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Andre Lacy Dies in Motorcycle Accident In Africa

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 30 2017

Gift from the philanthropist and his wife resulted in the renaming of the College of Business.

Andre B. Lacy, the man for whom Butler’s Lacy School of Business is named, was killed Thursday, November 30, in a single-rider accident while on a private motorcycle tour in southern Africa.

“We are saddened to share the news that Andre B. Lacy passed away this morning,” said J.A. Lacy, chief executive officer and president of LDI, where Andre Lacy was Chairman of the Board. “Andre was known for his entrepreneurial fire and sense of adventure in business and life. We take comfort knowing that he passed away while pursuing one of his passions in life, and are inspired by the legacy of leadership that he leaves.”

Steve Standifird, Dean of the Lacy School of Business, issued this statement:

“It is with great sorrow that I share with you that Andre Lacy was killed in a motorcycle accident earlier today. There will be a university wide note coming out from Jim Danko later today. I wanted you all to be made aware of this incredibly tragic news prior to the university announcement.

“Andre and Julia Lacy will be remembered in perpetuity for their transformational gift to name the Lacy School of Business. For those of us that have had the good fortune of working with Andre as Senior Advisor for the school, he will be remembered as someone who cared deeply for the success of the school and of our students.

“Andre had become a central figure in the Lacy School of Business. I have personally benefited immensely from his insights. That said, the most meaningful moments for me have been his one-on-one conversations with our students. He had the unique capability of connecting with our students in the most meaningful of ways. He was more than a Senior Advisor; he was a friend, colleague, and inspirational leader for many of us. He will be deeply missed by many.”

Butler President James M. Danko said in an email to campus that Lacy was “a dear friend to Butler University.”

“The transformational gift from Andre and his late wife, Julia, built upon a nearly decade-long relationship with the University,” Danko said. “Their gift went far beyond a monetary commitment; in sharing their family name with Butler, Andre and Julia Lacy created a legacy for young businesspeople in the city they love. They endorsed The Butler Way, and everything it stands for—especially caring for others and leading with integrity.”

Following graduation from Denison University, Lacy started his career at LDI’s founding enterprise, U.S. Corrugated Fibre-Box, where he worked his way through the corporate ranks. Following the sale of U.S. Corrugated, he was named executive vice president and chief operations officer of the newly created Lacy Diversified Industries, the holding company that would become LDI. He was elected CEO of LDI in 1983 and Chairman of the Board in 1991. He remained chairman following his retirement from LDI in 2006.

A strong advocate of civic progress, especially economic development, agriculture, and education, Lacy was co-chair of the Cultural Trail fundraising committee and a co-creator of Conexus. In 2009, Governor Mitch Daniels appointed Lacy chairman of the Indiana State Fair Commission, a role in which he remained in until his death. As commission chair, he was a driving force behind the State Fair Coliseum restoration.

Lacy provided leadership for many boards, including the United Way of Central Indiana, Indianapolis 500 Festival, Indianapolis Public School Board, and Economic Club of Indianapolis. He served as an advisor for the Lacy School of Business at Butler University. He was also an alumnus of the Stanley K. Lacy Executive Leadership Series (SKL) and served as moderator of Class XV.

In addition to his civic contributions, Lacy was active on numerous corporate boards, including Hulman & Company, Herff Jones, Patterson Companies, Inc., Ethyl Corporation, National Bank of Indianapolis, and Indianapolis Power & Light Company. He is past chairman of the Indiana State Chamber of Commerce and the chairman of the National Association of Wholesaler-Distributors.

Governors Roger Branigan, Robert Orr, and Mitch Daniels each recognized Lacy as a Sagamore of the Wabash.

Information regarding funeral arrangements will be announced in the coming days.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

CampusCommunity

Andre Lacy Dies in Motorcycle Accident In Africa

Andre B. Lacy, the man for whom Butler’s Lacy School of Business is named, was killed Thursday, November 30, in a single-rider accident while on a private motorcycle tour in southern Africa.

Nov 30 2017 Read more
Campus

Artist KP Singh to Speak at Winter Commencement

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 16 2017

Artist, community leader, and 2016 Butler University Legacy Award winner Kanwal Prakash Singh will receive an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters and serve as the keynote speaker for Winter Commencement on Saturday, December 16, at 9:00 AM in Clowes Memorial Hall.

Robert Postlethwait MBA ’74 and Kathleen Postlethwait MS ’74 will receive Honorary Doctors of Science and Humane Letters, respectively.

KP Singh

A native of India, KP Singh is one of the Hoosier State’s most prolific and well-known artists. His pen-and-ink images of great buildings, colleges, places of worship, and other historic sites are displayed in public and private collections throughout the United States and the world. In 2007, three of his drawings were installed in The Sikh Heritage Gallery at The Museum of Natural History, part of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC.

