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Butler to Study the Effects of Music on Dementia Patients

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 22 2016

Butler University has been awarded a $600,000 Indiana State Department of Health grant for a two-year project to determine whether dementia patients’ lives can be improved through the use of personal musical playlists.

In the project, called Music First, faculty and students from across Butler—in Psychology, Music, Pharmacy, Communication Disorders, and other areas—will team up to study 100 residents in the American Village retirement home throughout the 2016-2017 academic year. Additional locations will be added in the spring for the second phase of the study.

Dementia Patient Listening to MusicButler researchers will create playlists of at least 20 songs that the patients enjoyed when they were in their late teens and early 20s. The songs will be put on an iPod Shuffle, and the patients will listen through headphones so they have an intimate experience with the music.

The hope is that the music will calm the patients, reduce the use of black-warning-label medications, and relieve some of the pressure on caregivers.

“Creating a better understanding of ways that dementia patients can be treated and lives can be enhanced in this situation is in the interest of us all,” said Donald Braid, Director of Butler’s Center for Citizenship and Community, who is directing the project. “With a rapidly aging population, if we don’t do something, things are going to get worse in terms of the number of individuals who need care. If we can find a better way to provide care and demonstrate the significance of our results, we can make enormous progress.”

The idea for the project began about five years ago when Music Professor Tim Brimmer, Psychology Professor Tara Lineweaver, and others began discussing the idea of an interdisciplinary project between music and science. “The Neuromusic Group,” as they called themselves, started working with residents of Rosewalk and Harrison Terrace, an all-dementia nursing home.

While they were completing their second study at Harrison Terrace, the Indiana State Department of Health asked if they could expand their research. While designing this larger, renewable study, the Neuromusic Group began offering a course called The Neuromusic Experience, working with Joy’s House Adult Day Service, where they established and improved the protocols from the first two studies.

“ISDH is intensely interested in our outcomes,” Brimmer said, “because they have described the healthcare industry in nursing homes as a crisis. Staffing turnover with the stress and the working environment is extraordinary. If they can improve patient behavior, it will improve staff retention.”

In the beginning of the study, the music will be used in late afternoon and early evening, when dementia patients exhibit signs of “sundowning”—a tendency to become confused or agitated.

Brimmer said the researchers will be looking for a reaction in the patients’ rate of speech, physical movement, and clarity of responses. They also will be looking to see if the patients sing or dance, and how long the effect of the music lasts.

“With the right playlist, they tend to remember where they were,” he said. “They might not remember what they had for breakfast that morning or who their son or daughter are. But they can tell you about the place they were when they heard these songs.”

Although music therapy has been used with dementia patients, this study is different because it uses music specifically targeted for each patient.

Lineweaver said the early work at Rosewalk, Harrison Terrace, and Joy’s House found that music has some calming influence on the patients. But the studies have only been for three months each, which isn’t long enough to be able to document any improvement in medication regimens.

The nine-month study at American Village should yield broader, more substantial results, she said.

Because the Neuromusic Experience course involves students in the Music First research project, it has been approved as satisfying the Natural World component of Butler’s core curriculum—a component that helps non-science majors deepen their understanding of the scientific method through first-hand experience and discovery-based learning.

The course also satisfies the Indianapolis Community Requirement of Butler’s Core curriculum because it immerses students in a learning environment that helps them better understand themselves and their roles as citizens in a diverse and interdependent world.

“What we’re most excited about with this project is getting students involved in science that has such profound applications,” Lineweaver said. “It not only links them to science—it links them to the community.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler to Study the Effects of Music on Dementia Patients

“Creating a better understanding of ways that dementia patients can be treated and lives can be enhanced in this situation is in the interest of us all.”

Aug 22 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler and Cornette Family Establish the Joel Cornette Scholarship Fund

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 19 2016

The Butler Family lost one of its favorite Bulldogs with the passing of Joel Cornette. One of the most popular student-athletes in Butler history, he was known for his outgoing personality, quick wit, trademark smile, and toughness that so many identify with Butler teams, especially of his era. He embodied The Butler Way.

Joel CornetteThe outpouring of support from those who knew Joel well and those who appreciated his true love for Butler has been remarkable. In partnership with the Cornette Family and as one of the ways to celebrate Joel's legacy, Butler University has established the Joel Cornette Scholarship Fund, which will provide scholarship support for future Butler Bulldogs.

