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Future Farmers Get a Look at Butler's Campus Farm

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 21 2016

On a brisk fall Indiana Friday morning, 49 members of FFA (Future Farmers of America) got a look at a model for the future of urban agriculture.

The FFA members, who came from as far away as Massachusetts and Connecticut, Arizona and Washington state to attend the annual FFA convention in Indianapolis, took a tour of the CUE Farm at Butler to see how the University is approaching sustainable, environmentally responsible urban farming.
Butler University CUE farm hosts FFA convention attendees October 21, 2016.

“Small-scale sustainable agriculture can be a part of our food system,” Farm Manager Tim Dorsey told the group, showing them around the one-acre parcel west of campus where approximately 75 different kinds of fruits, vegetables, nuts, and plants are grown. “People want to start connecting to the places where their food is grown.”

The produce grown on the farm is sold locally through a CSA group (Community Supported Agriculture), at a weekly farmstand, and to 6-10 local restaurants and grocery stores.

The farm also provides students with educational opportunities.

“Butler doesn’t have an agriculture major or degree,” Center for Urban Ecology Director Julia Angstmann told the group. “But students can participate in the environmental, social and business component of the operation.”

Butler students can take a class called Cultivating Well Being, where they work on the farm. Biology, Communications, and Business classes, as well as interns, also participate in farm activities.

For many of the FFA visitors, the Butler farm is a postage stamp of land compared with where they live. Katherine Carpenter—Miss Washington Teen Agriculture—lives on roughly 150 acres where they grow oats, timothy, alfalfa, grass, pasture mix and other kinds of hay that thrive in Washington State.

She wanted to see the farm at least in part because “it’s at a college and we’re all in high school and looking at colleges.” She said she liked what she saw.

“It’s really cool,” she said. “I enjoyed looking at it and listening to the talk. The way they work with the bees and things like that was interesting.”

Sydney Riebold, also from Deer Park, Washington, whose family raises steer, hogs, pigs, and sheep on their farm, said the campus farm is “not my thing, but I think it was good and it was interesting.”

After the tour, Angstmann polled the group and found that only one member had visited an urban farm prior to this tour and two had previously seen a sustainable agriculture project.

“I think,” she said, “it may have been an eye-opening experience for many of the attendees.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Future Farmers Get a Look at Butler's Campus Farm

On a brisk fall Indiana Friday morning, 49 members of FFA (Future Farmers of America) got a look at a model for the future of urban agriculture.

Oct 21 2016 Read more
Campus

Longtime Voice Professor André Aerne Dies

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 20 2016

Longtime Butler Professor of Voice André Aerne died on Sunday, October 16, in Petoskey, Michigan. He was 84.

Aerne taught at Butler from 1966-1998 and also was often featured as a soloist in the Romantic Festival programs.

Andre Aerne“Professor Aerne left every life he touched richer,” said Sheridan Stormes ’76, MM ’81, Associate Professor, Performing & Fine Arts Librarian. “He loved teaching and he loved his students but held them to the highest of standards. He was always impeccably dressed and his conduct was ever that of a gentleman. He was gentle and soft-spoken but also possessed of a sharp wit. He valued and devoted himself to all things beautiful, from exquisitely executed music and fine literature to delectable food and glorious gardens to rare antiques, Oriental rugs, and Clarice Cliff pottery. André Aerne was one of a kind and I think I speak for all who have been his students, colleagues, and friends when I say that his presence in our lives was a very special blessing.”

Aerne spent his early childhood near St. Gallen, Switzerland. His mother was a pianist and teacher, and after they moved to the Chicago area, Aerne studied voice with Hannah Butler, a well-known Chicago voice teacher.  In his pre-adolescent years, Aerne distinguished himself as a boy soprano, giving numerous concerts and recitals including performances as soloist with the Chicago Symphony and recitals in Kimball Hall.  He toured with the Apollo Boys Choir and later traveled with that group as an instructor.

