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History As Seen Through the Eyes of the Disney Company

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 08 2017

Jason Lantzer’s family trips to Disney World started as vacations. They ended up becoming research for his new book, Dis-History: Uses of the Past at Walt Disney’s Worlds.

In the book, Lantzer, Assistant Director of the Butler University Honors Program, looks at the way Walt Disney’s theme parks have presented history over the years. Each area of the parks, starting with Main Street, gets dissected—what’s there, what’s missing, what’s changed, and what Walt Disney wanted to do as he attempted to reflect his vision of America.

Dis-History“In some ways, Walt Disney is a public historian as he’s fashioning Disneyland, which opened in 1955,” Lantzer said. “And that carries over into Disney World 16 years later—that notion that we’re going to have an educational component to what we do, that it’s not just about going and seeing characters from movies and riding rides. They were helping shape public discourse at the time.”

Early on, the Disney Company was interested and active in “edutainment” about subjects as broad as Davy Crockett and space exploration. Lantzer said that when Disneyland opened, Frontierland was supposed to give visitors the sensation that they were stepping into the past. The original exhibit had horses and a stagecoach, and real Native Americans talking about their customs and traditions.

Lantzer writes that in a speech when the park opened, Disney said he wanted to connect today’s youth with what their parents and grandparents had to go through to settle in this country.

“Davy Crockett was a huge part of that,” said Lantzer, who also teaches an Honors Seminar at Butler called “Disney in American Culture.” “He has almost no presence in the Disney parks today.”

But Disney was a different company then, Lantzer said. It didn’t have the mythology—or the raft of characters—it has today. So while longtime history-related exhibits like the Hall of Presidents still spark interest and discussion among visitors, Disney now has its own history and doesn’t need to rely on the grand American historic narrative anymore.

“In the Epcot theme park, the Norwegian pavilion has been taken over by Frozen,” he said.Jason Lanzter

Lantzer said the Disney Company cooperated in the writing of the book, giving him access to corporate archives. Among the nuggets he was able to glean: Disney had planned history-intensive exhibits that let visitors “experience” the signing of the U.S. Constitution and see what Boston was like before the Battle of Lexington and Concord, but those were never built.

The archives do not indicate why.

In the book, Lantzer also looks at the quality of the history Disney presents—both positive and negative. He particularly likes the Hall of Presidents and American Adventure at Epcot.

“It’s hitting on everything possible,” he said. “Does it get everything? No, of course not. But what it does do, it does surprisingly well for a 20-minute show exposing American history from the Colonial period to the present.”

Overall, Lantzer said, Disney does a reasonably good job presenting history.

“Could they do things better? Sure,” he said. “But that’s not their business. They are a company, for profit, and they are trying to find ways that are going to hit with the public. If history is a tool in that regard, then they’re going to use it.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

History As Seen Through the Eyes of the Disney Company

Jason Lantzer’s family trips to Disney World started as vacations. They ended up becoming research for his new book, Dis-History: Uses of the Past at Walt Disney’s Worlds.

Sep 08 2017 Read more
Campus

The Butler Arts Center Sees the Big Picture (20x40 Feet)

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 07 2017

The Butler Arts Center has unveiled The Journey from Outside In, a 20-by-40-foot painting by Indianapolis artist Justin Vining that required 263 hours of work spread over three months and 25.5 gallons of paint.

The painting, which will hang in the Clowes Memorial Hall lobby for a year, depicts sunrise over the Indianapolis skyline, the Butler University campus, and farmland on the outskirts of town. The Clowes Hall lobby is open to visitors Monday through Friday from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

The Journey from Outside In“My inspiration for the painting really stems from my time as an elementary art school teacher, and a lot of my early work as a professional artist,” Vining said. “Super whimsical, very brightly colored, tons of movement. Because of its massive scale, there’s a lot of room for playful fun. When thinking about this, I had a lot of different ideas churning, but I thought that style of my artwork would lend itself best to this project.”

A time-lapse video of The Journey from Outside In, from start to unveiling, can be seen here. An interview with Vining is here.