Contributions in Joel's honor may be made online at https://www.butler.edu/cornette or by check to Butler University Advancement, 4600 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis, IN 46208. Please reference "Joel Cornette Scholarship Fund" in the check memo or online designation field. Thank you for helping us honor Joel and provide support for future Bulldogs.

Cornette, who was a key member of Butler's first Sweet 16 team, passed away suddenly on August 16 due to natural causes. He was 35.

On the court, Cornette helped the Bulldogs to a record of 100-30 in his four seasons (1999-2003). Butler made three NCAA Tournament appearances in his four years, including the program's first Sweet 16 in 2003. The Bulldogs also made the NIT in 2002. He scored 1,100 career points and pulled down 712 rebounds, marks that are 33rd and tenth respectively in Butler history. His 144 career blocks and .544 career field goal percentage also rank among the Top 10 in Butler history.

Cornette was named to the Midwestern Collegiate Conference/Horizon League All-Defensive Team in 2000-01, 2001-02 and 2002-03. He earned second-team All-League honors in 2002-03. Cornette served on the Butler coaching staff for the 2006-07 season as the team's coordinator of basketball operations before going to Iowa as a member of Todd Lickliter's staff. Cornette grew up in Cincinnati, Ohio, starring for St. Xavier High School. An NBPA-certified player-agent, Cornette served as the Director of Basketball Recruiting at Priority Sports since January, 2012.

A celebration of Joel Cornette's life will be held at Hinkle Fieldhouse on Monday, August 22, at 11 AM.

 

Media contact:
John Dedman
jdedman@butler.edu
317-940-9414

Campus

Butler and Cornette Family Establish the Joel Cornette Scholarship Fund

He was known for his outgoing personality, quick wit, trademark smile, and toughness that so many identify with Butler teams, especially of his era. He embodied The Butler Way.

Aug 19 2016 Read more
Campus

Metro Diner to Locate in the Sunset Avenue Parking Garage

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PUBLISHED ON Aug 18 2016

Butler University has signed Metro Diner to be its third retail customer in the Sunset Avenue Parking Garage. The Jacksonville, Florida-based restaurant is scheduled to open a 3,800-square-foot location in early December next to Scotty’s Dawghouse and Pita Pit at 4702 Sunset Avenue.

Trip at Metro Diner“We’re glad to have Metro Diner on campus,” Butler Executive Director of External Relations Michael Kaltenmark said. “With the addition of Metro Diner, we now have excellent options for the Butler community, neighbors, and friends for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.”

Metro Diner’s menu features “comfort food with flair”—items such as fried chicken and waffle, “Yo Hala on the Square” (two thick slices of challah bread stuffed with bananas, brown sugar, cream cheese and hazelnut syrup, prepared like French toast), and a signature meatloaf plate. The average check is $12 per person.

The Butler-based Metro Diner will be the company’s third in Indianapolis. One is at 3954 East 82nd Street, and the second is set to open at 7225 U.S. 31 on the southside.

“Metro Diner is the kind of place where last night is recalled over pancakes,” the company said. “Where the portions are big, but the egos are small. Where you don’t have to impress anyone and you can come as you are.  The kind of place you’re proud to take out-of-town guests. We believe that when you care about the people you’re cooking for, it shows in the food.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Metro Diner to Locate in the Sunset Avenue Parking Garage

The Butler-based Metro Diner will be the company’s third in Indianapolis.

Aug 18 2016 Read more
Campus

Gallup Survey Finds Widespread Satisfaction Among Butler Alumni

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PUBLISHED ON Aug 18 2016

Butler University alumni are thriving personally and professionally, according to the Gallup-Purdue Index, a national survey of college graduates conducted by the Gallup Organization. Butler outperformed its peers across most items in graduates’ assessment of their student experience including faculty support and experiential learning, affinity for their alma mater, and overall well-being.

Butler CampusThe Gallup-Purdue Index measures the degree to which graduates have successful and engaging careers, and whether they are thriving in their overall well-being. It also emphasizes the undergraduate experiences that most substantially influence these outcomes.