Aerne earned the Bachelor of Arts Degree from the University of Chicago.  Afterwards he enrolled at the American Conservatory of Music in Chicago, where he earned Bachelor and Master of Music degrees in voice.  During the course of his career, Aerne was privileged to study with a number of notable musicians.  His private teachers included Rudolph Ganz (piano), Leo Sowerby (composition), Theodore Harrison (voice), Nadia Boulanger (music theory), Gerard Souzay (voice), Pierre Bernac (voice), and Margaret Harshaw (voice).

From 1956-1966, he was on the faculty of Shenandoah Conservatory of Music in Winchester, Virginia.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Longtime Voice Professor André Aerne Dies

He was always impeccably dressed and his conduct was ever that of a gentleman.

Oct 20 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler’s First Mock Mediation Team Finds Success at Tournament

BY Kailey Eaton ’17

PUBLISHED ON Oct 20 2016

Butler University’s first ever Mock Mediation team had quite a showing at the Brenau Invitational Mediation Tournament in Gainesville, Georgia, on October 7 and 8.
(Pictured L to R) Russ Hunter, Nick Fox and Anthony Murdock display their awards.

Russ Hunter ’17 and Anthony Murdock ’17 both took home “Top Mediator.” Hunter also was awarded “Top Advocate/Client,” as was his teammate Nick Fox ’18.

The tournament drew 20 teams from nine schools. Each team consisted of three students. The events began on Friday after a short mediation training session. There were two rounds of mediation on Friday afternoon, one on Saturday morning and the winners were announced Saturday afternoon.

Each round in the tournament involved students serving as a plaintiff, a defendant, attorneys for both, and two mediators. Students rotated roles, serving as co-mediator in one round.

Teams were given general facts of a legal case, and then confidential facts for each side were handed out. The mediators’ job was to get the parties to negotiate a settlement in 90 minutes. Local lawyers from Northeast Georgia volunteered to serve as judges and provide feedback directly to the students after each round.

Prelaw advisor Jim McKneight served as the coach for the team, which practiced this fall with him and Jerry Pitt, who is a College of Business Career Mentor and veteran mediation trainer. McKneight said he was proud of the team’s success.

“Our goals were to have fun, compete with passion, and represent Butler in a first-class way,” McKneight said. “This team certainly did that. The tournament environment was similar to a law school Socratic method style class, so it will serve these students well in their future law school careers.”

This experience will certainly benefit these students moving forward.

Nick Fox is a risk management and insurance double major with a prelaw minor. He said that being on the team will give him an advantage when applying to law school.

“I was already 100 percent set on law school and participating on this team has given me some important experience that will give me a leg up as I go into law school in a few years,” he said.

McKneight and the students said they hope to make this an annual event.

Anthony Murdock said the tournament was affirmation that he was making the right decision in applying for law school following graduation. He also took away some lessons that will serve him well no matter where his future takes him.

“Conflict resolution is so important, and the ability to listen is even more crucial to success,” Murdock said. “Mediation teaches us how to do both things, so it was rewarding to be a part of the team.”

Campus

Butler’s First Mock Mediation Team Finds Success at Tournament

Three Butler students took home awards at the Brenau Invitational Mediation Tournament, which gives participants practice with mediation techniques and conflict resolution. 

Oct 20 2016 Read more
Campus

Retired Faculty Member, Alumna Ann Harper Dies

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 17 2016

Longtime Butler faculty member and pioneering Indiana broadcaster Ann Wagner Harper ’63, MS ’68 died Thursday, October 13. She was 92.

By the time Ann HarperHarper got to Butler, she had already established herself as a local celebrity in music and broadcasting. Among her credits, she was the first female vocalist on television in Indiana, on WFBM (Channel 6); and first female disc jockey in the state, on WFBM radio, where she conducted on-air interviews with such personalities as Patti Page, The McGuire Sisters, Nat King Cole, Tony Bennett, and Bill Haley and the Comets.