Singh earned his Bachelor of Arts from Punjab University and Bachelor of Architecture and Master of Technology in Regional Planning from The Indian Institute of Technology. He also earned a Master of City Planning from The University of Michigan. He founded KP Singh Designs, a firm specializing in fine art, in 1972.

Singh considers community service to be a major focus and commitment of his Sikh faith as well as a civic responsibility. He is a founding member of The International Center of Indianapolis, a past member of the Butler University Center for Faith and Vocation Advisory Board, and has tirelessly served many other local and national organizations.

Bob and Kathi Postlethwait are fellow exemplars in their dedication to serving others. Bob Postlethwait, Retired President of the Neuroscience Project Group at Eli Lilly and Company, is a former Butler University Trustee and current member of the Butler Business Consulting Group Advisory Board. Among many other activities, he has served on the Advisory Council for the National Alliance on Mental Illness and the Board of Directors of the National Foundation of Suicide Prevention.

Kathi Postlethwait, a former Analytic Chemist at Eli Lilly and Company, is a member of the boards of WFYI and The Villages, as well as a past member of the Indianapolis Museum of Art Board of Governors.

Together, the Postlethwaits served as co-facilitators of the 2016–2017 One Butler: Brain Project Committee. In 2013, they established the Kathi and Bob Postlethwait Mental Health Recovery Center at Eskenazi Health, an inpatient facility for individuals with serious mental illness who require a safe environment for their recovery.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Artist KP Singh to Speak at Winter Commencement

The ceremony begins at 9:00 AM on Saturday, December 16.

Nov 16 2017 Read more
Campus

And They Said It Wouldn't Last: Richard Clark's Orchestra Turns 30

BY

PUBLISHED ON Nov 08 2017

Butler Professor of Music Richard Auldon Clark started his group, the Manhattan Chamber Orchestra, in 1987. By 1989, the orchestra was performing at Carnegie Hall, and by 1990, it was being reviewed—favorably—in The New York Times.

“Many big names in the profession told me the group won’t last,” Clark recalled. “‘You’re doing great work, it’s a nice way for you to get started. But the group won’t survive.’ Well, they’re wrong. Tons and tons of recordings later and live radio broadcasts and Carnegie Hall shows and performances and international attention, we’re still here.”

Not only is the group still here, but it’s getting ready for a 30th anniversary concert at Symphony Space in New York City on November 21. The concert will feature music by Clark, Howard Cass, Seymour Barab, Eric Ewazen, and Alan Hovhaness.

“I play with the group, sometimes I’m conducting, sometimes they’re playing my music,” he said. “Most composers whose work we perform are living and friends of the group. It’s become a real clique in New York, a modern music clique.”

Over the years, the size of the group has changed—it started as 70 musicians, and now it’s 16—and a number its members have graduated to great organizations such as the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, and the Chicago Symphony.

But the Manhattan Chamber remains Clark’s baby. So at least once a month, he drives from Indianapolis to New York for rehearsals and performances.

“It’s a really good group of players who are really dedicated,” said Clark, who started teaching at Butler in 2003 and serves as conductor of the Butler Symphony Orchestra. “And I’m the chief cook and bottle washer. There’s a thrill to having your own group of musicians that you work with, people who you really know and really trust.”

But as much as he loves being in New York and playing with his orchestra, Clark said he also appreciates returning to Indianapolis, where the garage on his house is bigger than the Manhattan apartment he used to rent.

Richard Auldon ClarkFor one thing, he can devote more time to composing while he’s at Butler.

“It’s a focused, wonderful environment to create,” he said. “In New York, I was always running around like a madman playing every gig, every show, every concert, teaching in between. Freelance life in New York is a wonderful thing to do when you’re young, but it grows weary.”

Last year, thanks to a sabbatical and financial support from Butler, Clark was able to finish the opera he wrote with Kurt Vonnegut, based on the author’s play Happy Birthday, Wanda June, and see its world premiere performed by Indianapolis Opera.

“That was one of the landmarks of my composing career,” he said. “And that was all because of Butler.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

Campus

And They Said It Wouldn't Last: Richard Clark's Orchestra Turns 30

Butler Professor of Music Richard Auldon Clark started his group, the Manhattan Chamber Orchestra, in 1987.

Nov 08 2017 Read more
Campus

In State of The University, Danko Asks: How Can We Be Better?

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 20 2017

In his seventh State of the University message, Butler President James M. Danko on Friday, October 20, said he is pleased with the University’s growth and achievement, and he challenged the community to ask “How can we as a university be better?” and “What can I do to help make us better?”

