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Growing Community Connections

By Morgan Skeries '20

An Indianapolis Community Requirement, also known as an ICR, is a learning experience that integrates classroom knowledge with activities in the Indianapolis community. Students are required to take one course in any part of the university that involves active engagement with the Indianapolis community, and there are many classes that offer this.

Grace Bowling, junior strategic communications major, explains that an ICR helps students to learn more about Indianapolis and the way it is unique to other cities. “An Indianapolis community requirement is a way that Butler students can broaden their horizons and make themselves well rounded students,” Grace said. “It is a way that we can reach out to the community we live in and impact them on a deeper level.”

ICR’s are a great way to push Butler University students out of their comfort zones. Moreover, Grace said it was important to be apart of something that is bigger than herself. By fulfilling her ICR requirement in a science course, called “The World of Plants,” and by partnering with students at the Indianapolis School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, she found that she loved connecting with the students. She found that she really enjoyed the experience and being able to get involved into the community.

“A lot of what we did was very hands on,” Grace said. “For example, our ICR required a project that helped us connect with students from ISBVI. We made butterflies with them, planted plants in their personal butterfly garden, and explored the Indianapolis Zoo's Butterfly Garden.”

The experience really impacted her positively and showed her that doing something bigger than herself is always important to pursue. “I loved getting to know the community better and learning more about the place that I live in,” she said.

Want to learn more? Information all about ICRs can be found on Butler University’s Indianapolis community requirement page.

Green House
Student LifeCommunity

Growing Community Connections

Indianapolis Community Requirement’s are a great way to push Butler University students out of their comfort zones.

Green House

Growing Community Connections

By Morgan Skeries '20

An Innovative Partnership

Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

from Spring 2018

Tim Valentine and Joshua Gaal started Train 918, their video-production company, at Butler. But after graduating in 2016, they needed a home base.

They found it at the Broad Ripple Speak Easy, which bills itself as "a place for entrepreneurs to create, collaborate, and learn."

The Broad Ripple Speak Easy only offers community space, though, and with their business growing, the Train 918 partners needed dedicated office space. So they moved to the downtown Indianapolis Speak Easy—of which Butler University is a founding partner—where they have an office and a secure place for their equipment. Not only that, but they work alongside lawyers, graphic designers, programmers, and others trying to build new businesses. The opportunities to collaborate are abundant.

"What's nice about the Speak Easy is the community," Valentine said. "If you ever have a question, there's tons of people that are here as resources. I can't tell you the amount of times I get up and walk across to the guy next door, who's a venture capitalist, and ask him a question about an email I'm going to send or a marketing strategy or anything like that. Everyone's here trying to help each other out to get to that next step."

Butler got involved with the Speak Easy in 2016 when the business was looking to expand beyond its Broad Ripple location. Andy Clark MBA '99, a founder of the Broad Ripple Speak Easy, approached the University with the idea of a partnership downtown.

Melissa Beckwith, Butler's Vice President for Strategy and Innovation, Chief Information Officer Pete Williams, and Lacy School of Business Dean Steve Standifird saw the potential.

"What an interesting opportunity from the standpoint of experiential education," said Beckwith, who's now a Speak Easy board member. "If you have this very entrepreneurial co-working space with all of these companies, it is another way to connect Lacy School of Business students into the working environment of these companies. There are all kinds of possibilities for internships and job placements. It's another way to connect our students with the business community."

The downtown Speak Easy, located at 47 South Meridian Street, is situated in a 12,000-square-foot space. With its exposed brick and pipes, rustic woodwork, and large common area where members can avail themselves of coffee and beer, it looks like something you'd expect to see in Seattle or Silicon Valley.

Travis Herring, Speak Easy Experience Manager, said the downtown venue has 17 offices with tenants. (Over all, the Speak Easy now has about 1,000 members and five locations in Central Indiana.)

Herring sees the space as a middle ground for fledgling businesses for whom working from a coffee shop might not be conducive to doing business but renting a large office might be too expensive. Membership costs $75 a month, or $750 a year (office space is additional), and gives members access to community space in the five Speak Easy locations.

Valentine said the office that Train 918 rents for about $1,200 a month has been "100 percent worth it. We as a company make that back monthly—easily—just by the connections that we make."

Beckwith said the Speak Easy partnership has been worth it for Butler too. Butler students have been able to get involved with companies housed at the Speak Easy. Representatives from some of the companies have come to campus to work with students in the Real Business Experience classes. The Small Business Development Center, which became part of Butler on January 1, is housed in the Speak Easy. And the Speak Easy and Butler's Executive Education program are working to develop a non-degree certificate program for Speak Easy members.

"There are so many benefits for us partnering with startups and creating synergies we can potentially offer beyond academic," she said. "This is giving us an opportunity to be in the middle of a lot of companies."

Community

An Innovative Partnership

"Everyone's here trying to help each other out to get to that next step."

by Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

from Spring 2018

Read more
Arts & CultureCommunity

Collins to Replace Glück in Visiting Writers Series

BY

PUBLISHED ON Apr 11 2018

Former United States Poet Laureate Billy Collins will replace another former United States Poet Laureate, Louise Glück, in Butler University's spring 2018 Vivian S. Delbrook Visiting Writers Series lineup.

Collins will give a public reading in the Atherton Union, Reilly Room, on Wednesday, April 18, at 7:30 PM.

Admission is free and open to the public without tickets.

Collins, who sees his poetry as “a form of travel writing” and considers humor “a door into the serious,” served as U.S. Poet Laureate from 2001 to 2003 and was the New York State Poet Laureate from 2004­­ to 2006.