When rock ’n’ roll hit, she decided to give up radio and finish her college education at Butler University. (She had started college at the University of Louisville in 1944 after winning a voice contest sponsored by the Louisville Courier Journal and WHAS, but moved to Indianapolis in 1947 to sing with the Art Berry Orchestra at The Columbia Club.) She earned her bachelor’s degree in speech, then taught high school, and completed her master’s degree at Butler in education and speech.

After graduation, the manager of WAJC, Butler’s student-run radio, asked her to join the faculty in radio and television broadcasting. She advised students and taught announcing and radio production. She later introduced two new courses, broadcast law and music in broadcasting. Starting as an instructor, she became a full professor, her proudest professional accomplishment. In 1985, she was inducted into the Indiana Broadcast Pioneers Hall of Fame. She retired from Butler in 1988.

"Generations of Butler students learned from Ann Harper and Jim Phillippe, who together held us to very high expectations,” said Class of '85 Radio/TV graduate Dave Arland, today the Executive Director of the Indiana Broadcasters Association. “Her encouragement, patience, good humor, and trailblazing experience in broadcasting was a gift that still resonates. Butler had no better advocate for communications students from the 1960's through the 1980's."

In 2015, Harper was awarded the Butler Service Medal, which recognizes emeriti faculty or retired faculty and staff (alumnus or non-alumnus) for a lifetime of distinguished service to Butler University and to the community.

Funeral services will be held at 10:30 AM Wednesday, October 19, at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Vincennes, Indiana, where she lived.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Retired Faculty Member, Alumna Ann Harper Dies

Longtime Butler faculty member and pioneering Indiana broadcaster Ann Wagner Harper ’63, MS ’68 died Thursday, October 13.

Oct 17 2016 Read more
Campus

Two Butler Alums Team Up to Create a National Fundraising Contest

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 11 2016

Two Butler alumni and the organizations they run have teamed up to create a nationwide fundraiser that will pit 64 charities in a bracket-style fundraising tournament.
Matt McIntyre '06 of Brackets for Good and Bill Soards '96 of AT&T Indiana have teamed up to create Brackets for Good USA.

Matt McIntyre ’06, Executive Director and Co-Founder of Brackets for Good, and Bill Soards ’96, President of AT&T Indiana, made the announcement outside Hinkle Fieldhouse on Tuesday, October 11, of the first national Brackets for Good USA tournament.

“We talk about the Butler Way a lot, and I think it’s on the court and off the court,” McIntyre said. “I think we’re doing great things for a great community that we stayed in and love and want to support. And we’ve now put it on a national stage.”

Soards added: “It’s the kind of excitement that Butler basketball has brought to its fan base over the last few years that Brackets for Good and AT&T hope to replicate to benefit non-profits across the country.”

In March 2012, Brackets for Good kicked off its bracket-style fundraising competition in Indianapolis modeled after the NCAA basketball tournament brackets. Non-profit organizations "play" each other in a fundraising competition, with the winner—the organization that raises more money in a set time—advancing to the next round.

Brackets for Good—which itself is a non-profit—has since expanded its competitions to 10 other cities: Louisville, Kentucky; Ann Arbor, Michigan; St. Louis, Missouri; Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota; Cincinnati, Ohio; Nashville, Tennessee; Denver, Colorado; Baltimore, Maryland; Hartford, Connecticut; and Miami, Florida.

The city competitions have raised $2.75 million so far, McIntyre said.

In March 2017, Brackets for Good will again hold 11 city-based tournaments, but it will add the national competition. The deadline for non-profits to register is October 28 at bfg.org. Brackets for Good will validate the 501c3 non-profit status for each group, then work with Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affair to evaluate which organizations make the tournament and how they are seeded in the competition.

The national winner will receive an addition $100,000 contribution from AT&T.

