Catching up with Jimmy Lafakis ’19

The 2019 grad discovered a love for sports photography during his time at Butler. Now, after a year covering rodeo, wrestling, and more in North Dakota, he's back home in Indiana. 

Butler University MBA students learn about whiskey business (stock image)
Experiential Learning

“From Grain to Glass to COVID-19”: MBA Class to Publish Case Study on Whiskey Business

BY Katie Grieze

PUBLISHED ON Nov 23 2020

During the spring 2020 semester, a class in Butler University’s Master of Business Administration (MBA) program partnered with a local distillery to learn about the downstream supply chain—the process by which a product makes its way from production to consumers. After studying for themselves how the distillery’s Indiana-sourced whiskey is typically sold through restaurants, tasting rooms, or grocery store shelves, the class would write a case study to teach what they had learned to future business students.

They had just finished the second draft when the COVID-19 pandemic hit.

“Instead of teaching from a textbook about what the challenges are in distribution, I wanted students to have a grasp of what a real company actually goes through,” says Dr. Jane Siegler, Assistant Professor of Operations. “When the pandemic hit, we didn’t just ignore that and focus on what would happen in normal circumstances. No—this is a small business that is trying to find its way in the market, with all the normal challenges that a small company faces, but now there is this global pandemic. What do you do?”

Shutdowns affected restaurants and other distribution outlets across the hospitality industry, and the distillery’s on-site tasting room had to close its doors. So, while continuing to learn about the company (who asked to remain anonymous for the case study), the MBA students helped the distillery identify new opportunities for getting its products to customers.

Dr. Siegler says she often likes to partner with real companies for her classes, which not only provides an experiential learning opportunity for students, but also offers a range of fresh perspectives for the business.

“When we have all these smart minds working together in class,” she says, “chances are that we will see things that the company may have missed. We are offering high-quality consulting projects at low or no cost to the companies. It’s a way to benefit the companies, the regional economy, and the students.”

The students’ key recommendation for the distillery was to place more focus on direct-to-consumer sales. Without the need to pay distributors, these channels would be more profitable, as well as help the relatively young company continue building relationships and growing its brand. After the pandemic hit, the distillery opened a carryout bottle shop that replaced their tasting room as a way to engage directly with consumers.

The case study, which has now been accepted for publication in the International Journal of Teaching and Case Studies (IJTCS), also identified opportunities for the distillery to attract customers by highlighting stories about how its whiskey is sourced and produced entirely in Indiana (a state not known for making bourbon). The company could produce videos profiling local corn farmers, or showing the whole production process from seed, to grain, to glass, the students suggested. That all-Indiana ingredient sourcing was the main thing that caught Dr. Siegler’s attention, and chances are it would appeal to customers, too.

“The entire supply chain from the farmers all the way to packaging is made up of Indiana companies,” Dr. Siegler says. “I thought that was pretty interesting from a supply chain perspective, especially when you think about how we are a very global society. But this company points to their supply chain strategy as one of the key components to their success.”

Angie Bidlack, one of the four MBA students involved with the case study, says the onset of COVID-19 didn’t derail what they had started working on. It just added a new dimension.

“There are always unknowns in a case study,” she says, “but then we had this challenge of thinking through the immediate future during COVID, as well as the future post-COVID. We could compare how things changed before and after the pandemic.”

For example, when the class first toured the distillery at the beginning of the semester, the company had plans to take their brand national by partnering with some of the largest grocery retail outlets in the United States. The pandemic brought those plans to a crawl, but the class helped think through other ways the distillery could keep growing.

“Even with the pandemic, the company was doing great things,” Bidlack says. “They found a way to make challenges into opportunities and didn’t continue going with their normal business plan. They were very agile, and they immediately pivoted to something that allowed them to thrive. And that is something I think everybody can take and apply to their career in some way.”