He has published 12 collections of poetry, including Questions About Angels, The Art of Drowning, Sailing Alone Around the Room: New & Selected Poems, Nine Horses, The Trouble with Poetry and Other Poems, Ballistics, Horoscopes for the Dead, and Picnic, Lightning. His book Aimless Love: New and Selected Poems 2003 – 2013 was a New York Times bestseller as is his most recent book of poetry, The Rain in Portugal.

His work has appeared in a variety of periodicals including The NewYorker, The Paris Review, and The American Scholar. His last three collections of poems have broken sales records for poetry.

He has been honored by fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Guggenheim Foundation. He has also been awarded the Oscar Blumenthal Prize, the Bess Hopkins Prize, the Frederick Bock Prize, and the Levinson Prize — all awarded by Poetry magazine. In October 2004, Collins was selected as the inaugural recipient of the Poetry Foundation’s Mark Twain Award for Humor in Poetry.

Glück had to cancel her scheduled appearance due to illness.

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan MFA '18
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822

(Photo by Bill Hayes)

Arts & CultureCommunity

Collins to Replace Glück in Visiting Writers Series

Billy Collins will speak at Butler on April 18.

Apr 11 2018 Read more

Scholarship: The Joel Cornette Scholarship Fund

Patricia Snyder Pickett '82, APR

When legendary Coach Tony Hinkle first touted The Butler Way, it was the pinnacle for which to strive—not just on the court, but throughout life, long after hanging up the uniform. The Butler Way demands commitment, denies selfishness and accepts reality, yet seeks constant improvement while promoting the good of the team above self. 

Joel Cornette ’03 embodied The Butler Way both during his time at Butler University and his post-graduate years. He was a member of the first Bulldog Sweet 16 team in 2003; his 144 career blocks and .544 career field goal percentage also rank among the Top 10 in Butler history. He later served as a member of the Butler coaching staff from for the 2006–2007 season as the team’s Coordinator of Basketball Operations before going to Iowa as a member of Todd Lickliter’s staff. He was an NBPA-certified player-agent, serving as the Director of Basketball recruiting for Priority Sports since January 2012. 

Tragically, Cornette passed away of natural causes last August at age 35. It was a loss that shook his family and friends to the core, as well as both the Butler community and peers in the world of athletics. 

In the wake of such an inexplicable loss, those who loved him most chose to commemorate him in a means of which they knew he would approve. The Joel Cornette Scholarship Fund was established by his family and Butler University to provide support for future Bulldogs. 

“Through the generous support of our donors, we’ve been able to establish this scholarship program/fund, that will guarantee there will be monies available for deserving student athletes now and into the future,” said Ken LaRose, Associate Athletic Director for Development. “We are able to pay tribute to these special people while offering the gift of education to our student athletes.” 

As a testament to this inspiring young man, at least five Butler head coaches (past and present), immediately donated to the fund along with scores of others, expediting the scholarship to be fully funded at the endowed level of $50,000. 

“We could never out give what he gave to the institution,” said Todd Lickliter, Cornette’s coach while at Butler. “It was such an honor to have been involved with him, and the scholarship will continue his good works.” 

Lickliter points to a well-known mantra often emphasized by former Lacy School of Business Dean Richard Fetter: “If you do well, do good.” 

“Joel did both,” he said. “He epitomized what it meant to be a true student athlete. Not only did he earn a distinguished degree, but he opened the door for others through his play on the court as well as his ability to articulate his vision and what Butler meant to him. He naturally drew people to the institution. He did well, and he did good.” 

 

Contributions in Joel’s honor may be made online or by check to Butler University Advancement, 4600 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis, IN 46208. 

AthleticsGivingCommunity

Scholarship: The Joel Cornette Scholarship Fund

Scholarship: The Joel Cornette Scholarship Fund

Patricia Snyder Pickett '82, APR

When a Journalist's Questions Transform Care

Monica Holb ’09

When one begins his healthcare career following a tandem bike across the country, there is no telling where he’ll travel and what he’ll learn along the way. 

“Transformation is a never-ending journey,” John Doyle ’74, said. He may have been referencing the continuing changes of the healthcare industry; he may have been talking about his own career. 

Doyle, Executive Vice President of Ascension, the largest nonprofit healthcare system in the United States, also serves as President and CEO of Ascension Holdings and Ascension Holdings International. He has spent his career in healthcare, a science-heavy industry. But the journalist by training admits science was never his strong suit. 

While at Manual High School, Doyle was named Editor in Chief of the Manual Booster and advisor Jane Gable encouraged him to apply for a Pulliam family-sponsored Hilton U. Brown Journalism scholarship. Upon being awarded the scholarship, he made the choice to attend Butler University and study Journalism. 

The closest Doyle got to science at Butler was covering the 1973 opening of Gallahue Hall for The Collegian. The writer’s outside perspective has allowed him to advance in a scientific industry, asking the unconstrained questions to stimulate progress. That is a trait emblematic of both journalists and scientists. 

After writing for and editing The Collegian, and having spent his senior year as Editor in Chief, Doyle found himself with a post-graduate internship at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. St. Jude commissioned a husband and wife to ride a tandem bike across the country to raise awareness and funds for the organization dedicated to healing sick kids. Doyle’s job was to plan the ride, work with media contacts, make introductions, and lay the foundation for a continuing campaign. 

“It was an exciting thing,” Doyle said. “I took off in a new Chevy Impala loaded with a stack of McDonald’s coupons to generate interest and support for what was, at the time, the world’s largest childhood cancer research center.” Along the way, he learned more about the science behind saving children’s lives. Going to entertainer Danny Thomas’ world-renowned hospital had a lasting impact as Doyle saw staff so dedicated to the children. “It became a heartfelt mission.” 

Doyle credits long-time Chairman of the Butler Journalism Department Art Levin with instilling in him a passion for bringing important issues to people’s attention. And with the road trip, Doyle began a career in healthcare communications to bring awareness to important issues and seek new solutions. “I was thunderstruck with the importance of the work they were doing,” Doyle said of St. Vincent Health, part of Ascension, when he began his work there in 1996. 