Next March, 768 non-profits will participate locally or nationally in Brackets for Good. McIntyre said all will gain new public awareness, raise funds, have the opportunity to use free tech tools, and engage supporters.

“It’s going to be an amazing March on the philanthropy court,” McIntyre said.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Two Butler Alums Team Up to Create a National Fundraising Contest

Two Butler alumni and the organizations they run have teamed up to create a nationwide fundraiser that will pit 64 charities in a bracket-style fundraising tournament.​

Oct 11 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler-IUPUI Project Wins National Sustainability Competition

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 10 2016

Butler University and IUPUI beat 225 colleges and universities to win the $50,000 Sustainable Campus Competition LIVE! by presenting a proposal to expand food waste composting at both universities.

CompostingButler Sustainability Coordinator McKenzie Beverage and IUPUI Sustainability Director Jessica Davis presented “University Collaboration to Scale Food Waste Collection on Campus and in the Community” on Monday, October 10, in Baltimore before a panel of judges at the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) Conference and Expo.

Their plan will begin with both universities sharing the cost of having a trash hauler cart away the food waste from dining halls at both campuses. The hope is to eventually bring other Indianapolis organizations on board to share and ultimately lower the cost of hauling.

“The idea is to remove the barrier to entry, change the market, and make this more affordable for other organizations to participate,” Beverage said.

Butler started a pilot composting project in 2014 after Beverage’s class secured funding from SGA to compost for a year. Under that program, which is ongoing, 800 pounds of pre-consumer food waste like the tops of peppers and apple cores are taken to a composting facility each week rather than incinerated. IUPUI has started composting pre-consumer food waste in their main dining hall, with the hopes of expanding to post-consumer food waste quickly. Large-scale composting helps both universities meet their sustainability goals of waste reduction and reducing emissions associated with climate change.

Each University hauling food waste on their own was cost prohibitive, so Beverage approached IUPUI in the spring, and together she and Davis devised the proposal to collaborate.  By recruiting community partners, commercial composting will become cost competitive in Indianapolis.

“Sustainable solutions don’t begin and end on our campuses,” Davis said. “For sustainability to be impactful, it must go beyond the campus.”

Sustainable Campus Competition LIVE! was hosted by Kimberly-Clark Professional. The competition featured three rounds. All entrants submitted their best idea in 500 words or less about a campus initiative related to energy, waste, food, water or climate change.

From there, 10 semi-finalists were invited to submit a two-minute video and one-page financial overview of their project. Three finalists were chosen to present their project in front of a panel of judges and a live audience at the AASHE Conference & Expo.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler-IUPUI Project Wins National Sustainability Competition

“Sustainable solutions don’t begin and end on our campuses. For sustainability to be impactful, it must go beyond the campus.”

Oct 10 2016 Read more
Campus

Professor Stark to Conduct at Carnegie Hall

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 10 2016


Eric Stark conducting Butler's annual Rejoice! concerts, which this year will take place on December 9 and 10 in Clowes Memorial Hall.

Professor of Music Eric Stark will conduct the Indianapolis Symphonic Choir at Carnegie Hall on Sunday, October 16, in a performance that will include New York composer Mohammed Fairouz’s new oratorio, Zabur, which the choir commissioned.

Stark, who is Butler’s Director of Choral Activities and also serves as the Indianapolis Symphonic Choir’s Artistic Director, told New York’s Downtown magazine, that conducting in New York “feels like going to the musical version of Mount Olympus.”

“Our musical gods lived, worked, performed and made history in New York,” he said. “The world knows the United States through New York City. It’s a platform for music making that serves a universal audience.”

Read more of the interview here.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Professor Stark to Conduct at Carnegie Hall

“The world knows the United States through New York City. It’s a platform for music making that serves a universal audience.”

Oct 10 2016 Read more
Campus

Danko Says Butler Is Strong and Getting Stronger

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 07 2016

President James M. Danko said in his 2016 State of the University address that Butler is strong academically, financially, reputationally, and otherwise, and he challenged the University community to keep the success going.