Vining’s painting is the first piece commissioned by the Arts Center. Ty Sutton, Executive Director of the Butler Arts Center (Clowes Hall, the Schrott Center for the Arts, the Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall, and Lilly Hall Studio Theatre), said a painting of this size is “a true challenge for any artist.”

“This is the size of a two-bedroom apartment at 800 square feet,” he said. “When I met with Justin for the first time, I was confident that he was the perfect choice for our first commission. The amount of work and dedication, and the extraordinary number of man-hours and support this took from Justin’s entire community of supporters is really something special.”

Vining is an Indianapolis-based artist, specializing and landscapes and cityscapes. He studied Art Education at Purdue University and taught elementary art for three years. Following his tenure as a teacher, Vining attended Valparaiso Law School, where he rekindled his love for creating between classes and clerking. Shortly after graduating and passing the bar in 2010, he decided to pursue art full time and hasn’t looked back since.

Originally from a small farm town in Indiana, Vining finds inspiration from American regionalist painters and WPA-era public works. In his progress as a full-time artist, his artwork has evolved from bright, whimsical watercolors and acrylics to more classical oil scenes. In his exploration of oils, he’s begun working en plein air and exploring more muted, natural tones. In 2017, he plans to continue his exploration in oils, balancing this new found love of plain air painting with his studio work.

Starting in 2009, Vining’s work has been displayed in cities and towns throughout Indiana. His exhibits and shows in 2017 have included the 93rd Annual Hoosier Salon Exhibit, Juried Exhibit at the Indiana State Museum; “Painting in the Parks,” a group exhibit in the Garfield Park Art Center; and “Chasing Daylight,” new work by Indiana Plein Air Painters, Hoosier Salon, Carmel.

 

Media contact:
Joanna Hodges
jhodges@butler.edu
317-940-6411

Campus

The Butler Arts Center Sees the Big Picture (20x40 Feet)

Because of its massive scale, there’s a lot of room for playful fun.

Sep 07 2017 Read more
Campus

President Danko Responds to DACA

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 06 2017

On September 7, 2017, Butler University President James M. Danko sent the following letter to Indiana’s U.S. Senators and Indiana’s U.S. Representative for District 7 concerning the proposed changes in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

Campus

President Danko Responds to DACA

On September 7, 2017, Butler University President James M. Danko sent the following letter to Indiana’s U.S. Senators and Indiana’s U.S. Representative for District 7 concerning the proposed changes in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

Sep 06 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler Bowl Gets a New Name

BY

PUBLISHED ON Sep 05 2017

The Butler Bowl, Butler University’s longtime home for football and soccer, will be officially renamed the Sellick Bowl on September 16 in honor of Winstan R. “Bud” Sellick ’47 and his wife, Jacqueline (Blomberg) ’44.

Sellick BowlButler President James M. Danko and Athletic Director Barry Collier will unveil the plaque during an invitation-only ceremony shortly before the 6:30 PM football game between Butler and the Taylor Trojans.

The Sellicks’ generosity toward their alma mater spanned a third of a century, and it culminated this spring with a $9.4 million gift from their estate that is being shared by Butler Athletics, the Lacy School of Business, and general University support.

In honor of their gift, the Butler Bowl becomes the Sellick Bowl, the Champions Room inside the Sellick Bowl is now the Bud and Jackie Sellick Room, and the Registrar’s Office is the Jacqueline Blomberg Sellick Registrar's Suite.

“The Sellicks had a tremendous concern for the well-being of future generations of Butler students,” Danko said. “This generous gift will ensure Bud and Jackie’s wonderful legacy—that current and future Bulldogs will have access to the same great education and campus experiences that they enjoyed.”

The Sellicks had asked longtime friends Dan Yates and Bob Wildman to assist in the transfer of their final gift to Butler. Wildman noted that the Sellicks “were special people with a special place in their hearts for Butler.”

“During their long history with the school, they saw it grow and prosper and I know they were quite happy and proud to be a part of its success,” he said. “They would be extremely grateful to Butler for this recognition by the University of their generous gift.”