As the industry endured changes, Doyle brought the science of marketing to the healthcare organizations he served. He was challenged by the perception of “merchandising” care, but knew consumers were increasingly making choices about where they would go for their care. 

Moving from communications to strategy, Doyle helped incubate the new ways healthcare systems provided care. He helped organizations rebuild their capacity to serve the community and to see the way forward to meet the needs of different populations. With his colleagues at Ascension beginning in 2000, he worked on systemwide efforts to improve the patient experience and to eliminate preventable injuries and deaths. During this time, Ascension made great foundational strides with innovative safety and quality initiatives that kept patients from being harmed during the course of care. Doyle was particularly drawn to the mission of faith-based care with a primary concern for the poor and vulnerable. Ascension provides nearly $2 billion of charity care and community benefit annually. 

Now, Doyle is learning from international care providers on how to transform healthcare in the United States. Doyle travels to India and the Cayman Islands with Ascension partners Narayana Health and Health City Cayman Islands to see how they can provide high-quality healthcare, particularly to the poor and vulnerable, at lower costs. While the United States spends more in healthcare than other countries, it does not see significantly higher positive outcomes. As CEO of Ascension Holdings International, Doyle is charged with sharing what has been learned at Ascension and bringing innovative lessons learned back to the United States.

“Over the years in my work, I’ve had the privilege of being a voice at the table, with the ability to ask how we might think differently to make things better,” he said.

Throughout the journey that began with raising awareness for a tandem bike ride across the country and to discovering new models to care for patients through international joint ventures, Doyle has continued asking questions. Whether that’s the journalist or the scientist in him, it’s helping transform healthcare.  He remains excited to ask, “What’s next?”

John lives with his wife, Barb, and daughter, Ginna, in St. Louis, Missouri. 

PeopleCommunity

When a Journalist's Questions Transform Care

When one begins his healthcare career following a tandem bike across the country, there is no telling where he’ll travel and what he’ll learn along the way.

An Enterprising Pediatrician Expands His Mentors’ Influence

Monica Holb ’09

Scientific theories comprise some of the lessons Butler University students receive in Gallahue Hall. One, for example, is Hubble’s law, which describes the expanding universe. In the law’s equation—velocity = H x distance— the H stands for Hubble’s constant. 

But if that equation were adjusted to explain the expanding influence of Butler’s science departments in the universe, the H might stand for Hole: Dr. Michael Hole ’08. 

 

Hole graduated from Butler less than a decade ago; received his MD and MBA from Stanford University; and spent time in Ecuador, Guatemala, Uganda, and Haiti. Now a pediatrician and clinical fellow at Harvard, Hole is committed to improving life trajectories for the poorest children. Around the world, many children are better off because of Butler scientists’ influence on Hole. 

“The part of science I like is its potential impact on the human experience beyond the classrooms and laboratories. Scientists, often humbly behind the scenes, make life better for each of us,” Hole said. “The mentors I had at Butler pushed me to apply their teaching outside the classroom, which led me to Timmy Global Health.”

Hole, who founded the Butler chapter of Timmy Global Health, an organization fighting for global health equity, credits his professors for shaping his work. Mentors such as Professors Bob Pribush, Thomas Dolan, Shelley Etnier, Phil Villani, Carmen Salsbury, and John Esteb taught him the minutiae of biology and chemistry, while placing the learning in a broader context. 

“You may think that learning how a muscle contracts is silly as a student. But imagine you understand that and can apply it for someone whose muscles aren’t working. You can help them work better,” Hole said. 

When Hole worked with a medical service team in Ecuador, he saw the effects of developing-world poverty on human suffering. “That broke my heart,” he said. The experience moved Hole to focus on becoming a physician for underprivileged children. 

“The Butler Way, if you will, supported me to take on leadership positions and to start organizations aimed at those social injustices,” Hole said. 

This support, particularly from Pribush and the late President Bobby Fong, allowed Hole to begin a fundraising campaign to build a school in Uganda. After raising $50,000 and partnering with Building Tomorrow, an organization providing access to education in hard-to-reach areas, Hole is proud to say the school now serves 350 children. The students, aged 4 to 14, learn science among other subjects, and the Butler influence continues its expansion. 

Hole has since kept in touch with his Butler science mentors. “They have been instrumental in helping me think about how to increase the impact of the missions of the organizations I’ve created,” he said. 

Among those organizations is StreetCred. As a pediatrician, Hole sees the negative impact of poverty on children’s health. He lamented that resources were available, but inaccessible. StreetCred helps parents file their taxes and apply for and access the benefits they can put toward children’s health—and it is all done in the doctor’s waiting room. 

“Butler had patience with me. They taught me and got me fired up about scientific thinking because of the implications it could have on human suffering. What is unique is that they are not only interested in scientific thinking, but are experts in mentorship; they are experts in trying to understand what gets me out of bed in the morning so they can apply their expertise to that,” Hole said. 

Yet, the biology major who became a doctor doesn’t necessarily think of himself as a scientist. 

“What I do is mostly social. If you find a cure for cancer, but you can’t get it to the poorest people, there is a gap. That is my passion—figuring out how to use the brilliant minds and breakthroughs of scientists and getting it to the people who need it most.” 

For children around the world, the universe is indeed expanding, leading to health and opportunity—in large part because of the Butler scientists who continue to influence Dr. Hole.

PeopleCommunity

An Enterprising Pediatrician Expands His Mentors’ Influence

Around the world, many children are better off because of Butler scientists’ influence on Hole. 