“As we move forward this year, I would like to challenge everyone in this room to join me in practicing more self-reflection,” Danko said in his speech at the Schrott Center for the Arts.  “Let’s ask ourselves hard questions and honestly assess the ways in which we can seek improvement every day—for ourselves, for our teams, and for Butler.”

Overall, Danko said, Butler has made great strides, from the classroom (new programs that include the first student-run insurance company in the nation and a collaboration to record and produce musicians participating in the Indy Jazz Festival) to the city (the University contributed more than 77,000 volunteer hours to the Indianapolis community) to Admissions (applications are currently up over 8 percent compared with this time last year) to Athletics (Men’s Soccer and Tennis winning BIG EAST championships and David Goldsmith being named the BIG EAST Male Scholar-Athlete of the Year).

He noted new construction projects and campus additions, including:

  • Irvington House, the 647-bed residence hall being built on the site of former Schwitzer Hall, which opens in fall 2018.
  • The Lacy School of Business building currently under construction and slated to open in fall 2019.
  • Major upcoming renovation of the science facilities for the first time in more than 40 years. At its most recent meeting, the Butler Board of Trustees approved plans for the construction of a new addition that will connect Gallahue Hall and the Holcomb Building, as well as the renovation of the existing buildings.
  • Upcoming finalization of a campus-sharing agreement with Christian Theological Seminary (CTS). In 2018, the College of Education is expected to move to CTS, a spacious location that will better suit its learning objectives.

Danko said the University faces challenges, including the diminishing number of college-age students and the intense competition for good students, “especially in the State of Indiana, where the public universities are quite good,” and from “many private schools in the state that are discounting tuition significantly to fill their classrooms.”

Danko praised the Board of Trustees for holding the 2018–2019 tuition increase to 3.25 percent, the lowest increase in at least the past 11 years, while boosting the financial aid allocation to $68 million.

“I can assure you that we will continue to grow our financial aid in order to help many, many future students to afford a Butler education,” he said. “We remain more committed than ever to providing an exceptional academic experience, one that inspires achievement, growth, and a love of learning in our students.”

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

In State of The University, Danko Asks: How Can We Be Better?

In his seventh State of the University message, Butler President James M. Danko on Friday, October 20, said he is pleased with the University’s growth and achievement, and he challenged the community to ask “How can we as a university be better?” and “What can I do to help make us better?”

Oct 20 2017 Read more
Campus

Father Thomas Baima '76 Awarded Gold Palm of Jerusalem

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 20 2017

In acknowledgement of his lifetime of service to the Church and the Holy Land, Father Thomas A. Baima ’76 was presented with the Gold Palm of Jerusalem, the highest distinguished service award of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre, an international order of the Vatican that serves the Holy Land, on October 21 at Saint John the Evangelist Church in Indianapolis.

Photo courtesy of USML.Baima’s activities on behalf of the Holy Land stretch back to the 1980s. As an ecumenical officer, he worked extensively with Eastern Christian, Muslim and Jewish Communities. His connection to the Middle East began with work with the Melkite Catholic Church and the Arab Christian community in Chicago.

He worked ecumenically with the Armenian Church, one of the major Christian communions of the Holy Land. He planned and managed Joseph Cardinal Bernardin’s historic Dialogue Visit to Israel, the West Bank and Gaza with leadership of the Catholic/Jewish Dialogue in Chicago. He accompanied Cardinal Bernardin in meetings with numerous dignitaries, including presidents, prime ministers, the foreign minister of the State of Israel, the president of the Palestinian Authority, the chief rabbi of Israel, and others.

He worked with Francis Cardinal George and the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago to create the Fassouta Project, which raised $100,000 to create a computer literacy center in the all-Christian village of Fassouta in northern Israel as a demonstration project to call attention to the problem of Christian emigration.

Baima is a priest of the Archdiocese of Chicago. He currently serves as Vice Rector for Academic Affairs of the University of Saint Mary of the Lake, where he is a full professor of dogmatic theology and Vicar for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs of the Archdiocese of Chicago.

He studied Philosophy and Religion at Butler and has served on the Board of Visitors of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and on the Advisory Board of the Center for Faith and Vocation.

The author of six books, and an internationally recognized expert in the promotion of Christian unity and interreligious dialogue, Father Baima serves on two Vatican dialogue commissions, the dialogue of fraternity and service with the Buddhists and the theological dialogue with the Assyrian Church of the East. Nationally, he is a member of the Catholic-Muslim Consultation for the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Father Thomas Baima '76 Awarded Gold Palm of Jerusalem

Baima’s activities on behalf of the Holy Land stretch back to the 1980s.