 

Media Contact:
Katie Grieze
News Content Manager
kgrieze@butler.edu
260-307-3403  

Butler University MBA students learn about whiskey business (stock image)
Experiential Learning

“From Grain to Glass to COVID-19”: MBA Class to Publish Case Study on Whiskey Business

The Butler MBA class led by Dr. Jane Siegler partnered with a local distillery to help find solutions to new challenges 

Nov 23 2020 Read more

Bulldogs Adapt: COE Professor Offers Flexibility for Students

By Catalina Gallegos ’21


In a semester like no other, faculty members at Butler University have adapted to continue providing engaging academic experiences for their students. We checked in with Susan Adams, Professor of Education in the College of Education, to learn about how she has been putting students first this fall.

VIDEO PRODUCED BY: Catalina Gallegos ’21, Journalism major, Digital Media Production Minor

Butler University, Susan Adams COE class
Student-Centered

Bulldogs Adapt: COE Professor Offers Flexibility for Students

Susan Adams, Professor of Education, shares how she has met students' needs during a semester like no other

Steps to Success with Josh Turner ’15

By Grace Gordon ’23

On the evening of October 19, 2019, Josh Turner ’15 was preparing to step onto the stage of Shepherd’s Bush Empire in London to perform a tribute show to Paul Simon’s album Graceland. He, along with a six-piece band and a full South African Cultural Choir, would join the guestbook of major artists who had performed on the stage before, from Charlie Chaplin to David Bowie.

Waiting to hear the show was a nearly packed house and the London theatre press. The pressure was high, and in Turner’s words, “it was so scary.” Despite the nerves, Turner now identifies the show as a highlight of his career because halfway through the second set, the audience stood up and started dancing. For the rest of the night, the concert was a party.

For the Butler University graduate, that moment was the culmination of years of dedication and exciting opportunities—from performing on Good Morning America to touring with a tribute show called the Simon and Garfunkel Story. Music was always important in Turner’s life, especially on the internet. Starting in middle school, Turner had a YouTube channel dedicated to his musical journey, with a focus on singing and guitar. Since then, his channel has significantly expanded. In addition to an ongoing solo career, he is now in the musical group The Other Favorites, which may be best known for their performances on YouTube. Along with millions of video views, The Other Favorites have successfully created a virtual touring experience, which gives fans the opportunity to tune in to monthly live-streamed performances.

However, Turners’ journey to finding his way through the professional musical world was not without uncertainty. He outlines his success with three pieces of advice.

 

“Following what you are passionate about is step one to being successful.”

Like many students at Butler, Turner’s educational journey was not a straight line. Though music was always his passion—he started singing when he was 9 years old—he wasn't ready to officially pursue music as a first-year student. He worried that if he decided to study music, he might lose some of his passion for the art, so he initially chose a major in Digital Media (now called Creative Media and Entertainment). Turner also wondered if he was good enough to make a career out of music. But through taking classes outside of his major, he was always able to keep music in his life and class schedule.

Eventually, taking classes such as Music History and Aural Skills proved that Turner’s relationship to music wouldn't change just because he was graded on it.

“The more classes I took,” he says, “the more I realized that wasn't the case. Everyone is best served if I am doing something that I am really engaged in and I am motivated to work hard toward.”

With that mindset, Turner fully dove into the world of music, declaring a major in Music during his sophomore year. He graduated in 2015 to pursue a professional career in performing, writing, and producing music in nearly every genre. His music ranges from folk, to jazz, to R&B, to bluegrass-infused renditions of popular Backstreet Boys songs.

Now, living in New York, creating music every day, and performing around the world (or, during the pandemic, via livestream), Turner says he still feels the moments of self-doubt he felt in school. He still wonders if he has “made it.” But he combats these feelings by reminding himself that “comparing yourself to other people is, at the end of the day, not helpful.” He stresses how important it has been for him to learn his worth and walk the line between being confident without getting arrogant, and feeling motivated without getting down on himself.

 

Be “constantly in the process of ‘making it.’”

While enjoying every exciting opportunity, Turner says he has kept the mindset that he is “constantly in the process of making it.” He has never relied on one big break to be successful. Turner has continued to invest in himself, stay flexible in the mediums he uses to provide content to his fans, and know that he is “as prepared as he can be” for every performance. Right now, being flexible as a performer looks like providing online content through live streams.