The Path Began at Butler

Patricia Snyder Pickett '82, APR

The recent addition of the Healthcare and Business major to Butler University’s College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences reflects the evolving needs within the life sciences industry. Many of these students will go straight into jobs at pharmaceutical or medical device companies, healthcare IT, or public policy positions; others will be prepared to go into clinical graduate programs or pursue post-graduate programs in public health or hospital administration. 

When Lynne Zydowsky ’81 began pursuing her Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy at Butler University, no such combination major existed and her path seemed fairly clear cut. After graduation, she would probably return to the small town of Newton, Illinois and help run the family-owned drug store where she had worked for nearly as long as she remembered. Her father had followed the same path—including graduating from Butler—and it seemed a logical progression. 

Instead, at the urging of what she describes as the interested and insightful Butler Pharmacy School faculty, she received a doctorate in Chemistry from The Ohio State University and was a National Institutes of Health post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School. Because her career path kept merging with the business side of life sciences, she briefly considered entering an MBA program. “However, in the end, I really believed that I was learning a lot along the way, and that I had the innate desire to solve the problems at hand and was able to accomplish it in a positive and creative way,” she said. 

In the last 25 years, she has launched and built several successful life science companies, playing a key role in raising private capital, setting overall corporate strategy, and establishing and managing strategic alliances. Since 2003, she has owned her own business, Zydowsky Consultants, as well as served as Chief Science Advisor to the CEO for Alexandria Real Estate Equities Inc, a NYSE traded company. In addition, she co-founded the Alexandria Summit®, an invitation-only gathering that brings together the world’s foremost visionaries from the biopharma and tech industries; medical, academic, financial, philanthropic, advocacy groups; and government to discuss and take action on the most needed innovation in life sciences. 

She credits much of her success and subsequent leadership to a work ethic established in the family business that carried over to her years at Butler. “There was no doubt that my post-graduate work was going to be self-funded. Even while at Butler, I worked in the science library as a lab tech and at both Haag’s Drug Store and the Winona Hospital pharmacy,” she recounts. “I got my (pharmacy) license to practice in Indiana and Ohio after college because I had to support myself in graduate school. I learned to manage my time and work efficiently.” 

Her advice to those students considering a career in the life sciences? 

“You always have to be realistic about the opportunities at hand—even when I was getting my PhD I was thinking about my future job,” she said. “I’d really like to see students intern every summer in internships that are meaningful where they can experience different segments of business, science, or philanthropy and not wait until their last summer before graduation … why not do it every summer?” 

Zydowsky has lived in San Francisco since 1996, moving there initially for a position with a biotech company. She admits it took several years before she adjusted to living on the West Coast. Now? “I can’t imagine leaving,” she said. “Acceptance, social responsibility, and innovation are woven into the fabric of the city. There’s a feeling that no problem is too big to solve. Living here really changed me; it’s made me more open and creative in my thinking.”

PeopleCommunity

The Path Began at Butler

The recent addition of the Healthcare and Business major to Butler University’s College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences reflects the evolving needs within the life sciences industry.

The Path Began at Butler

Patricia Snyder Pickett '82, APR

Taking Pharmacy Skills to a North Carolina Indian Reservation

Meghan Blais '17

When I first learned about the opportunity to work on an Indian Reservation during my sixth-year pharmacy rotations, I immediately knew I wanted to apply. As students, we are lucky enough to have a few options to choose from when applying, but I knew I wanted to go to North Carolina—partly because I had peers who had told me great things about the site and partly because I was familiar with the Smoky Mountains and the beauty in that area. So, when I received my schedule and saw that I would be going to North Carolina, during the fall no less, I was ecstatic. My rotation is in Cherokee, North Carolina, and as its name implies, it is at the Cherokee Indian Hospital, which serves the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. But it is not a reservation. The Eastern Band owns the land; they built the hospital too, and anyone who steps foot into the facility can see that. The culture of the tribe is reflected in almost every facet.  But the culture is also reflected in the care, and that is why I wanted so badly to have a rotation at this site.

Mountains

 

Throughout my entire month, I will have the opportunity to learn and apply my time in the classroom to real situations, but I will also be able to learn about a patient population, a culture that I have limited experience with, and about how there is more to healthcare than just medicine.

Within these next few posts, I will try to convey my time and experiences in North Carolina.  And as the saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words.  I’ll start off with this one of the sunrise from the top of the mountain just outside of town.

Rotations for Butler students start on Mondays, unless there is a holiday, but those are always exceptions to the rule.  And, since our rotation sites change every four weeks, it is pretty much like starting a new job every month.  This rotation was no different.  I reported to work bright and early on Monday morning where I went through orientation for the better part of the morning.  I had my picture taken, received my ID badge, and got a brief tour of the facility before being dropped off at the pharmacy to meet my preceptor and the other students on rotation (I had already met one of them since the hospital has housing for its students—my roommate was from a pharmacy school in upstate New York!). Meghan Blais with Waterfall

Then I got a quick tour and information session about the pharmacy, which fills on average, 1000 prescriptions a day.  The amazing thing about the Cherokee Indian Hospital is that is serves as both an in-patient and out-patient facility.  Primary care doctors and pediatricians have offices in what was known as the clinic—a large building which houses 12 different medical teams and serves over 18,000 enrolled members.  There is an emergency department, a lab, an eye care clinic, and a dental clinic.  In addition to this, there is also a 20-bed facility which houses patients who are admitted to the hospital, a wound care clinic in conjunction with physical therapy, and a complementary and alternative medicine center.  This is where I would be working for a month!Cherokee Syllabry

In the afternoon, I was trained on their electronic health record system, then was taken on a more in-depth tour of the hospital.  It was during this tour that I started to learn more about the people I would be serving during the month—the Cherokee Indians.  I was told about the importance of nature and the environment around someone during the healing process, which is why the hospital is built in a way such that every room has a window with a beautiful view of the mountains.  I also learned about how the hospital was built to be the center of care for this community and how important it was that the community was reflected within the walls of the hospital.  On the floor, you can see the river and its banks, an important aspect of life to the Cherokee.  At one end is the spider which is said to have brought fire to the community.  At the other end, a water beetle, which brought water to the community.  The entrance that was built to look like a basket weaved by a local woman, known as the Rotunda.  The artwork, most of which was done by local artists, which incorporates the Cherokee syllabary—the language of the tribe.  It is truly beautiful!

