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Butler's Center for Citizenship and Community Turns 20

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 07 2016

Butler’s Center for Citizenship and Community (CCC) celebrates its 20th anniversary on November 30 at 4:00 PM in Jordan Hall 109, and among the achievements the CCC will be reflecting on is the widespread impact it’s had on the city of Indianapolis, the University, and, especially, Butler students.

The CCC is responsible for creating the Indianapolis Community Requirement (ICR), which requires students to take one course in any part of the University that involves active engagement with the Indianapolis community. In 2015-2016, Butler students gave more than 25,000 hours of time, which translates to about $600,000 in value.

Students Digging“I'm not sure money captures the reciprocal learning value of the ICR, though,” said Donald Braid, who has been the CCC Director since 2007. “The work students do in ICR classes has helped address needs in Indianapolis communities, and it helps the students understand their own role in the community.”

In addition, Braid said, thanks to the ICR, “community engagement is woven into the fabric of the institution. All students participate, so that embeds in our core curriculum the civic goals that are part of a liberal education and Butler’s founding principles.”

Beyond the ICR, the CCC also has helped facilitate projects that involve campus-community partnerships. This year, for example, the center is helping lead a major research project, “Music First,” which will use music to attempt to ease the suffering of Alzheimer’s patients. It also has supported Education Professor Katie Brooks, who secured a $2 million grant to alleviate the shortage of English as a New Language teachers. And the center has sponsored educational programs like leading a campus-wide discussion on civil discourse.

But Braid said the most significant impact the CCC has had may be on individual students who have gone into the community thinking they were simply doing volunteer work and instead found that they were learning about themselves and getting back even more than they were giving.

When Kate Richards ’18 came to Butler from Effingham, Illinois, she knew a little about the ICR and Butler’s focus on service learning. But the idea of communicating with the Indianapolis community was something that appealed to her.

During her first American Sign Language class, she did her service learning at Miller’s Merry Manor, a nursing home and rehabilitation center, where she and another student played cards and talked with three or four deaf residents using sign language. In her third ASL class, she was assigned to the Indiana School for the Deaf, where she tutored middle-school students in math.

Richards, a Communication Sciences and Disorders major, has now completed four ICR courses and works for the CCC as a liaison between the Deaf School and students at Butler. In that role, she places students where they’ll have the best experience.

“Students know about the ICR,” she said. “But they don’t realize how much of an experience it is. I think that’s what the CCC is trying to get at—it’s much more than everyone thinks it’s going to be.”

*

The CCC began through a grant from Eli Lilly & Co. in 1996 with Political Science Professor Margaret Brabant as its first director. The center’s creation was an outgrowth of Butler’s role as a founding member of Indiana Campus Compact, an organization of Indiana universities that got together to recognize the value of civic engagement and the responsibility of universities to make connections with their communities.

Early on, Brabant pursued Community Outreach Partnerships Centers grants from the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development. The grants help colleges and universities apply their human, intellectual, and institutional resources to the challenge of revitalizing distressed communities.

Those grants, along with funding from the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust and other local foundations, launched the CCC, which initially focused on service learning, community revitalization, fair-housing, and crime and safety issues.Hearing Test

“A lot of that work was valuable, and some portions didn’t fit Butler’s mission,” Braid said. “Over the years, we’ve learned which pieces really fit the university’s educational mission, which partnerships really are valuable reciprocally in supporting the education of our students and in supporting community issues, and we’ve focused on those things.”

The Indianapolis Community Requirement is one of those pieces that stayed. The CCC set up partnerships with community organizations, many of which continue to this day. The relationship with the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ISBVI) is one.

Luke Schaible ’17, an Accounting major from Findlay, Ohio, began his service learning experience at ISBVI when he was a first-year student in Braid’s Making a Difference in the World course.

“I was pretty new to the whole concept of service and I had no idea what to expect,” he said. “I thought it was something you did for a requirement in college because you had to, and I didn’t know what I was going to gain. But talking to the students there really changed my view.”

When he first got there, he sat in a corner—“just being my shy self”—when a student came up and asked him to play basketball.