Oct 20 2017 Read more
Campus

Former Congressmen Open 2017–2018 Diversity Lecture Series

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 12 2017

Two of Indiana’s most prominent and respected political leaders, former U.S. Senator Richard Lugar and former U.S. Representative Lee Hamilton, will sit down for a discussion with former Lieutenant Governor and current Ivy Tech Community College President Sue Ellspermann at 6:00 PM Monday, November 13, in Clowes Memorial Hall as part of Butler University’s Celebration of Diversity Distinguished Lecture Series.

A Conversation with Senator Richard Lugar and Representative Lee Hamilton, co-presented by Ivy Tech Community College, is free and open to the public, but tickets are required. They will be available beginning Friday, October 19, at 10:00 AM at the Clowes Hall box office and through ButlerArtsCenter.org.

At a time when the country seems politically polarized and incapable of engaging in civil discourse, Lugar and Hamilton will talk about ways to bring us together.

Richard LugarLugar is the longest-serving member of Congress in Indiana history (1976–2012). He currently is  President of The Lugar Center, a non-profit organization focusing on global food security, WMD nonproliferation, aid effectiveness, and bipartisan governance. He serves as a Professor of Practice and Distinguished Scholar at the School of Global and International Studies at Indiana University and is distinguished faculty member in the Department of History and Political Science at the University of Indianapolis, where he leads the Richard G. Lugar Symposium for Tomorrow’s Leaders.

Hamilton, who served in Congress for 34 years (1965–1999), is Director of the Indiana University Center on Congress, a non-partisan educational Lee Hamiltoninstitution seeking to improve the public’s understanding of Congress and to inspire young people and adults to take an active part in revitalizing representative government in America. Located on the IU Bloomington campus, the Center offers an extensive array of civic education resources and activities aimed at fostering an informed electorate that understands our system of government and participates in civic life.

Sue EllspermannEllspermann has more than 30 years of experience in higher education, economic and workforce development, and public service. She was selected to serve as President of Ivy Tech Community College and began her tenure in May 2016. She is the ninth individual to hold the position and first female president for the college. Ellspermann served as Indiana’s 50th Lieutenant Governor from 2013 until March 2016.

 

 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

 

Campus

Former Congressmen Open 2017–2018 Diversity Lecture Series

At a time when the country seems politically polarized and incapable of engaging in civil discourse, Lugar and Hamilton will talk about ways to bring us together.

Oct 12 2017 Read more
Campus

She Couldn't Find The Book She Needed, So She Wrote Her Own

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 09 2017

Ann Bilodeau wanted a book to explain to her then-5-year-old daughter why she didn’t believe in God, but such a book didn’t exist.

So Bilodeau wrote her own.

What Do You Believe, Mama? (Mascot Books), an illustrated children’s book, features a mother teaching her daughter lessons such as “Look for things that are true. Be open to ideas. Listen to your heart” and “You don’t have to believe in God to be good.”

“My daughter started asking questions,” said Bilodeau, a Speech-Language Pathologist and Director of Butler University’s Speech and Language Clinic. “All the kids around her asked her why she did not believe in God, and she would come home crying because they said she was going to hell. We have always been respectful of others and I wanted a book to help me share that message with her.”

Bilodeau, a secular humanist, said that growing up, she attended a Methodist church—mainly on the holidays and special occasions. She never felt connected to a higher being, but she appreciated the moral lessons found in various religious ideologies, particularly the Golden Rule.

That is the advice she imparts in the book.

“I believe in caring for people with RESPECT, KINDNESS, ACCEPTANCE, FAIRNESS, and LOVE,” she writes. “I believe in knowing right from wrong and making good choices.”

“I wanted to find ways to teach her these important lessons—but from a secular perspective,” Bilodeau said.

The book is illustrated by Stanley Burford, Bilodeau’s aunt and a Herron School of Art professor emeritus.

“No children’s book is any good without wonderful illustrations, and this is where my aunt comes in,” Bilodeau said. “She completed these when she was 80 (she’s now 82).  She is an amazing woman and partnering with her on this project means the world to me.”

What Do You Believe, Mama? is available through amazon.com, Barnes & Noble, and Books-a-Million.

“If we sell some and get the book—and the message—out there, I will be over the moon,” Bilodeau said.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Board of Trustees Elects Seven New Members

BY

PUBLISHED ON Oct 04 2017

The Butler University Board of Trustees has elected seven new members—six of whom are Butler alumni.

The new trustees are Alex Anglin, Jana Fuelberth, Chris Gahl, Robin Lauth, Tom Mathers, Bill Soards, and Brian Stemme.

The trustees, who meet three times a year, are charged with fiscal and strategic oversight and governance of Butler University.

More about each new member follows.