As much as I loved taking in all the different aspects in the hospital, though, I love working with the patients too!  I jumped right in on Tuesday, where I worked in one of the counseling rooms, talking with patients about their medications.  This is such an important part of pharmacy, and it is one of my favorite parts really.  These interactions allow me to get to know someone, to find common ground and create a relationship that promotes trust and improved care.  As the week progressed, I moved into the anticoagulation clinic—where patients taking warfarin (or Coumadin) would follow-up and work with pharmacists to ensure proper management—and into the actual clinic, where pharmacists were called on to follow-up with patients on a wide range of conditions, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and tobacco cessation.  Being able to work in an environment that provides me with so many different opportunities is phenomenal, and I know it is making me a much more well-rounded student pharmacist!  With one week under my belt, I am excited to get back and do more next week.  Until then, we have a weekend to explore all that Cherokee, NC has to offer!

Returning to a rotation site after the first week takes on a whole new look because at this point, you have had a week to learn your way around, ask questions, and find your groove in the work place.  The great thing about this rotation was the daily changing of tasks.  No two days were the same for me.  Some days I would counsel in the morning, then work with the teams in the clinic in the afternoon.  Other days I would work in the anticoagulation clinic, better known as a Coumadin clinic.  Most importantly, though, every day I had a chance to talk with patients, ask questions, and help make decisions about their care.

A huge part of the reason I love pharmacy and what I do is due to the interactions and communication with both patients and other healthcare providers.  Pharmacists have an amazing opportunity to not only help the patient but to advocate for them within the healthcare team.  At the Cherokee Indian Hospital, there were about 10 medical teams of caring for about 20,000 patients! So, it is understandable that communication is key to be successful.  Doctors relied on pharmacists to help care for the patients beyond simply supplying medications.  Clinic pharmacists worked directly with patients to help them better control their diseases, such as diabetes and high blood pressure.  As a student, I had a unique opportunity to lead some of these sessions, to interview patients, determine potential gaps in care, and problem-solve to close those gaps.Cherokee Seal

In addition to my patient care responsibilities, weeks 2 and 3 of my rotation also brought me opportunities to present at the monthly P&T (pharmacy and therapeutics) meeting.  P&T meetings are not exclusive to 1 hospital; if a location has a formulary—a list of approved drugs available for use in the pharmacy and hospital—it has P&T meetings.  Having the opportunity to present at these meetings, as a student, is a little less common, so I was very excited to have the chance to do this while on rotation!  My presentation was also a bit different since it was not a drug proposal but rather an educational review on the recommended treatments for irritable bowel syndrome.  I will spare you from my nerd talk, and simply say it was an excellent way for me to learn about a disease state I was not very familiar with and to provide an informative session to the doctors on staff about the available options for their patients. 

Suffice to say that the middle weeks of my rotation were busy ones.  But, with each week completed, we earn a weekend to explore.  Cherokee is in an amazing location—both Gatlinburg and Asheville are an hour’s drive away.  The Great Smoky Mountain National Park and Blue Ridge Parkway both have entrances a few miles from the student housing.  The new presence of forest fires, however, have casted a smoky haze over the town making hiking and exploring the mountains a bit more difficult. The tourism season is winding down, so town is much less crowded.  However, the other students and I still found time to explore some of the shops, many filled with handmade crafts by local artists, and to watch the Chicago Cubs win the World Series (I was much more excited about this than any of the other students, but they offered support for me while I cheered at the TV).  It is amazing that I am nearly done with my rotation already, but I have one week left and a few more new experiences to come.  Stay tuned, and in the meantime, check out these pictures and the stories they tell within the hospital!

The last week of a rotation is always a confusing time—on one hand, you have finally become acclimated to the location and feel comfortable with all your tasks, on the other hand, you are about to leave just as you started to get settled in.  My last week at the Cherokee Indian Hospital was still filled with new experiences though, and new students (you can see them all below)!  But most importantly, my last week was filled with reflection and appreciation for all the experiences I had this month.

I had the chance to sit in with the pharmacy resident and the physician who operates the pain management clinic.  I also had a chance to go into the in-patient side of the hospital for table rounds—a quick way for everyone on the medical team to receive updates about the patients currently being treated.  It is easy to think that the primary topic of these conversations would be the medicine, but it wasn’t.  Many of the topics and updates focused on the patient and his or her life, struggles taking place outside the hospital.  Some touched on the forest fires, which were threatening the homes of some of the patients.  Others focused on reunions of family deaths and how this time of the year, the holiday season, can be difficult. 

In all these conversations, though, one thing remained the same—compassion.  It can be easy to get caught up in the medicine; after all, there are so many novel treatments and interesting research trials to capture the eye.  There is more to that though, and that is what my time in Cherokee taught me.  Care comes in all forms—sometimes it is a hospital room with a spectacular view of the mountains, other times it is a simple question of ‘how are you doing?’    


Group of Students

I have always wanted to do something with my life that serves others.  For a while, I thought about being a teacher (I still do, but in pharmacy now!), and then I found pharmacy.  It combined my love for math and chemistry with the ever-changing world of medicine.  But most importantly, it provided me with an outlet to show compassion and make a difference in others’ lives, to have an impact.  But truthfully, my month in Cherokee made a difference in my life and had an impact on me. 