“It’s nice to go into their world for a few hours and see how ISBVI students are with their peers,” said Schaible, who now works for the CCC, guiding students to ISBVI to make sure they have the kind of experience he had. “You see that ISBVI students are just like you and me. That’s what’s so intriguing.”

Braid said the experiences Richards and Schaible have had are exactly what makes the CCC important to Butler.

“We’re interested in empathy, community, and service, which are what we think are an essential part of an education, and with students coming through a liberal arts university, we hope to generate an understanding and a practice of those kinds of values and virtues,” he said.

“The kind of educational process we promote is experiential on one hand, which is more than just doing in the community; it’s learning to value the community, it’s learning to understand others, to understand and appreciate diversity. In a way, this could be seen as an experiential education for the liberal arts. Anything that falls within that domain are things the center is interested in supporting.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler's Center for Citizenship and Community Turns 20

Among the achievements the CCC will be reflecting on is the widespread impact it’s had on the city of Indianapolis, the University, and, especially, Butler students.

Nov 07 2016 Read more
Campus

Brandie Oliver Named Counselor Educator of the Year

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 02 2016

Brandie Oliver, Assistant Professor of School Counseling in the College of Education, has been named Indiana School Counselor Association (ISCA) Counselor Educator of the Year. She will be recognized at a luncheon on November 4.

Brandie Oliver“It is an honor to receive this award from the Indiana School Counselor Association and to join past recipients who I have long admired and respected,” Oliver said. “Numerous people have supported me in my journey and I owe much of my success to the excellent training I received during my graduate school counseling program at Butler University. I was taught to be an advocate, build relationships, and to keep students at the center of my work. These lessons are at the core of my work as a Counselor Educator.”

Nicole Detrick, Upper School Counselor at the International School of Indianapolis, nominated Oliver for the award. In her nomination essay, Detrick credited Oliver with asking her to be the Indiana School Counselor Association Secondary School VP board member when Oliver was president of ISCA.

“Brandie giving me this state leadership opportunity helped me to grow as an education professional and inspired me to study education administration for which I hope to move into in the next couple of years,” Detrick said. “During my time at the state school counseling level, Brandie continued to support and model great student advocacy for ALL students. She works tirelessly bringing positive change to the lives of Indiana students at the K-12, post-secondary, and policy levels. I am proud to be her colleague and friend. She is an exemplary educator!”

Oliver said she has been fortunate to work with “amazing school counselors, educators, and community partners during my service on the ISCA Board and as a Counselor Educator at Butler University.”

“I often tell others that I have the best career because my work is to teach the next generation of school counselors as well as to mentor and support practitioners in the field, like my friend Nicole Detrick. While awards are wonderful to receive, the greatest rewards are witnessing the success of my students and alumni and the relationships that I have developed both inside and outside of the classroom.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Brandie Oliver Named Counselor Educator of the Year

"While awards are wonderful to receive, the greatest rewards are witnessing the success of my students and alumni and the relationships that I have developed both inside and outside of the classroom.”

Nov 02 2016 Read more
Campus

Justice Shepard to Speak at Winter Commencement

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 26 2016

Randall Shepard, the longest-serving Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Indiana, will be the speaker and honorary degree recipient at Butler University Winter 2016 Commencement on Saturday, December 17, in Clowes Memorial Hall, beginning at 10:00 AM.
Randall Shepard

“We are pleased to have Justice Shepard speak to our graduates,” Butler University President James M. Danko said. “In choosing honorary degree recipients, Butler University strives to invite individuals whose life and work reflect Butler University’s core values and whose message can positively impact our students through sharing their insights and life lessons. Justice Shepard’s many accomplishments provide an inspirational example for all Butler students, parents, faculty, and staff.”

Throughout his distinguished career, Shepard strived to make the judicial system simpler and fairer for all. He is credited with modernizing Indiana’s courts, instituting rules to help citizens avoid litigation, implementing easy-to-understand jury instructions, expanding translation services in trial courts, and creating a scholarship program for minority law students. He also led efforts to webcast the Indiana Supreme Court's oral arguments.

In 2015, he received the American Bar Association’s John Marshall Award, named after the longest-serving Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, for his commitment to the legal profession, legal education, and the justice system.