Alex Anglin ’10Alexander A. “Alex” Anglin ’10 is a Consultant within Eli Lilly and Company’s API Manufacturing Finance division. He joined the company in 2014 and has served as a Senior Analyst and Associate Consultant in Lilly’s Corporate Audit Services and Corporate Financial Planning functions.

He earned a B.S. in Accounting and is a Certified Public Accountant. While at Butler, Anglin was a member of the men’s basketball team under Coach Brad Stevens as well as a member of the Spring Sports Spectacular Executive Board, an organization raising funds and awareness for Special Olympics Indiana.

He has formally served on the YMCA of Greater Indianapolis Avondale Meadows Advisory Board. Currently, he serves on the Indiana CPA Society’s Diversity Initiatives Council and is an MBA Prep Class of 2018 Fellow with Management Leadership for Tomorrow, an organization that equips high-potential minority professionals with the skills necessary to lead organizations and communities worldwide.

His sister Kymbrielle Anglin ’08 is a Butler alumna. His wife, Lindsey ’11, is a Deputy Prosecuting Attorney in the Marion County Prosecutor’s Office. She earned a B.A. in Electronic Media/Broadcast Journalism from Butler’s College of Communication in 2011 and obtained her JD from IU McKinney School of Law in 2014. While at Butler, she was a member of the women’s track and field team.

*

Jana Fuelberth ’10Jana E. Fuelberth ’10 is President and Co-Founder of analytic.li, a human capital management analytics company that helps employers make data-driven people decisions by combining HR and business data. She is also the Co-Founder of HireCredit, an employer tax credit processor. Jana currently serves as Partner in Beyond Payroll.

She earned a B.S. in Marketing. She was a Butler Business Scholar, as well as a member of Kappa Alpha Theta and the Podium Expressions Program Board of the Student Government Association. She serves on the Young Alumni Board of Directors and is a current member of the Indianapolis Zoo Council.

Fuelberth has numerous family ties to Butler. Her brother, Ben Fuelberth, earned a B.S. in Marketing in 2008, and her sister-in-law Kate (Fuson) earned a B.S. in Elementary Education in 2008. Her late grandfather Robert “Bud” Laue (d. 1993) earned a B.S. in Business Administration from Butler in 1949.

*

Chris Gahl ’00Chris Gahl ’00 earned a B.S. in Radio/TV. He has been Senior Vice President, Marketing and Communications for Visit Indy, the marketing organization for the city of Indianapolis, since 2005. He is a former member of Butler’s Young Alumni Board of Directors and Alumni Board of Directors. He also has spoken at the University Convocation for the past few years.

A member of the 2012 Super Bowl Host Committee, Gahl helped spearhead promotion and media relations for Super Bowl XLVI. Previously, he was co-owner of a marketing firm in Hawaii, helping various tourism clients in the islands.

In 2013, Gahl was named a “40 Under 40” business leader by the Indianapolis Business Journal. In 2014, he was a member of the Stanley K. Lacy Leadership Class. In 2015, he co-chaired the city’s Plan 2020 Love Indy committee. In 2016, he helped launch the city’s Film Indy initiative, helping attract TV and film-related production to Indy.

Gahl serves on the St. Vincent Foundation Board of Directors and the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library Board of Directors. He and his wife, Catherine (Dunaway) ’99, have two sons.

*

Robin (Robertson) Lauth ’77, MS ’82Robin S. (Robertson) Lauth ’77, MS ’82 earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees in Education. As an undergraduate, she was a member of Kappa Alpha Theta, the cheerleading squad, and was voted Homecoming Queen.

Lauth is President of the Lauth Family Foundation, Inc. She previously owned and managed the first three free-standing Vera Bradley retail stores and was an elementary school teacher at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel. She is Vice President of the Lake Maxincuckee Association and a member of the Junior League.

Her husband, Bob, is Chairman of Lauth Group, Inc., a national real estate development construction company based in Carmel, Indiana.

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Tom MathersThomas “Tom” Mathers is the Founder and Chairman of Déclion Holdings, a biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery and development of innovative treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. Prior to Déclion, Tom was the President and CEO of CoLucid Pharmaceuticals, Inc., which focused on the development of lasmiditan for the acute treatment of migraine headaches. Eli Lilly and Company acquired CoLucid in March 2017 for $960 million.

Prior to joining CoLucid, Mathers was President and CEO of Peptimmune, Inc.; President and CEO of Cell Based Delivery, Inc.; Vice President and General Manager of Cardion AG; and Vice President of Strategic Development at Genzyme. For nine years, he has served on the Board of Directors for the Biotechnology Industry Organization where he is active in the policy areas of capital formation, bioethics, intellectual property, and regulatory policy.

Mathers earned a B.S. in Engineering from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1988. He went on to serve as a Captain in the United States Army and received several medals for his service as an AH-64 Apache helicopter pilot during the Gulf War.