The Sellicks were married for 69 years. A Marine Corps veteran, Bud served on Okinawa and in Korea. His association with Butler University was long and deep. When Bud was born, his father was the Treasurer of Butler University in Irvington, as well as a Professor of Economics at the school. In 1939, when he came to Butler as a student, an aunt was Assistant Registrar and a second aunt was a Librarian.

Bud’s pursuit of a degree was interrupted by World War II. He returned to Butler following the war, earned his degree in economics, and married his college sweetheart, Jacqueline Blomberg. As a student, he was involved in the band, Kappa Kappa Psi band honorary, and Delta Tau Delta fraternity. In 1947, he began his successful career as an insurance agent in the Indianapolis area.Sellick Bowl Sign

After fighting in Korea, he returned to Indianapolis, where he served as President and Owner of Bud Sellick Insurance Agency and the Blessing-Sellick Insurance Agency for several decades until his retirement. He was also involved in a successful real estate business in the Indianapolis area with his wife and brother-in-law.

Bud died March 30, 2015. He was 93.

Jackie was a lifelong resident of Indianapolis. She attended Shortridge High School, then went on to become a graduate of Butler University. During her Butler days, she was a member of Alpha Chi Omega sorority, a member of the Debate Team, and a recipient of the Ovid Butler Award.

Her career included over 20 years on the Industrial Board. She also owned and operated commercial real estate for 40 years.

Jackie died October 20, 2012. She was 89.

The Sellicks endowed three scholarships at Butler: The Winstan R. Sellick, Jacqueline Sellick, and Herman W. Blomberg Scholarship; the Sellick, Deming, and Schuler Scholarship; and the Winstan R. Sellick and Jacqueline B. Sellick Business Scholarship. They also made gifts to the Butler Fund and several athletic funds, including the restoration of Hinkle Fieldhouse.

In 2007, Bud and Jackie Sellick received the Ovid Butler Society Mortarboard Award. In 2014, Bud also was honored when he received the Butler Medal. He also was a donor and strong supporter of Delta Tau Delta Fraternity.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Bowl Gets a New Name

Stadium to be Named in Honor of Bud and Jackie Sellick.

Sep 05 2017 Read more
Campus

BITS Brings Out 1,500 Volunteers to Help In Indy

BY Hannah Hartzell '17

PUBLISHED ON Aug 23 2017

Reilly RoomYou would’ve thought there was a party in the Reilly Room on Saturday, August 26. Music was blasting and everyone was moving. But the students and community members were doing a lot more than just belting out tunes. They were boxing up food as part of Bulldogs into the Streets (BITS), Butler University’s annual day of service.

Sophomore Kayla Garrison was one of them. “Today, we are packing meals for Hoosiers that are food insecure. One in four kids in Indiana has trouble getting food right now,” she said. “So we’re packing for them.”

Garrison’s assembly line, dubbed “Dawgs Gotta Eat,” packed 180 meals within the first hour, adding to the grand total of 25,000 by the day’s end.

The packing party was spearheaded by the Million Meals Movement, a humanitarian food organization that feeds Hoosiers and empowers volunteerism.

Million Meals Movement’s Shane Scarlett said the BITS volunteers assembled and packed enough meals to feed 6,250 families of four that need food, right here in Indiana.Bulldogs into the Streets

And that’s just one BITS location.

Altogether, more than 1,000 Butler representatives volunteered in more than 40 locations. Butler President James M. Danko was pleased with the turnout.

“Our BITS participation has gone up 50 percent in only two years,” Danko said at the BITS kickoff Saturday morning. “We’re about to provide 4,500 hours—over $100,000 worth of labor—to our neighbors. Now, that’s the Butler Way.”

In other words: “It’s crazy great.” At least, that’s what Mark Varnau exclaimed as he bustled around the Boulevard Place Food Pantry helping supervise. “We don’t have the time or the energy to get some of this stuff done,” said Varnau, who regularly volunteers at the pantry.

Eight hundred families utilize the pantry each month, Varnau said. That’s why the BITS volunteers spent time organizing the food storage and cleaning up the grounds.James Danko and Students

Sophomore Alyssa Mason and first-year Jack Carlin were part of the clean-up crew. Mason, a BITS site leader, was tasked with encouraging and leading the other volunteers. But she wasn’t afraid to get her hands dirty.