Shepard was appointed to the Indiana Supreme Court by then-Governor Robert D. Orr in 1985 at the age of 38. He became Chief Justice of Indiana in March 1987 and retired from the Court in March 2012, at which point he was the longest-serving Chief Justice in Indiana history and the senior Chief Justice in the country’s state supreme courts.

An Evansville native and seventh-generation Hoosier, Shepard started his judicial career as Judge of the Vanderburgh Superior Court in 1980. He graduated from Princeton University cum laude and from the Yale Law School. He earned a Master of Laws degree in the judicial process from the University of Virginia.

When Justice Shepard retired in 2012, he was lauded by both sides of the aisle for his evenhandedness. Former Indiana Senator Richard Lugar wrote of Shepard, “The experience and intellect with which you presided over the Indiana judicial system led others in our communities and at the federal level to seek your leadership and talents.” U.S. Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan wrote, “Your tenure has been simply remarkable. You have been an inspiration for so many judges across the country and, of course, the greatest of public servants for Hoosiers.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Justice Shepard to Speak at Winter Commencement

Throughout his distinguished career, Shepard strived to make the judicial system simpler and fairer for all.

Oct 26 2016 Read more
Campus

CUE Farm Gets a New Addition: A Mobile Greenhouse

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 25 2016

Butler University’s Center for Urban Ecology Farm is the new home of the first fully automated, mobile greenhouse, an 8-foot-wide by 32-foot-long structure designed and built by Ball State University architecture students to enable the CUE Farm to start plants earlier in the season.

The $50,000 project was built with a grant from the Butler Innovation Fund. Public tours for the greenhouse will take place November 3 from 3:00–6:00 PM at the farm, which is located west of campus near the athletic fields. The event will occur during the last farm stand of the season. A week’s worth of produce will be offered as a raffle prize.

CUE Farm Mobile GreenhouseThe greenhouse was built to be mobile because the farm is in a floodplain, so a permanent structure was not an option. It will serve as a model for other urban farms, which often experience land access challenges that require mobility.

“A lot of urban farming happens in marginal areas that are challenged in different ways like floodplains,” said Travis Ryan, Chair of Butler’s Biology Department, which oversees the farm. “So the idea of making something that’s mobile that might be able to exist and support facilities in these areas is interesting.”

Ryan said when the decision was made to create a mobile greenhouse, Butler representatives approached Timothy Gray, Associate Professor of Architecture at Ball State. Gray and his students previously designed and built the CUE Farm’s mobile classroom, which is made from a shipping container.

Over two semesters, his students designed and built the structure, taking into account variables such as placement on the farm to get the best sunlight and shelving to house the optimum number of plants. Their design also includes ventilation, heating and cooling, heat-sensitive actuators that open and close windows, fans connected to a thermostat, and an irrigation system customizable to different times of the year and different plants.

“Every detail is really thought through,” Gray said. “That’s part of the learning process for the students. We had to pay attention to all the details to make sure it functions and also find architecture in all those moments.”

Ryan said he is impressed with the students’ work.

“Tim Gray said he really stepped back and let them work,” he said. “They cut the pieces, they welded it, they put it all together. There are some really nice touches to what they’ve done.”

Gray said what his students designed and built is a prototype. There has already been interest from other communities that found the design at https://growinggreen2016.wordpress.com/. One of the calls he received was from Liverpool, England.

“They’re working with the homeless population to develop these urban farming sites around Liverpool, and they’re looking for facilities that can support multiple farms,” he said. “So they’re looking for a greenhouse that can be moved between the different farming sites they’re developing. I thought was an interesting application as well.”

The greenhouse is not only functional, but it caught the attention of the American Institute of Architects. Gray and his students won a prestigious 2016 American Institute of Architects Indiana Design Award for the mobile greenhouse.

Opportunities to partner with Butler University in support of the Center for Urban Ecology, the Farm, and its community programs are available. To learn more, please contact the Office of Corporate and Foundation Relations at cfr@butler.edu.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

CUE Farm Gets a New Addition: A Mobile Greenhouse

The greenhouse was built to be mobile because the farm is in a floodplain.