Key findings from the survey include:

  • 82% of Butler grads agree or strongly agree it was the perfect school for them—a rate 15% higher than the national average.
  • Nearly 80% of Butler grads have attained careers in which they agree or strongly agree they are deeply interested in their work.
  • Approximately 2/3 of Butler grads agree or strongly agree they have the ideal job for them, surpassing the national average.
  • 94% of Butler grads agree or strongly agree their professors made them excited about learning as a student on campus.
  • Nearly twice as many Butler grads were extremely active in extracurricular activities on campus than graduates nationally.

“Butler’s liberal-arts based education encourages students to develop a lifelong love of learning, a passion for community involvement, and meaningful, fulfilling careers,” said President James M. Danko. “We are gratified by these survey results, which show that Butler is delivering on these promises.”

Butler also participated in the first statewide Gallup-Indiana Graduate Satisfaction Survey, coordinated by the Indiana Commission for Higher Education (ICHE), which revealed that 90% of alumni agree or strongly agree they are satisfied with the education they received at Butler and 81% agreed or strongly agreed that they were well prepared for life.

This marks the second year of the Gallup-Purdue Index, which is an annual national survey of alumni who received their undergraduate degrees. Results are based on surveys conducted online from December 16, 2014 to June 29, 2015, from a random sample of 30,151 respondents living in the U.S. with a bachelor’s degree or higher.

The Gallup-Indiana Graduate Satisfaction Survey included more than 22,000 graduates from 13 Indiana public and private colleges that volunteered to participate. Butler’s results are based on online surveys conducted from February 22 to March 22, 2016 with a sample of 4,696 Butler University undergraduate degree alumni. The Gallup-Indiana survey was conducted in partnership with ICHE and USA Funds.

“This kind of information about the college experiences and outcomes of Indiana graduates is invaluable for prospective students and their families who are planning for college, as well as for policymakers and educators who are determining higher education policy and programming,” said Carol D’Amico, USA Funds executive vice president, National Engagement and Philanthropy. “USA Funds is delighted to support these more robust measures of college value to promote student success in college and career.”

View Butler’s complete survey results here.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Gallup Survey Finds Widespread Satisfaction Among Butler Alumni

Butler outperformed its peers across most items in graduates’ assessment of their student experience including faculty support and experiential learning, affinity for their alma mater, and overall well-being.

Aug 18 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler Welcomes Its Largest Class Ever

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 18 2016

Butler University will welcome a record first-year class of 1,272 students on move-in day, Saturday, August 20. Classes begin on Wednesday, August 24.

This year, 12,949 prospective students applied to Butler, a 30.2 percent increase compared with 2015.

Butler UniversityButler’s Class of 2020 continues the University’s track record of attracting high-quality, academically prepared students. Here’s a look at some numbers.

-46 Valedictorians and 11 Salutatorians

-2 National Merit Finalists

-21 Lilly Scholars

-45 21st Century Scholars

-292 in the top 10 percent of their high school graduating class

-GPA (average): 3.8

-ACT (middle 50 percent) 25–30

-SAT (middle 50 percent) 1600–1840

The Class of 2020 comes from 37 states and five countries. Forty-three percent are from Indiana, and 57 percent are from out of state. The number of out-of-state students increased by 28 percent compared with 2015, with 205 percent growth in students from the Northeast and 108 percent growth in students from the South.

Nearly 16 percent of the class are U.S. students of color or international citizens.

 

The most popular majors this year are Pre-Pharmacy (135), Exploratory Studies (109), and Biology and Exploratory Business (both with 81).

Individual student achievements include:

Camille Arnett (Granger, Indiana), a four-time winner of National Novel Writing Month (write a 50,000-word novel in a month).

Julia Bluhm (Waterville, Maine), who successfully petitioned to have Seventeen Magazine stop digitally altering their models (as an eighth-grader), and afterwards received national media attention.

Josh Ford (Newburgh, Indiana), who actively participates in and promotes the Make-a-Wish Foundation. He was a recipient of a wish as a seventh-grader and has been a spokesperson for the organization since.

In addition, members of the first-year class have:

-Started a service/support group (In The Dark) to help counsel athletes going through post-concussion syndrome.

-Been published by The Los Angeles Times.