“We’re weeding and putting down some mulch for their landscaping,” she said, adding: “You think that hard labor won’t be very fun, but when you’re with other people, it can be lots of fun.”

Carlin also noted the significance of such an event. “There are so many people on campus. It’s important that we reach out and help the town around us.”

Campus

BITS Brings Out 1,500 Volunteers to Help In Indy

BITS Brings Out 1,500 Volunteers to Help In Indy

Aug 23 2017 Read more
Campus

Indianapolis Public Schools Requests a Second Butler Lab School

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 23 2017

The 6-year-old IPS/Butler Lab School has been so successful and in demand that the Indianapolis Public Schools has asked Butler’s College of Education to create a second school.

Inside the Lab School in 2015.

If all goes as planned, the Eliza A. Blaker School 55 at 1349 East 54th Street, named for the founder of the school that eventually became the Butler College of Education, will become the second lab school overseen by the University. The new school, located about three miles from the Butler campus, would open in fall 2018.

The original Lab School, located at 3330 North Pennsylvania Avenue, teaches pre-kindergarten through eighth grade. Officials from Butler’s College of Education officials and Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS) are still discussing which grades would be taught in the second lab school.

The IPS Board is expected to decide on the second lab school in September.

College of Education Dean Ena Shelley said IPS Superintendent Lewis Ferebee and Deputy Superintendent for Academics Wanda Legrand have asked to replicate the first Lab School because of the large waiting list for the current school.

“They’re very pleased with the success of the Lab School,” Shelley said. “It’s been so well received by the community. So many parents are really interested and intrigued by this idea. They love not only the approach, which is different, and the environment, which looks different, but they love the University involvement and commitment to this.”

The Lab School, inspired by the teachings of Reggio Emilia Italy, is a project-based school that builds its curriculum with the children’s interests in mind. Classes often engage in long-term projects that intertwine into all aspects of the day.

The school uses the workshop method for teaching reading, writing, and math, which means that once the students are taught a lesson in that subject area, they are then released to work throughout the room. Children are encouraged to communicate and ask questions of one another during these times, and they frequently work in pairs and groups to encourage communication and problem-solving strategies.

In practicing the Reggio Emilia philosophy of teaching and learning, the school considers the environment to be the third teacher. Students are encouraged to explore and interact with their surroundings. Instead, the students choose seating that fits their learning/work style.


Ron Smith, Principal of the Lab School.Nearly all the teachers at the first Lab School are Butler alumni, as is Principal Ron Smith ’88, MS ’96 and Assistant Principal Nicole Ciegelski Kent ’10.

“It is a joy to work with a staff where most graduated from Butler and all share similar values and beliefs about children and learning,” Smith said.

Smith said the Lab School’s academic performance data is on the rise. “This year, our third-grade mathematics competition team finished second in the district and our fourth-grade team finished first.  Attendance is consistently over 97 percent and our family involvement is extraordinary. There is much to celebrate.”

Shelley said she is happy to see the Lab School idea expand.

“I smiled,” she said, “and I thought: Eliza, you would be so happy to know that this is where the College of Education is today.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Indianapolis Public Schools Requests a Second Butler Lab School

The 6-year-old IPS/Butler Lab School has been so successful and in demand that the Indianapolis Public Schools has asked Butler’s College of Education to create a second school.

Aug 23 2017 Read more
Campus

Butler Welcomes the Class of 2021

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 17 2017

Butler University will welcome 1,065 first-year students on move-in day, Saturday, August 19. Classes begin on Wednesday, August 23.

This year, 14,638 prospective students applied to Butler, a 13 percent increase compared with 2016. In the last two years, the University has seen more than 40 percent growth in first-year applications for admission.
Class of 2021Butler’s Class of 2021 continues the University’s track record of attracting high-quality, academically prepared students. Here’s a look at some numbers.