Oct 25 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler Introduces New Academic Program Development Director

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 25 2016

Butler University has hired Erin Vincent as Director of Academic Program Development and Innovation, a new position designed to help faculty, staff, and administrators to move new academic programs from idea to program launch.
Erin Vincent

Vincent brings more than 20 years of experience in higher education to the position. She had served as the Director for Kelley Direct Online Programs with the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University since 2006. Before that, she was an Academic Advisor at the Kelley School, where she was selected to receive a 2015-2016 Schuyler F. Otteson Award for Undergraduate Teaching Excellence—an honor awarded by student nomination and student selection.

“Erin comes to us with a rich background in higher education,” Provost Kate Morris said. “She has experience in both academic and student affairs, expertise in the area of multicultural education, and knowledge of program building in online, hybrid, and face-to-face learning environments.”

Vincent earned both her Bachelor of Arts and Masters of Arts degrees from Ball State University. She serves on several professional committees and organizations within Higher Education. She also serves on the Board of Directors for Mid-North Food Pantry, a food pantry serving the largest food desert in central Indiana.

At Butler, she will be part of a team of three.

“Our goal is to lead Butler University's educational impact beyond the traditional classroom and preparing graduates to succeed," Vincent said. "I believe our team's unique blend of experiences will be an asset in the development of new academic programs for Butler University."

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Introduces New Academic Program Development Director

Vincent brings more than 20 years of experience in higher education to the position.

Oct 25 2016 Read more
Campus

Future Farmers Get a Look at Butler's Campus Farm

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 21 2016

On a brisk fall Indiana Friday morning, 49 members of FFA (Future Farmers of America) got a look at a model for the future of urban agriculture.

The FFA members, who came from as far away as Massachusetts and Connecticut, Arizona and Washington state to attend the annual FFA convention in Indianapolis, took a tour of the CUE Farm at Butler to see how the University is approaching sustainable, environmentally responsible urban farming.
Butler University CUE farm hosts FFA convention attendees October 21, 2016.

“Small-scale sustainable agriculture can be a part of our food system,” Farm Manager Tim Dorsey told the group, showing them around the one-acre parcel west of campus where approximately 75 different kinds of fruits, vegetables, nuts, and plants are grown. “People want to start connecting to the places where their food is grown.”

The produce grown on the farm is sold locally through a CSA group (Community Supported Agriculture), at a weekly farmstand, and to 6-10 local restaurants and grocery stores.

The farm also provides students with educational opportunities.

“Butler doesn’t have an agriculture major or degree,” Center for Urban Ecology Director Julia Angstmann told the group. “But students can participate in the environmental, social and business component of the operation.”

Butler students can take a class called Cultivating Well Being, where they work on the farm. Biology, Communications, and Business classes, as well as interns, also participate in farm activities.

For many of the FFA visitors, the Butler farm is a postage stamp of land compared with where they live. Katherine Carpenter—Miss Washington Teen Agriculture—lives on roughly 150 acres where they grow oats, timothy, alfalfa, grass, pasture mix and other kinds of hay that thrive in Washington State.

She wanted to see the farm at least in part because “it’s at a college and we’re all in high school and looking at colleges.” She said she liked what she saw.

“It’s really cool,” she said. “I enjoyed looking at it and listening to the talk. The way they work with the bees and things like that was interesting.”

Sydney Riebold, also from Deer Park, Washington, whose family raises steer, hogs, pigs, and sheep on their farm, said the campus farm is “not my thing, but I think it was good and it was interesting.”

After the tour, Angstmann polled the group and found that only one member had visited an urban farm prior to this tour and two had previously seen a sustainable agriculture project.

“I think,” she said, “it may have been an eye-opening experience for many of the attendees.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Future Farmers Get a Look at Butler's Campus Farm

On a brisk fall Indiana Friday morning, 49 members of FFA (Future Farmers of America) got a look at a model for the future of urban agriculture.

Oct 21 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler’s First Mock Mediation Team Finds Success at Tournament

BY Kailey Eaton ’17

PUBLISHED ON Oct 20 2016

Butler University’s first ever Mock Mediation team had quite a showing at the Brenau Invitational Mediation Tournament in Gainesville, Georgia, on October 7 and 8.
(Pictured L to R) Russ Hunter, Nick Fox and Anthony Murdock display their awards.