-Organized a fundraiser for a classmate that raised over $10,000 for a liver transplant.

-Played violin with an international orchestra at Carnegie Hall.

The University will also welcome 90 new transfer students to campus this fall.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Welcomes Its Largest Class Ever

Butler University will welcome a record first-year class of 1,272 students on move-in day.

Aug 18 2016 Read more
Campus

Celebration of Joel Cornette's Life to Be Held at Hinkle

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 17 2016

A celebration of Joel Cornette's life will be held at Hinkle Fieldhouse on Monday, August 22, at 11 a.m. The service is open to the public. Doors will open at 10:30 a.m. Attendees are invited to park in the main Hinkle lot (please utilize the parking garage near Scotty's Brewhouse if the main Hinkle lot becomes full). Please enter through Gates 2 and 3.

Cornette, who was a key member of Butler's first Sweet 16 team, passed away early on the morning of August 16 due to natural causes. He was 35. One of the most popular student-athletes in Butler history, he was known for his outgoing personality, quick wit, trademark smile, and toughness that so many identify with Butler teams, especially of his era. He embodied The Butler Way.

Tributes to Cornette can be found here and here.

On the court, Cornette helped the Bulldogs to a record of 100-30 in his four seasons (1999-2003). Butler made three
March 28, 2003 Butler University mens basketball team versus the Oklahoma Sooners at the NCAA Mens Basketball Tournament Sweet 16 at Albany, New York.

NCAA Tournament appearances in his four years, including the program's first Sweet 16 in 2003. The Bulldogs also made the NIT in 2002. He scored 1,100 career points and pulled down 712 rebounds, marks that are 33rd and tenth respectively in Butler history. His 144 career blocks and .544 career field goal percentage also rank among the Top 10 in Butler history.

Cornette was named to the Midwestern Collegiate Conference/Horizon League All-Defensive Team in 2000-01, 2001-02 and 2002-03. He earned second-team All-League honors in 2002-03. Cornette served on the Butler coaching staff for the 2006-07 season as the team's coordinator of basketball operations before going to Iowa as a member of Todd Lickliter's staff. Cornette grew up in Cincinnati, Ohio, starring for St. Xavier High School. An NBPA-certified player-agent, Cornette served as the Director of Basketball Recruiting at Priority Sports since January 2012.

Memorial service arrangements will be forthcoming from his family.
Media contact:
John Dedman
jdedman@butler.edu
317-940-9414

Campus

Celebration of Joel Cornette's Life to Be Held at Hinkle

One of the most popular student-athletes in Butler history, he was known for his outgoing personality, quick wit, trademark smile, and toughness that so many identify with Butler teams, especially of his era. He embodied The Butler Way.

Aug 17 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler Honors Three With Distinguished Faculty Awards

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 17 2016

Professor Emeritus of Music James Briscoe, Professor of Education Suneeta Kercood, and Professor of Communication Ann Savage will be honored with Butler University’s 2016 Distinguished Faculty Awards.

The awards will be presented Wednesday, August 17, at the Fall Academic Workshop. Winners receive a recognition plaque and a $3,000 stipend.

The Faculty Development Advisory Committee reviewed nominations across three categories—teaching; research, scholarship, and creative work; and service and leadership. Nominations can come from anyone, but this year’s winners were all nominated by fellow faculty members. More information about the Distinguished Faculty Awards can be found here.

More about each winner follows.

JAMES BRISCOE, Jordan College of the Arts

James BriscoeBriscoe, who is being honored for teaching, spent 36 years on the Butler faculty before retiring at the end of the 2015–2016 academic year. In that time, he taught 30 separate courses at both the undergraduate and graduate level, advised 20 master’s theses and seven undergraduate honors theses, and taught six undergraduate seminars through the Honors Program.

Briscoe established himself as an exemplary and innovative teacher, integrating professional musicological expertise with a passion for the liberal arts. For example, by designing and teaching courses in collaboration with the curator at the Indianapolis Museum of Art even as early as the 1980s, he created an interdisciplinary partnership between Butler and the IMA. He also organized 12 large-scale, weeklong music festivals over a 30-year period that included performances, scholarly lectures, and panel discussions.