James Danko“I believe it is imperative that we at Butler demonstrate courage and confidence as we confront the very real challenges facing higher education institutions in an era of increasing competition for enrollment, unprecedented scrutiny over costs, and questions in the national dialogue of whether college is ‘worth it,’” Danko said on October 7 at the Schrott Center for the Arts in his sixth State of the University address.

Watch the entire address here.

Among the successes Danko touched on were:

-Finishing last year under budget and with a more than $1 million surplus.

-Attracting the largest first-year class in Butler’s history. In addition, Butler’s retention rate of returning students increased across all classes.

-Fundraising efforts that brought in nearly $45 million in the last year.

“Rather than running a large budget deficit this year, we now anticipate having our best financial results ever, well on the positive side,” he said.

Danko also noted successes in new facilities, U.S. News & World Report ranking as the most innovative university in the Midwest, and overwhelmingly positive results from a Gallup poll that has Butler ahead of peer and aspirant universities on the impact a Butler education has on the lives and careers of alumni.

He also singled out each of the six colleges for praises, noting the $25 million gift from LDI Chairman Andre Lacy and his wife, Julia, to name the College of Business the Andre B. Lacy School of Business; the College of Education’s continued 100 percent job placement rate for its graduates; the College of Communication’s successful symposium on race and community; Jordan College of the Arts’ consolidation of Clowes Hall, the Schrott Center, Lilly Hall, and the Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall into the Butler Arts Center; the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences’ partnering with the Lacy School of Business to establish the new Healthcare and Business Major; and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences’ creation and expansion of its neuroscience program.

Danko said the University will continue to grow, with a new building planned for the Lacy School of Business and renovation of Holcomb and Gallahue halls scheduled to create a science complex. Groundbreaking for both projects could take place as early as next summer, he said.

In closing, Danko challenged the University community to focus effort and energy to:

-Improve Butler’s campus environment and dialogue when it comes to diversity and inclusivity.

-Accelerate efforts to advance new ideas and support innovation.

-Create an inspired workplace and positive culture.

-Enhance and improve communication across our community.

“I am proud of the fact that over the past few years, when we could have just as easily kept our heads down and continued to do things the same way as always—hoping that the storm would pass and we’d weather it—we instead had the confidence to invest deeply in the type of education we believed was right for our students,” Danko said. “While preserving critical philosophical elements that are central to a Butler education and the Butler Way, we had the courage to innovate and change both inside and outside the classroom, and the confidence to invest in differentiating Butler as a premier, nationally recognized University.”

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Danko Says Butler Is Strong and Getting Stronger

Danko said the University will continue to grow, with a new building planned for the Lacy School of Business and renovation of Holcomb and Gallahue halls scheduled to create a science complex.

Oct 07 2016 Read more
Campus

Professor McGrath Finds the Intersection of Theology and Science Fiction

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 04 2016

Professor of Religion James F. McGrath is both a New Testament scholar and a science fiction fan, and over the years he has noted the frequency with which they tell a similar story.

James McGrathIn his new book, Theology and Science Fiction, McGrath documents some of the parallels in the big questions they both ask, such as: What makes us human? Where did everything come from? What awaits us in the future? What do we dare to hope for?

“When I first started dabbling in this area, people seemed surprised that anyone would connect religion and science fiction,” McGrath said. “And sometimes I still deal with that. But more and more people are treating as a given that science fiction deals with these kinds of questions. So it’s a great time to be working on it.”

McGrath notes, for example, that certain translations of the Bible often mention aliens—using it in the sense of strangers or foreigners. “But I thought it would be interesting,” he said, “to take this and say, ‘What happens if you take this and see how it applies to the aliens in the sci-fi sense? How antiquated do these texts seem in relation to some of the things imagined in sci-fi? How much does science fiction, in talking about aliens, show itself to actually be concerned with how we treat foreigners?’”

