Jordan College of the Arts

Headline/Body Copy

The Jordan College of Arts puts students and their success at the forefront. A conservatory-style curriculum, strengthened by a strong liberal arts core, gives students the foundation for a fulfilling career and life. And Butler's location in the heart of Indinapolis's thriving art scene helps connect students with the local community and real-world experiences that develop them as artists.

98% Placement Rate

70% Employed | 20% Grad School | 5% Gap-Year Program | 3% Internship | 2% Still Looking

 

This information is based on 76% of 2017 graduates. Data is collected up to six months post-graduation from sources including students, employers, faculty, staff, parents, and online.

Median Starting Salary

$37,000

Featured Employers

Arts Council of Indianapolis
Newfields

Missouri Botanical Gardens
Barrington (MA) Stage
Indiana History Center
Washington Ballet
Milwaukee Ballet
Writers Theatre of Chicago
Roche Diagnostics
Carmel Clay Schools

Selected Graduate Schools

University of Delaware
Indiana University School of Music
Southern Illinois University Law School
University of Illinois
North Carolina School of the Arts

 

FEATURED STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS

University College Dublin (Ireland)

University of Cape Town (South Africa)

John Cabot University (Rome)

University of Maastricht (Netherlands)

Ritsumeikan University (Japan)

FEATURED GRADUATE SCHOOLS

University of Michigan

Indiana University

University of Chicago

McGill University 

Purdue University

#1

Most innovative school among midwest regional universities

U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges

#2

best college among midwest regional universities

U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges

33%

Students who chose to study abroad in 2017

Internship and Career Services

1,166

Total Bachelor's degrees awarded in 2017

237

Total graduate degrees awarded in 2017

75%

Students who chose to do one or more internship

 

Our Alumni Stories

Our alumni stories

Sarah Tam

Sarah Tam ’17

BY

PUBLISHED ON Dec 20 2017

Sarah Tam spent much of her time at Butler “cocooned in the theatre world,” and when she wasn’t there, she was working on her minor in English writing. The results, she said, prepared her well for what she would like to eventually do—work in publishing as an Editor during the day and pursue acting on the side.

 

 

Tam’s work in Butler Theatre productions included a part in the world premiere of The Water Carriers, a play about a group of refugees attempting to flee Africa in a shipping container; the title role in Karlsson on the Roof, in which she learned to fly; and several roles in Caryl Churchill’s Love and Information.

She also had a part in a friend’s theatrical adaptation of The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, which gave the participants—all of them Butler students—a chance to have an ensemble experience where they did everything.

“It feels to me what Butler Theatre encourages—theatre artists who can do lots of things well and can create their own work because they have something they want to do,” she said. “It was really cool to be a part of that.”

Since graduating, Tam has been working as an actor/interpreter in the Indiana Historical Society’s living-history exhibits, which re-create a piece of history. The actors research and train to become characters, then play the parts by interacting with the historical society’s guests. Her next role is in an 1863 Gettysburg exhibit, where she will be dressed in full costume, including corset and petticoats.

“That’s been really cool because it’s a day job, but it’s acting,” she said. “So I get to do theater as my primary job right now.”

Tam, who had been looking at colleges in Massachusetts, said she made the right selection when she chose Butler.

“When I think back on what I’ve done here—I directed my own show as part of my thesis; I studied abroad twice—a semester in Dublin and six weeks in Russia during the summer; I took classes in so many different aspects of theatre and other subject areas—I don’t think I could have done that anywhere else,” she said.

Sarah Tam

Sarah Tam ’17

I don't think I could have done what I did here anywhere else.

Sarah Tam ’17

Sarah Tam spent much of her time at Butler “cocooned in the theatre world,” and when she wasn’t there, she was working on her minor in English writing. The results, she said, prepared her well for what she would like to eventually do—work in publishing as an Editor during the day and pursue acting on the side.

Tam’s work in Butler Theatre productions included a part in the world premiere of The Water Carriers, a play about a group of refugees attempting to flee Africa in a shipping container; the title role in Karlsson on the Roof, in which she learned to fly; and several roles in Caryl Churchill’s Love and Information.

She also had a part in a friend’s theatrical adaptation of The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, which gave the participants—all of them Butler students—a chance to have an ensemble experience where they did everything.

“It feels to me what Butler Theatre encourages—theatre artists who can do lots of things well and can create their own work because they have something they want to do,” she said. “It was really cool to be a part of that.”

Since graduating, Tam has been working as an actor/interpreter in the Indiana Historical Society’s living-history exhibits, which re-create a piece of history. The actors research and train to become characters, then play the parts by interacting with the historical society’s guests. Her next role is in an 1863 Gettysburg exhibit, where she will be dressed in full costume, including corset and petticoats.

“That’s been really cool because it’s a day job, but it’s acting,” she said. “So I get to do theater as my primary job right now.”

Tam, who had been looking at colleges in Massachusetts, said she made the right selection when she chose Butler.

“When I think back on what I’ve done here—I directed my own show as part of my thesis; I studied abroad twice—a semester in Dublin and six weeks in Russia during the summer; I took classes in so many different aspects of theatre and other subject areas—I don’t think I could have done that anywhere else,” she said.

Sarah Tam
People

Sarah Tam ’17

  I don't think I could have done what I did here anywhere else.