Throughout his career, Briscoe demonstrated his commitment to the founding principles of Butler University by promoting the study of music composed by women, both in the classroom and in his scholarship. His widely recognized contributions in this area include usable anthologies and other teaching tools on female composers.

He also demonstrated his dedication to the value of interdisciplinary education by convincing the founder of the Undergraduate Research Conference to include an Arts section in addition to the natural sciences, for which the URC was created. By organizing the first non-science section of the conference, Briscoe initiated the expansion of the scope of the URC, which has continued to grow over the years and now represents all disciplines taught at Butler University.

“There may well be members of our faculty who have received higher teaching evaluations than Briscoe, or who have advised a larger number of theses, or who have organized more pedagogy workshops, and so on,” said the faculty member who nominated him. “But if one asks whether there is a senior Butler faculty member who has achieved pedagogical distinction in more areas simultaneously—whether there is a Butler faculty member who has achieved more comprehensive distinction as a teacher than Jim Briscoe—I honestly believe the answer is no.”

SUNEETA KERCOOD, College of Education

Suneeta KercoodSuneeta Kercood, who is being recognized for research, scholarship, and creative work, has over 20 years of experience working with children, families, and service providers of individuals with disabilities. She is a highly active researcher in the area of interventions and preventive care in education for individuals with special needs.

Since joining the faculty at Butler in 2000, Kercood, who teaches special education, has received 26 grants to support her research and presentations at conferences. She has collaborated with faculty and students from multiple colleges at Butler and from other universities around the world and she has published in journals such as the Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology and Contemporary Educational Psychology.

She was selected by NIH-NIMHD to receive training in health disparities research, and recently completed a Fulbright senior research scholarship.

“Dr. Kercood provides a model for rigorous research and scholarship activity in a department whose predominant focus is extensive teaching,” said a faculty member who nominated her.

ANN SAVAGE, College of Communication

Ann SavageAnn Savage, who is being awarded for service and leadership, arrived at Butler University in 1998 to discover several gender issues on campus. To begin to address these issues, she worked with Political Science Professor Margaret Brabant to create the Women’s Caucus, which now has over 100 members and was cited as a contributing factor in Butler’s receiving the Mayor’s Celebration of Diversity Award for Leadership in 2006.

Savage’s dedication to bringing issues of gender and equality into the fore led to the development of the Presidential Commission on Gender Equity, which involves external review and consultant recommendations. In her discipline, she has served as the Director of the Gender Studies program, which grew from one to over 40 minors under her direction. She teaches in Critical Communication & Media Studies.

She also led the development of Butler’s major in Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies and she played a significant role in the establishment of the Collaborative for Critical Inquiry into Race, Gender, and Sexuality, an interdisciplinary group of faculty interested in the relationship between social justice and pedagogy.

“Dr. Savage has been a role model to a new wave of young feminist scholars joining our faculty over the last 10 years,” said one of the faculty members who nominated her. “She is a tireless community activist and a champion of collaboration and inclusivity. She ensures everyone’s voice is heard, and she works toward building consensus among all involved. She is passionately committed to shared governance and transparency.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Honors Three With Distinguished Faculty Awards

Professor Emeritus of Music James Briscoe, Professor of Education Suneeta Kercood, and Professor of Communication Ann Savage will be honored with Butler University’s 2016 Distinguished Faculty Awards.

Aug 17 2016 Read more
Campus

A Week of Math? 14 Students Say Yes, Thank You

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 16 2016

Investigating the Rubik’s cube, comparing contracts for restricted free agents in the NBA, and constructing Cantor polynomials—those were just some of the research projects Butler students undertook during this year’s Mathematics Research Camp, an eight-day intensive experience designed to introduce students to mathematical research.
Taylor Pieper shows off her work.

From Monday, August 8, through Monday, August 15, 14 Butler Math and Actuarial Sciences students spent the week on campus working on math problems suggested by faculty mentors.

On the first day, faculty mentors gave quick presentations about different, unsolved math problems they thought the students would be interested in trying to solve. The students selected their problem and faculty member to work with, then spent the week working on calculations and preparing a poster explaining their results.

They displayed the results of their work during a poster session August 15 in Jordan Hall Room 236.