Mathers and his wife, Michele, have two children, Savannah ‘20 (COPHS) and Tucker. Savannah is in Butler’s new Healthcare and Business degree program and is a member of Butler’s cheerleading squad and Delta Gamma sorority. Tucker graduated from Tufts with a degree in International Security and Arabic, and was the captain of the men’s lacrosse team, winning two NCAA National Championships.

*

Bill Soards II ’96Bill Soards II ’96 has been President of AT&T Indiana since October 2013. In this role, he is responsible for external affairs for AT&T in the state, including state and local government relations, community affairs, regulatory and legislative activities, and initiatives before the Indiana General Assembly and the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission.

He earned a B.S. in Telecommunications from Butler’s Jordan College of the Arts. He was awarded the Hilton U. Brown Alumni Achievement Award in 2004 and was also named to Butler’s “50 Under 50” list that same year. As a student, he was a member of the Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He is also a past member of the Young Alumni Council and the Alumni Engagement Sub-Committee.

Soards’ family ties to Butler run deep. His mother, Mary Lu  Schroeder Pennington, earned both a B.S. and M.S. in Education from Butler’s College of Education in 1990 and 1994 respectively; she is associated with the class of 1967. His stepfather, Kenneth Pennington, also earned his B.S. and M.S. from Butler’s College of Education. Pennington played basketball for Butler under Coach Tony Hinkle and is a member of the BU Athletic Hall of Fame. His wife, Ann (Fulkerson) ’95, earned a B.A. in Journalism.

*

Brian A. Stemme ’91Brian A. Stemme ’91 is the Project Director for BioCrossroads, , a non-profit organization which stimulates the continued growth of Indiana’s life sciences industry by investing in life sciences businesses and public-private partnerships, connecting   local companies with resources and building awareness of the industry.  As Project Director, Stemme works to identify and develop opportunities for growth within Indiana’s sector, evaluate early-stage companies for BioCrossroads’ venture capital fund and support the State’s efforts to attract and grow life sciences companies. He is a Board member of biotechnology companies Algaeon and Allinaire, and a co-founder of Indy Science Connect.  Prior to BioCrossroads, he worked for Eli Lilly and Company and Arthur Andersen.

Stemme earned his B.S. in Accounting with Honors from Butler and was selected for the Top 100 Outstanding Students Program and a member of President Bannister’s inaugural Council on Presidential Affairs. He was a member of the Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity. He is a past Trustee and a former Alumni Board President.

Stemme’s wife, Britt, is a domestic relations mediator. Brian and Britt have four children: Kathryn, a junior at the University of Louisville; Mark and Rachel, twins who are seniors in high school; and Frances, an eighth-grader.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Board of Trustees Elects Seven New Members

The Butler University Board of Trustees has elected seven new members—six of whom are Butler alumni.

Oct 04 2017 Read more
hrc
Arts & CultureCampus

In The HRC, A Blank Wall Becomes a Canvas

BY Hannah Hartzell ’17

PUBLISHED ON Oct 02 2017

One wall gets a new look — a painting depicting the front of Hinkle Fieldhouse.

Butler Director of Recreation Scott Peden was running on the track in the Health and Recreation Center (HRC) when he noticed the number of blank walls.

“I saw this particular wall,” Peden said, referring to the north entrance, “and thought: ‘We need to put something there.’”

So he turned to Chris Blice and John Edwards, who painted the mural in the Robertson Hall Johnson Boardroom as well as the historical mural in the Wildman Room in Hinkle Fieldhouse.

Peden proposed a medium-sized painting.

But Blice and Edwards were thinking big picture.

“They came back to me with a vision that was 10 times what I’d thought of,” said Peden. “They wanted to make the entire wall a mural.”

Blice and Edwards proposed creating a massive rendering of Hinkle Fieldhouse from the outside looking in. A glimpse of the Hinkle magic.

“We didn’t want the colors to be overpowering or realistic, though,” Edwards said. “It needed to blend in with the room.”

The room, Peden said, is somewhere students often come to study or relax. He thinks the mural will enhance the soft space even further.

The new mural will hold special significance for the graduating class of 2010, which helped fund it. According to Peden, when the 2010 graduates couldn’t decide what to do with their class gift money, they gave it to the HRC.

“The HRC meant so much,” Peden said. “They were the first class to have use of it for four full years. They really valued it, and they also valued Hinkle.”

When he contacted the 2010 class president and shared the idea, she was “extremely excited.” The class gave its blessing and the Hinkle mural got the green light.

Blice and Edward began work on Monday, September 11, and they were still working on it as this story was being written.