 

“Be a good person.”

For Turner, the final step to achieving success has been to just be a good person. He says that in a competitive job market, you can really be set apart from all the other talented people by “being the person who isn't judgmental, who returns calls, and who does the little things.”

Turner has found the most satisfaction in his music by trying to create joy. He recognizes that the internet can be a platform that creates division, but he says his favorite part of his job is the feeling that he is contributing to “the part of the internet that actually brings people together.”

Turner certainly follows his words with action, and the evidence lies in the example he sets for those around him. Most recently, he demonstrated his commitment to making the world a better place by speaking at Butler’s virtual School of Music Convocation in September 2020. During the Zoom call, he talked about investing in yourself as a musician and a professional, harnessing social media to build an audience, and expanding interests outside of your major. The more time you can spend away from music, he told the students, the more you’ll love it when you come back.

 

Grace Gordon is a sophomore at Butler University, where she majors in Strategic Communication and minors in Creative Writing and Creative Media and Entertainment.

Josh Turner
Alumni Success

Steps to Success with Josh Turner ’15

The Butler graduate shares what it took for him to become a professional musician

Bulldogs Adapt: LSB Professor on Teaching During a Pandemic

By Catalina Gallegos ’21

 

In a semester like no other, faculty members at Butler University have adapted to continue providing engaging academic experiences for their students. We checked in with Stephanie Fernhaber, Professor of Entrepreneurship in the Lacy School of Business, to learn about the new approaches she’s using in the classroom this fall.

VIDEO PRODUCED BY: Catalina Gallegos ’21, Journalism major, Digital Media Production Minor

LSB
Student-Centered

Bulldogs Adapt: LSB Professor on Teaching During a Pandemic

Stephanie Fernhaber, Professor of Entrepreneurship in the Lacy School of Business, discusses the new approaches she’s using in the classroom this fall

A Chat with Dr. Fait Muedini

By Maddy Kline ’21

The newest published work to come from Butler University Director of International Studies Fait Muedini, Idolatry of the Translated Forms, is a clear departure from Muedini’s traditional written research—the 99 poems weave together to form the first book of poetry he has ever published.

“A lot of my work is research, of course—a lot of work related to human rights, LGBTI rights, child education rights—but I've always had a passion for writing poetry, as well,” Muedini says. “I just keep writing, keep writing, putting it aside, and really not thinking much of it. And there came a point when I said, ‘well, maybe I should focus on poetry as an outlet for publishing, as well.’ I'm happy I did it. I probably should have done it earlier.”

The book is deeply rooted in Sufi poetry and ideas, most of which are encapsulated by notions of beauty and love. Like his passion for poetry, Sufism has been a theme in Muedini’s life for a number of years. His ties to the subject matter of the book make it both a personal and striking read.

“The poems clarified a lot of how I view the world,” Muedini says. “And the best way to describe it, it's really this idea of non-duality, just kind of thinking about the world as a unity of everything—this manifestation of nothing, but what is understood as beauty and love—again, a very Sufi idea. All of the poems in some way center around the idea of elevating this idea of love in everyday beauty.”

But why stop at 99 poems?

Muedini explained the significance of the number in Islamic theology. Within that faith, he says, there exist 99 names or attributes of God known to the human mind.

“My idea of the book is idolatry of the translated forms, which essentially means all our conceptions of God are lacking—we can't ever understand, with language, what the ultimate power of God is,” Muedini says. “In Islam and Sufism, there's this idea that God has a 100th name, but that it's not revealed to anybody. And so, it's essentially silent. That's exactly what I was going for.”

Apart from publishing a new book, what else has Muedini been up to lately? Below, we chat with him about favorite meals, must-read books, and go-to films—spoiler: he loves slapstick comedy.

Are there any television shows or series that you're watching and enjoying right now?
To be honest, I don't get too much into series. It's not that I don't like TV, it's that once you get into a series, you feel like you have to watch all of it. And that takes a lot of time. I'll have some soccer games on in the background when I'm doing work, things like that.