If someone would have asked me when I started my journey at Butler if I could have imagined it would take me here, my answer would have been no.  I was not keen on being away from family, traveling to a place where I know no one.  But, here I am now, a month later and I can’t imagine my rotation schedule without Cherokee.

If there is one thing I want to share (apart from the pictures of course), it is this—don’t be afraid to do something different, to go somewhere new.  Learning happens all around us when we step outside the classroom, all you must do is talk to others and listen in return.

AcademicsCommunity

Taking Pharmacy Skills to a North Carolina Indian Reservation

When I first learned about the opportunity to work on an Indian Reservation during my sixth-year pharmacy rotations, I immediately knew I wanted to apply.

Antiretrovirals and Intentionality

Emily Yarman ’17

“I’m too early. Typical,” I thought as I sat silently in my car, eagerly waiting for the day to begin. On the first day of my elective rotation, I arrived at the Damien Center in downtown Indianapolis fifteen minutes before the doors to the building were unlocked. I would spend the next month at Indiana’s largest AIDS service organization in their sister clinic, Damien Cares, seeing patients with HIV and AIDS. Although I love being early on my first day, this has led to a great deal of waiting in my car. As I sat there, the engine gently purring, I wondered what the month would hold. I quizzed myself on what I knew about HIV: the risk factors, the pathophysiology, the medications used to treat it and how they work. I stopped mentally drilling myself when I realized that I didn’t actually know much about the day-to-day life of a patient with HIV. I had studied the disease enough to pass the test, but I hadn’t had an opportunity to really get to know any patients with HIV.

I thought about the struggles patients with HIV in the US have had since the 1980s. I had learned about the social implications of HIV and I wondered what emotional hardships these patients had been through. I already knew that my month at the Damien Cares clinic would teach me a great deal about medical management of patients with HIV. I realized then, while sitting in my idling car, that it would also deepen my knowledge about how to care for a patient as a whole person.

My first patient was a gentleman in his early 50’s. He had been on ART (anti-retroviral therapy) for years and came to the office for a visit as an established patient. I followed my preceptor, Randall McDavid, NP, into the exam room and introduced myself. After a pretty uneventful follow-up visit, Randall and I sat down in his office. He turned to me and asked, “If you saw that man walking down the street, would you think he had HIV?” I quickly responded, “No, I wouldn’t.” This patient did not look like he was HIV-positive. Neither did my second patient. Or my third patient. As someone that recognizes the damage that stereotypes can cause, I’m always trying to purge myself of my presuppositions about people. As I saw more patients on that first day, I realized I had failed to do just that; I had unconsciously built up presuppositions about how an HIV-patient would look or act. I expected patients with HIV to appear much more sick than this gentleman had.

I was reminded on this rotation that by unconsciously pigeonholing a patient, I set myself up for failure as a provider. Even something as simple as having preconceived notions about what an HIV patient looks like can affect the way I practice medicine. There are certain risk factors that make a patient more likely to acquire the illness, but HIV still affects every sex, gender, age, race, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status. Embarking on the slippery slope of making assumptions about patients can lead to big mistakes in forming treatment and prevention plans for them. By making assumptions about patients, I also miss out on the opportunity to get to know and learn from them, which could benefit my future patients. It seems simple, but it is easy to overlook the fact that everyone suffers when providers make assumptions, especially in a patient population as diverse as the HIV community. There is no one face of HIV. This month, I have been learning to stop giving it one.

***

I held the diaphragm of my stethoscope over his left chest and heard the thunderous, rapid lub-dub of his heart. I finished my physical exam and told Randall that everything was within normal limits, except his heart, which was beating quickly. The patient shifted uncomfortably in his chair when we asked him questions about his sexual habits. He laughed nervously when we inquired about drug use. This was the typical behavior of a patient new to the clinic.

New patients with HIV experience a spectrum of emotions during that first visit, including fear and anxiety. Their anxieties include questions about what it means to have HIV, if they can afford the treatment, and ultimately, if it will kill them. They are nervous about if the people they meet at the clinic will judge or chide them. Their fear of being rebuked is legitimate; decades after HIV showed up in the US, it still carries a stigma and is very closeted. The medical and social concerns that a new HIV patient has culminate into a patient presentation like the one I described above: visibly restless and apprehensive about being honest with their provider.

An established patient with HIV, however, is a foil of a new patient with HIV. While new patients tend to be restless and apprehensive, many established patients are calm and relaxed. Long-time HIV-positive patients understand that if they are compliant with their medications, their life can be much like the life of a person that is HIV-negative. They are happy to see Randall and talk about their social and sexual histories with ease. The visit becomes less about HIV and more about friendly conversation and getting to know each other. During physical exam, their hearts beat at a regular rate again.

Some of this release of anxiety in patients is because of patient education about the disease and the effectiveness of HIV medications. HIV pharmacotherapy has progressed a great deal since the 1980s. Many patients with HIV take just one pill per day and have an undetectable blood viral load. Causes of death in the HIV population are increasingly due to chronic illness, like most of the US, and less due to immunological compromise because we diagnose and treat earlier. The average life expectancy of an HIV-positive patient is the same as an HIV-negative patient. When patients learn about these advances in our understanding and treatment of HIV, many of their fears are quelled. This, however, is only a part of the cause for calm in established patients.

The other, bigger, part of the relief of anxiety for established patients with HIV is the relationship that they build with their provider. The care that Randall provides his patients is non-judgmental. He talks comfortably about patient’s sexual habits and drug use without scolding them. I have watched patient’s anxiety melt away during office visits because of the relaxed demeanor. This allows the patient to be honest, which enables Randall to take better care of them. I have observed that this kind of therapeutic relationship is the key to success for patients at the clinic. The patients that are most healthy are patients that have built this kind of relationship with Randall. In the presence of empathetic medical care, the patient’s viral load and anxiety both drop. Randall always says “HIV is a relationships disease,” and he’s right. Because HIV is a physically and socially taxing disease, it is best treated with appropriate medical therapy and a caring heart.