In the meantime, they’re discussing where they want to paint their next Butler mural. “It’s very special,” Blice said of the experience. “This is our neighborhood college and we love Butler.”

“For me, it’s nostalgic,” Edwards said. “I grew up here. I’ve known Butler forever.”

hrc
Arts & CultureCampus

In The HRC, A Blank Wall Becomes a Canvas

One wall gets a new look — a painting depicting the front of Hinkle Fieldhouse

Oct 02 2017 Read more
Campus

How Butler Prepared Him for the Mayo Clinic

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 19 2017

As an undergraduate at Butler, Robert Jacobson ’80 participated in a dizzying array of activities—debate team, student government, dorm governance, writer, and cartoonist for The Butler Collegian—while majoring in pre-med.

All of that, he told students in the Pre-Med Society over lunch on September 21, shaped and prepared him for the rigors of medical school and a career in pediatrics at the Mayo Clinic.

Robert Jacobson“I would say Butler is a great place for professional preparation,” said Jacobson, who grew up in Indianapolis' Warren Township. “Butler offers you a lot of opportunities to challenge yourself, and medical schools are looking for how well you do on the standardized tests and how well you’ve challenged yourself. They want to see students who did hard work and did well with that. Butler offers you that. At the same time, Butler offers you a chance to explore who you are and what you’re capable of doing.”

The Center for High Achievement and Scholarly Engagement (CHASE) invited Dr. Jacobson to be the first speaker in its alumni speaker series, which is designed to connect graduates with current students in the Honors Program. Jacobson, who graduated with Highest Honors in Chemistry, shared his story with several science classes, groups of students interested in pursuing medicine, and, on Thursday night, nearly 100 people in the Reilly Room.

He shared fond memories of how he met Renee (Oehler) ’81, a Pharmacy major, on his first day at Butler. How, as a sophomore, he created a dorm-based fraternity event called the Ross Hall Rat Race that featured competitions such as the blindfolded maze and a mattress race and ended with a dance. How he helped Renee, who ran the campus movie series, promote a screening of The Exorcist by drawing a poster showing a girl vomiting and the caption “Guess What’s Coming Up This Friday.”

And he told how lessons he learned gathering evidence as part of debate preparation inspired him as he advanced from medical school at the University of Chicago to residency at Yale University. At Yale, one of his mentors told him that no one should take a job in clinical medicine without touring the Mayo Clinic.

Jacobson was already a fan of the world-renowned clinic—he had signed up for the free monthly magazine Mayo Clinic Proceedings while at Butler. On the tour, Jacobson noted the clinic’s practice of evidence-based medicine that depended on research.

“I fell in love with Mayo Clinic,” he said. “It was everything a former debater from Butler would love about medicine because there was real evidence for what we did and I could be part of gathering the evidence just the way I started in September of 1976 for the debate team at Butler—collecting evidence.”

Jacobson said he originally intended to be an internist, and found pediatrics mortifying. “The first child I ever drew blood from was dying of measles in a hospital bed.” But the first rotation he had as a four-year resident was ambulatory pediatrics, and he found it intriguing that every child, depending on their age and their development, offered a different aspect of “the differential diagnosis”—the list of diseases you would consider in making a diagnosis.

He had found his calling.

Jacobson advised students to “realize what you can deliver and are good at.” He said he had been active in student government at a university-wide level, but he found dorm activities to be a better fit. “While I got a kick at times from butting heads with our President, Alexander Jones, and Herb Schwomeyer, the Dean of Men, it wasn’t the thing I really enjoyed. So ask yourself: What am I good at and what do I enjoy doing? And how can I do that better?”

He also offered advice about:

-The importance of the Honors Program. Good students often hear that they’re doing well, he said. “The Honors Program gave me the opportunity to hear, ‘That’s not good enough. You’ve got to do that over.’ The program pushes you and prepares you for medical school, where everyone is an exceptional student.

-Writing a thesis. “Even if you don’t think of yourself as a great writer, you are writing it down and trying to make the sentences match and click with the evidence. In making your arguments, you will learn so much more.”

-Starting on projects immediately. “I think there’s a real danger in procrastinating because something’s difficult. I think that if you have work assigned, spending a little time on it every day is better than saving it up. Get working now rather than putting off the big things.”

“Butler will do a great job preparing you for how to study, how to think, how to present yourself, and how to be efficient with time,” he said. “There will be doubts in your mind whether the degree of work is worth it. But boy, I swear I meet people in all walks of life who will tell you that about their career—there were certain points where they were questioning it. But the great thing about health is the problem you’re trying to solve won’t go away. There will always be ill people who need your help. To have a career where you’re helping a person, you can keep coming back to: That’s worth it.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

How Butler Prepared Him for the Mayo Clinic

Jacobson advised students to “realize what you can deliver and are good at.”