In the vein of less time commitment, then: What about films? Do you have a favorite film?
I do tend to watch more films. I like a lot of introspective foreign films, or outright slapstick comedy type films—it's really that dichotomy.

Do you have a go-to for each of those categories?
There's a film in my course that a student actually recommended called Mustang about social gender issues in Turkey. It is a story about these five sisters who have various social pressures on them to marry, and then human rights abuses against women. I also thought Roma was very powerful. Films that I think really get people to reflect on topics and themes that again, bring about the human condition, I would say, are where there's a lot of interest.

Friends who've known me forever will know that Dumb and Dumber is by far the funniest I've ever seen. I've watched it countless times and I still laugh uncontrollably at so many of the parts.

What books should everyone read in their lifetime?
I just would tell people just to keep reading. The more you read, the more ideas you're exposed to. Really, it depends on the genre of what you're looking for. So, in the spirituality genre, for example, there's a book called The Upanishads. It's an ancient Hindu text—that was really one of the most influential books in my life.

For something like financial advice, there's a book called Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki, which I think everyone should read. For something about monetary policy, there's a book I really think everyone should read called The Bitcoin Standard by Saifedean Ammous. But again, it really depends on the category of literature because there's just so much in every field.

What is your favorite meal to either cook or eat?
I don't cook. I've never even tried cooking. So, there's that. Thankfully, my wife loves to cook, and so she'll learn recipes and try a variety of dishes. I am very fortunate about that. My palate is pretty American-based—fried chicken, cheeseburgers—things like this. Although, I'm realizing as I get older, I should eat much less of it.

What three historical figures would you most want to have dinner with?
The ones that just immediately come to mind for me, I would say the Sufi poet Rumi, absolutely. Albert Camus, my favorite overall writer, would come to mind. There was a poet who died not too long ago. Her name was Mary Oliver, and she was an American poet. Those would be the three who would come to mind for me, initially, that I would have that dinner with.

What do you consider to be the most interesting thing that you've done in your lifetime?
For me, what has brought by far the most joy throughout my life—and continues to—is really to be married to the person I'm married to, whom I love very much. We have two children together. And with them, just seeing the wonder in their eyes every day, to me is interesting; seeing how they're going through life, and how they are developing their characters and personalities. So just having a family is, I think, the most interesting. I mean, I could quote where I've traveled, what I've written, but to me, it just pales in comparison to having this core nucleus of my family.

Where is your favorite place to be?
It doesn't matter anymore. I think this poetry really kind of brought that out: I really have tried in the past years just to be present in any spot I'm in. Being around my family—if I take kind of a non-physical location—being around my family as much as I can, is always where I'm happiest. There's just beauty in every space, every place, if we just pay attention to it. And so, I actually don't like sometimes when people say, ‘I must go here, I must go there,’ because I think you forget the wonder of where you're at now in that present moment.

What has been your favorite part of being a professor at Butler?
That’s an easy one. Just the inquisitive minds of my students. I mean, being alert, having conversations with them, having them just ask such detailed questions—really wanting to learn about the world, wanting to learn about human rights issues, and being so committed to their education. It makes work just such a joy because students are just excellent and have been excellent since I've arrived here.

Muedini
Campus

A Chat with Dr. Fait Muedini

Butler's Director of International Studies typically works on research, but he recently explored a different passion: poetry

Muedini

A Chat with Dr. Fait Muedini

By Maddy Kline ’21

What is it Like to be an Honors Student at Butler?

By Cassandra Stec ’23

Cassandra Stec is a junior at Butler studying Computer Science and Art + Design.

When I was first applying for college, I noticed a section in the Common App that asked if I wanted to participate in the Butler University Honors Program.

Intrigued, I looked up more information and learned that the Honors Program at Butler allows you to graduate with University Honors, as well as finish college with a published thesis. In order to complete the Honors Program, you need to attend eight honors community events, complete four honors classes (including a First Year Seminar), write a thesis on a topic of your choosing, and maintain a 3.5 GPA.