Russ Hunter ’17 and Anthony Murdock ’17 both took home “Top Mediator.” Hunter also was awarded “Top Advocate/Client,” as was his teammate Nick Fox ’18.

The tournament drew 20 teams from nine schools. Each team consisted of three students. The events began on Friday after a short mediation training session. There were two rounds of mediation on Friday afternoon, one on Saturday morning and the winners were announced Saturday afternoon.

Each round in the tournament involved students serving as a plaintiff, a defendant, attorneys for both, and two mediators. Students rotated roles, serving as co-mediator in one round.

Teams were given general facts of a legal case, and then confidential facts for each side were handed out. The mediators’ job was to get the parties to negotiate a settlement in 90 minutes. Local lawyers from Northeast Georgia volunteered to serve as judges and provide feedback directly to the students after each round.

Prelaw advisor Jim McKneight served as the coach for the team, which practiced this fall with him and Jerry Pitt, who is a College of Business Career Mentor and veteran mediation trainer. McKneight said he was proud of the team’s success.

“Our goals were to have fun, compete with passion, and represent Butler in a first-class way,” McKneight said. “This team certainly did that. The tournament environment was similar to a law school Socratic method style class, so it will serve these students well in their future law school careers.”

This experience will certainly benefit these students moving forward.

Nick Fox is a risk management and insurance double major with a prelaw minor. He said that being on the team will give him an advantage when applying to law school.

“I was already 100 percent set on law school and participating on this team has given me some important experience that will give me a leg up as I go into law school in a few years,” he said.

McKneight and the students said they hope to make this an annual event.

Anthony Murdock said the tournament was affirmation that he was making the right decision in applying for law school following graduation. He also took away some lessons that will serve him well no matter where his future takes him.

“Conflict resolution is so important, and the ability to listen is even more crucial to success,” Murdock said. “Mediation teaches us how to do both things, so it was rewarding to be a part of the team.”

Campus

Butler’s First Mock Mediation Team Finds Success at Tournament

Three Butler students took home awards at the Brenau Invitational Mediation Tournament, which gives participants practice with mediation techniques and conflict resolution. 

Oct 20 2016 Read more
Campus

Longtime Voice Professor André Aerne Dies

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 20 2016

Longtime Butler Professor of Voice André Aerne died on Sunday, October 16, in Petoskey, Michigan. He was 84.

Aerne taught at Butler from 1966-1998 and also was often featured as a soloist in the Romantic Festival programs.

Andre Aerne“Professor Aerne left every life he touched richer,” said Sheridan Stormes ’76, MM ’81, Associate Professor, Performing & Fine Arts Librarian. “He loved teaching and he loved his students but held them to the highest of standards. He was always impeccably dressed and his conduct was ever that of a gentleman. He was gentle and soft-spoken but also possessed of a sharp wit. He valued and devoted himself to all things beautiful, from exquisitely executed music and fine literature to delectable food and glorious gardens to rare antiques, Oriental rugs, and Clarice Cliff pottery. André Aerne was one of a kind and I think I speak for all who have been his students, colleagues, and friends when I say that his presence in our lives was a very special blessing.”

Aerne spent his early childhood near St. Gallen, Switzerland. His mother was a pianist and teacher, and after they moved to the Chicago area, Aerne studied voice with Hannah Butler, a well-known Chicago voice teacher.  In his pre-adolescent years, Aerne distinguished himself as a boy soprano, giving numerous concerts and recitals including performances as soloist with the Chicago Symphony and recitals in Kimball Hall.  He toured with the Apollo Boys Choir and later traveled with that group as an instructor.

Aerne earned the Bachelor of Arts Degree from the University of Chicago.  Afterwards he enrolled at the American Conservatory of Music in Chicago, where he earned Bachelor and Master of Music degrees in voice.  During the course of his career, Aerne was privileged to study with a number of notable musicians.  His private teachers included Rudolph Ganz (piano), Leo Sowerby (composition), Theodore Harrison (voice), Nadia Boulanger (music theory), Gerard Souzay (voice), Pierre Bernac (voice), and Margaret Harshaw (voice).