***

Seeing established patients with HIV gives me so much hope during those initial patient visits at the clinic. As a future physician assistant, I have the opportunity to be part of what brings that hope to fruition. I can walk with patients on their journey to have an undetectable viral load and an unbroken spirit. This month, I have learned that even in in the face of a disease that used to be a death sentence, there is hope on the horizon through proper medical treatment and a truly therapeutic relationship. Serving patients in this way, however, is not simple. It requires a concerted effort on the part of the provider to be intentional about the medical and emotional care they offer. I have learned that part of that intentional care is to resist pigeonholing patients and to actively dismantle stereotypes that we create. I have learned that it means listening and responding in a way that creates a comfortable environment for the patient to be honest in, regardless of any social stigma involved. Truly treating a patient as a whole person requires all of these things and nothing less.

Butler Alumna Makes Science Fun

Krisy Force

from Spring 2017

Julie Boyk ’10, Senior Education Coordinator for the Museum of Science and Industry (MSI) in Chicago, remembers having a difficult time deciding which college to attend. She was excited to be accepted to Butler University but she had two other colleges who were offering scholarships from which to choose. It wasn’t until her dad was heading to Indianapolis for a business trip that he asked her along to tour the campus.

“I went on the trip just to appease my father. It was freezing cold and snowing, but the moment I stepped out of my dad’s car, I felt at home,” Boyk said. “I thought, ‘this is where I was going to spend the next five years of my life.’ We went on a tour, further drawing me into what some people call ‘Butler magic;’ I was hooked.”

Boyk spent her next few years at Butler working toward her degree in Early/Middle Childhood Education. About a year after graduation, Boyk stumbled across a position at MSI while perusing the museum’s website prior to a planned visit, and since she had been having a difficult time finding a job within the school systems, she decided to apply. Julie Boyk with students

“MSI was the mecca of field trips as a kid from the Chicago suburbs, so the thought of working there brought back many positive memories,” Boyk said.

During her interview, Boyk pulled from the skills toolkit Butler’s College of Education gave her to demonstrate a potential lesson plan that was hands on, thoughtful, and tasty since Oreo cookies were involved.

“All of the hands on work Butler exposed me to was very helpful and I wouldn’t be the teacher I am today without that,” Boyk said.

Before she made it home, Boyk had an offer.

Since getting hired, Julie has had many realizations about herself and the job she had in mind before starting at MSI.

“I never saw myself teaching middle school or high school students, but it’s so fun. I’ve discovered it’s one of my favorite parts,” Boyk said.

Her list of favorites regarding her work at MSI doesn’t stop there. Every day is different and through MSI’s Learning Labs she has the opportunity to teach a wide range of science subjects like forensics, pendulums, simple machines, and Mars, where students and Boyk have the opportunity to teleconference with real NASA scientists to ask questions.

If she had to choose a favorite aspect of her job, it would be when she gets to make science fun for all of the students who enter the museum with the mindset that science is boring, or confusing.

Julie Boyk with students

“Not too long ago we were doing a project about Mars and a student in 6th or 7th grade asked me if I was a scientist. Technically I’m not, but to answer his question, and to get him involved I responded by saying ‘Yes, I am a scientist and you are too,’” Boyk said. “At first he said ‘No, no I’m not.’ He came up to me after class and told me, ‘I understand what you mean now about how I’m a scientist too,’”

Creating even just a small shift in attitude among students about science, and making sure they understand that science can be messy and fun is why Boyk loves the work she does and for a museum that is considered an industry leader.

“I’m able to touch the lives of so many more students with what I’m doing here. Between myself and four other co-workers, we are able to interact with about 24,000 students a year,” Boyk said. “We really are at an important museum, and it makes me want to work above and beyond my abilities to make sure I represent the museum in the best way possible.” 

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Butler Alumna Makes Science Fun

It wasn’t until her dad was heading to Indianapolis for a business trip that he asked her along to tour the campus.

by Krisy Force

from Spring 2017

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Writing for Wellness

Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

from Spring 2017

Leona, a lady beyond a certain age, likes to break out in song. Doesn’t matter where she is or who’s in the room or that it’s well after Christmas and she’s still singing “Silent Night.” She’s going to sing.

At this moment, she’s sitting in a conference room at American Village retirement community, explaining herself between song bursts to Stephanie Anderson, a student in Butler’s Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program. Every Tuesday, Anderson and three other MFA students visit Leona and others at American Village to hear their stories and get them down on paper.

Leona talks, and Anderson captures her words.

“Leona feels happiest when she is among her 10 children,” she writes. “She loves to sing a lot too, and this is a gift she shares with her children, especially since it's a God-given talent. She loves singing in a choir and sharing the community, because God knows when she is happy and sad, and he projects his goodness through her. Leona knows we have to choose happiness. Words cannot describe the joy she feels being with her family, the one at home, and the one at church.

“Sometimes she is so glad to be alive that she bursts into song, being so glad for her life and her gift. She used to teach singing and sometimes she would sing those songs to her children when they felt lonely or sad, particularly ‘Amazing Grace.’ Leona believes firmly in love and laughter and compassion, and believes harder in the power of beautiful love. She doesn't want to be evil and frowning. She wants to kill sadness with joy. She sings when she is sad and when she is happy, because the voice is the soul coming to the light."

Sometime later, Anderson reflects on what happens in these sessions.

“We’re making a difference in these people’s lives,” she says. “We’re getting to know each other. We’re making friends. We’re showing ourselves and each other that it’s a big world we live in, but in this circle there’s joy, there’s happiness, there’s laughter. This is marvelous.”