After reading about the program, I immediately applied. I enjoy education, as well as being involved, so the Honors Program seemed right up my alley. A few months later, I received my Honors Program acceptance along with the news that I had been accepted to Butler.

During New Student Registration, I attended the honors luncheon, where my dad and I got to sit with current honors students and hear about classes and professors. Dr. Jason Lantzer, Assistant Director of the Honors Program, provided details about the Honors requirements, as well as the various study abroad opportunities offered through the program. Later on, right before moving into my dorm and starting my first year of college, I was also assigned an Honors mentor, whom I could go to for help or questions regarding the program, Butler, or college life in general.

Since then, I have completed almost all requirements of the Honors Program. My first year, I took an Honors First Year Seminar (FYS) called “Women Writing the World.” The class was taught by English Lecturer Dr. Natalie Carter and delved into the different experiences of women around the world through pieces of literature written by women. For me, that class instilled a sense of togetherness and community among my Honors peers. Thanks to the Honors Program, I met some of my closest friends through that class that I likely would not have met otherwise.

I also participated in a variety of Honors events, including lectures (I went to a really cool one about Abraham Lincoln.), the Nutcracker ballet, and game and pizza nights.

My second year, I took a 200-level Honors course in the fall, as well as a 300-level Honors course in the spring. The 200-level course was called “The Wonderful World of Disney,” taught by Dr. Lantzer. The course delved into who Walt Disney was, as well as the company that came from his creations. It has been one of my favorite classes so far at Butler.

The 300-level course was called “Paris: The City as Text,” taught by History Professor Dr. Paul Hanson. The course examined Paris from a variety of disciplines and approaches. As part of the course, I also did a study abroad program to Paris over spring break to see and experience what we had discussed in class. Traveling to Paris and exploring alongside my classmates really made me appreciate what I had learned in the course.

Also during my second year, I joined the Student Honors Council. This organization helps plan events (such as “We Love Honors Week”) and get-togethers for Honors students, as well as helps connect mentors and mentees for the mentorship program. I also became a mentor for several first-year Honors students, not only helping them with life at Butler and college in general, but also becoming close friends with several of them.

Now, I am beginning work on my thesis by planning the proposal and searching for a thesis advisor. While I have finished all my other Honors requirements, I plan to stay involved with the program by continuing to take more Honors courses and study abroad as my schedule allows—just because of how much I enjoy not only the content of the courses, but also the professors who teach them.

If you are a prospective student interested in the Honors Program, make sure to apply by November 1. If you are a current student, it’s not too late! You can still petition for admission to the program.

For more information about the Honors Program at Butler, visit our website.

Butler University
Admission

What is it Like to be an Honors Student at Butler?

Cassandra Stec ’23 shares her experience with the program

A Day in the Life of Blue IV

By Nicki Clark ’22

 

 

Nicki Clark is a student in Butler’s Class of 2022, majoring in Journalism and minoring in Digital Media Production.

 

Perhaps the most famous face around Butler’s campus is Blue IV. After having Trip’s collar passed down in February 2020, Blue has been hard at work to keep his predecessor’s legacy strong. Being Butler’s live mascot is a serious gig, and Blue takes his job very seriously. He spends his days interacting with students, greeting visitors, and practicing to make sure he is the best mascot he can be. His schedule varies from day to day, but I was able to spend a morning with Blue to see what it’s like to spend a day in his paws.

9:30 AM
Blue IV went to the bookstore to see students, but he also had to take care of some business. He took a photo with the winning submissions from the AT HOMEcoming Coloring Contest. He also took photos to promote a Butler graduate’s new book. He got to say hello to many students, which resulted in pets, boops on the nose, and even a few treats.

Butler Blue IV

 

10:00 AM
Blue headed over to Robertson Hall to greet prospective students who were visiting Butler for a tour. The visitors’ faces lit up at the sight of Blue trotting up to say hello. It’s hard to say no to his fist bumps and wrinkly little face!