-36 Valedictorians and 11 Salutatorians

-6 National Merit Finalists

-16 Lilly Scholars

-234 (22 percent) in the top 10 percent of their high school graduating class

-GPA (average): 3.8

The Class of 2021 comes from 35 states and five countries. 43 percent are from Indiana, and 57 percent are from out of state. Fifteen percent of the class is from the Chicagoland area. This year’s class shows significant growth in new students from the Mid-Atlantic region (42), double the number from last year’s class.

Sixteen percent of the class are U.S. students of color or international citizens. Fourteen percent of the class is multicultural and 2 percent are international.

The most popular majors this year are Pre-Pharmacy (107), Exploratory Studies (107), and Biology (73).

Individual student achievements include:

Entrepreneurs:

Austin Valleskey (Hoffman Estates, Illinois) – Developed Impossible Rush, a game intended to improve cognitive skills, which has over 1 million downloads on iTunes to date and was featured on NBC, WGN, Forbes, Business Insider, and the Huffington Post.

Isabella Ruscheinski (Peoria, Illinois) – At 15, started her own cupcake/catering business, which she still runs.

Philanthropists:

Tamalynn OGrady (Dexter, Michigan) – Disheartened by the rising costs associated with the arts, she founded a community service organization aimed at providing free music education to those who may otherwise not have the means. She gave free cello lessons seven days a week during the summer of 2016.

Ethan King (West Olive, Michigan) – When he was 10, he founded Charity Ball, which has raised money to hand-deliver thousands of soccer balls and clean drinking water to kids in impoverished areas all over the world.

Lifesaver:

Haylie Hansen (Pewaukee, Wisconsin) – Saved her cousin’s life with CPR her freshman year of high school.

Legacies:

Will Butler Haughey III (Concord, California) – The great, great, great, great grandson of Ovid Butler. He is also the great, great, great grandson of William Wallace, whose brother wrote Ben-Hur.

Henry Johnston (Arlington Heights, Illinois) – His great, great, great, great grandfather was married to Mabel Butler, sister of Ovid Butler.

The University will also welcome 80 new transfer students to campus this fall, including one Lilly Scholar.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Butler Welcomes the Class of 2021

Butler University will welcome 1,065 first-year students on move-in day, Saturday, August 19.

Aug 17 2017 Read more
Campus

Zotec Partners Continues Sponsorship With Butler Athletics

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 08 2017

Zotec Partners announced on August 14 that it will continue a multi-year sponsorship agreement with Butler University’s Athletics Department that allows the company's logo to be displayed alongside the University’s logo on the Hinkle Fieldhouse court.
Scott Law

T. Scott Law, President and CEO of Zotec Partners, notes that the sponsorship, which began in 2011, means much more than just advertising the Zotec Partners brand.

“To us, it is a symbol of our Butler pride and support for the Indianapolis community at large, which is home to 350 Zotec employees,” he said.

As a former student-athlete, Law believes it is important to support the University and its sports teams that will directly benefit from the sponsorship commitment. “I am delighted we can honor the drive, dedication, and teamwork of Butler’s student-athletes,” he adds. “The University’s students, alumni, faculty, and staff are an important part of our company’s history and future, and it is our privilege to support them.”

For more than eight decades, Hinkle Fieldhouse has upheld a reputation as one of the nation’s great sports arenas. The classic facility was constructed in 1928 and has withstood the test of time, maintaining the splendor, character, and atmosphere that made it one of the nation’s most famous basketball arenas in a state that is practically synonymous with the sport. Today, Butler men’s basketball, women’s basketball, and volleyball teams play their home games at Hinkle.

“We are thrilled to continue our partnership with Zotec. Scott Law knows that putting together a great team—as he has at Zotec—takes commitment and support from many participants,” said Athletic Director Barry Collier. “Zotec’s continued, unwavering support greatly benefits our student-athletes, Butler University, and the Indianapolis community.”

In addition to supporting Butler Athletics, Zotec has a long relationship with the Lacy School of Business through the Zotec Business Competition, a competition for sophomore business students involved in the Real Business Experience (RBE) practicum course.

Butler President James M. Danko said the University deeply appreciates the devotion to Butler by Scott and Zotec Partners. “We are not only grateful for their financial contribution, but for their partnership to impact the quality of the student experience at Butler.”