This is Writing for Wellness, a program that MFA students began two years ago to use writing for therapy, for recollection, for relief, for fun. The first classes took place at Eskenazi Health in Indianapolis, where the MFA students worked with hospital staff who needed an opportunity to relax and unload.

Since then, Writing for Wellness has expanded—to Riley Hospital for Children, Indiana Women’s Prison, Hope Academy (a high school for students recovering from addiction), and Indiana Youth Group (an  organization for LGBT youth). The program is soon to add sessions for breast-cancer survivors.

The idea to bring Writing for Wellness to Butler started with Hilene Flanzbaum, the Director of the MFA program. Flanzbaum has taught creative writing on the undergraduate and graduate levels, and her husband, Geoffrey Sharpless, runs the summer creative writing camp at Butler and teaches creative writing at Park Tudor School. They often talk about the psychological benefits of that work, how the participants seem happier when they’re getting a chance to express themselves.

Flanzbaum thought that idea could be incorporated in the MFA program. And since one of the program’s missions is to provide service, Writing for Wellness seemed like a natural fit.

“It’s a discipline that’s fairly well established in other places but had no footprints at all in Indiana or Indianapolis,” Flanzbaum says. “So I saw a real opportunity for our students.”

Around the same time, Flanzbaum was recruiting a new MFA student, Bailey Merlin, who had taught in a Writing for Wellness program as an undergraduate at Berry College in Rome, Georgia.

“When we talked on the phone,” Merlin says, “I told her what I did: I bring everyone in, I have people write, they come to conclusions on their own, and it’s pretty fascinating. She’s like, ‘That’s exactly what we want.’”

That led Merlin to choose Butler for her MFA, and she led the MFA program’s first Writing for Wellness group that went to Eskenazi. There, she says, they saw staff members “writing about things they’d never expressed before and crying.” At Riley Hospital, she worked in a behavioral unit with kids suffering from eating disorders and depression.

“To see the spark of life go back into them is just amazing,” she says.

The spark works both ways.

“You would be amazed how much doing this changes you as a person,” Merlin says. “Just to see how you directly affect someone else. You don’t get that opportunity a lot.”

The MFA students who facilitate the program all seem to have that reaction. Tristan Durst has spent her Tuesday afternoons writing with a retiree named Robert, who was part of a 1950s Indianapolis-based doo-wop group called The Counts. The first week, she says, he told the same stories several times.

“Now, he’s remembering more, and more of his personality is coming out,” she says. “And this week, he was cracking jokes left, right and center. He was telling me about his brothers playing baseball and he said, ‘I won’t say that I was the best baseball player. I could, but I won’t.’ He started slipping in jokes, and I’m getting a real sense that he enjoys being there.”

Taylor Lewandowski, the MFA student who’s leading the group at the senior center, says he and the other Butler students are needed there. He tells the story of a woman he’s worked with named Martha.

“Her roommate passed away, and she saw her last breath,” Lewandowski says. “That obviously affected her. She came in three days after that and I worked with her. Afterward, she said, ‘That was really good for me. It was good for me to get out and talk to someone.’ Writing for Wellness creates this community that’s really nice. It’s really a service. We’re there to be there for them and once you realize that, it’s really nice. We’re actually doing something good.”

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Writing for Wellness

Leona, a lady beyond a certain age, likes to break out in song.

by Marc D. Allan MFA ’18

from Spring 2017

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One Butler: The Brain Project

Catherine Pangan MS ’99

from Spring 2017

What do you get when you combine leaders in the neuroscience field from around Indianapolis, an engaged community, and a spirit of integrated learning? You guessed it—One Butler: The Brain Project. 

One Butler: The Brain Project is a yearlong, campus-wide initiative focusing on brain health, with the goal of developing appreciation of how neuroscience is woven into the tapestry of our lives. 

The Brain Project transcends academic disciplines and is led by a dynamic steering committee that includes representatives from the community, each of Butler’s six colleges, students, trustees, the library, performing arts venues, Student Affairs, the Health and Recreation Complex, and several faculty members who are already using neuroscientific research in their curriculum. (Read more on Butler faculty neuroscience study in this issue’s faculty profile of Professor Tara Lineweaver.) 

Neuroanatomist Jill Bolte Taylor kicked off the initiative in September 2016 to a packed house in Clowes Memorial Hall. The Brain Project includes a yearlong speaker series, integrated coursework opportunities for students, faculty art exhibits, and connections in our Themed Living Communities in the residence halls. 

A central highlight of One Butler: The Brain Project is the installation of the “Big Brains!” This exhibit of 10 enormous fiberglass brain sculptures (5’x6’), commissioned by Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor, depicts neuroscience themes (mental health, concussion, food, etc.) and will be displayed on campus this April. 

Efforts have been coordinated with community partners, including the Eskenazi Center for Brain Care, Community Health Network, and others. 

Some of the topics explored this year include: 

  • Mental health’s cutting-edge research in schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s 
  • Creativity: music, art, and innovation 
  • Addictions, Brain Food, and Sleep 
  • Sports Wellness: prevention of traumas and concussions 
  • How we learn: education and neuroscience with an Educational Neuroscience Conference offering April 29

The Butler Brain Project seeks to distinguish Butler as an environment where academics, student life, interpersonal relationships, and physical and mental health are informed by knowledge of the human brain and how it works. It also aims to create a model for comprehensive, collaborative, and transdisciplinary exploration of a relevant topic that can be replicated and scaled to other campus environments.

Serving as a convener for neuroscience educators and clinicians from Central Indiana, we expect 40,000–50,000 students, faculty, staff, and community members will experience the One Butler: The Brain Project. We hope you can join us for this brain-boosting experience! Please visit www.butler.edu/brainproject for the most up-to-date information. You can also find us on Facebook under One Butler: Brain Project.

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One Butler: The Brain Project

by Catherine Pangan MS ’99

from Spring 2017

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