“We wanted to provide an experience for our students where they would be engaged in an independent study that they could develop into strong mathematical research,” said Bill Johnston, Chair of the Department of Mathematics and Actuarial Sciences. “We’re not aware of any other institution doing this the way we do it.”

Johnston said the students, rising sophomores to rising seniors, will continue to do research with their faculty mentors throughout the 2016-2017 academic year.

“We think every single one of these students has significant results that we’re encouraging them to go to research conferences to present and certainly at Butler’s Undergraduate Research Conference,” he said.

Justina Kaiser, a senior from Highland, Indiana, who did her research on constructing Cantor polynomials, said the week was fueled by “a lot of coffee, a lot of math, and a lot of wondering how math actually fit into everything. It was a lot of fun trying to see how everyone worked on their own projects.”

Highland Park, Illinois, senior Guy Preskill, who looked at the contracts of NBA restricted free agents, appreciated the opportunity.

“I had a lot of hours to work on this, and I had a lot of attention from my adviser, Dr. (Rasitha) Jayasekare, which is great,” he said.
Guy Preskill explains "Non-Parametric Modelling of Contracts for Restricted Free Agents in the NBA."

Taylor Pieper, a senior from Greenwood, Indiana, said her work on the Rubik’s cube, taught her a lot about group theory and also provided her with a crash course in computer programming that she used on her calculations.

“And not only did I learn about what I was doing,” she said, “but I learned about what the other students were doing in conversations at lunch and dinner.”

Also participating in the weeklong camp were Butler students Sam Turley (Whiteland, Indiana), Sam Good (Indianapolis), Lauren Briskey (Avon, Indiana), Micah Brame (Libertyville, Illinois), Anthony Gurovski (Libertyville, Illinois), Lucas La Rosa (Indianapolis), Ellie Demuth (Goshen, Kentucky), Rosa Florence (Springfield, Illinois), Mario Guzman (Plainfield, Illinois), Zak Morgan (Cicero, Indiana), and Alex Glickfield (Greentown, Indiana).

They were mentored by Johnston, the department chair, and faculty members Chris Wilson, Prem Sharma, Jonathan Webster, Becky Wahl, Amber Russell, Rasitha Jayasekare, Scott Kaschner, and John Herr.

Johnston said he was pleasantly surprised by the work that came out of this third-annual camp.

“We have all been surprised,” he said, “that in only eight days, students can get the kind of mathematical results that these students did. They’re terrific.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

A Week of Math? 14 Students Say Yes, Thank You

Investigating the Rubik’s cube, comparing contracts for restricted free agents in the NBA, and constructing Cantor polynomials

Aug 16 2016 Read more
Campus

Danko Reappointed to NCAA Presidential Forum

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 09 2016

Butler University President James Danko has been reappointed as the conference’s representative on the NCAA Division I Presidential Forum, the BIG EAST Conference announced.

James DankoThe Presidential Forum consists of one President or Chancellor from each of the 32 NCAA Division I Conferences and serves as the division’s primary presidential advisory body. The Forum is charged with addressing future issues, challenges and opportunities regarding intercollegiate athletics and its relationship to higher education and was created to facilitate presidential leadership of athletics at the campus, conference and national levels.

“We are very fortunate to have President Danko representing the BIG EAST on this important and influential body within the NCAA governance structure,” BIG EAST Commissioner Val Ackerman said. “His knowledge, leadership and experience in higher education will be invaluable as the Forum looks to devise thoughtful and innovative approaches to the complex array of challenges confronting intercollegiate athletics.”

Danko previously was a member of the NCAA Presidential Advisory Group. He has served as the 21st President of Butler since 2011 and oversaw the school’s move to the BIG EAST Conference in 2013.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Danko Reappointed to NCAA Presidential Forum

Butler University President James Danko has been reappointed as the conference’s representative on the NCAA Division I Presidential Forum, the BIG EAST Conference announced.

Aug 09 2016 Read more
Campus

Summer Ballet Program Keeps Faculty, Students On Their Toes

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 01 2016

While most of Lilly Hall was silent in July, the dance studio Room 310 crackled with the kind of energy and determination that 45 aspiring ballet dancers can bring.

The students had come from 15 states to participate in the first Butler Ballet Summer Intensive, a three-week (July 10-30) pre-professional program where they lived on campus and received intensive training in ballet, pas de deux, character, modern, jazz, and repertoire.