The book is part of the Cascade Companions series, which are short texts designed to give an introduction to a subject and do it as succinctly as possible without being superficial. Theology and Science Fiction is 113 pages—six chapters of analysis and a final chapter featuring three short original science fiction stores that McGrath wrote.

McGrath said the idea for a book began to take shape when he came to Butler in 2003 and was asked to teach a humanities colloquium on Religion and Science Fiction.

“Whenever I’ve done things like that in teaching, I’ve always tried to find ways to do some research in the area,” he said. “I always like it to be something I’ve dived into more deeply.”

Soon after, he got involved with several related projects, including editing a volume on religion and science fiction, co-editing a volume on religion and the long-running British sci-fi series Dr. Who, and writing an op-ed column for USA Today about the end of the TV series Lost and its religious undertones.

“I’m certainly not saying that theology and science fiction are always the same,” McGrath said. “But I’m definitely saying that some science fiction is theological, and some theology is ‘science-fictional.’”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Professor McGrath Finds the Intersection of Theology and Science Fiction

“I’m certainly not saying that theology and science fiction are always the same. But I’m definitely saying that some science fiction is theological, and some theology is ‘science-fictional.’”

Oct 04 2016 Read more
Campus

Professor Brooks Receives $2 Million U.S. DOE Grant

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 29 2016

Associate Professor of Education Katie Brooks has been awarded a $2 million U.S. Department of Education grant to train 80 current or potential teachers to become licensed to teach English Language Learning (ELL) students.

Katie BooksThe five-year grant is intended to help alleviate the chronic shortage of English as a New Language (ENL) teachers. The grant will pay for 20 college graduates who have a bachelor’s degree in a licensable area such as biology, math, social studies, world languages, or English to get both a teaching license and an ENL license.

An additional 60 teachers who are already licensed will add ENL certification to their license. Twenty teachers will be from the Indianapolis area and 40 will be from Kokomo and surrounding communities.

“The shortage of ENL teachers is so bad in Indiana that a lot of kids are not being served by licensed teachers; they’re being served by paraprofessionals who’ve had 2–3 days of training,” Brooks said. “This is deeply needed in our state.”

Also as part of the grant, Butler College of Education (COE) ENL, reading, special education, and early childhood faculty will collaborate with each other and with representatives of Indiana immigrant communities to integrate ENL theory, research, and practice throughout the curriculum used to train both content area and ENL teachers.

The first year of the grant will include curriculum development and recruiting participants. Brooks said the priority in recruiting will be to find bilingual paraprofessionals who have a bachelor’s degree and are already teaching. “We want to help those people get their teaching license and support them along the way.” Teacher training will be the focus after that.

“Everything we will be doing will be job-embedded coursework,” Brooks said. “We’re not having teachers do anything that doesn’t directly apply to their jobs. So instead of writing a paper for me, they’re going to create professional-development modules where they’re going to do teacher research and share what they’re learning. I want everything they do to make a difference in their schools and in the broader community.”

Brooks said the Butler Center for Citizenship and Community, the Indiana Department of Education State, and the Mayor’s Immigrant Task Force helped with planning the grant proposal. As part of the grant, Butler will work with Indianapolis’s Immigrant Welcome Center to promote family and community involvement. Donald Braid, Director of Butler’s Center for Citizenship and Community, said this partnership “demonstrates the University's commitment to immigrant and refugee issues through service.”

Under a five-year grant Brooks received in 2006, teachers went to the clubhouses in the apartment complexes where many immigrant students lived and led parent-involvement activities. In the process, teachers learned more about the families and families came to understand how the schools worked.

That kind of collaboration will continue under this grant.

Brooks said training teachers to work with students who are learning English also benefits native English speakers.