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Zotec Partners Continues Sponsorship With Butler Athletics

Butler Alumnus and Zotec Founder and CEO Scott Law Proud for his Company to Support Student-Athletes.

Aug 08 2017 Read more
Campus

Holcomb Observatory Presents 'All American Eclipse'

BY

PUBLISHED ON Aug 07 2017

In the days prior to the first total solar eclipse to pass over the continental United States in 38 years, Butler University’s Holcomb Observatory and Planetarium will present the planetarium show All American Eclipse focusing on this astronomical event.

Holcomb ObservatoryThe show will take place August 17-19. On August 17 and 18, doors will open at 6:30 PM, with shows at 7:00 PM and 8:00 PM. On August 19, doors will open at 3:45 PM, and shows will take place at 4:00 PM, 7:00 PM, and 8:00 PM.

Additional shows will be added if needed.

Admission is $3 for children and $5 for adults for the planetarium show. (Cash only accepted.) Viewing through the telescope is always free.

All American Eclipse will examine historical eclipses, types of eclipses, how and where to observe this eclipse, and what to expect. Following the informational eclipse portion of the program, the planetarium comes alight with a tour of the night time sky pointing out stars, constellations, and planets currently visible in our Hoosier skies.

After the planetarium show, visitors will have an opportunity to view through Indiana's largest telescope, weather permitting. Objects that are being viewed this season include the sun (if daytime), the planets Jupiter and Saturn, M13 (a globular star cluster), Albireo (a binary star), and M57 (the Ring Nebula).

Holcomb Observatory will be closed on the day of the solar eclipse (August 21) so that faculty, students, and staff can travel to get the best view of the eclipse. The path of the eclipse will cut through the United States from Northwest to Southeast. Most of the United States, including ALL of Indiana, will only experience a partial solar eclipse.

Holcomb Observatory and Planetarium is located on the north end of the Butler University campus and can be reached by heading west on 46th Street from Meridian Street. In addition to the planetarium shows, the Observatory will be selling NASA-approved eclipse glasses while supplies last.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

Holcomb Observatory Presents 'All American Eclipse'

All American Eclipse will examine historical eclipses, types of eclipses, how and where to observe this eclipse, and what to expect.

Aug 07 2017 Read more
Campus

Schwitzer is Gone. Long Live Schwitzer.

BY Todd Leone

PUBLISHED ON Aug 01 2017

Schwitzer Residence Hall came to life in 1956 and for 60 years was called "home" to many Butler alumni and current students. Demolition of Schwitzer Hall was completed March 1, 2017, and construction of the new residence hall is currently underway. Although Schwitzer Hall has been removed physically, its ashes will be spread throughout campus and it will continue to serve a relevant purpose throughout the Butler University grounds.
A Butler Collegian photo of Schwitzer Hall.In the early stages of construction, bed frames, mattresses, chairs, and desks were removed from Schwitzer and donated to Goodwill. Existing doors, hardware, and equipment were also removed. These will aid in repairs for other Residence Halls throughout campus. The original stone entryway arches and sections of the building facade were removed and preserved. These parts will be incorporated elsewhere on campus. Thus, beloved Schwitzer Hall will continue to live beyond its useful life.

As Schwitzer's walls and floors were taken down, its remains began to fill the site of 750 West Hampton Drive.

As part of the LEED building process, all existing brick, concrete, and stone will be recycled onsite and used as backfill for the new residence hall. The bones of Schwitzer will continue to serve a purpose as the foundation for the new facility.

Shiel Sexton Company is General Contractor for the new $30 million residence hall, which is being developed by American Campus Communities. This is the second phase in the new frontier of modern student housing, a continuance Irvington House renderingof Fairview House. The new student housing will contain 660 beds in apartment-style units, a fitness center, study lounges, game rooms, a large community meeting space, and much more.

In the end, this traditional residence hall gives way to a modern facility, but the ashes of Schwitzer Hall will lay the foundation for a new place that will soon be called "home" to many at Butler University.