Butler Blue IV

Butler Blue IV

 

10:30 AM
Blue put on his Butler jersey and headed to Hinkle Fieldhouse to take a picture with two students. They were even nice enough to bring Blue some treats, which he could not wait to get his paws on. Although he had to save some of the treats for later, he did get to enjoy half of a doggy cupcake on the sidewalk outside Hinkle before heading off to his next adventure of the day.

Butler Blue IV

 

11:00 AM
Blue headed inside Hinkle Fieldhouse to get some Live Mascot practice. He had to work on getting comfortable walking up the ramps and up the stairs. He worked on his entrance run for basketball games—executing it perfectly. He made sure to drink lots of water to keep hydrated during his practice. He even got to sit at the very top of Hinkle and look down at all the empty seats that will someday be filled to cheer on the Dawgs.

Butler Blue IV

Butler Blue IV

 

12:00 PM
After a successful practice, Blue wanted to film a TikTok. He started off at Hinkle Fieldhouse and ventured all around campus to showcase the beautiful fall weather. Of course, he had to stop for some pictures with students along the way, but he always loves meeting all the Butler students and fans.

Butler Blue IV

Butler Blue IV

 

1:00 PM
After a long morning of strutting around campus, Blue was ready to head home for a well-deserved nap. While he can’t wait to get back to running out of the tunnel with the basketball team, he’s very much enjoying his walks around campus and other activities until sports start back up again. To keep up with Blue IV, you can follow him on his social media accounts: InstagramTwitterTikTok, and Facebook.

Butler Blue IV

 

Butler Blue IV
Campus

A Day in the Life of Blue IV

Butler's live bulldog mascot spends his days interacting with students, greeting visitors, and practicing to make sure he is the best mascot he can be

Butler Blue IV

A Day in the Life of Blue IV

By Nicki Clark ’22

Scholarship Helps Indy Native Study Pharmacy at Butler

By Meredith Sauter

Indianapolis native Andrés Huerta remembers his first visit to Butler. It was Homecoming weekend and he was with Sam, his mentor with Starfish Initiative—a local nonprofit that works with promising students to help overcome the barriers of poverty and to understand that college is an option. He vividly remembers walking around campus and eating dinner at Atherton Union, all the while visualizing himself as a student.

“I could see myself here,” Huerta says. “I knew deep down that this was the right place for me.”

So, with the help of his high school guidance counselor, he applied to Butler. And only to Butler.

Huerta was accepted into the highly-competitive Pre-Pharmacy Program, which he knew would be a great academic fit. However, the reality of funding his education was a challenge. “Looking back, I was very ignorant of the fact that college was expensive,” Huerta says. “I just knew I wanted to go to Butler, so I applied, but I didn’t really understand how I was meant to pay for it.”

Thankfully, Huerta, a 21st Century Scholar and first-generation college student, applied for—and received—the Butler Tuition Guarantee, a full-tuition scholarship available to Marion County students who exhibit a strong academic background, but also a large financial need. Huerta admits, “If I didn’t receive this scholarship, not only would I have not gone to Butler, but I probably wouldn’t have gone to college at all.”

Starting as a first-year student in 2017, Huerta said he was very timid and kept mostly to himself. But, over time, he became more comfortable interacting with students and professors, thanks largely to his involvement with the Efroymson Diversity Center (The DC). The DC helped him find his home away from home, allowed him to become more intertwined with campus, and served as the catalyst to many leadership opportunities, including his current role as the treasurer with Latinos Unidos.

Huerta is in the midst of his first (of four) years as a professional student in the Doctor of Pharmacy Program, and is still exploring the many avenues of pharmacy. Regardless of what he chooses, though, he knows that his Butler education will help get him there.

“At Butler, I’ve found that if you put in the work, things typically work out,” Huerta says. “Butler has pushed me to grow and I’ve succeeded far beyond what I thought I was capable of.”

Andrés Huerta
Student-Centered

Scholarship Helps Indy Native Study Pharmacy at Butler

Thanks to the Butler Tuition Guarantee, a full-tuition scholarship available to Marion County students, Andrés Huerta is a Bulldog