Sep 19 2017 Read more
Hurricane Irma Destruction
CampusCommunity

Hurricane Irma, Up Close and Personal

BY Hannah Hartzell ’17

PUBLISHED ON Sep 18 2017

September 6 was supposed to be the first day of school in the U.S Virgin Islands. Teachers like Vanessa Mackenzie were supposed to start lessons.

Then Hurricane Irma struck. You can’t hold class when a Category 5 hurricane is barreling through the Caribbean.

Mackenzie, who graduated from Butler in 2015, had recently moved to the Caribbean and was slated to begin her first year of teaching on the island of St. Thomas. When we spoke the week after the hurricane, she was just hoping her students were safe and had a place to sleep.

“Half of my students live on St. John and the other half live in the part of the island that was completely devastated,” Mackenzie said. “I don’t know what kind of devastation they are going home to, or not going home to.”

It’s not only homes that are destroyed. Mackenzie said power lines are strewn across the streets. Cars have no windows. Trees are stripped bare.

With the island in disarray, citizens are on a curfew. They are only allowed outside between noon and 6:00 PM. During those hours, Mackenzie said everyone wants three things: gas, ice, and water.

“It’s unbelievable how important those things have become,” said Mackenzie, who stayed in a hotel on the south portion of the island during the hurricane—and returned to find her house still standing. “You need gas for your car and your generator, and water is essential on a Caribbean island.”

Citizens are unsure when the next shipment of supplies will come, so they are relying on the generators for power. “We need electricians, contractors, and construction workers,” Mackenzie said. “We need national help.”

For now, Mackenzie is running her generator for a few hours a day, just enough to keep food cold.

She’s also utilizing a Facebook group where people are sharing information about where they’ve found provisions. “That’s how I’m finding out where ice is available,” she said. “That’s how we’re spreading information.”

Those that don’t have internet are relying on word of mouth and the help of neighbors.

“Every time you approach someone in the street, they ask how you are and how your family is,” Mackenzie said. “There have been a lot of people helping and that’s the coolest part.”

The islanders have been told it will take six to 12 months to restore power. There’s no word on when the students will start school again.

“Private schools are getting back in class sporadically,” Mackenzie said. “But I work for a public-school system and I lost all the windows in my classroom. The wall is concave.”

One of the school buildings that is intact is being used by the Red Cross for disaster relief.

Mackenzie though, hopes classes can resume quickly.

“Coming back to school will be the only sense of normal stability for these kids. There’s no routine right now.”

The children are learning one lesson you can’t learn in a classroom though: resiliency.

“We’re going to rebuild,” said Mackenzie. “We’re going to be OK.”

Hurricane Irma Destruction
CampusCommunity

Hurricane Irma, Up Close and Personal

Vanessa Mackenzie ’15, who is teaching on the U.S. Virgin Islands, hopes to get back to her classroom soon.

Sep 18 2017 Read more
Campus

Adam Grant to Speak at Butler

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 12 2017

Adam Grant, one of the world’s 25 most influential management thinkers, will speak about “Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World” October 4 at 7:00 PM in the Schrott Center for the Arts.

Adam GrantAdmission is free, but tickets are required. Public tickets will be available beginning at 10:00 AM Tuesday, September 19, at the Clowes Hall box office and ButlerArtsCenter.org.

In his speech, Grant, a leading expert on how we can find motivation and meaning, and live more generous and creative lives, will explore how we can all get better at recognizing and championing new ideas, and how to build cultures that welcome diverse perspectives and honest feedback.

Grant is The New York Times bestselling author of three books that have sold over a million copies and been translated into 35 languages: Give and Take, Originals, and Option B with Sheryl Sandberg. His TED talks have been viewed more than 9 million times, and his keynote speaking and consulting clients include Facebook and Google, the NBA, the Gates Foundation, Goldman Sachs, and the U.S. Army and Navy.

He is the Saul P. Steinberg Professor of Management and a Professor of Psychology at the Wharton School of Business, where he has been the top-rated Professor for six straight years.

Grant has been recognized by Fortune’s 40 under 40, Oprah’s Super Soul 100, and a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader, and received distinguished scientific achievement awards from the American Psychological Association and the National Science Foundation. He writes for The New York Times on work and psychology, and serves on the Lean In board and the Department of Defense Innovation Board.

Grant, whose insights on unleashing originality have been praised by J.J. Abrams, Richard Branson, and Malcolm Gladwell, received his bachelor’s degree from Harvard University and his doctorate from the University of Michigan.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Adam Grant to Speak at Butler

Author/professor/thought leader explains how people with groundbreaking ideas made them happen.

Sep 12 2017 Read more

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