Butler University summer intensive dance class in Lilly Hall July 26, 2016“The idea is to make them excited about Butler Ballet,” said Dance Professor Marek Cholewa, who organized the program. “Not all of them will be coming to our University program, but some of them will. We’ll be able to view them and judge them wisely, especially those who apply for scholarships.”

When students audition for Butler Ballet, they typically come to campus for a day of tryouts and meetings, which gives the Dance faculty limited time to make decisions. Cholewa wanted more time with students to see what they could do. So he recruited Dance Professors Cynthia Pratt and Susan McGuire, as well as his wife, Rosanna Ruffo, an adjunct Professor of Dance, and two other adjuncts, Laura Byram and Jaclyn Virgin, for this summer experience.

The results were everything he had hoped for—he got to work with several promising students and get Butler on their radar for college. The students had a similarly positive reaction.

Lauryn Adams, a 16-year-old high school junior from Atlanta, Georgia, who’s been dancing since she was 4, heard about Butler from a friend who had toured campus. She jumped at the chance to participate in the Summer Intensive program.

“It’s been really nice to dance around different people and be exposed to other kinds of dancers—different bodies, different abilities,” she said. “So I’ve been able to take other people’s corrections that I haven’t heard before and get a new perspective from the teachers. That’s been really nice for me.”

Catalina Good, 16, who came from Orlando, Florida, said learned and improved a lot during the three-week session. She found the program “an enriching experience,” both from what she learned about dance and what she learned about herself.

“I’ve learned to nurture myself as a whole person, not just strictly pushing, pushing ballet,” said Good, who is going into her senior year of high school. “I love to do that, but to think about the aspects of a well-rounded person. I’ve learned many corrections about my body and treating it correctly, listening to my body more instead of just ignoring it and telling myself to go.”

Because of the experience, Adams and Good both said Butler is on their list of college choices.

Same with Erica Lohman, 17, who was one of 10 commuters who took part in the program. Lohman, who lives just outside Indianapolis and will be a senior at Mt. Vernon High School in Fortville, said the three weeks was like getting to “test-drive the college.”

She liked what she saw. She found the professors “amazing” and said she came away with better ideas of how her body should work and how to express herself while dancing.

“I loved it,” she said. “I think the campus is cool. I’ve enjoyed getting to see not just the dance part of Butler, but we’ve been able to eat in Atherton and get stuff from the bookstore and so it’s been really fun. I’ve really, really enjoyed everything about this intensive.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Summer Ballet Program Keeps Faculty, Students On Their Toes

"I’ve enjoyed getting to see not just the dance part of Butler, but we’ve been able to eat in Atherton and get stuff from the bookstore and so it’s been really fun. I’ve really, really enjoyed everything about this intensive.”

Aug 01 2016 Read more
Campus

Notice: "Project Management Fundamentals" Email Is a Scam

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jul 25 2016

Butler University warned the public today that an organization called Project Management International, which has sent out emails offering a class at Butler in August, is in no way affiliated with the University and has not been authorized to hold events on the Butler campus.

“We want the public to be aware that no space on the Butler campus has been leased to anyone relative to this course,” the University said in a statement. “This appears to be a scam. We have sent this organization a cease-and-desist letter.”

The University recommends that anyone who signed up for this class request a refund and contact the Indiana Attorney General at 317-232-6330. Complaints can be filed at ic3.gov.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Notice: "Project Management Fundamentals" Email Is a Scam

Butler University warned the public today that an organization called Project Management International, which has sent out emails offering a class at Butler in August, is in no way affiliated with the University and has not been authorized to hold events on the Butler campus.

Jul 25 2016 Read more
Campus

Butler Athletic Hall of Fame Inducts Jack Krebs Again and Again and Again and Again and Again

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jul 22 2016

Jack Krebs ’63 came to Butler in 1958 with no fanfare. At 6-foot-1 and 155 pounds, he was talented enough to play quarterback at Shelbyville High School, but not big or strong enough to be recruited by Butler.

He chose Butler anyway, and walked on to the football, basketball, and track teams.