Campus

CUE Farm Manager Earns River Friendly Farmer Award

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jul 31 2017

Tim Dorsey, Manager of the CUE Farm at Butler, has won the 2017 River Friendly Farmer Award, a statewide initiative that recognizes farmers who do an outstanding job of protecting rivers, lakes, and streams through their everyday conservation management practices.
Tim Dorsey

The award is given by the Marion County Soil & Water Conservation District. Dorsey will be recognized by Lieutenant Governor Suzanne Crouch and leaders of the Indiana Conservation Partnership at this year’s Indiana State Fair.

“Tim works tirelessly each year to refine and improve conservation practices on the CUE Farm, and it shows in the quality of produce we are able to offer to our customers,” said Julia Angstmann, Director of Butler’s Center for Urban Ecology. “When an ecosystem is in balance, there is no need for artificial fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides that are so harmful to our water resources. The farm’s native and cultivated organisms—pollinators, predatory insects, and carefully selected and placed plants—create checks and balances in the system that benefit all life on the farm."

Nestled between the White River and the Central Canal, the Butler Center for Urban Ecology Farm produces mixed vegetables, fruits, nuts, herbs, flowers, and mushrooms. In recognizing Dorsey, the Soil & Water Conservation District noted that his goals are soil regeneration and holistic farm management, and that he uses a variety of techniques for conserve water and improve soil.

Under his watch, water infiltration has improved visibly, which has made denser plantings possible. That not only improves revenue opportunities but combats weeds.

The CUE Farm has also recently begun to see the presence of reptile life on the farm, which could be attributed to the layered perennial cover available as habitat. Butler University also maintains a managed prairie and riparian buffer adjacent to the farm.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

CUE Farm Manager Earns River Friendly Farmer Award

Tim Dorsey to be honored at this year's Indiana State Fair.

Jul 31 2017 Read more
Campus

The Total Solar Eclipse is Coming (South of Us)

BY

PUBLISHED ON Jul 24 2017

The first total solar eclipse over the continental United States in 38 years will be visible south of Indianapolis in Illinois and Kentucky on August 21, but Indianapolis residents will still get to see a 91 percent partial eclipse, Associate Director of Butler University’s Holcomb Observatory and Planetarium Rick Brown says.

And the best place to see the eclipse locally? Probably your own back yard.

Eclipse Glasses“You don’t need to go anywhere to see it except an open area where the sun would normally be visible,” Brown said. “But you’ll need to wear solar eclipse glasses during this time if you want to look at the sun. They have special filters that prevent your eyes from having permanent damage.”

The partial eclipse—which occurs when the moon passes directly between the sun and earth—will be visible in Indianapolis beginning at 12:57 PM and will end at 3:48 PM, reaching its maximum blockage at 2:24 PM when the moon will block approximately 91 percent of the sun.

The total solar eclipse begins in Oregon and moves eastward along an arching path that includes Kansas City, St. Louis, Nashville, and Charleston, South Carolina.

During a total solar eclipse, the corona of the sun—the gas that surrounds the sun—is visible, Brown said. Normally, it can’t be seen because the sunlight is too bright.

“Sometimes during a total solar eclipse, if you’re lucky, you get to see some stars in the background during the daytime,” Brown said. “And sometimes you can see solar flares and prominence, which are explosions on the surface of the sun.”

Brown said that the Holcomb Observatory and Planetarium will be closed on August 21. Staff members will be heading south to get the best possible view of the total eclipse.

“There’s really no benefit to being at an observatory during our partial solar eclipse,” he said. “The sun takes up about half a degree in the sky, which is less than the width of your finger at an arm’s length. So if you looked at that through a telescope, first of all you’d be magnifying the sun’s light, which would make it even more dangerous, and secondly we would be enlarging it out of our telescope, so you’d only be able to see a small portion of it.”

Special glasses to view the eclipse are for sale for $2 each at the Holcomb Observatory during weekend hours, which begin at 8:15 PM. For more information, visit https://www.butler.edu/holcomb-observatory.

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

Campus

The Total Solar Eclipse is Coming (South of Us)

And the best place to see the eclipse locally? Probably your own back yard.

Jul 24 2017 Read more

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