“ELLs are not the only ones who struggle with language and literacy development,” she said. “So when you help teachers think about how they can make this material more understandable for students, you’re not just doing that for ELL learners—you’re doing that for everybody.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Professor Brooks Receives $2 Million U.S. DOE Grant

“The shortage of ENL teachers is so bad in Indiana that a lot of kids are not being served by licensed teachers. This is deeply needed in our state.”

Sep 29 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler's Student-Run Insurance Co. to Start Up Early

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 26 2016

Butler University’s Lacy School of Business, which planned to establish a student-run insurance company by the beginning of the 2019–2020 academic year, has moved up the start date to May 1, 2017, Clinical Professor & Director of the Davey Risk Management and Insurance Program Zach Finn announced on September 26.
Butler University Lacy School of Business June 15, 2016.

Finn said the opening of the “captive insurance company,” as the business is known, is more than two years ahead of schedule thanks to:

-Successful fundraising, including a $15,000 grant from the Westfield Insurance Co.’s foundation and a matching gift from MJ Insurance and Michael M. Bill. MJ Insurance had already given the program $250,000 to get started.

-The hiring of P. Kevin Thompson, “a heavyweight in the risk management and insurance community,” to teach in the program. Thompson previously served as counsel to Plews Shadley Racher & Braun (PSRB) LLP and President of Insurance and Risk Management Services LLC, an affiliate of the firm. Prior to joining PSRB, he served as Director of Corporate Risk Management for Eli Lilly & Company.

“He’s someone who adds a lot to our brand,” Finn said.

-The requisite courses—a first-in-the-nation class called Captive Feasibility and Business Plan Development, Captive Implementation, and Captive Operations—which either have started or are ready to be offered.

The Butler captive insurance company will insure certain programs at Butler, perhaps including the live mascot, Butler Blue III, or physical damage to University vehicles. The idea is to give students hands-on experience and prepare them for an industry that expects to need tens of thousands of new employees over the next seven years to replace workers who will be retiring.

Students will learn how to write the insurance policy, what the coverage terms will be, how to finance the company, and more. They will be able to apply their risk-management expertise in accounting, investments and numerous other areas.

Finn said there are 82 insurance risk management programs in North America that graduate 3,500 students a year—not nearly enough for the $5.7 trillion insurance industry.

To get Butler’s captive insurance company ready to roll, students in the Captive Feasibility and Business Plan Development course are now selecting jurisdictions to potentially locate the company. Teams of students are developing business plans and evaluating the pluses and minuses of potential locations.

The students also are working with the University to decide the kinds of coverage the company will provide and determine how the captive is adding value or lower the cost of risk to Butler.

They’ll present their findings in front of a panel of industry experts, then spend the spring semester starting the company.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler's Student-Run Insurance Co. to Start Up Early

The idea is to give students hands-on experience and prepare them for an industry that expects to need tens of thousands of new employees over the next seven years to replace workers who will be retiring.

Sep 26 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler Named One of the Country's Healthiest Colleges

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 20 2016

Butler University has been named one of the 26 healthiest colleges in the country by Greatist.com, a website devoted to healthy living.

Butler University HRC aquatics staff April 22, 2016.

“With a staff of 25 personal trainers at your fingertips, you’ll easily be able to avoid the freshman 15—or, alternatively, gain 15 pounds of muscle,” the website said. “Butler also hosts the Bulldog Jog, a philanthropic 5K that’s been running for 24 years straight. And the school takes a fun and down-to-earth approach to sexual health through Sex Signals, an improvisational, educational program about sex, and Get Yourself Tested (GYT) Tuesdays—you can probably guess what that entails.”

Greatest.com said it looked for schools “where students don’t have to resort to eating chicken fingers and ramen every night—schools that go the extra mile to create an environment where students have access to not only healthy food but also top-notch fitness facilities, and robust medical and mental health services. And these 26 schools passed with flying colors.”

 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Named One of the Country's Healthiest Colleges

With a staff of 25 personal trainers at your fingertips, you’ll easily be able to avoid the freshman 15

Sep 20 2016 Read more

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