Jack KrebsAnd then this happened: The football teams Krebs played on finished with a combined record of 34-2. The basketball team compiled a winning record every year, and in 1962 made the NCAA tournament. And Krebs made it to two NCAA national track meets, placing eighth in his junior year for the long jump and eighth in his senior year for the triple jump.

He may have been unheralded then, but on October 1, when the 1961 men’s track and field team is inducted into the Butler Athletic Hall of Fame, Krebs will become the hall’s first athlete to be inducted five times. Only Tony Hinkle (six) has more.

“Tony Hinkle would be rolling over in his grave,” Krebs, 76, said, laughing. “But it was just a great time to be here. It was really fun. We had terrific teams in all the sports.”

Krebs was inducted into the Hall of Fame as an individual in 1997 and as part of the 1959 and 1961 football teams (both undefeated, and both inducted in 2004) and the 1962 basketball team (inducted in 2007).

He said his main contribution to the basketball team was guarding Dick Haslam and Gerry Williams during practices. (“I think I helped make them better players because it wasn’t easy for them in practice.”) As for football, when Krebs arrived at Butler, the team had eight athletes who’d played quarterback in high school, so he wound up as an end. “And if I didn’t hit somebody first, I was going to get hurt.”

Krebs memories of those times are all fond ones. He recalled Hinkle coming into the locker room clapping and singing “The Butler War Song.” “He’d get tears in his eyes and everything. Everyone waited for that before they got dressed.” And when Hinkle had time off from coaching baseball, he was down at the track meets in his shorts and baseball cleats.

Krebs also remembered that Hinkle would not give him a scholarship. “But he gave me tuition the last year, which was $250. I was working at the time. My family had an insurance business by the fairgrounds on 38th Street. I worked there in the mornings, went to basketball practice in the afternoon, and went to school at night. I went in every semester asking him for money. He’d say, ‘Kid, your family can take care of you.’”

Hinkle called almost everyone “kid” or by the name of their hometown. Some years later, after Hinkle retired, Krebs ran into him at a golf tournament.

“He said, ‘Hi, Jack,’” Krebs recalled. “First time he ever called me that. It was a big surprise that he even knew names, as many kids as he coached.”

Track was where Krebs excelled—and had the most fun. The coach, Galvin Walker, “was a character,” Krebs said. “He’d give everybody a push toward something, then it was a do-it-yourself type thing.”

The 1961 men’s track and field team won the Indiana Collegiate Conference championship. Throughout the season, the team set new school records in the pole vault, discus, triple jump, and half-mile relay. The Bulldogs tied for first at the eighth Wabash Relays, which included 10 teams, won a dual meet with Indiana State, and won triangular meets with DePauw and Memphis State, and Indiana Central and St. Joseph’s, respectively.

In 1963, Krebs’s 47-foot, one-half-inch leap in the triple jump set a conference record that earned him the Scott Ham Award, which is given annually to the team's outstanding track athlete.
Jack Krebs is third from the left in the middle row.

Off the field, Krebs studied business and accounting at Butler. After graduation, he worked for the accounting firm Katz (now Katz, Sapper & Miller) for 10 years doing auditing work, sold clothes at a Roderick St. John’s store for a short time, and then found a home as the accountant for Gene Beltz Shadeland Dodge, where he worked for 37 years till he retired.

Krebs and his wife, Betty, who’ve been together for 54 years and married for 40, take every opportunity to visit campus—sometimes with memorable results.

Betty Krebs said that between eighth grade and freshman year of high school, Jack grew 11 inches and lost his hair. He faced unmerciful taunts from fans of opposing teams. People would spit on him at ballgames. They threw water on him and called him baldy.

But a few years ago at a Butler basketball game, something special happened.

As Betty tells it: “This guy came up and said, ‘Are you Jack Krebs? I just want to tell you—you’re my hero. I watched you play basketball at Hinkle, and you’re the reason I came to Butler—because I knew people would treat me right with my bald head.’

“That was so neat,” she said, “for him to come over and say that to Jack.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Athletic Hall of Fame Inducts Jack Krebs Again and Again and Again and Again and Again

He may have been unheralded then, but on October 1, when the 1961 men’s track and field team is inducted into the Butler Athletic Hall of Fame, Krebs will become the hall’s first athlete to be inducted five times.

Jul 22 2016 Read more

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