From 1956-1966, he was on the faculty of Shenandoah Conservatory of Music in Winchester, Virginia.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Longtime Voice Professor André Aerne Dies

He was always impeccably dressed and his conduct was ever that of a gentleman.

Oct 20 2016 Read more
Campus

Retired Faculty Member, Alumna Ann Harper Dies

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 17 2016

Longtime Butler faculty member and pioneering Indiana broadcaster Ann Wagner Harper ’63, MS ’68 died Thursday, October 13. She was 92.

By the time Ann HarperHarper got to Butler, she had already established herself as a local celebrity in music and broadcasting. Among her credits, she was the first female vocalist on television in Indiana, on WFBM (Channel 6); and first female disc jockey in the state, on WFBM radio, where she conducted on-air interviews with such personalities as Patti Page, The McGuire Sisters, Nat King Cole, Tony Bennett, and Bill Haley and the Comets.

When rock ’n’ roll hit, she decided to give up radio and finish her college education at Butler University. (She had started college at the University of Louisville in 1944 after winning a voice contest sponsored by the Louisville Courier Journal and WHAS, but moved to Indianapolis in 1947 to sing with the Art Berry Orchestra at The Columbia Club.) She earned her bachelor’s degree in speech, then taught high school, and completed her master’s degree at Butler in education and speech.

After graduation, the manager of WAJC, Butler’s student-run radio, asked her to join the faculty in radio and television broadcasting. She advised students and taught announcing and radio production. She later introduced two new courses, broadcast law and music in broadcasting. Starting as an instructor, she became a full professor, her proudest professional accomplishment. In 1985, she was inducted into the Indiana Broadcast Pioneers Hall of Fame. She retired from Butler in 1988.

"Generations of Butler students learned from Ann Harper and Jim Phillippe, who together held us to very high expectations,” said Class of '85 Radio/TV graduate Dave Arland, today the Executive Director of the Indiana Broadcasters Association. “Her encouragement, patience, good humor, and trailblazing experience in broadcasting was a gift that still resonates. Butler had no better advocate for communications students from the 1960's through the 1980's."

In 2015, Harper was awarded the Butler Service Medal, which recognizes emeriti faculty or retired faculty and staff (alumnus or non-alumnus) for a lifetime of distinguished service to Butler University and to the community.

Funeral services will be held at 10:30 AM Wednesday, October 19, at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Vincennes, Indiana, where she lived.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Retired Faculty Member, Alumna Ann Harper Dies

Longtime Butler faculty member and pioneering Indiana broadcaster Ann Wagner Harper ’63, MS ’68 died Thursday, October 13.

Oct 17 2016 Read more
Campus

Two Butler Alums Team Up to Create a National Fundraising Contest

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 11 2016

Two Butler alumni and the organizations they run have teamed up to create a nationwide fundraiser that will pit 64 charities in a bracket-style fundraising tournament.
Matt McIntyre '06 of Brackets for Good and Bill Soards '96 of AT&T Indiana have teamed up to create Brackets for Good USA.

Matt McIntyre ’06, Executive Director and Co-Founder of Brackets for Good, and Bill Soards ’96, President of AT&T Indiana, made the announcement outside Hinkle Fieldhouse on Tuesday, October 11, of the first national Brackets for Good USA tournament.

“We talk about the Butler Way a lot, and I think it’s on the court and off the court,” McIntyre said. “I think we’re doing great things for a great community that we stayed in and love and want to support. And we’ve now put it on a national stage.”

Soards added: “It’s the kind of excitement that Butler basketball has brought to its fan base over the last few years that Brackets for Good and AT&T hope to replicate to benefit non-profits across the country.”

In March 2012, Brackets for Good kicked off its bracket-style fundraising competition in Indianapolis modeled after the NCAA basketball tournament brackets. Non-profit organizations "play" each other in a fundraising competition, with the winner—the organization that raises more money in a set time—advancing to the next round.

Brackets for Good—which itself is a non-profit—has since expanded its competitions to 10 other cities: Louisville, Kentucky; Ann Arbor, Michigan; St. Louis, Missouri; Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota; Cincinnati, Ohio; Nashville, Tennessee; Denver, Colorado; Baltimore, Maryland; Hartford, Connecticut; and Miami, Florida.

The city competitions have raised $2.75 million so far, McIntyre said.

In March 2017, Brackets for Good will again hold 11 city-based tournaments, but it will add the national competition. The deadline for non-profits to register is October 28 at bfg.org. Brackets for Good will validate the 501c3 non-profit status for each group, then work with Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affair to evaluate which organizations make the tournament and how they are seeded in the competition.

The national winner will receive an addition $100,000 contribution from AT&T.

Next March, 768 non-profits will participate locally or nationally in Brackets for Good. McIntyre said all will gain new public awareness, raise funds, have the opportunity to use free tech tools, and engage supporters.

“It’s going to be an amazing March on the philanthropy court,” McIntyre said.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Two Butler Alums Team Up to Create a National Fundraising Contest

Two Butler alumni and the organizations they run have teamed up to create a nationwide fundraiser that will pit 64 charities in a bracket-style fundraising tournament.​

Oct 11 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler-IUPUI Project Wins National Sustainability Competition

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 10 2016

Butler University and IUPUI beat 225 colleges and universities to win the $50,000 Sustainable Campus Competition LIVE! by presenting a proposal to expand food waste composting at both universities.

CompostingButler Sustainability Coordinator McKenzie Beverage and IUPUI Sustainability Director Jessica Davis presented “University Collaboration to Scale Food Waste Collection on Campus and in the Community” on Monday, October 10, in Baltimore before a panel of judges at the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) Conference and Expo.

Their plan will begin with both universities sharing the cost of having a trash hauler cart away the food waste from dining halls at both campuses. The hope is to eventually bring other Indianapolis organizations on board to share and ultimately lower the cost of hauling.

“The idea is to remove the barrier to entry, change the market, and make this more affordable for other organizations to participate,” Beverage said.

Butler started a pilot composting project in 2014 after Beverage’s class secured funding from SGA to compost for a year. Under that program, which is ongoing, 800 pounds of pre-consumer food waste like the tops of peppers and apple cores are taken to a composting facility each week rather than incinerated. IUPUI has started composting pre-consumer food waste in their main dining hall, with the hopes of expanding to post-consumer food waste quickly. Large-scale composting helps both universities meet their sustainability goals of waste reduction and reducing emissions associated with climate change.

Each University hauling food waste on their own was cost prohibitive, so Beverage approached IUPUI in the spring, and together she and Davis devised the proposal to collaborate.  By recruiting community partners, commercial composting will become cost competitive in Indianapolis.

“Sustainable solutions don’t begin and end on our campuses,” Davis said. “For sustainability to be impactful, it must go beyond the campus.”

Sustainable Campus Competition LIVE! was hosted by Kimberly-Clark Professional. The competition featured three rounds. All entrants submitted their best idea in 500 words or less about a campus initiative related to energy, waste, food, water or climate change.

From there, 10 semi-finalists were invited to submit a two-minute video and one-page financial overview of their project. Three finalists were chosen to present their project in front of a panel of judges and a live audience at the AASHE Conference & Expo.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler-IUPUI Project Wins National Sustainability Competition

“Sustainable solutions don’t begin and end on our campuses. For sustainability to be impactful, it must go beyond the campus.”

Oct 10 2016 Read more
Campus

Professor Stark to Conduct at Carnegie Hall

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 10 2016


Eric Stark conducting Butler's annual Rejoice! concerts, which this year will take place on December 9 and 10 in Clowes Memorial Hall.

Professor of Music Eric Stark will conduct the Indianapolis Symphonic Choir at Carnegie Hall on Sunday, October 16, in a performance that will include New York composer Mohammed Fairouz’s new oratorio, Zabur, which the choir commissioned.

Stark, who is Butler’s Director of Choral Activities and also serves as the Indianapolis Symphonic Choir’s Artistic Director, told New York’s Downtown magazine, that conducting in New York “feels like going to the musical version of Mount Olympus.”

“Our musical gods lived, worked, performed and made history in New York,” he said. “The world knows the United States through New York City. It’s a platform for music making that serves a universal audience.”

Read more of the interview here.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Professor Stark to Conduct at Carnegie Hall

“The world knows the United States through New York City. It’s a platform for music making that serves a universal audience.”

Oct 10 2016 Read more

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